Pierce Lydon's Comic Reviews

Reviewer For: Newsarama, IGN Reviews: 613
6.4Avg. Review Rating

6.0
A+X #3

Dec 19, 2012

This issue takes a hit because the second story is so lacking. The first one might have been worth the price of admission had it actually been a full-on one shot but I'm hard pressed to want to plunk down hard earned cash on something that's so inconsistent. Still, it's nice to see these characters outside of their solo books or their typical team settings and for fans of whichever characters are featured month in and month out, A+X might be a decent way to get your fix.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Action Comics (2011) #7

Mar 8, 2012

With this issue, Morrison is truly beginning to show us his hand. He has huge plans for the book but with this issue we truly begin to understand just how encompassing they may be.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Action Comics (2011) #27

Jan 9, 2014

It might not jive with the rest of DC's Superman output, but Greg Pak is writing the best Man of Steel comics right now.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Action Comics (2011) #39

Feb 5, 2015

Superman fans yearning for some old-school Kryptonian action will want to check this one out.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Action Comics (2011) #42

Jul 1, 2015

Action Comics #42 is an incredibly powerful issue, and a return to form for one of America's most enduring heroes. Pak and Kuder handle their premise with poise and maturity. While some readers will decry this as another attempt by comic book creators to infect "Big Two" comics with their own personal politics, it should be seen as a stark reminder that the times we're living in are dark and getting darker. Even our greatest heroes don't stand a chance against systemic oppression, and that should be something of a wake-up call. Pak and Kuder have managed to call attention to a problem that has permeated our culture so deeply that we've let it become an acceptable status quo. But Superman can't let these injustices stand, and neither should we. Clark Kent is just like you. He barely has any superpowers now. So what's your excuse?

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Action Comics (2011) #43

Aug 12, 2015

I loved the last issue of Action Comics but this one sees Greg Pak, Aaron Kuder and DC pull a resounding #NOTALLCOPS, undermining the statement that they started making.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Action Comics (2011) #52

May 11, 2016

In trying to get us to the finish line that is the end of the "New 52," DC is really limping along. While Batman has gotten a fairly succinct finish to this era of DC publishing, Superman's final days are spent much like the first ones - a varied, scattershot approach that doesn't serve the characters or creators as well as it should. This storyline is a mess and one that readers will, no doubt, want to move on from. But why should they have any faith that DC will handle the Man of Steel correctly in the next go-around? Completists won't mind flipping through this one but more casual fans might just want to wait for Rebirth.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Action Comics (2016) #976

Mar 22, 2017

Action Comics #976 feels like it has really large implications for “Rebirth” as it moves forward, but it’s hard to entirely see the writing on the wall. This crossover has definitely existed to move certain pieces into place and it might frustrate some readers that there’s very little clarity as to whether or not what we’re seeing is as real as it seems. But the art team does a really good job of upping the stakes and overall, “Superman Reborn” puts the Superman family in an interesting place. We’ll just have to wait and see if the creative teams on these titles can deliver on this mounting uncertainty.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Adventure Time #1

Feb 9, 2012

All in all, Adventure Time with Finn & Jake #1 marks a promising debut for the all-new ongoing title.""

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Adventure Time #9

Oct 25, 2012

Time travel is awesome. Time travel Adventure Time might be even better.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Adventure Time #28

May 22, 2014

The opening is a bit overwhelmingly dialogue-laden, but North turns on the charm after a few pages, teaching us how ghosts work in the land of Ooo and having Princess Bubblegum team up with Anti-Ghost Princess, the warrior princess.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Adventure Time: Fionna and Cake #1

Jan 3, 2013

All in all, another quality entry in BOOM!'s Adventure Time catalog that stays true to the source while forging ahead with fun stories.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Adventure Time: The Flip Side #1

Jan 8, 2014

Boom! is continuing to pump out quality Adventure Time work and The Flip Side is no exception. Coover and Tobin are clearly familiar enough with the property to what works and what doesn't. They're packing in so many jokes that this issue will beg a second read. They have the benefit of being coupled with an artist with a talent for visual gags in Wook Jin Clark, as well. This a definitely must read. So Adventure Time fans who have plenty of time, now you know the way.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Adventures of Supergirl #2

Feb 9, 2016

The biggest knock on this series is the length of each chapter. Because what you're reading is essentially half a comic book, there's a feeling that things don't really get going. That said, it still works in terms of giving more to fans of the show who might not have interacted with comics before now. The team has a great handle on the tone of the show and translating into something palatable for a new audience. With the support of the show and a lack of messy continuity, I wouldn't be surprised to see this Supergirl overtake the current DCU version as the preferred take on the character.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Age of Apocalypse (2015) #1

Jul 8, 2015

Maybe it's time to put this concept on the shelf. Age of Apocalypse holds a lot of nostalgia for many readers of a certain age (including this reviewer), but this is a bit of a jumbled mess. The stakes are unclear. The characters ring a bit hollow. The art is stylistically strong but that can't overcome the lack of visual clarity on display. We like to remember the '90s as a time of excess and bad comics. Maybe this was a meta-commentary on that, but I doubt it. Instead of an interesting new chapter in the Age of Apocalypse, all we get is a middling Secret Wars tie-in.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Airboy #2

Jul 6, 2015

Airboy will probably get a push from the controversy that surrounded this issue, and maybe the last two issues will prove that push to be deserved. Hinkle's art definitely deserves attention, but Robinson has yet to find his footing. The "depressed artist" trope is a well-worn one, and I kept waiting for the script to really say something about, well, anything at all. We do get an interesting bit of self-evaluation from Robinson, but it isn't the tentpole moment that the comic needs. Some readers might be enthralled with the bit of "inside baseball" that the comic provides, but that's a terribly small niche to be aiming for. I believe that Robinson has something to say - some of his previous work has had a very strong voice - I don't think this is an effective vehicle for him to say it.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Alex + Ada #1

Nov 5, 2013

Comic books are episodic. It's what sets them apart from other printed mediums. Each individual issue must have an arc, just as a larger run or miniseries does. Alex + Ada is definitely a comic book that comes out tomorrow. It is definitely about artificial intelligence in the mold of I, Robot and classic science fiction. But Luna and Vaughn have made their opening issue a non-event, and that's a shame.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
All-New All-Different Avengers #2

Dec 3, 2015

I wonder if the layouts could have been improved to really take this book to the next level but for fans of fast-paced, fun superhero action comic books, this one is a winner.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
All-New All-Different Avengers #14

Sep 7, 2016

All-New All-Different Avengers is an interesting addition to the Civil War II canon. Waid, Whitley and company stay away from the main fray and craft a careful character study that puts into words some of the feelings that readers themselves have about the current state of superhero comic books. Kubert is as effective as ever, despite a couple of odd shot choices, but he’s able to deliver Waid and Whitley’s script here with aplomb. This issue of Avengers might not be what most readers are expecting, but over time it should stand out as one of the better tie-ins to come out of Civil War II.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
All-New Captain America #1

Nov 13, 2014

Steve to Sam with an opening narration that nails down Sam's character for the uninitiated. From then on out, this book is non-stop fun.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
All-New Captain America #3

Jan 15, 2015

Stuart Immonen's artwork is on point. He continues to show more and more range with regards to his expression work, shot selection and panel layouts. The visual language of Sam as Cap is (and should be) different than Steve Rogers as Cap. Immonen recognizes that and is able to give this book its own unique visual flavor.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
All-New Ghost Rider #4

Jun 26, 2014

Smith tries to prop the book up on brotherly love schmaltz, but it's hollow at best.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
All-New Guardians of the Galaxy #1

May 4, 2017

Duggan writes some really big, silly stuff into his script and Kuder doesn't shy away from it at all, proving that they're just the creative team to bring out the best in this ragtag group of intergalactic flarknards.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
All-New Hawkeye #1

Mar 4, 2015

All-New Hawkeye is suffering from a little bit of identity crisis right now. Lemire definitely has a direction he wants to take the book in, but he doesn't dig deep enough into yet and then drowns himself out by aping Fraction's quick quipping on the superhero side. Prez pulls something similar, letting loose during the flashbacks but then moving closer to Aja's style for the rest of the book. The book tries to play both sides of the new reader/old reader coin to some only middling effect. If the creative team continues to cuckold itself by hewing to the one that came before them, it's going to take a while for this book to find its own voice. If that's the case, they'll have to hope that readers stick by them.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
All-New Hawkeye #2

Apr 9, 2015

Ramon Perez is the biggest reason to buy this book. All-New Hawkeye is, by far, the best work he's ever produced for Marvel.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
All-New Miracleman Annual #1

Jan 5, 2015

This annual is a weird move for Marvel especially, with seemingly no further Miracleman material on the immediate horizon. All the creators involved are great talents (and Quesada in particular is a standout in this issue) but, especially at a $5.00 price point, this seems like little more than a cash grab. It's an expensive reminder that, oh yeah, Marvel owns that guy. Neither story develops a foundation for Marvel to continue with their vision of Miracleman and that might be because they don't have a vision yet. For hardcore Miracleman fans, this is an interesting piece of work, but it's one that a more thrifty fan is better off waiting to find in the $1 boxes.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
All-New X-Factor #2

Jan 24, 2014

Peter David does little to make his team compelling and their mission lacks a real hook. On top of narrative deficiencies, Carmine Di Giandomenico's art is lacking. Hes almost a Walt Simonson without any of the charm of Simonson's work and he has a penchant for awkward posing and unruly facial expressions. Hopefully once the entire team is together, David and Giandomenico can flesh out a solid direction for this book.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
All-New X-Men #14

Jul 19, 2013

All in all, All New X-Men has been a really fun book thus far, even if the plot seems to be spinning its wheels a bit.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
All-New X-Men #23

Feb 13, 2014

Brian Michael Bendis has a lot of fun having the All-New X-Men interact with the Guardians of the Galaxy. It gets a little tiresome when he leans on Iceman and Rocket Raccoon for humor but its pretty much par for the course for a Bendis title.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
All-New X-Men #25

Apr 9, 2014

While some might write this off as an anthology comic that's simply marching toward to inevitability of a big event, I see it as crash course in X-Men mythology for the uninitiated. Sure, it might not be familiar and it might not even be showing things that are going to happen. But the beauty of comics is that on any given page you might be seeing something incredible. The narration is big and sweeping, enveloping readers in a grand scheme that may never come to be. For readers new and old, there is something intrinsically exciting about that. Comics are about infinite possibilities and while the modern media machine seems to have stripped them of that quality, All-New X-Men #25 reminds us that it still exists.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
All-New X-Men #26

May 1, 2014

Brian Michael Bendis and Stuart Immonen team up for an incredible first half of an issue but they can't sell the rest as they try to further the plot

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
All-New X-Men #29

Jul 10, 2014

All-New X-Men is losing some of its luster. Someone should call Doc Brown and get these kids home.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
All-New X-Men #31

Aug 27, 2014

All-New X-Men #31 plays more like filler than anything else. In an age where marketing and PR has completely robbed us of any surprises, storytelling decompression has only served to annoy readers rather than enhance their experience. I think Bendis presents us with a fairly classic "X-Men go find a new mutant" story (complete with another "survive the experience" reference to X-Men #139) in order to reacquaint readers with these characters before thrusting them into a new situation. But it only serves to delay the inevitable and it makes the final splash completely predictable. Asrar doesn't really get much to draw in this issue either. Without any action to anchor the book, the lack of detail almost comes across as disdain for having to draw so many talking heads. Maybe this journey into the Ultimate universe is what's needed to reinvigorate this book - ya know, if they survive the experience.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
All-New X-Men #40

Apr 23, 2015

This issue acts as an epilogue for "The Black Vortex" crossover that has consumed both the X-Men and the Guardians of the Galaxy, and in typical Bendis fashion, it's a pretty breezy read with a couple of big soap opera moments throughout.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
All-Star Batman #3

Oct 12, 2016

All-Star Batman works in tandem with the other titles in the Bat family to create a really complete picture of the world of the Batman. This is definitely the strongest that the line has been in a while and where the main Batman title might be the brain, All-Star is the heart, pumping lifeblood elsewhere in the line when needed. These stories feel like the essential takes on certain characters that we saw with Batman: The Animated Series. While the medium is different, the idea that these arcs deepen the established roles and continuity of these characters is really powerful. Not many other families of titles can claim to have an emotional core that keeps evolving. Add to that the fact that Snyder has a murderer’s row of talent joining him on the title, and you’ve got one of the best books currently running in superhero comic books today.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
All-Star Batman #6

Jan 12, 2017

The real MVP is letterer Steve Wands, who packs pages with text when needed but never makes the pages feel overwhelmed. He deftly works around Jock's penchant for not leaving enough negative space when Snyder's waxing poetic and really holds the book together.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Amazing Spider-Man #700.1

Dec 5, 2013

I think that most fans wanted new adventures from Peter Parker and not think pieces on what it means to be Spider-Man. Unfortunately, this issue doesn't do a great job of delivering either one.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #1

May 1, 2014

Peter Parker is truly back and with him, the ol' Parker luck. We're along for the ride as Peter navigates a myriad of messes left by the Superior Spider-Man, and while the light tone comes in heavy contrast to the recent web-slinging stories, it lacks any real gravitas.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #1.1

May 8, 2014

Slott has worked with Spidey/Peter analogues in the past (remember Alpha, everyone?) and their storylines always come to a similar conclusion: if you don't learn that with great power comes great responsiblity, then you can't be a hero. It looks like we're getting set up for that again. But, on the whole "Learning to Crawl" is more enthralling at the moment than Amazing Spider-Man proper.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #1.2

Jun 13, 2014

"Learning to Crawl" is an interesting case. Considering the sliding timeline of Marvel's heroes with regards to their continuity, it makes sense that we would eventually see a teenage Peter Parker in the Internet age, but the retroactive inclusion of "Clash" is a little bit heavy-handed.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #1.3

Jul 10, 2014

"Learning to Crawl" is unoriginal and it has no heart. It's basically the opposite of the main Amazing Spider-Man arc.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #2

May 22, 2014

Writer Dan Slott really steps up his game here, turning in the best issue of Amazing Spider-Man in about six months.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #3

Jun 26, 2014

It's incredible how easy Dan Slott falls back into writing Peter Parker. This issue is more of a set-up issue than the last one, but it features a lot of the old Peter Parker charm.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #4

Jul 28, 2014

This issue kind of comes out of left field. Hopefully, the end of Original Sin will get it back on track.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #5

Aug 14, 2014

Spidey definitely swings out on top this week as we are treated to a near-perfect amalgam of his world.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #6

Sep 10, 2014

This issue is another win for the Spider-Man office. Slott is constantly resolving plot points with satisfying answers while still bringing up new questions and that's one of his greatest strengths, the ability to keep moving forward without leaving any dangling plot threads. With Silk, Black Cat and Parker Industries all vying for Peter's attention in some way, we're sure to get some interesting new stories. Plus all of these storylines have the potential to link back to Spider-Man's central maxim, "With great power comes great responsibility," and that's how you know you've got a creative team that's on the right track.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #9

Nov 10, 2014

"Spider-Verse" is off to a good start. We'll have to wait and see what Slott does with the idea that Peter Parker is the greatest Spider-Man in the multiverse. That's an intriguing title considering that we know that he isn't even the strongest member of all the Spiders currently assembled. Slott is doing a good job of keeping all the mysteries at play fresh in our minds. Olivier Coipel is a great fit for this event. His involvement is the shot in the arm that this title needed to remind everyone that this isn't your average Spider-Man story. I think it's easy to get caught up in the fact that there are so many different versions of Spider-Man featured in this book but it's important to remember that there's a larger story underneath it all. Slott's always writing for the long game and so far this one should be keeping everyone guessing.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #12

Jan 9, 2015

Slott's dialogue is not at the level is usually is as he tries to balance the large cast, but the book does deliver some big moments (can you say Leopardon?) that keep it fairly entertaining.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #13

Jan 21, 2015

"Spider-Verse" will be over soon, but even it's conclusion looks to be overshadowed by Marvel's recent S" announcements. These are all imaginary stories, but at least when the universe isn't coming to a close they feel like they have some weight. The hype machine needed for Marvel's next big event might have cut the legs out from under Slott and company, and that's a shame. Up until now, the book had been carrying along at a nice pace. Unfortunately, it gets too caught up in it's own machinations in this penultimate chapter, and muddies the potential for a strong conclusion.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #15

Feb 25, 2015

With so many ideas in play, it's no surprise that we needed an epilogue to tie up loose ends. It's just too bad we couldn't get a better one.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #16

Mar 12, 2015

Event hangover is in full effect in this one. Without a new one to jump into, Dan Slott and Christos Gage's narrative meanders about in a bland attempt at establishing some sort of baseline for stories moving forward.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #17

Apr 2, 2015

Humberto Ramos' artwork is effective but the story is a bit of a bore, making this issue one that most readers can probably pass on.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2015) #5

Dec 23, 2015

Amazing Spider-Man is a fine book, but maybe it's time for some fresh blood. By taking Peter out of his element, the writers have definitely opened up the story possibilities, but they've also moved away from some of the things that make him unique. The back-to-basic approach has been done time and time again, but if New York can have the Avengers, Fantastic Four and many other heroes, I think there's room for more than one webslinger. There are still ways to make his adventures unique without rehashing old stories or forcing him into another character's general concept. There are worse books you'll read this week, but if you're looking for a more classic Spider-Man yarn, you might want to look elsewhere.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2015) #10

Apr 18, 2016

Amazing Spider-Man is a little cheesy but it has heart. It might be a little bit ho-hum for long-time readers but Slott shows that he knows how to work with his collaborators and turn out an entertaining story. The team has coalesced so much to this point that sometimes they're going to churn out an issue like this. They moved the chains on the A, B and C plots just like you would expect. That was the goal here. It only feels disappointing because of the talent involved. We've seen what these creators can do when they let loose. I guess we'll just have to wait a bit longer.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows #1

Jun 2, 2015

Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows could have been campy fan service, but it avoids that with an almost-twist ending. That sets the stage for what's to come in a big way. Dan Slott and Adam Kubert took a good approach to this one and executed very well. Minor hiccups abound, but they're not enough to take you out of the story or affect the readability of the issue. While it's hard to gauge how important these miniseries are to the main narrative, some of them have undeniably been fun, and Renew Your Vows is no different.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows #2

Jul 9, 2015

We haven't seen too much direct Secret Wars influence to this point, but Renew Your Vows is a really fun read and a return to form for Slott after an overlong Spider-Verse event.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows #4

Aug 19, 2015

The concept is strong, the Secret Wars tie-in is enough to pique interest but not overwhelm the book, and the return to this family dynamic for Peter and MJ is really refreshing. Slott lets us all take a breath here while also giving Annie May Parker a chance to show us what she's made of. The art team's work as whole may not be the best that it's been but they have an issue to pick up the slack. Overall, this is a well-balanced issue that readers who have been sticking with the series will enjoy.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows #5

Sep 10, 2015

Renew Your Vows was a nice trip down memory lane, but it doesn't have the teeth to be considered memorable on its own.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Amazing X-Men #2

Dec 4, 2013

Amazing X-Men #2 is by no means a bad comic. It's really fun, with lots of action. But the lack of real stakes and worthwhile characterization - not to mention the absence of the main attraction - make this issue something less than the debut. This issue will read so much better in trade when you can immediately get to the next issue. If the point in slowing this story down was to get five issues of McGuinness' art, then I'm all for it. Ultimately it succeeds in making me want to read Issue #3 and one some level, that might be all that matters.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Amazing X-Men #8

Jun 5, 2014

"World War Wendigo" might be an eye-catching title but this issue isn't worth the cover price. Hopefully, Kyle and Yost will do better than to use ol' Canucklehead as a storytelling crutch.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
America #1

Mar 1, 2017

The change is here. It’s right now. It’s going to wreck everything. And comic books will be so much better for it.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
America #2

Apr 6, 2017

America has suffered a massive drop off from its first issue because it isn't solidifying its identity in a meaningful way through the writing or art.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
American Monster #1

Jan 26, 2016

Azzarello has a track record miles long. A lackluster debut issue could be long forgotten by the time #2 rolls around. The art side of this title is what will keep me coming back in hopes that book lives up to its pedigree at some point. Fans of Azzarello's other darker creator-owned work will see some similarities here, but for me it hews a little closer to stuff like Southern Bastards. The difference is in the creative decisionmaking to emphasize plot or characters (or neither). American Monster looks to be a slow burn, but right now it's barely flickering.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Angela: Asgard's Assassin #1

Dec 3, 2014

The opening pages are rocky, but the creative team overcomes a bad start to deliver a fun debut issue that sets the stage for what's to come. Angela has become a character that thrives in just about any story she's been placed in, so fans worried that she might seem out of place can breathe easy. The final page reveal gives us a reason to keep checking in on Angela, as her tenuous relationship to her newfound family is sure to keep this book going for at least the first couple of arcs. The editors made the right decision by putting two artists on this issue, as they're able to provide two different looks that enhance the reading experience and don't overwhelm one another. Angela is a good start to this book and a reminder that while they might stumble once in a while (ahem, Spider-Woman), Marvel isn't afraid to give a diverse cast of characters a spotlight.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Angry Birds Comics #1

Jun 10, 2014

I was a little bit skeptical that an Angry Birds comic book would work. I mean, the game itself isn’t the most original app on the block. But the entire team puts together a convincing package. This might not be the kind of book that you’ll buy month in and month out but if you need to keep your kid entertained for a few minutes or you’re trying to introduce an otherwise video game-obsessed kid to reading, this is a solid purchase.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Animal Man #8

Apr 9, 2012

Animal Man has really come back into its own thanks in large part to Steve Pugh's phenomenal work. This book is at its best when Lemire continues to expand our knowledge of Animal Man's mythology while still grounding the conflict with his family, some of the greatest supporting characters in comics ever. A great comic satisfies you with answers but always leaves you with questions and this one fits the bill.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Animal Man #26

Dec 19, 2013

This issue is a prime example of what's been so problematic about Lemire's run on this book. In spending so much time with added Red/Green mythos, we lose Buddy's family and it waters down the threat of Brother Blood.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Animal Man #27

Jan 24, 2014

Animal Man is hurtling towards an ending, and Jeff Lemire is making sure it goes out with a bang.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Animal Man #29

Mar 19, 2014

This final issue serves as a warm reminder. It's like the night before graduation and you're sitting on the hood of your buddy's car drinking a beer saying "Hey, remember that time..." The memories flow out of you. You think about where you'll be next year. What's going to happen? But you take comfort in knowing that you'll always have the past, even while you are thrust into new beginnings. This isn't the last we'll see of Buddy Baker or Animal Man. This isn't even the last time Lemire will write him. This wasn't a run without any faults but it's important to relish the good stories because you don't know when you'll get the next one. On the whole, Animal Man was a good story. It's sad to see it go.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Apocalypse Al #1

Feb 4, 2014

Apocalypse Al is the kind of book that wouldn't be out of place on any primetime network if it was a TV show. The question is, is it better than the offerings that are already on the shelf in this crowded genre? JMS' vague "Book of Keys" that serves as the center of conflict might not be enough for seasoned veterans even though the writer does bring in a supernatural heavy hitter in the finals pages. The miniseries is only four issues so it might be worth taking a chance on. IT's solid and unassuming. It achieves exactly the goals that it sets out to. But don't be surprised if you get burned by another fire and brimstone narrative in a world chock full of them.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Aquaman (2011) #44

Oct 1, 2015

It's far from the worst book you'll read this week but it definitely won't inspire anyone to really dive into the hero of Atlantis.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Aquaman (2016) #3

Jul 24, 2016

When Abnett digs into the bureaucracy, it feels real, like a scene you might see in House of Cards but it's not terribly interesting and that's because we know so more information than the characters do.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Archer & Armstrong #1

Aug 7, 2012

This isn't the old Archer & Armstrong but Van Lente and Henry are definitely off to a good start. They've packed an impressive debut full of punches and punchlines that are sure to enthrall new readers and jog some old-timers' memories.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Arclight #1

Jul 2, 2015

This comic is slow-moving but it's the kind of thing that makes you want to really dig into the world and see what it's about. This is a great debut for this unique mini-line.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Arkham Manor #2

Dec 1, 2014

The problem with Arkham Manor is that is doesn't have its own identity yet. Sure, the setting is unique but the story hasn't played out all that differently from any story that you might find in Batman or Detective Comics. I assumed that a book focused on Arkham would place more of an emphasis on the villains and we haven't really gotten there yet. Their presence is used more for color than anything of substance. But the art is really great and fans looking for the next big thing to come out of DC should be paying attention to Shawn Crystal's work. Hopefully as the book progresses, the writing will start to match the art in terms of quality.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Arkham Manor #6

Mar 30, 2015

I'm left wondering if Arkham Manor ever really had a chance. Duggan clearly had some farther-reaching ideas that we didn't get to see play out. But was the concept ever really strong to begin with? I think the world of story made for a ton of potential to see some interesting relationship dynamics amongst a bunch of characters that we know but maybe that hewed too close Arkham Asylum for DC's tastes. that said, the execution was still similar to that seminal work, in that Bruce shows up to Arkham and has to get to the bottom of everything. Despite a real lack of a hook, Shawn Crystal's art helped buoy the series and hopefully, this isn't the last we see of him. There is room for a lot of different kinds of books within the Batman/Gotham City dynamic, but Arkham Manor is further proof that you need an airtight concept to really succeed.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Atomic Robo Presents: Real Science Adventures #2

May 16, 2012

There's a little bit for everyone here. Anthologies are great primers for new readers and Clevinger wisely crosses over into video game territory to maybe try and bridge that gap. Despite multiple artists, the different visual styles all suit the story at hand and more importantly the Atomic Robo universe. Three out of four solid entries isn't bad for this kind of book and I'm sure that time will prove the one outlier to be a quality addition to the Robo mythos as well.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Atomic Robo: The Flying She-Devils Of The Pacific #1

Jun 26, 2012

Atomic Robo and the Flying She-Devils of the Pacific #1 is the beginning of what is sure to be another incredibly entertaining Atomic Robo epic. Clevinger and Wegener are a team in perfect sync with one another and it shows. Some readers might be disappointed in the overall lack of any really heavy sci-fi beyond jetpacks but there's still time for that. Remember, the beauty of Robo is the build-up, and this only the beginning.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Avengers (2016) #2

Dec 7, 2016

Avengers is going big with its story while still maintaining the heart of Marvel Comics: the humanity of its characters. There’s a lot of fun to be had with something that feels this larger than life and is still told without changing what makes these characters great. Marvel would be wise to pay attention to what’s happening with this book the next time they plan a big event. You can have big, weird stories that take some effort to fully grasp if the characters within them are written well. Avengers is one of the better books in this post-Civil War II iteration of the Marvel U because it doesn’t force you to accept anything about the characters themselves that don’t hold true elsewhere, it only asks you to come along for a ride. That’s the whimsy that corporate comics are, sadly, usually missing.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Avengers Academy #27

Mar 8, 2012

If Marvel is trying to rope in lapsed Runaways readers with this mini-crossover, this is a good way to do it. It not only progresses the Avengers Academy story but the Runaways one, too. Even if this is all we get, this issue (and hopefully the next) will go down as one of the best issues in this run.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Avengers Undercover #1

Mar 11, 2014

Avengers Undercover #1 reads more like an epilogue to Avengers Arena than a debut issue of a new series. Considering Hopeless and Walker's good work with these characters in the past, it will be exciting to see them in a new setting but we haven't gotten to anything exciting just yet. Kev Walker remains a great fit for Hopeless' style and the tone of this book. A lesser artist wouldn't be able to keep a slow issue like this one afloat. Arena stumbled similarly at its debut until Hopeless really hit his stride and it became one of Marvel's most entertaining books. Here's hoping that's what we're in store for with Avengers Undercover.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Avengers Undercover #2

Apr 11, 2014

If you're hankering to fill the void left by Young Avengers, this is a book to watch.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Avengers Undercover #3

Apr 25, 2014

Superhero comics are frustrating sometimes because the characters never really change, but Hopeless is making sure that these characters have no choice but to, making Avengers Undercover one of the most fun reads in the Marvel Universe.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Avengers Undercover #10

Sep 12, 2014

The writing is a bit saccharine and the conclusion is fueled by a pretty big deus ex machina, but Dennis Hopeless and Tigh Walker send Avengers Undercover off in style.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Axe Cop: President Of The World #2

Aug 30, 2012

Creating good all-ages comics is a difficult task but the Nicolle brothers make it look easy.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
B.P.R.D.: 1948 #1

Oct 16, 2012

B.P.R.D. 1948 #1 is another great addition to the mythology of Hellboy and the B.P.R.D. Some origin stories feel shoehorned in after the fact but the Secret Origins trilogy has continued to build on an almost unparalleled mythology without alienating readers. The dynamic collaboration between Mignola, Arcudi and Fiumara is one that should be kept together even after this miniseries is finished.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Bandette #1

Jul 3, 2012

Monkeybrain Comics has a lot going for it right from the outset. We expect quality work from quality creators. Tobin and Coover absolutely deliver here. Bandette is a reminder that all kinds of comics have the potential to be good even if they are far from what's generally out there. It's just a matter of strength of execution.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Batgirl (2011) #36

Nov 13, 2014

This is how you reinvent a character. By basically doing everything in contrast to the rest of the Bat-titles, DC has put together what is easily their best book and what is unequivocally the best take on Barbara Gordon since Batgirl: Year One.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batgirl (2011) #37

Dec 10, 2014

The plotting may ultimately betray the characters and concept in this issue, but on the whole, it's not a bad effort. good writers can make bad decisions and hopefully, this is just a case of the team hitting an early bump in the road. (We are only three issues into their run, after all.) And for it's narrative flaws, Barbara Gordon is still a very strong character. I'm hoping that she'll start to come up against some bigger villains or at least more inventive ones (a la last issue's motorcycle ninjas). Despite this issue's flaws, Babs Tarr should be the real draw for most readers. She's continuing to make this book a great read for new and old fans alike.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #1

Aug 17, 2016

Batgirl and the Birds of Prey is a good book, and one that lives up to the significance of its title. Both Batgirl and Birds of Prey have historically yielded great stories about women and, even more importantly, great stories coming from great female creators. It's clear that the Bensons are comfortable working together and their scenes flow together so well; this isn't a case of two different writing voices being mashed together. It's nice to see the Bat-family open up a little bit without involving Bruce Wayne or Dick Grayson right off the bat. The women in Birds of Prey are more than capable without leaning on A-listers to help sell the book. There is an obvious connection but these women are carving out their own niche in the DCU, and that's a very, very good thing.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman (2011) #28

Feb 13, 2014

If this doesn't win back lapsed readers exhausted by Zero Year, I don't know what will. Scott Snyder and Dustin Nguyen tease the future of Batman Eternal in this one and its got a little bit for everyone.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman (2011) #29

Mar 13, 2014

This has probably been my favorite of the "Zero Year" tie-ins. Scott Snyder brings his conflict to a head with the drama and tension of the superstorm juxtaposed with the infamous events of Crime Alley.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batman (2011) #30

Apr 16, 2014

I hate to bring up "Year One," because comparing "Zero Year" directly to it is unfair to what Snyder and Capullo were assigned to do. But part of the reason that "Year One" worked so well as a prequel story was the efficiency in its storytelling. Everything you needed to know and wanted to know could be found in one place. "Zero Year" has been a sprawling mess of an event that's crossed over with too many titles and involved too many other creators of varying levels of talent. Snyder and Capullo can only control what happens in their book, and they've done all right on that front. But the scope and length of this event has robbed them both of the ability to imbue this arc with the stakes necessary to tell a great story. They were able to manufacture some in the first two acts of "Zero Year," but so far it hasn't carried through to the final act.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman (2011) #31

May 29, 2014

All around, this is an excellent issue that'll have fans foaming at the mouth for next month.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batman (2011) #37

Dec 17, 2014

On its own, this issue doesn't stand up but as part of the whole story - it's probably a necessary cog in the machine, but that makes it hard to read (let alone enjoy) issues on an individual basis rather than as a collected whole. But even when writing for the trade, each single issue should gets you jazzed for the next issue, and that just doesn't happen here. The next issue of Batman will undoubtedly be better not because of anything we've seen, here but because that's what we've come to expect from this creative team. Here's to next month.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batman (2011) #39

Feb 26, 2015

Greg Capullo's art is as strong as it's ever been, and he really gets to dig into a bunch more characters than usual. (His Clayface is a personal favorite of mine.) But a wholly dull script has me wondering if the insular nature of this Batman book is starting to hurt it.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman (2011) #43

Aug 13, 2015

"Superheavy" has felt like it was holding back until now, but if you dropped off the title because of Robo-Bunny Batman, now would be a good time to catch up and pretend you never left.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman (2011) #44

Sep 10, 2015

Overall, this is a strong showing and a great reminder of the abundance of stories that can be told with Batman at the center.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batman (2011) #47

Dec 9, 2015

Despite the lack of an emotional payoff, this book is still pretty sound. The art is tight and it accomplishes its goals even if it meanders for a moment in the service of poetic license. But the ending feels like a non-event. It's cheap, and frankly it feels like the creative team isn't giving readers enough credit. They've built a rabid fanbase with this take on Batman. The tease is unnecessary, and I think it undercuts the effectiveness of the script. The big reveal plays like that episode of a TV show that knows it wasn't strong so they give you a glimpse of next week's guest star to get you to tune in. Stick the landing before getting back on the horse. I promise your audience will still be there.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Batman (2011) #49

Feb 10, 2016

My favorite part of any hero story is when the hero has to double down on their resolution to become a hero, because they realize that it's a lot harder than they thought. This is that moment for Batman. This is that moment in Scott Snyder's run. This is a creative team saying, "we've put this guy through hell, but even happiness itself can't stop him." And that's why people love Batman. Because against all odds, this guy, millionaire or not, ninja or not, gets up and decides to be a hero. And I think that's how most people want to view themselves. Snyder's Batman is a reflection of our innermost desires and our purest intentions. If you've ever tied a towel around your neck and snuck around in the shadows ready to leap to action at the first sign of injustice, this one is for you. Bruce Wayne is dead. Long live Batman.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman (2016) #3

Jul 24, 2016

There's a lot to like in this script. It's an origin story for Gotham and Gotham Girl but even more so it reminds readers why Batman is an inspiration to be a better version of themselves.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #1

Nov 20, 2014

This is a solid fight comic through and through. The "boss battle" is coming up, and it looks like it'll be a doozy.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #21

Jun 20, 2013

Cliff Richards's pencils are solid, if unspectacular. Unfortunately, they don't do enough to sell some of the emotional weight that is present in the script, causing the big moments to fall flat.?

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #27

Jan 24, 2014

I hope Patrick Gleason always draws Batman books. If there was ever a worthy successor to Greg Capullo on the mina book, Gleason is it.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #30

Apr 17, 2014

Batman and... has been a good place to explore Bruce's relationships with many different characters, but here it only changes the setting, and the narrative falls flat as a result.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #33

Jul 28, 2014

"Robin Rises" is off to a great start, and this issue is the complete package.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #34

Aug 21, 2014

Peter J. Tomasi really nails the Bat family dynamic better than most writers at DC right and as Bruce embarks on this suicide mission to save Damian, he gives his family their own mission: keep Gotham safe.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #35

Oct 16, 2014

Tomasi keeps going bigger and bigger with this story, never shying away from using his characters to their full potential. (You'll see what I mean during the Cyborg scenes.) That might be why Batman and Robin is the most consistently entertaining Batman book on the stands.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #38

Jan 22, 2015

Patrick Gleason's art is sublime. He curates a perfect balance of action, comedy and dramatic tension that brings out the best in Tomasi's script. This team is truly one for the ages.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman And Robin Eternal #1

Oct 8, 2015

Batman and Robin Eternal has started off nicely, but time will tell if it can tell a great story without retreading too much from the last Batman weekly series.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Batman And Robin Eternal #2

Oct 15, 2015

The curse of the weekly struck swiftly. After an exciting opening issue, Tim Seeley mires Batman & Robin: Eternal in dialogue. The plot moves at a snail's pace and the lack of action is alarming.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman And Robin Eternal #3

Oct 22, 2015

All right! Now we're getting somewhere! Some meaningful plot development shows up here and sets the stage for what's to come in this weekly series.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman And Robin Eternal #4

Oct 29, 2015

This weekly series has been a lot more even than DC's past attempts thus far. With the current Robins/sidekicks at the center of the story, it's fun to see them interact with the We Are Robin crew so early, and I think that's going to be a recurring part of the plot.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Batman And Robin Eternal #5

Nov 5, 2015

Weekly series always have a few clunker issues, but this is far from the worst of them.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman And Robin Eternal #6

Nov 12, 2015

All in all, this is a quick read because it's a fun one and that's what should be expected from a weekly series that's working.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman And Robin Eternal #7

Nov 19, 2015

The result is a fairly utilitarian chapter in the Eternal saga, but at least it's a quality one.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman And Robin: Futures End #1

Sep 18, 2014

This book oozes emotion and it's a great addition to the web of Futures End.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman: Eternal #2

Apr 17, 2014

It's not a perfect comic, but two issues in, it might already be DC's most accessible Batman title.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman: Eternal #3

Apr 25, 2014

This is the Batman title for everyone from longtime fans hoping to see their favorite parts of the Bat mythos come to life in the New 52 to new readers just getting acclimated to Gotham's rogues.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batman: Eternal #4

May 1, 2014

We are less than 10% through this series, but we're not seeing enough effective payoff yet. The World's Greatest Detective is really taking his time doing any detecting.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Batman: Eternal #5

May 8, 2014

James Tynion IV handles scripting duties for this installation of Batman Eternal, which is proving to be an all-encompassing narrative but an unwieldy one

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batman: Eternal #6

May 15, 2014

Trevor McCarthy turns in the best looking issue we've seen so far as James Tynion IV and Scott Snyder add Batwing, Doctor Phosphorus, Gentleman Ghost and Spectre to the fray.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman: Eternal #7

May 22, 2014

This is comic books as a big-budget action thriller, a much-needed respite from more tedious world-building.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batman: Eternal #8

May 28, 2014

Batman Eternal might actually be a good story, but its weekly nature works against it. Not so much on the writing side, as the entire team are fairly capable. But the art really suffers by changing issue in and issue out. On some level, it limits what the artists can do because they don't have the opportunity to lay the same groundwork that they would on a monthly book. Readers are forced to readjust to a new style and different storytelling tendencies. That's great as a way to sample the line of Batman writers and artists that are currently working but it's not conducive to this story. There's more set-up in this issue but the plot is rolling forward. Since some issues thus far have felt rather plodding in terms of pacing, I'd call this one a net positive despite its artistic failings.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman: Eternal #9

Jun 5, 2014

John Layman lays a good groundwork for future issues and the twist is actually surprising, something of a rarity in the modern age of Big Two comics.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman: Eternal #10

Jun 13, 2014

John Layman is turning in the best scripts during Batman Eternal thus far. There's a lot packed into this issue but the pacing is stellar.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman: Eternal #11

Jun 23, 2014

Where has DC been hiding Ian Bertram? A mix between Ramon Villalobos and Frank Quitely, Bertram's art is a welcome change of pace for Batman Eternal and that he gets a good script to draw is a bonus.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman: Eternal #12

Jun 26, 2014

With Grayson right around the corner, this issue is a great showcase for an artist on the rise.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman: Eternal #13

Jul 7, 2014

Eternal has rebounded from a few duller issues and is delivering solid story at an exciting clip.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman: Eternal #14

Jul 10, 2014

James Tynion IV takes a step back in the latest installment of Eternal by beating his readers over the head with themes of natural order and cycles. But he does make strides with Lt. Bard that do a lot to change the dynamic of this book.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Batman: Eternal #15

Jul 17, 2014

This issue reminds us of the pitfalls of the weekly format; sometimes you hit odd uneven patches after a stretch of good storytelling.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batman: Eternal #16

Jul 28, 2014

The key to these weekly issues has been the pacing and Fawkes doesn't nail it down here. While the supernatural elements dominate most of his script, his little check-ins with Lt. Bard and Red Robin are too short to really be impactful.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Batman: Eternal #18

Aug 7, 2014

Eternal keeps adding pieces to this puzzle but it feels like we're no closer to any sort of resolution.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman: Eternal #19

Aug 14, 2014

Eternal is at its best when the pacing is good. Unfortunately, not every writer is up to the task of balancing each story line every time out. Tim Seeley nail it in this one, though.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman: Eternal #21

Aug 28, 2014

The gaggle of creators has definitely led to some inconsistency in this book but this one hits a sweet spot in terms of writing and art that definitely ups the ante.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Batman: Eternal #22

Sep 4, 2014

This chapter almost feels extraneous, but it's not the worst this title has been.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batman: Eternal #23

Sep 12, 2014

Catwoman gets a big background reveal here that helps set up her upcoming solo adventures and Dustin Nguyen provides solid art, but there's something about Batman Eternal that consistently holds it back. I think it's that the incredibly expansive story is just too much for the weekly schedule.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batman: Eternal #24

Sep 18, 2014

There are definitely a few wonky expressions (par for the course when most artists have to draw children, sadly) but storytelling-wise, this is a solid, if unspectacular, issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman: Eternal #25

Sep 25, 2014

R.M. Guera is a welcome sight in Gotham City. The artist, who made his name on his grim n' gritty collaboration with Jason Aaron Scalped, injects Eternal with the adrenaline it needs as Hush makes himself more known and the Bat family pulls together.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman: Eternal #27

Oct 9, 2014

Javier Garron is the star of this installment, imbuing Batman Eternal with a certain measure of energy and (mostly) strong characters. He runs into some trouble when posing Catwoman but there's a certain Nick Bradshaw/Chris Bachalo tinge to his art that gives his characters a ton of presence in just about every panel.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman: Eternal #28

Oct 16, 2014

This is another solid entry in this series, but I'm hoping that as we get closer to the end it starts to break through the glass ceiling it's constructed for itself.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Batman: Eternal #29

Oct 23, 2014

This issue sets up Arkham Manor but does little to be a satisfying read.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman: Eternal #31

Nov 6, 2014

The unlikely team-up of Bane and Alfred alone is worth the price of admission for this one.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman: Eternal #32

Nov 13, 2014

Jason Fabok turns in a good outing in this issue. His art here is much grittier than what he's doing on Justice League, but obviously the darkness suits the tone of the story.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman: Eternal #33

Nov 20, 2014

I love when the Eternal braintrust opts to let the same writer/artist duo do back-to-back issues. It helps some of the pacing problems that a weekly series can run into.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman: Eternal #35

Dec 4, 2014

Things are really moving at a faster pace as we approach some kind of inevitable reveal. I think the fun of this issue is that James Tynion IV and the rest of the consulting team have injected some mystery back into the plot.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman: Eternal #36

Dec 11, 2014

Another enthralling installment of Batman Eternal puts Lt. Bard a a crossroads, reminds us that Harper Row is a character and gives us another moment to reevaluate just how far-reaching the plot has been.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Batman: Eternal #37

Dec 18, 2014

This is the worst I've seen Batman Eternal look in a while.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman: Eternal #40

Jan 9, 2015

Davide Furno and Paolo Armitano's art really stands out here. There's a grittiness to it that tows the line between a regular capes book and a noir title that really works for the smaller machinations of the script.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman: Eternal #41

Jan 15, 2015

A good script, great art and a bunch of fan-favorite characters place this issue of Eternal firmly in the win column.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman: Eternal #43

Jan 29, 2015

Batman Eternal is trying to bring it all home and if it keeps up this level of quality, we're in for a great conclusion.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Batman: Eternal #44

Feb 5, 2015

This one is a bad effort all-around that really shows the worst of the weekly comics format. It's repetitive, unnecessary and boring.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman: Eternal #45

Feb 11, 2015

I suppose the big reveal could be a red herring but Fawkes and Fernandez do this chapter justice. Given all that we've seen in Batman Eternal and the Bat-books in general, I have a hard time believing that the overall creative team is really going to be able to stick the landing with the ending of this event. Fawkes and Fernandez fulfill their duties here and give us a few of the better character moments that we've seen in recent weeks. With such a scattershot approach to this title, sometimes that's the best you can ask for.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Batman: Eternal #46

Feb 19, 2015

Each interesting concept that has been broached by the Batman Eternal creative team has (mostly) been marred by poor execution, and the plot is starting to feel more like a wild goose chase than a compelling narrative.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman: Eternal #47

Feb 26, 2015

Just as it seemed that Batman Eternal was buckling under its own weight, the creative team turns in a strong installment mostly because of the gorgeous art of Juan Ferreyra.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Batman: Eternal #48

Mar 5, 2015

Fernando Blanco's art works for this issue and by virtue of effectively telling the story, it's definitely ahead of many of the other artists that have worked on Batman Eternal. But for this issue, there's nothing to get particularly excited about - fatigue is definitely setting in.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batman: Eternal #52

Apr 2, 2015

All in all, Eternal has been the best of DC's weeklies, but it never breaks through to truly legendary status because of a lack of cohesive execution on a week-to-week basis.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Batman: Joker's Daughter #1

Feb 6, 2014

Overwrought narration and a weak concept bring this one down. A Joker derivative as a villain will always be appealing in theory but the execution leaves this one lacking.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #29

Mar 27, 2014

Gregg Hurwitz ends this Man-Bat story with a fittingly gray conclusion. Man-Bat might have been stopped but corporate greed is alive and well. Hurwitz is reaching for something bigger than this book ever was and the sentiment rings a bit hollow.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Batwoman Annual #2

Apr 2, 2015

The creative team ties a bow on this book with a schmaltzy closing bit, but any good will for this title has long been spent already, and any attempts to salvage the emotional core of the title comes across like putting lipstick on a pig.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batwoman #25

Nov 20, 2013

Andreyko proves himself completely capable to write Batwoman. I'm more excited to see what he does outside the "Zero Year" box. I'm also hoping that the art on this one is the exception and not the rule. It's rare for one story to bear the weight of so many artists without hurting the quality of the book. Batwoman #25 could be the start of a quality entry in the "Zero Year" saga but it definitely has its warts. Fixing those will be the difference between a memorable first arc that does Williams II/Blackman's work some justice and a disastrous one that only justifies the comics community's hemming and hawing over editorial interference.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Batwoman #26

Jan 2, 2014

After a forced tie-in to "Zero Year," writer Marc Andreyko finally gets to spread his wings in Batwoman #26. But the results are less than inspiring.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Batwoman #27

Jan 24, 2014

Batwoman is starting to read like a book on its last legs. Marc Andreyko moves into familiar territory with a hallucination sequence that recounts Kate Kane's struggles with being gay in the military. While that could have the potential to be very powerful, the delivery method is awkward and haphazard.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batwoman #29

Mar 20, 2014

Time has given this creative team the opportunity to gel and Batwoman is better for it.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batwoman #30

Apr 17, 2014

Marc Andreyko and Jeremy Haun deliver on the fight scene promised last month, and it's clear that Andreyko is really starting to get a handle on Kate Kane's voice.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batwoman #31

May 22, 2014

Artist Jeremy Haun is really coming into his own on Batwoman. It seems that the longer he draws it, the stronger his work is getting. And we're finally seeing him really nail facial expressions and renderings, an aspect of his art that has been plagued by inconsistencies in the past.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batwoman #34

Aug 21, 2014

Overall, you might be tearing up while you roll your eyes, but this one is ultimately a net positive.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Batwoman #35

Oct 16, 2014

Hopefully, DC will put this book out of its misery soon. We've already seen how Kate dies. I don't think that the character needs to be dragged through the mud any further. When Andreyko was announced on the book, I was hoping he'd be able to provide a unique perspective as one of the few openly gay writers in comics. Instead, he's stripped the book of everything that's made the book unique and traded bigger emotional stories for cheap thrills that, unfortunately, aren't all that thrilling.

View Issue       View Full Review
1.0
Batwoman #39

Feb 19, 2015

Andreyko has shown flashes of competence during his run, but this book is overstuffed with characters and gaudy soap opera style relationship dynamics that are a total bore.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Batwoman (2017) #1

Mar 15, 2017

Bennett and Tynion don't do anything to make this story uniquely a Batwoman story. The plot feels interchangeable, like any hero could be slotted into a very similar situation. That's disappointing for a character who was previously one of the more exciting heroes on DC's roster.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batwoman (2017) #2

Apr 21, 2017

This book is not shaping up at all. We're three issues into the Marguerite Bennett/James Tynion IV/Steve Epting run and we don't have much to show for it.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Batwoman: Futures End #1

Sep 18, 2014

People were invested in Batwoman because she helped fill a need for diversity and the book was one of high quality. Now, she's a vampire, and the shift from critical darling to anonymous DC dreck is complete.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Bee and PuppyCat #1

May 14, 2014

This book already has a huge built-in audience that will surely be overjoyed to see Bee and PuppyCat in comic book form. But unlike something like Adventure Time, it hasn’t hit its stride in this medium yet, and that’s working against it garnering new fans who might be expecting something a little bit more polished. But Allegri’s trademark charm and unique worldview do shine through this work. Bee and Puppycat is a fun concept with a lot of room to grow. In a few months, it could be truly one to watch.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Big Trouble In Little China #1

Jun 3, 2014

Fans of the original movie might be split on the comic. On one hand, we get the continuation of Jack Burton's story but on the other hand, was that something that we really wanted or needed? It's great that a new medium allows Carpenter and Powell to open up the mythology of the property and it's fun that they've gone for full-on camp. I'm not sure it will resonate with everyone, though. This is a different kind of goofy than the movie was, and it might not have the same appeal.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Birds Of Prey (2011) #27

Jan 24, 2014

On the whole this one just sets the status quo as we launch into Gothtopia. There's nothing here you won't glean from the next issue's recap page.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Bitch Planet #1

Dec 11, 2014

Altogether, this is a great book that's taking a stand that many others might be afraid to.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Black Kiss 2 #2

Sep 6, 2012

Hardcore Chaykin/Black Kiss fans will probably find something to love here, but casual readers should seek out the original.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Black Knight (2015) #1

Nov 18, 2015

A lot of people will point to the choice of character as a reason for the book's failings. But there is no such thing as a bad character (well, maybe Forearm, but I digress), only creative teams who fail to help them meet their potential. The fact is, we have decades of Black Knight stories of varying quality, but Tieri and Pizzari are unable to scratch this one into the win column.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Black Panther (2016) #1

Apr 6, 2016

Black Panther isn't for everyone yet. The book is knee-deep in its own world for now, and that might be off-putting for some readers that are hoping to jump into something a little bit less dense. But it does stand as a great way to take continuity and make it your own. Coates is unapologetic about the things he doesn't like about Black Panther, and so he sets out to change them. But he doesn't so that wholesale, making changes that run counter to the character or previous events - instead, he seeks to lead the narrative in a way that the changes he wants to see are part of a natural story progression. That's something we don't always see from writers. Stelfreeze continues to be one of the best and my nitpickings with the color work are minor compared to the wholly effective work that's present and the scale of this book. Black Panther's a winner that should be making it on to pull lists everywhere as soon as possible.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Bloodshot #1

Jul 16, 2012

Bloodshot #1 is fuled by cool factor and driven by "whoa!" moments. It's meant to shock you into reading on while still providing a few main plot points about Bloodshot's past and origins. But it's not enough. It feels like we've been down this road before with other series. If this book continues to be dragged down by inconsistent art and recycled plot points, it'll have a hard time getting its hooks in with the current comics market.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Bloodstrike #30

Sep 6, 2012

Decidedly average is probably the best way to describe this outing.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Blue Beetle (2016) #1

Sep 28, 2016

Blue Beetle looked like it might be the kind of book that helped DC revitalize its lineup of teen heroes and give us a look in on the magical side of the DCU. Unfortunately, the creators at work here walk back on everything they did right in the debut issue. They end up stalling out on the same basic plot as the debut and in doing so, fail to move the narrative forward or enhance it by explaining some back story. Somehow they managed to tread water and we’re technically still at the beginning of an arc. Moving forward, Giffen and Kolins are going to have to try to recapture the energy of the Rebirth special if they really hope to get this bug off the ground.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Blue Beetle: Rebirth #1

Aug 24, 2016

Blue Beetle: Rebirth #1 is a very pleasant surprise. Giffen and Fajardo work together to remix the idea of a teen hero in the 2010s very well. It's too soon to call this DC's answer to a title like Ultimate Spider-Man, but it definitely has that feeling. When books are working this well, the powers that be would be remiss not to pay attention. The seamless integration of Doctor Fate makes this book one that holds keys to understanding the new limits of this DCU. But on a smaller scale, there's a really fun superhero book about a kid who just wants to get to school on time and happens to have some really bad luck along the way. DC has long lacked a human element, opting to present their characters (even the solidly human ones) as mythic, godlike figures. But with Blue Beetle, it seems like the times, they are a-changin'.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Book Of Death #1

Jul 14, 2015

Book of Death #1 is a rough beginning but maybe not one the creative team can't come back from. The lifeless and bland nature of the art is a letdown, considering this is supposed to be Valiant's main event for the summer, but there are a few bright spots for them to build on. Venditti's concept at the core of the title is one that can work in the Valiant Universe, it's just going to take a little bit more time for the individual pieces to gel. Die-hard Valiant fans will be excited by the premise but likely disappointed in the execution and new readers will just be a bit lost.Overall, there isn't too much for anyone here except the hope that it gets better.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Brain Boy #1

Sep 11, 2013

Only time will tell if this iteration of Brain Boy will stick around longer that its Dell Comics predecessor. All the pieces are here to really build a world but it's unclear whether or not we'll see Brain Boy as a part of the larger Dark Horse superhero line. While Van Lente turns in a solid effort, it's really the art team that's firing on all cylinders. If they keep this up, Brain Boy could very well be a hit.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Bravest Warriors #1

Oct 25, 2012

Yep. They defeat sexism and a banana is proud. If that last sentence seems like something you're into, you'll dig this book. It's fun and silly and a reminder that not everything has to be dark and brooding to be good.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Buzzkill #1

Sep 17, 2013

The front cover of Buzzkill has a quote from Mark Waid saying, "God, I wish I'd thought of this." That's a hell of an endorsement and so far, it's kind of book that'll make you say that. The art is engaging and visually stimulating. The writing has kept everything pretty simple and straightforward while still allowing room for twists and some unanswered questions. Cates and company's first issue is a good reminder that sometimes less is more especially when remixing a genre that many believe has been done to death.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
C.O.W.L. #2

Jun 24, 2014

C.O.W.L. takes a step forward in the art department in Issue #2, but the narrative is still treading water. Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel are building something big while trying to forge a new path in done-to-death cape comics. But the world-building is slowing the pace to a crawl. The writers are trying to flesh out a complex cast that will allow their story to really sing, but it’s not as easy was it might be with a television show that can rely on an actor to turn in a good performance.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Cage (2016) #1

Oct 5, 2016

It’s a simple and straightforward story, and Tartakovsky doesn’t lean heavy into the era’s bad scripting habits (particularly with dialogue) that would make modern readers cringe. The art is expressive and outsized. The pacing comes at a good clip. The script has a couple of fun cameos. It might stand in stark contrast to the Cage we see on the small screen but Tartakovsky’s reverence for the character is clear. This is his love letter to an era of comics that he grew up reading and that’s why it works so well. It combines his unique sense of humor with the best parts of ‘70s Power Man, while leaving the more problematic bits by the wayside. Ya dig?

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Captain America (2012) #14

Dec 16, 2013

The final showdown with The Iron Nail is still to come but the stakes surrounding their confrontation aren't nearly as high as they should be. Remender has a lot of things falling into place and anyone would be a fool to believe he won't surprise us with the conclusion of this arc. However, this issue doesn't stand up. While the visuals do line up well with the message, it fails to provide more context for The Iron Nail's involvement and Nuke never seems like a credible threat. The added nuance of Captain America's public persona coming under fire is an interesting caveat but not necessarily a new one. We'll have to wait and see how this one shakes out.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Captain America (2012) #18

Mar 6, 2014

This issue is essentially the action filler as Rick Remender and Nic Klein build to the main confrontation.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Captain America (2012) #19

Apr 3, 2014

Last issue was an out and out fight comic. This one leans more toward exposition but is balanced with plenty of explosions. Remender returns to the theme of his run, "You always stand up" and it's clear that he's not done putting Steve through the wringer.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Captain America (2012) #21

Jun 5, 2014

Rick Remender might be leaving it all out on the court over in Uncanny Avengers, but he's really slipping in Captain America. The conclusion to Iron Nail and the Gungnir's story is lifeless. Iron Nail proves to be an uninteresting, single-minded enemy and the implications of the ending are greater than the story that got us there.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Captain America (2012) #22

Jul 7, 2014

It's a good mix of humor and exposition that brings this book back from the brink of falling off my pull list.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Captain America (2012) #23

Aug 14, 2014

This issue feels a little light, but the more Rick Remender returns to his initial Dimension Z arc, the more we're seeing a return to form. Captain America might not always seems like a fit for weird sci-fi plots but taking the experimentation at the heart of his porigin and exaggerating it even further works well here.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Captain America (2012) #24

Sep 4, 2014

Captain America is continuing to shine, even with only a shell of its main character.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Captain America (2012) #25

Oct 1, 2014

We've seen the ending of this one coming for a while, but the epilogue was a nice surprise. It seems there's a fox in the hen house, and the Avengers don't see it coming. That's a pretty big challenge for a new Captain America, especially as Jet's loyalties are now in doubt. I have to say I'm looking forward to the new art team as well, in hopes that they'll be able to give Sam Wilson's Cap his own visual style. This big announcement issue is solid through and through. It's not going to change the world or be anyone's favorite comic that comes out this week. But it does it's job, even if it's somewhat unspectacular.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Captain America: Sam Wilson #1

Oct 14, 2015

This is a bold, new era for Captain America, one that is already boiling over with tension. Sam Wilson is an unpopular man in the Marvel Universe, because he's trying to fix something that you can't necessarily fix with punching and catchphrases. Nick Spencer's star is definitely rising at Marvel lately, after a few missteps early in his tenure. He really hit his stride with a comedic turn in Superior Foes of Spider-Man, but he's shooting for something much larger here. And hopefully, as the story gets bigger, Acuna's artwork will settle in and help shed light on what looks to be an emotional arc. Welcome to the court of public opinion, Mr. Wilson. Hope you survive the experience.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Captain America: Sam Wilson #7

Mar 31, 2016

Nick Spencer digs into some of the legacy of the shield and that's the strongest part of this issue, though Daniel Acuna's artwork is as effective as it ever was.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Captain America: Sam Wilson #17

Jan 4, 2017

This book isn't a sendup of extremism. It punches down at something that tries to help bring clarity and understanding to our world and, in doing so, empowers the rejection of any meaningful dialogue about these ideas. It might be small, but missteps like these make it harder for anyone to do the things that superheroes can't.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Captain America: Sam Wilson #20

Mar 16, 2017

Captain America: Sam Wilson is one of the more challenging books in Marvel's line, and that's a good thing, even when the book's narrative and message find themselves at odds.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Captain America: White #1

Sep 16, 2015

Captain America: White is by no means a perfect book. Loeb only really just introduced his thesis statement between this and the zero issue without giving much indication as to how this story will play out. There are a few different directions for it to go and what we have know is an exciting revisiting of some of Cap's WWII history; not only of his deeds there but the dynamic that he had with his partner and the other soldiers. Tim Sale is one of comic's greatest working artists and it's a treat to see him dig into a book like this. All the hallmarks of his style are here, ensuring that longtime fans won't be disappointed. Captain America: White is a solid start to what is hopefully another great entry in the partnership between two great creators.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Captain Britain and the Mighty Defenders #2

Aug 20, 2015

Al Ewing and Alan Davis reimagine their little section of Battleworld as a Judge Dredd-esque dystopia. The problem might be that it's so short. In two issues, fans unfamiliar with some of these characters won't have much reason to root for them.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Captain Marvel (2012) #17

Nov 7, 2013

It's a love letter to Captain Marvel fans everywhere and proof that even big, corporate comics can come from a truly genuine place.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Captain Marvel (2014) #3

May 15, 2014

The writing provides a good balance between drama and humor. Carol Danvers feels like the kind of superhero that you could be best friends with, and coupled with David Lopez's incredible visuals, that's enough to best any stagnation with the plot.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Captain Marvel (2014) #7

Sep 12, 2014

Marcio Takara makes his debut in this issue, and it's a great example of his cartooning abilities.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Catwoman (2011) #30

Apr 25, 2014

Ann Nocenti's first issue of the "Race of Thieves" arc is as bland and antiseptic a superhero comic as they come.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Catwoman (2011) #35

Oct 23, 2014

But overall, coupled with Lee Loughridge's colors, Catwoman feels like a crime noir title and that's a good thing for a book that had little identity before.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Catwoman (2011) #37

Dec 18, 2014

Genevieve Valentine has managed to take the superheroics out of a superhero book and still make it compelling, which is no easy task. Catwoman might be more akin to The Sopranos, which allows it to carve out an interesting space in the Bat publishing line.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Clockwork Angels #1

Mar 18, 2014

Rush fans will likely be happy to see the band expanding into another medium and considering Clockwork Angels's previous success as a novel and an album, there is definitely an audience for it. But translating a work across mediums means that certain aspects are gained and lost. Obviously here, the art is a huge gain, showcasing a new artist with obvious chops. But what is lost? It might be the simple fact that in translating an album into a novel and then parsing it down to a six-issue comic book series, there's a certain amount of simplification that might rob the story of its uniqueness. Time will tell on that one. For now, Clockwork Angels is an interesting debut from an unlikely source thats worth a look from Rush fans and sci-fi enthusiasts alike.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Cluster #1

Feb 3, 2015

Cluster #1 might be lacking in any real "wow" moments, but it is a well-told debut that provides a solid foundation moving forward.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Colder #1

Nov 5, 2012

For readers with a penchant for mystery and horror, this might be one to sink your teeth into but the interiors don't deliver on the creepiness promised on the cover. It's the first issue and the pacing is slow but the art is good enough to keep it afloat. Time will tell if pacing will freeze Colder in its tracks, but for now it has a vague premise with an intriguing amount of potential.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Constantine #4

Sep 17, 2015

This isn't an issue you can afford to miss if you're a Hellblazer fan.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Constantine #12

Mar 13, 2014

Forever Evil hasn't been kind to Constantine and what we get here is essentially a drawn out fight comic, bereft of the character's intrinsic charm.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Constantine: The Hellblazer #1

Jun 10, 2015

This is a great debut for this creative team and this iteration of the character. It doesn't require any knowledge of Constantine before this point and it's a fun, self-contained story. Doyle and Tynion are clearly attuned to the charms of Hellblazer and put them on full display here. Rossmo is particularly talented at exploring John's corner of the DCU and rendering it in such a way that it looks like nothing else in any other DC book. This Constantine isn't as weathered as many readers are used to him being but this book is sure to satisfy new and old fans. You'll feel like there's real darkness and evil here but that Constantine can handle it with a one-liner, a shot of whiskey and a half-remembered incantation. This is the Hellblazer we know and love and have missed.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Constantine: The Hellblazer #2

Jul 9, 2015

This creative team hasn't disappointed yet and they're showing no signs of stopping.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Convergence #0

Apr 1, 2015

But after months of build-up, Convergence presents little more than a confused Superman running around punching stuff asking "Why?" I can't say that it's the start I hoped for - maybe it's not even a start at all. It feels like a haphazard attempt at Grant Morrison-esque meta-narrative, but without any of that writer's trademarks. A lot of people are heading into Convergence because they are excited to see their favorite eras of DC Comics represented, (I'm not the only one stoked for '90s Superboy, right?) but this issue doesn't really add to the hype at all. While an A-list artist elevates the book in terms of execution, at the end of the day, Convergence #0 is still a bizarre proof of concept that might actually fail entirely at setting up what comes next.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Convergence #3

Apr 22, 2015

Better art can't save this issue, though. The plot is meandering. The villain might as well be made of cardboard, he's so two-dimensional. There are still no stakes, and it's easy to see why. This is filler through and through. Why else would the event's main title not carry A-list talent? Don't get me wrong - these creators are capable, but their names don't exactly carry the weight that a Geoff Johns or a Jeff Lemire or a Scott Snyder might. Convergence is a disappointment that doesn't seem too concerned with righting the ship. It's bad, but not bad enough, and in a few month's time, when the small publishing changes that come out of it are written away, we'll forget it ever happened.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Convergence #5

May 7, 2015

This is probably the most entertaining issue of Convergence yet, due in part to Andy Kubert's artwork doing a lot of the heavy lifting. Jeff King's plot is still of questionable quality but at least the character dynamics at play are becoming fun to watch.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Convergence #6

May 13, 2015

I think this event is finding some sort of footing but it has yet to really resonate with me in any meaningful way. Telos hasn't been a compelling character from the onset of this story so any development he has towards the end of the story doesn't really look to make us suddenly care. Great villains are usually born of great tragedy (in this case, Thanos specifically comes to mind) but Telos' great tragedy is so amorphous that we have no context for it. I'm glad that DC is putting some competent artists on these issues to at least make for something easily readable but there's no substance to this event/ And without that substance, how is it supposed to have a significant impact on the line moving forward?

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Convergence: Justice League International #1

Apr 16, 2015

Like many other Convergence artists, Manley's art exists mostly to be a vehicle for the narrative and not to be the real draw of the book. To that end, it succeeds.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Convergence: Nightwing / Oracle #1

Apr 9, 2015

For a tie-in that's so focused on its characters, Duursema can't seem to decide what they look like and that draws attention to other weaknesses in the art such as the lack of visual flow. These inconsistencies pile up and mar an otherwise inoffensive event tie-in.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Convergence: Superboy #1

Apr 16, 2015

Here's a prime example of a book that's definitely not as good as it's cover.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Convergence: The Question #1

Apr 9, 2015

The issue is pretty light on any actual plot, opting to maintain the formula set by some of the other tie-ins, but we do get to see the effect the overarching event is having through a different lens.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Curse Words #1

Jan 17, 2017

Curse Words is a little harried and scattered but it's fun because it embraces some of it's own silliness. Soule and Browne are hugely self-aware of the toys they're playing with and how they're executing their story, which is a really good sign moving forward.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Cyborg (2016) #1

Sep 22, 2016

Semper's dialogue is snappy, though a little overwrought at points. Paul Pelletier's art is open and expressive, selling the internal conflict that Cyborg deals with in just about any interaction he has. The supporting cast is starting to get fleshed out as well and this stands as an intriguing start to the latest adventures of Victor Stone.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Cyclops (2014) #1

May 7, 2014

Cyclops is serving up teen angst in space and I'm sold on it. Scott's dealing with a lot right now. He misses Jean but at the same time, he's struggling with it. He's not sure if he made the right decision by running away with his father. And he hasn't really even gotten to the moral ambiguity of his father's profession. He says he wants to be good. But does he know that his father is good? He might be away from the insanity of the X-Men on Earth but he can't really know what he's gotten himself into. So far Rucka is writing this like the best television sci-fi. It hits beats as well as Farscape or Firefly and it's just as much fun thanks to Russell Dauterman's artwork. If you aren't a fan of the current, older incarnation of Cyclops, I suggest you get onboard with this one.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Cyclops (2014) #2

Jun 4, 2014

For anyone turned off by young Scott's pangs of angst in Issue #1, I offer up this issue as proof that Cyclops isn’t navel-gazing, woe-is-me-isms. Scott and his father’s relationship is still in its early stages, but it will be tested - and Scott will have to decide the kind of person that he wants to become. He’s seen what following Xavier’s path gets him, but he’s also starting to understand who his father really is. These ideas are at odds with each other, and I don’t think that Scott is discerning enough just yet to recognize the best parts of either ideology to let those inform his actions. There’s even still a chance that he decides against both and forges a new path for himself. Cyclops is doing what any great superhero comic should: make its readers reflect on themselves and their own humanity while still being incredibly entertaining.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Cyclops (2014) #4

Aug 28, 2014

This book continues to have a lot of heart, and if Corsair succeeds at being a father to Scott where Professor X may have failed, we might have the beginnings of a sea change in the X-Universe.

View Issue       View Full Review
1.0
Damian: Son of Batman #1

Oct 30, 2013

The lack of care taken to justify the characters' actions in this book make it seem like a nothing more than a cash grab that combines a popular character with a popular creator and hopes for the best. Ultimately, it does a disservice to previous work on the character and Kubert's legacy as a creator. Damian: Son of Batman is simply an exercise in weeping and moaning and gritting of teeth. Unfortunately, the weeping and moaning will be coming mostly from a reader who can't believe they spent four dollars on this one.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Damian: Son of Batman #2

Dec 2, 2013

It seems that we're finally starting to get somewhere with Damian. But we're still lacking any real substance here. What are we supposed to learn about Damian? Why is he worthy or unworthy of the cape and cowl? Right now, we're flipping back and forth between action scenes and Damian's personal gripes about Batman's code. It's not particularly grabbing. But Kubert fans will definitely get a kick out of the art, which is more than I can say about the first book.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Damian: Son of Batman #3

Jan 2, 2014

The third installment of Andy Kubert's bizarre Damian Wayne story trudges toward the end by adding even more to an already convoluted plot. But it's hard to look away because the the art is so good!

View Issue       View Full Review
1.0
Damian: Son of Batman #4

Jan 30, 2014

This series is an exercise in how not to make comics.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Damsels #1

Jul 10, 2012

Damsels will immediately be compared to Fables and Fairest because of its setting and characters but its definitely got a different feel to it. Unfortunately, this first issue is not going to be enough to hook most people in.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Daredevil (2011) #31

Sep 23, 2013

Waid and company provide a nuanced story with a healthy helping of superheroics, suspense and real-life drama. The twist ending could potentially be a big one and so it's unfortunate Waid takes a pretty weak route to get there. But for the most part, Daredevil remains one of the gold standards in superhero comics today.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Daredevil (2014) #18

Sep 2, 2015

Overall, Waid's run will be missed and Daredevil fans will wait with baited breath for Charles Soule to return Matt Murdock to the mean streets of New York City. The finale doesn't do ol' Hornhead enough justice, but this run is definitely one of the greatest of all time. It's a reminder that the superheroes that we love are almost infinitely adaptable with a strong enough creative team behind them, and that there's no such thing as a bad character. Though the finale reads like the creative team was told their time was up, it still does a nice job of closing the book on this run. I don't think we'll see another like it for a long time, but the reverberations of books like this one as well as Matt Fraction and David Aja's Hawkeye will be felt on generations of aspiring creators to come.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Daredevil (2015) #5

Mar 31, 2016

This isn't the best issue but it should instill some faith in readers who weren't sure what was in store for Matt Murdock in the Soule era.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
DC Rebirth Holiday Special #1

Dec 15, 2016

Your mileage may vary with an anthology like this. If you really love the season and want to see these characters getting up to some holiday hijinks, you’ll definitely have fun with this book. But even at 88 pages, the price point may give some readers reason to pause. That’s a potentially big burden on a pull list (and a holiday shopping budget) for stories that are very sweet but lack any sort of impactful substance. It would be a different story if the second half of the book stood up as well as the first half, but this special stands firmly in the middle of the road.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Dead Body Road #1

Dec 10, 2013

Dead Body Run #1 is a great debut by a talented creative team. They've managed to take a fairly stock concept and turn it into something worth reading. The mystery teased in the last few pages will give Jordan some room to make this book really unique. It's exciting to know that we haven't really scratched the surface yet and Scalera is already on top of his game. As long as the action and intrigue stay at high levels, Dead Body Road will definitely be a winner.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Dead Body Road #2

Jan 24, 2014

Some might knock the almost stock concept of this book but Jordan and Scalera are making this one their own.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Deadpool & The Mercs For Money (2016) #1

Jul 20, 2016

The only sure things in life are death, taxes and more Deadpool comic books. Cullen Bunn and Iban Coello produce another ho-hum entry into Marvel's most famous Merc's bibliography but they could elevate the concept at some point. This almost feels like the kind of book that you trade-wait on just because someone mentions that it gets good eventually. This first issue just doesn't stand alone as it's own compelling entry. The characters are hollow. The plot is predictable and the book isn't particularly funny or interesting. Best to spend your our dollars on something else this week.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Deadpool (2012) #20

Dec 5, 2013

Brian Posehn and Gerry Duggan have turned in some fine Deadpool comics lately. They've added high stakes and gravitas to an otherwise silly character, but that doesn't mean they've forgotten how to have fun.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Deadpool Vol. 3 #51

Feb 23, 2012

There's a chance that this arc improves with the next issue. It really could go either way at this point. We already know the book will survive this arc now hopefully Way will deliver a stunning to conclusion to whether or not Deadpool does.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Death Of Wolverine #1

Sep 2, 2014

But at the end of the day, all we’ve gotten is a familiar set-up for a familiar final splash page. This is a comic book well-made, no doubt about that, but it’s not exactly breaking any new ground. Soule definitely shows an adept understanding of Logan and his situation. McNiven and the rest of the art team have clearly gone for a certain tone and they nailed it. But for an issue that represents a quarter of the “Death of Wolverine” story, there are absolutely no surprises thus far, and that’s somewhat disappointing.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Defenders Vol. 2 #4

Mar 12, 2012

This is good comics, plain and simple.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Descender #1

Feb 10, 2015

Descender is an stunning debut. It's obvious why Hollywood jumped on this train early. Lemire and Nguyen are building their world at a rapid pace without leaving their characters behind. They've created enough questions to entice readers to read the next issue but haven't forced too many concepts that the main narrative gets lost. Science fiction is experiencing a new renaissance in recent years and Descender looks to be finest addition from the comics medium since the debut of Saga.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Detective Comics (2011) #23.2

Sep 12, 2013

There are some really great, smaller character moments when Harley is home with her family but his art doesn't come across with the same kinetic energy that say a Humberto Ramos Spider-Man book has.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Detective Comics (2011) #25

Nov 7, 2013

Detective Comics #25 isn't reinventing the wheel with this entry into Zero Year, but it is an inoffensive starting point for those would-be Gordon fans.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Detective Comics (2011) #26

Dec 5, 2013

Layman turns in a Man-Bat tale that's not exactly as it seems and proves why he's one of the most underrated writers on DC's roster. Batman stories are notorious for messing with readers' expectations. Layman plays them with nuance and subtlety by expounding on Bruce's detective skills.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Detective Comics (2011) #31

May 8, 2014

Francis Manapul and Brian Buccellato up the ante in their second issue of Detective Comics in terms of both art and storytelling.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Detective Comics (2011) #32

Jun 13, 2014

Francis Manapul and Brian Buccellato continue to redefine Detective Comics, and they're starting to make the case that this should be the only Batman book you're reading.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Detective Comics (2011) #33

Jul 10, 2014

Detective Comics #33 is missing the wow factor of recent issues, but it's still an above-average installment in this arc.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Detective Comics (2016) #948

Jan 11, 2017

There's an aspect of this book that feels like a break from Detective Comics' regularly scheduled programming but after the event of the last two arcs, it's nice to have a bit of a breather. This is a relatively breezy book that has a lot of heavier implications. Ben Oliver is a big reason that's the case because his narrative sense is on point. But the big reveal at the end notwithstanding, Tynion and Bennett have worked together to make Kate's story have weight.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Doctor Fate #3

Aug 20, 2015

Maybe with more time Doctor Fate will come into its own, but these creators are an awkward fit for the property.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Doctor Fate #6

Nov 19, 2015

Unfortunately, Paul Levitz's scattered script is entirely flat, bouncing between the helmet, the medical troubles of the lead character's father, and the hodgepodge of Egyptian mythology

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Doctor Strange (2015) #1

Oct 6, 2015

All told, we're looking at a solid, if imperfect, post-Secret Wars debut.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Doctor Strange (2015) #2

Nov 5, 2015

No one else draws like Bachalo, and not many books look quite as good as Doctor Strange.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Doctor Strange (2015) #5

Feb 3, 2016

It might be some time before this run is remembered as fondly as Mark Waid's Daredevil or Matt Fraction's Hawkeye, but that's because Aaron's aspirations have always been so much bigger. Marvel's solo title have recently tried to remain a little bit insular, to provide heroes with smaller conflicts that they can handle on their own. But Aaron has always had a "go big or go home" mentality. When he wrote Wolverine and the X-Men, he made Krakoa the site of the school grounds. When he wrote The Mighty Thor, his big arc was called "Godbomb." With Doctor Strange, his plan is no different: tell a huge story that speaks to the heart of the characters involved. Aaron is lucky enough to have a collaborator that is suited for these particularly sensibilities and as the the "Last Days of Magic" approach, the writer looks to keep deliver a story that's right in line with his mighty Marvel tradition.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Doctor Who Vol. 3 #1

Oct 2, 2012

Doctor Who #1 is another solid entry in the storied Who franchise. While it may not hold immediate appeal for anyone wondering just what this Doctor guy is all about, it should be enough to at least pique some curiosity and send them diving backwards into glut of material from the past. Diggle remains true to the current status quo of the series, and fans will get to spend some more time with the Ponds.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
E Is For Extinction #1

Jun 24, 2015

E Is For Extinction is another one of the better Secret Wars tie-in books. It's faithful to it's source material without being slavishly devoted to it and the influence of the overarching event is present without being stifling. I'm very excited to see more from this creative team, and I'm eager to see how they continue to expand this concept. Some of the Secret Wars tie-ins have recalled other events in name only and they were worse for it. This book borrows its title from the first arc of one of the best runs on X-Men of all time. We can only hope that a strong debut issue signals a similarly strong outcome.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
E Is For Extinction #2

Jul 22, 2015

Don't get me wrong, I like E is for Extinction. It's refreshing to see a creative team do something weird but this issue loses the themes that were built up in #1. Without that focus to help ground the book, this issue turns into a trippy fight comic that lacks the context to really pack a punch. I even like that the final page reveal comes out of left field. This creative team is keeping us guessing and that's always good. I'm just hoping for the return of a more nuanced approach in #3, as well as a little more influence from Secret Wars.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
E Is For Extinction #3

Aug 27, 2015

This is one of the strongest books on the shelf this week and just goes to show that sometimes embracing the over-the-top, weird tendencies that a property has can make for good reading.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Edge of Spider-Verse #2

Sep 16, 2014

Edge of Spider-Verse #2 is not a perfect comic, but it doesn't need to be. It's stretching the tapestry of Spider-Man's legacy and broadening the definition of what it means to be a hero. To do that without ticking anyone off is a definite win for any creative team. But they are beholden to the parameters set out by the publisher and shoehorning their story into a small space doesn't serve the story well.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Edge of Spider-Verse #5

Oct 16, 2014

Spider-Verse has given us a ton of different looks, but maybe none so unique as Gerard Way and Jake Wyatt's.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Evil Empire #1

Mar 5, 2014

Evil Empire #1 ends with a groan-worthy revelation, and in that moment shows exactly how it's set apart from similar stories in the genre. It's a juvenile attempt at a political thriller that is bereft of any sophistication or nuance. It communicates in platitudes and leaves its characters flat. Getty is doing his job telling the story but its not enough to prop this one up. By the end of the book, its unclear how this issue relates to the larger concept. This is how empires are born? By rappers hanging out with politicians? Bemis has a lot of things happening to his characters but his characters are not making anything happen. When plot is moving forward for the sake of moving forward, there's a problem, and one that an editor probably should have caught.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Evil Empire #2

Apr 23, 2014

I've read good comics by Max Bemis before. It's clear that Evil Empire is his attempt to break out of his comfort zone, but it just isn't working. Uneven dialogue spouted by characters that have yet to be fully realized set against an increasingly unbelieveable political climate are making this more of an exhaustive melodrama than high stakes entertainment. It feels like there's an effort being made to say something important but if you don't care about who's saying it, then you'll never get your point across. whatever message Evil Empire is trying to get across is falling on deaf ears because the quality of its package isn't up to snuff.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Ex Sanguine #1

Oct 19, 2012

Josh Scott Emmons and Tim Seeley present a mash-up of the serial killer and vampire stories we know in ExSanguine and while Seeley's art shines, the script leaves something to be desired. The characters are hollow, for now, and they are set on an unclear path. That said, the book has the potential to go in a lot of different directions, anywhere from Zodiac-style drama to Kill Your Boyfriend levels of absurdity and that might be enough of a hook for some.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Extraordinary X-Men #1

Nov 4, 2015

The biggest knock against Lemire's work here is that it might hew too closely to what we've seen before from the X-Men. We're used to extinction plots. We're used to Jean Grey being called upon as a last hope. Hell, we've even seen a few different versions of that cliffhanger before. Lemire is definitely going to win some people over by staying in this lane, but familiarity can breed contempt. And the Terrigen Mists are clearly a pretty big concern for the X-Men, but one can't help but wonder if the sterility angle is really necessary considering plenty of non-mutants have birthed mutant children, so already the story logic is a headache. Ramos' strong work is coup for a book without much in the way of identity but they'll be in an even better position to usher in a new era of X-Men if Lemire can get a handle on the central conflict of this title.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Extraordinary X-Men Annual #1

Sep 22, 2016

This is a great little issue for completists and diehards, but there's nothing really essential here.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Fantastic Four (2014) #1

Feb 26, 2014

Fantastic Four #1 isn't a perfect comic, but it's a good enough relaunch for the team even if it doesn't achieve much in the way of characterization. Robinson has a good track record with big stories and big stakes. The sci-fi tilt that the FF have always had will surely be a fit for him stylistically. Leonard Kirk is already proving himself amongst the elite of Marvel's widescreen, action artists. As long as Robinson's scripts keep giving him exciting new places and things to draw, we're going to see a lot of range from him.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Fight Club 2 #1

May 28, 2015

Chuck Palahniuk returns to one of his greatest creations, and while tone of this sequel is definitely in line with the original, these characters have not evolved - and that stagnation holds back this book.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Flash (2011) #9

May 24, 2012

Manapul and Buccellato are clearly thinking about the broad strokes here, but I hope that in future issues we get a little bit more nuance and focus on character-building rather than world-building.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Flash (2011) #23.2

Sep 12, 2013

Francis Manapul and Brian Buccellato's Flash has been a joy to read. But their origin for an all-new Reverse-Flash leaves me wanting. It treads familiar supervillain origin ground but the dramatic tension is supposed to be elevated by the new Reverse-Flash's close proximity to Barry's regular life. It feels forced

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Flash (2011) #27

Jan 30, 2014

This is a grim Flash story because it needs to be and it's a nice change of pace from the more colorful Francis Manapul era.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Flash (2011) #28

Feb 27, 2014

Patrick Zircher and Matthew Hollingsworth are, once again, absolute powerhouses on the art side. They bring a darkness to the story that hangs heavy over the normally bright Central City and it perfectly suits the nature of this arc.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Flash (2011) #29

Mar 27, 2014

Buccellato's lackluster finale robs a good story of a worthwhile conclusion.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Flash (2011) #30

Apr 23, 2014

Venditti and Jensen's narrative approach props up solid, if unspectacular, artwork. It's a flip of the dynamic that existed before. Manapul and Buccellato's work was plagued with pacing problems, especially later in their run. Barry Allen might not be as strong as Superman or as cool as Batman but he's a hero through and through. It's good to have the writers remind us of that but it's clear that we're being set up for a fall. I'd be remiss to not mention the arrival of a long-awaited character to the New 52 but it's really too soon to tell what the writers are planning. But if the blend of characterization and big concepts that's on display here continues, I'm sure we won't be disappointed.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Flash (2011) #32

Jun 26, 2014

Brett Booth's tenuous grasp on anatomy doesn't do Robert Venditti and Van Jensen's story any favors.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Flash (2011) #42

Jul 23, 2015

This is a book that feels like it's going in reverse. Rob Venditti and Van Jensen's narrative lacks the excitement and stakes of previous Flash stories so they go back to the well.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Furious #1

Jan 29, 2014

Furious has some hurdles to overcome to break into the upper echelon of indie superhero books but they aren't insurmountable. There's a good foundation under some unfortunate art direction. The superhero as celebrity metaphor isn't new but it taken on a different kind of context as time has gone on. The 24-hour news cycle and the rapid growth of social media have changed the ways we think about our cultural icons. Glass is attempting to distill that are hopefully he can with stronger work from Santos.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Future Quest #1

May 19, 2016

This is a great start to DC's current foray into the world of Hanna-Barbera, and one that should leave fans hungry for more.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Ghost (2013) #1

Dec 17, 2013

DeConnick, Sebela and Sook pick up right where the last volume left off but add a last page twist that will surely define this iteration of Ghost. The dialogue does get a little over-expository at times (especially considering how succinctly the recap page can bring you up to speed) but not enough to affect the quality of this book. Consider this one another feather in the cap of Dark Horse's superhero lineup.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Glory #28

Jul 18, 2012

Glory is an interesting character. She exists as an antithesis to typical superhero ladies. This is no exercise in T&A. This book doesn't pander to the clich comic buying crowds by serving up cheesecake on a silver platter. It's about time, comics. It's about time. But all in all, crazy sci-fi, enough strong female characters to pass the Bechdel test a thousand times and intense, psychedelica-infused artwork; what's not to love? Glory is definitely flying under the radar but Joe Keatinge and company are creating something special that is both brutal and beautiful. It's brutiful. Yeah, let's go with that.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Glory #29

Oct 22, 2012

Glory is a great book for anyone looking for a little ugliness in their superhero comics. These characters aren't perfect and some of them aren't all that attractive. They're weird and conflicted but they're trying. It's easy to get caught up in the off-the-wall aliens and the less-than-normal proportions of our heroine but in the end, the first part of "Bloodshadow" is a sibling rivalry story on a grand scale that many of us can relate to.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
God Country #1

Jan 10, 2017

God Country is without a doubt one of the best books on the stands this week.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Gotham Academy #1

Oct 6, 2014

Gotham Academy is a step in the right direction for DC and for superhero comics in general but the creative team, specifically the writers, are going to have to give us more if they want us to keep coming back. So far, we've gotten a somewhat derivative story set-up with little in the way of direction or characterization coupled with mostly gorgeous artwork. It's not a terrible base to start from and the general comics buying public seems to agree. But a notoriously fickle audience could turn pretty quickly if the creators aren't able to deliver.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Gotham Academy #2

Nov 6, 2014

It's so hard not to like this book. The art is just that good. Karl Kerschl has created a world and characters that you can't help but want to get to know more and more intimately

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Gotham Academy #3

Dec 4, 2014

When this creative team finds their footing, they'll be taking an already very good book to the next level.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Gotham By Midnight #1

Nov 26, 2014

This is an efficacious start for this book. Fawkes puts all the major players in place. The hook is efficient and easy to understand. Templesmith's color work provides a few excellent moments that help improve a story that's similar to ones we've seen before. A supernatural police procedural is nothing new, but Fawkes and Templesmith are able to put their own little twists on it. Mark Doyle's continued reinvention of the Batman line is a bright spot in the DC publishing line and other editors would be smart to take note. Superheroes are incredibly flexible characters that can allow for almost limitless permutations of their concept. Gotham By Midnight is a good example of that now and it looks to only be getting better moving forward.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Grayson #1

Jul 9, 2014

Grayson is off to an excellent start. A strong narrative vision, couple with good character work, a refreshing change of scenery and a great visual style make it a clear cut winner and already one of DC’s better books. Hopefully, the creative team can really up the ante in the coming months but judging from the early goings, that should be a problem. Seeley and King have done a great job bouncing back from their issue of Nightwing and are poised to have even more success than that book did. Mikel Janin is only just beginning to show us what he can do and that’s a scary thought. Look out, All-New Marvel Now!, Grayson might be the breakout hit of the summer.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Green Arrow (2011) #32

Jun 9, 2014

Green Arrow #32 is a good place for new readers to jump on because it will feel instantly familiar (especially to fans of the TV show). Because Green Arrow isn’t held in the same regard as Batman or Superman, it gives the creators more room to tell different kinds of stories with him and take more chances with the visuals as well. To date, Lemire and Sorrentino haven’t been a letdown and while this issue isn’t up to the same standard as the last arc, it’s still a solid superhero story that has a lot of potential to wow its audience.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Green Arrow (2011) #41

Jun 4, 2015

The Emerald Archer has taken up residence in the Emerald City, and Benjamin Percy and Patrick Zircher serve up a appropriately grungy mystery. The book obviously borrows a lot of the tone of the Arrow TV show, but that really works for it.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Green Arrow (2011) #42

Jul 2, 2015

Patrick Zircher's art is still the main draw, but Benjamin Percy's concept is crumbling under its own weight.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Green Arrow (2016) #20

Apr 6, 2017

This issue wraps up the return of Roy Harper, but having to split time between present-day events and flashbacks hurts the flow of the book and the impact of the ending.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Green Lantern (2011) #28

Feb 6, 2014

Venditti doesn't do too much more than move the chains in the story but his character work between Walker and Hal is really strong, serving to reestablish the diffrent ways that some pieces of the emotional spectrum operate.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Green Lantern (2011) #41

Jun 4, 2015

The final page is ripped straight from Star Wars, Episode IV: A New Hope, but it sets the tone for this new era of Green Lantern. Hopefully, the execution will eventually match the potential here.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Green Lantern (2011) #42

Jul 2, 2015

Space scamp Hal Jordan is back at it again, but Robert Venditti's script is dull, save for one interesting action sequence.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Green Lantern Corps (2011) #29

Mar 13, 2014

Green Lantern Corps might be the only GL book doing the "space cop" concept any justice and it's one of the best looking cosmic book to come from either of the Big Two.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Green Lantern Corps (2011) #30

Apr 11, 2014

I'm not a fan of the dual artist approach to a book unless the artists' style work well together. Unfortunately, Scott Kolins and Chris Batista don't really mesh.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Green Lantern: The Lost Army #1

Jun 25, 2015

John Stewart's origins are revisited in Green Lantern: Lost Army, but I don't know if it's for the best. While the military overtures make for good narration, it's the same cliche-ridden stuff we've seen in tons of fiction that features veterans.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Guardians of the Galaxy & X-Men: The Black Vortex Omega #1

Apr 23, 2015

Early issues saw a pretty formulaic approach to this crossover, but Sam Humphries nails the landing for a satisfying conclusion that leaves our characters and the circumstances that surround them changed.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #11.NOW

Jan 30, 2014

Bendis is up to his old tricks (Mametian dialogue, a bit of overwriting, Skrulls) but he balances a large cast exceptionally well. He reintroduces characters in the context of the story without beating the reader over the head with exposition.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #12

Feb 27, 2014

Brian Michael Bendis takes "The Trial of Jean Grey" into full-on soap opera territory in this one which makes sense considering the X-Men's involvement but sometimes he overdoes.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #21

Nov 19, 2014

That all said, the opening chapter of "Planet of the Symbiotes" is still a bit of letdown. The art can only do so much to help what turns out to be a rare lame duck script from Brian Michael Bendis. Inevitably, this arc will get better if Bendis gives us more of what we seem to be promised by the title. Schiti's art will do a lot to help sell Bendis' sometimes tired dialogue but the moment these two creators really lock it in, readers will be in for a treat. Guardians of the Galaxy is usually near the top of my reading pile, but you wouldn't be missing much by skipping this installment.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #22

Dec 18, 2014

The story itself isn't really much of one, and the planet mentioned in the title is still nowhere to be seen. Here's hoping that Bendis picks up the pace next issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #23

Jan 22, 2015

While the "Planet of the Symbiotes" arc might feel a bit overlong, the conclusion is satisfying in that it gives context to the symbiotes' presence in the Marvel Universe and effectively explains their characterizations over the years.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Guardians of the Galaxy (2015) #12

Sep 22, 2016

This issue is like the Nilla wafer of comic books. It's light. It's airy. It's enjoyable enough. But by the time you're done, you're still left kind of empty.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Harbinger #1

Jun 6, 2012

This is an interesting debut. The potential is here for an exciting story but the groundwork necessary to get there drags. Dysart has a track record with books like Unknown Soldier and B.P.R.D., hopefully he's able to channel the higher concepts at work here into more compelling character work. Evans' work might just get better as the stakes are raised. Harbinger #1 could become the exciting and challenging title it once was but right now it's a little rough around the edges.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Hardcore #1

May 15, 2012

With Kirkman's popularity growing every day, it only makes sense that Top Cow would want to put out this unreleased issue. Hordes of Kirkmaniacs (and "Pilot Season" completists, I guess) will probably buy it. Mission accomplished. But as a standalone piece of work, this one was probably better left on the shelf.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Harley Quinn (2013) #2

Jan 24, 2014

Harley is a great character, but reducing her an inane plot and dumb jokes is an affront to her fans and her creator.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Harley Quinn (2016) #17

Apr 6, 2017

Palmiotti and Conner have her voice pretty locked down at this point, and fans wanting in on her latest adventures surely won't be disappointed.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Harley Quinn And Power Girl #1

Jun 18, 2015

Harley Quinn and Power Girl is a mess of a book that does a disservice to both the characters and creators involved.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Hawkeye (2016) #3

Feb 2, 2017

The stakes feel a little low, but they're telling a good story, and that's always got to be a team's first priority.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Hellboy and the B.P.R.D.: 1952 #1

Dec 3, 2014

This is a standard installment in the Hellboy universe. Mike Mignola gathers top-flight talent for his property, and the pieces fall into place. That said, this is a very introductory issue. Not much happens, but the exposition isn't so heavy-handed that you feel like you're just getting an information dump. It's paced well enough to keep readers enticed while still setting the stage for the rest of the story. It's a welcome reintroduction to this world and a reminder that Hellboy's still got it after all these years.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Homecoming #1

Aug 14, 2012

Sometimes a veteran presence doesn't always equal a good product, and even promising artwork isn't enough to save this one. Homecoming #1 has a good core concept that is, unfortunately, diluted by bad pacing, cookie cutter characters and overwrought narration.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Howard The Duck #1

Mar 11, 2015

Howard the Duck #1 might be the best superhero book on the stands this week and that's nothing to quack at. It's not concerned with crossovers or big events but even if it was, the creative team has created a unique lens to see those events through. Howard's a very lovable curmudgeon that is sure to worm his way into the hearts of even the most hardened Marvel fan and it's his view of the Marvel Universe that really informs the book. Combined with Quinones' art and Zdarsky playful riffs on fan favorite characters (his work with Spidey is particularly funny), Howard the Duck stands to be a breakout hit.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Howard The Duck #2

Apr 9, 2015

The follow-up to Chip Zdarsky and Joe Quinones' debut isn't as laugh-out-loud funny as the first issue, but it still stands up as one of the best examples of humor in capes comics today.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Hulk (2014) #5

Aug 14, 2014

Mark Bagley plays to all his strengths, never really venturing outside the pocket to experiment with new methods of expression or storytelling. But for a script that leans a little heavy on exposition to set the stage, that works here.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Hulk (2016) #2

Feb 6, 2017

This may not be the story that you're looking for if you're a Hulk fan. But then again, Hulk #2 isn't really a story for traditional Hulk fans. Tamaki and her art team are trying to tell a story about coping with reality. This might be an imaginary story but the weight of the proceedings is very real. Jen Walters is coping with loss in the same ways that the creators themselves and likely the readers of this book do as well. Hulk comics don't usually have a reputation for being all that cerebral, but this creative team saw that as a challenge. They're finding out what the Hulk means in 2017, and it's a captivating new exploration.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Infamous Iron Man #1

Oct 19, 2016

Bendis follows through on his premise, but he doesn’t do it with the flair that the character of Doctor Doom is really known for. On some level, this feels like a book without a solid identity. That kind of works since Doom is exploring his own role in the post-Secret Wars Marvel Universe but it might fail to hook many readers. The book does well to serve its central conceit but to the detriment of drumming up any real interest in the book. If you like the creators or the characters, you’ll likely have a good time, but the hook is weak for potential readers on the fence.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Infinite Vacation #4

Mar 21, 2012

Infinite Vacation is an absolute trip. It's one that I hope will provide a memorable conclusion as the series winds down but this issue has been the best so far in terms of artwork. Spencer's ideas might be a little all over the place and his main character might be a little weak but the world as a whole is compelling. Coupled with Ward's art, there is no reason not to at least flip through this one.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Infinity #5

Oct 31, 2013

Infinity has been an intense story both in planning and execution and Opena's work echoes Hickman's prose perfectly. There are still a lot of questions to be answered as the event winds down but the conclusion is sure to be as grandiose as the rest.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Infinity Man And The Forever People #1

Jun 11, 2014

It's great to see more of the "Fourth World" getting some play. But you'd be better served to read the originals. DiDio and Giffen clearly have a heart for the material, but they aren't doing anything exciting here or laying enough of a groundwork for new readers to really latch onto these characters. It's not enough to put characters in front of a reader and ride on historical significance alone. There's an opportunity for a great story somewhere in this book because of the pedigree of the characters and their original creator but DiDio and Giffen have yet to tap into it.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Inhumans Prime #1

Mar 29, 2017

Inhumans Prime #1 is a very, very soft reset for the Inhumans line. It puts some familiar pieces in slightly unfamiliar circumstances and it puts forward the idea that without the Terrigen mists, this may be the last generation of Inhumans. They’re now a race that faces imminent extinction, at least as far as having superpowers goes. That’s not unlike the X-Men’s status quo post-M-Day. It remains to be seen if a quality story can be built on this foundation, but at least Marvel has acknowledged that they need to make the Inhumans somewhat more unique. The less-is-more approach should help them refocus. As for this issue, it’s does a mediocre job of bridging the gaps because more of these plot points will be repeated in individual titles moving forward.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Invincible Iron Man (2015) #2

Oct 21, 2015

Invincible Iron Man seems to be biding time until Secret Wars to end so that it can really start revving up the plot. But if that's the case, maybe it wasn't the right time to reveal your new flagship title. I can't believe the plot is moving this slowly only two issues in, but at least the book is nice to look at. Bendis is not utilizing Marquez to the fullest extent, but they have a history, so I'm sure that there will be some big moments coming. Unfortunately, you won't find them here, and there's no reason to check in on an issue that can be summarized in half a sentence on the next recap page.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
It Girl and The Atomics #1

Aug 8, 2012

It Girl and the Atomics is by no means a bad comic. It's just one that takes a bit too long to get going. It treads water because of a lack of humor and originality until the final scene. But the art is beautiful. Norton knows his way around Snap City and Rich is lucky to have such a talented collaborator.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
IvX #3

Jan 25, 2017

We're halfway through this event and if you're feeling a bit nonplussed, you're not alone. This reviewer may be letting the outside factors of Marvel Entertainment's reality affect their enjoyment of the book, but it's hard not to consider when it's hard-earned cash that plunked down month after month. Clearly, no one is totally trying to phone it in - there are talented creators working on this title - but there's a level of complacence. Nothing is really going to change. While that feeling is present in all superhero comics, the arcs of these properties are too well-known (the recent "ResurreXion" announcements didn't help) to feel the gravity of this plot.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Jean Grey #1

May 4, 2017

Hopeless is clearly moving the story into bigger territory and that should allow Ibanez to let loose. For this story, the artist is a fit because he's able to faithfully render a teenaged character, her surroundings and the action that the script calls for. That's a good start.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Justice League Dark #6

Feb 23, 2012

I understand that they are not totally in reality but sometimes I need a little more than just a two color watercolor background. Justice League Dark heads into a vampire crossover with I, Vampire next but this issue does little to sell me on the future of the book. I'll be checking out until Animal Man scribe Jeff Lemire takes over with issue #9.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Justice League of America (2017) #1

Feb 22, 2017

There's not as much style or substance here as in some of Orlando's work but he's laying a foundation for what could be a really unique and exciting Justice League as it progresses.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Justice League of America (2017) #3

Mar 30, 2017

Justice League of America is slowly carving out its niche, but it needs to improve its pacing and stop spinning its wheels.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Justice League of America: Rebirth #1

Feb 8, 2017

Coupled with a boring story, this book just looks and feels like any old superhero comic book. That approach might work for a more established cast of characters, but the creators here do their book a disservice but not having it stand out more.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Justice League of America: The Ray Rebirth #1

Jan 18, 2017

The Ray is a solid introduction for a character that fills a need for a DC line looking to keep diversifying.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Justice League vs. Suicide Squad #1

Dec 21, 2016

Justice League vs. Suicide Squad is a fun exercise in pitting two ideological opposites against each other in a way that makes more sense than something like Avengers vs. X-Men. The rub is that Williamson hasn’t introduced a real conflict beyond the dichotomies already established by the very existence of these characters. There’s potential for his ending to inject some more life into the title, but for right now, it’s a pretty standard heroes-versus-villains book.

View Issue       View Full Review
1.0
Justice League: Darkseid War: Superman #1

Nov 5, 2015

Francis Manapul is a known commodity to many fans for his effusive, inventive art style, but none of that skill translates to his writing.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Kaptara #1

Apr 21, 2015

Zdarsky has set a pretty high bar for himself, and Kaptara's biggest weakness is only that it's not as strong as some of his other work. That's what make this a merely solid debut, despite stellar art from McLeod, rather than a truly spectacular one. The main character, Keith, has a lot of potential as the creative team continues to flesh him out. It's refreshing to see creators that are willing to try someone other than a straight, white character at the center of their narrative, but that may not be enough for readers that don't really get to know Keith very well in this issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Karnak #1

Oct 22, 2015

Anytime we're treated to more work from Warren Ellis in the Marvel Universe, there's reason for celebration. Karnak sees the writer continue to deliver work that is conceptually strong but this one might leave a little bit to be desired in terms of execution.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Karnak #2

Feb 24, 2016

Karnak is fine as it currently stands, but I fear that if it keeps going on like this much longer, it'll be just another in a long line of inconsistent attempts to make the royal Inhuman Family more relevant and interesting. There should be a place in the Marvel Universe for a character like Karnak. He's almost completely unique. But keeping him so far outside of the action doesn't benefit him. It's hard to understand a character's place in a world that they never interact with. I'm not saying that Karnak needs to be teaming up with the Avengers every other issue, but it would be nice for Ellis to define him within the world that we know he inhabits rather outside of it.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Kick-Ass 2 #7

Mar 26, 2012

While Kick-Ass had a tongue-in-cheek charm to it, Kick-Ass 2 reads like nothing more than half-baked storyboards for the next film, filled with "cool visuals" and "edgy material" but little in the way of substance.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Klarion #1

Oct 8, 2014

Klarion comes out of the gates brimming with potential because of it's gorgeous art and the start of a focused direction for the character. As Nocenti and McCarthy open up Klarion's world to the rest of the DC Universe, we'll see how well they're able to balance a book that less insular without losing sight of their main character. The threat is a bit amorphous right now, but the concept is strong enough to give that a pass for now. DC might have found their endearing trickster, and it looks like it's going to be fun seeing what this creative team can conjure up next.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Klarion #2

Nov 13, 2014

A promising debut is squandered in Issue #2 of Klarion. Trevor McCarthy's art goes from ambitious to incredibly messy.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Klarion #3

Dec 11, 2014

Klarion looked promising upon its debut but the central concept will probably leave most fans non-committal.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Larfleeze #7

Jan 30, 2014

Green Lantern stories thrive on themes of willpower and the struggle of good versus evil. Larfleeze doesn't have to concern itself with all that. Avarice becomes an opening to insert humor into the GL universe but J.M. DeMatteis and Keith Giffen don't attempt to write outside of Larfleeze's main motivation of greed, after awhile, it gets tiresome

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Legendary Star-Lord #1

Jul 7, 2014

This book might not be as "legendary" as the its name suggests but you could do a lot worse for your money on the comic stands than this fun, if somewhat hollow, debut.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Lets Play God #1

Oct 25, 2012

Let's Play God #1 is a horror mystery comic that touts itself as "Siouxsie and the Banshees meets Halloween" but comes off more like Evanescence in one of those awful Netflix horror movies that you come across when there is absolutely nothing left in the queue.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Loki: Agent of Asgard #1

Feb 5, 2014

Any character with Loki's popularity is going to be given at least a few issues to prove themselves. Ewing's going to get enough rope to hang himself and provided he can do something new with the character, this book could stick around. Lee Garbett is a fine fit for the God of Mischief but he'll also need to step up his game to keep this one from getting stale. For now, Loki: Agent of Asgard is solid offering by creators who have a game plan. It just seems like their game plan isn't all that inspired.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Longshot Saves the Marvel Universe #1

Nov 7, 2013

Longshot is a goofy character. He's got a goofy new haircut. This is a goofy comic. And that's why it worked for me.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Longshot Saves the Marvel Universe #2

Nov 21, 2013

After an inspiring start to this mini-series, Longshot Saves the Marvel Universe #2 goes off the rails in terms of pacing and effectiveness.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Longshot Saves the Marvel Universe #3

Dec 5, 2013

Longshot returns to the first issue's former glory by basically just throwing everything at the wall.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Lost Vegas #1

Mar 5, 2013

Lost Vegas proves that McCann and Lee have a lot more up their sleeves than all-ages allegories. The fresh setting for this story is sure to be a hook for many readers but the mash-up of influences could overwhelm the story if they're followed too closely. If their Eisner proved anything, it's that this creative duo doesn't need to borrow to create a good story.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Lost Vegas #2

Apr 23, 2013

This issue drags a bit but there are some interesting moments. It will probably be the kind of issue that reads way better in trade paperback format because you'll immediately be able to get into the action that issues three and four are sure to offer. The art is solid. The storytelling is happening but the pacing is a letdown after an introductory issue that moved at a much quicker and exciting clip.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Low #1

Jul 30, 2014

Low has promise but it hasn't been fully realized yet. Considering the larger than average size of this issue, it's unfortunate that we don't get a little more here. Remender has talked about how this book is a shift from his normal status quo, but so far the futility and negativity that exemplifies his past work is still on display - it's just been presented differently. Whereas past works have featured pessimistic protagonists, this book's pessimism is in its world. And maybe that's why we see such a focus placed on the world in this first issue. It's Creative Writing 101: "Write what you know." It'll be interesting to see how Remender cuts through that safety net with Stel, the proclaimed eternal optimist, in Issue #2, but this debut only hints at its potential.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Luke Cage (2017) #1

May 18, 2017

Walker's comfort level with the character is clear - there's no learning curve. This is the Luke Cage that readers know and love right from the jump.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Lunita #1

Jan 30, 2013

Xavier Morell's work is exactly in the paranormal crime genre defined by The X-Files and Hellboy. The two leads, Lunita and Ms. Fillion, are likable enough. The plot introduces a drug ring surrounding mermaid tears but it never really gets going. The art is what keep this book from really succeeding, though.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Marvel Knights Spider-Man #5

Feb 6, 2014

This book has lost a lot of steam since the early issues. As Matt Kindt's plot has gotten more convoluted, Marco Rudy's art has only gotten crazier.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Marvel Knights X-Men #1

Nov 14, 2013

It's unfortunate because the Marvel Knights imprint has always taken characters further than their regular stories would allow them. You won't see Spider-Man tripping out of his mind in any 616 book. Marvel Knights: X-Men doesn't go there and while the artwork is strong, a blend of Chris Samnee's simplicity with Jeff Lemire's off-kilter darkness, it's not enough to save this one.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Masks #1

Nov 27, 2012

With seven more issues to go, it'll be interesting to see what Roberson and company are able to do. The length of the mini could allow Roberson to more deeply examine each individual character and the ways in which they relate to and differ from each other. For now, Masks is a pretty typical comic book with outstanding artwork that might be fun for new fans looking for something different.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Masks and Mobsters #1

Jul 25, 2012

Masks and Mobsters exists at an interesting crossroads of both traditional superhero and traditional crime noir stories. The first issue is high-octane action, constantly reinventing itself with Williamson's acute sense for dramatic page turns and Henderson's knack for big moments. This is another strong entry in the Monkeybrain catalogue that seems as though it will only get stronger with time.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Master of Kung Fu #1

May 20, 2015

Master of Kung Fu is a pleasant surprise. It's not a particularly weighty book but it is a fun, quick read that sets up the next chapter well and actually makes you excited to see more from a fringe character. That's a best case scenario for an event tie-in, if I've ever read one. Blackman and Talajic's reinvention of Shang-Chi might not be the most original book you pick up this week but you'd be hard pressed to find another title with such tight craftsmanship.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Mega Man #16

Aug 9, 2012

Jonathan Hill delivers the best art that we've seen on this book so far. A flashback page featuring the leader of the Emerald Spear and his connections to previous arcs reveals his motivations with a beautifully laid out page that oozes emotion. Plus, longtime Mega-fans finally get a good look at a fan-favorite character. All-ages comics are rarely ever better than this.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Mega Man #22

Feb 12, 2013

Mega Man is a book that's expectations were definitely buoyed by nostalgia but Flynn and co. have expanded the scope of their storytelling and created a comic that's a delight to read. By not overly relying on the boss battle formula of the Mega Man games, they've been able to challenge readers while still having fun in an age-appropriate way.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Midnighter (2015) #1

Jun 4, 2015

This isn't a bad start, but it's not a particularly inspiring one, either.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Midnighter (2015) #2

Jul 2, 2015

Overall, this is an improvement on the debut that reveals the heart that was missing previously.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Mighty Avengers (2013) #8

Mar 17, 2014

Mighty Avengers didn't inspire much confidence when it was announced, but almost a year later, it's a book thats right in line with Marvel's plan of telling quality stories with a broad range of characters. In a superhero landscape where minority characters are only trotted out to show that they'll fail, it's refreshing to see the existence of a book that doesn't attempt to pander to anyone. Ewing and Schiti are doing an excellent job that's, unfortunately, gone under the radar. Hopefully, the presence of a larger threat can up the profile of this book before it gets cancelled and is wrongfully used as evidence of why publishers won't publish comics with more diverse lineups.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Mind MGMT #1

May 22, 2012

In broad strokes, Mind MGMT is something to be excited about. It has a huge concept and a lot of potential. It's held back by a boring main character, but the world of story surrounding her is definitely intriguing. The mark of a good mystery that you want to keep reading despite its flaws. Mind MGMT is definitely rough around the edges but should pique anyone's curiosity to much to pass up.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Mind the Gap #1

May 2, 2012

Mind the Gap #1 is an excellent debut of what's sure to be an incredible series. McCann is a master of pacing and left-hand page reveals that are sure to keep readers guessing. The art team of Esquejo and Oback is perfectly in sync with eac other and the vision that's been laid out for this book. The mystery at hand is compelling in ways that Lost was and Morning Glories is. This is a "whodunit" done right.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Monsters Unleashed #2

Feb 1, 2017

Monsters Unleashed doesn't live up to its potential so far because it can't even live up to the Pacific Rim-style inanity of its conceit. It's hard to get readers invested in a concept when you fail to execute the most basic part of that concept well. Marvel did Cullen Bunn and themselves a disservice by choosing to switch artists from issue to issue. Rather than create something cohesive, the script almost seems to be fighting with the art. There's no fluidity. There's no grace. The end of the book is promising but even the most optimistic readers are going to have trouble finding something to love here.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Morbius: The Living Vampire #1

Jan 2, 2013

Now, of course, this is only a first issue. Things can change quickly. By issue #2, maybe the creative team will have worked out some of the problems that plague this issue. But burying the potential hook that this series/character has and pedestrian artwork really start this one off on the wrong foot. Even if Morbius survives his current predicament, this book might not make it to 2014.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
MPH #1

May 21, 2014

MPH is not as strong as other Millarworld titles but fans of his work will probably be on board. The “superpowers as designer drugs” concept is not a wholly original one, and that’s compounded by lackluster characterization and plot development. But it still has the potential to be a very powerful starting point. Millar is onto something with his early depictions of super-speed. We’ll just have to see if the rest of his story can catch up to that.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Ms. Marvel (2014) #14

Apr 16, 2015

Ms. Marvel is more than deserving of a spot on your pull list every month.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Negative Space #1

Jul 7, 2015

Negative Space is another great comic book from a couple of creators who should soon be household names. It's a combination of a big concept relating to a smaller idea and strong execution that makes this one hold up. Lindsay and Gieni are a great team with strengths that definitely complement each other. It feels a little bit like this will read better as whole work, not broken down into individual issues but this is a strong start.

View Issue       View Full Review
1.0
Never Ending #1

Nov 26, 2013

Dark Horse has had a few noteworthy superhero outings lately but Never Ending isn't one. Its core concept is weak because we've been down this road before. We've had our heroes face these problems before. Knave and Kirkbride don't bring anything new or, at the very least interesting, to the table. They're working in analogs without delivering on the nuance that might make us care about characters that we don't already know. It's fitting that Baxter's superhero name is "Chuck," because this book feels like just another disposable, forgettable entry in the superhero genre.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Never Ending #2

Dec 19, 2013

Perhaps more than the writing, the art holds this book back. Robert Love's work is definitely reminiscent of Erik Larsen's but Love's awkward foreshortening, dull backgrounds and inconsistent characters make this one hard to get through.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
New Avengers (2013) #24

Sep 24, 2014

If the Illuminati existed as a riff on heroes living long enough to see themselves become the villain, the Cabal must almost be the other way around. The only problem is that while this group of supervillains is saving the universe, they're also doing a lot of very bad things. Those expecting an exciting face-off between Namor and Doom will be sorely disappointed. The art team is one of great talent but they don't really get to let loose here (the only exception being an incredible final page splash). Hickman's reputation as a master planner means that we'll probably look back on this issue a couple of months from now and realize all the clues that he had left for us. But as it stands, this is just another issue that moves the plot forward and introduces a new layer to the story.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
New Suicide Squad Annual #1

Oct 1, 2015

This is a solid story for Suicide Squad fans but there might not be much for anyone else.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
New Superman #1

Jul 13, 2016

DC probably wants (and maybe even needs) New Super-Man to be something of a hit. Marvel has seen a lot of success with giving readers a diverse set of heroes taking on mantles with some significance to the larger Marvel Universe and DC wants a piece of the pie. But this books feels so forced. By the time we get to the final pages, we haven't learned very much about Kong and we've already had two new heroes introduced. As far as origin stories go, this one fails to be captivating on either a narrative or artistic level. In theory, New Super-Man is the kind of book we need more of right now, but this outing isn't the one we deserve.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
New Warriors (2014) #1

Feb 19, 2014

The New Warriors title alone will cash in on a lot of nostalgia but not much else. Marcus To fans will be pleased but readers hoping for a team book with heart will be sorely disappointed. It's hard to have a team book without a team in place and Yost's disjointed approach just isn't gelling. Coming off a relative hit with Scarlet Spider, I'm this book will get a real chance to sink or swim but right now it looks like it's taking water.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Nick Fury (2017) #1

Apr 21, 2017

It's a really quick read, with Robinson getting the hell out of ACO's way and letting the artist rock through multiple double page spreads.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Nightwing (2011) #28

Feb 12, 2014

Nightwing #28 might not be remembered in the grand scheme of things as Forever Evil has set Nightwing's future on an entirely different path, but Higgins and Dauterman are giving us a grand ending. It's not big in terms the scope of the story or the villains involved, but its huge on heart and character moments. That's how Nightwing is different from Batman. That's where Dick Grayson is different from Bruce Wayne. And hopefully, we're in line for more stories of this ilk from the character some time in the future.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Nightwing (2011) #30

May 29, 2014

Entirely too long and incredibly self-important, the conclusion to Nightwing is one that nobody needed.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Nightwing (2016) #17

Mar 16, 2017

Overall, it's a good book for Nightwing fans and fans of the Damian/Dick relationship, but others might not get as much out of it.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Nonplayer #2

Jun 2, 2015

Nonplayer #2 isn't as exciting as it's debut but its existence means that we'll soon see more of this world. This issue lacks a real anchor character to help guide us through but with the context of the debut, it isn't that hard to put together. Simpson is playing with a lot of themes and ideas that hopefully won't weigh down the narrative but instead enrich and enhance the reading experience as it continues. For now, we'll wait with with bated breath for #3.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Origin II #2

Jan 27, 2014

Considering Marvel's recent rededication to OGNs, I'm somewhat surprised they didn't go that route with Origin II. This issue sets up the rest of the series without telling us anything new about the character. It doesn't have the same wow factor that issue one did with the fight between Wolverine and the polar bear. It's not that this is a bad comic but in the course of a five-issue miniseries, this might be the one you mostly forget.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Original Sin #1

May 8, 2014

The next great Marvel event? It's probably too soon to tell, but this definitely isn't a bad start.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Original Sin #2

May 21, 2014

Original Sin has six more issue to really come around but it seems like Aaron is going to have trouble balancing each of his different task forces. He’s especially having a hard time finding the different voices on each squad, a problem he didn’t have as much in issue one because he could rely on Thor, Captain America and Wolverine, characters that he’s fairly familiar with. Deodato’s art will look a lot better the more the story expands into space but he need to ease off the pedal with his heavy inking during daytime scenes. I didn’t think this event would start spinning its wheels so quickly, but here we are.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Original Sin #4

Jun 18, 2014

So far in Original Sin, we’ve learned that the Watcher is dead, been reintroduced to a Z-list villain in The Orb and had a plot point in issue three become nothing more than a red herring. As the book approaches its second half, the plot is leaving a lot to be desired. This event is built on fear, secrets and paranoia but that’s nothing new. Fear Itself had similar themes and left most readers wanting because of it’s inconsistent execution and disappointing conclusion. If Marvel insists on going back to the well by featuring these themes, they owe it to their readers to serve up something that ruminates more on these ideas rather than just sending their characters on a wild goose chase that ultimately teaches them and the reader nothing.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Original Sin #5

Jul 1, 2014

This is an improvement from the last issue, but it's not as strong as the opening was. A flashback issue to kick off the second half of this event is a bit unconventional, but it mostly works here. We're finally making some headway on answering the murder mystery that is central to the story and we're gaining insight on a character that we thought we were pretty familiar with. Deodato robs the books of a some clarity with his layouts, but hopefully he can right the ship next issue. Across the tie-ins and spin-offs, there are a lot of changes happening in the Marvel Universe and even if they don't seem to be important just yet, they'll have to come to a head. Original Sin has three more issues to solidify how it will be remembered. Here's hoping a satisfying conclusion is just around the corner.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Original Sin #7

Aug 13, 2014

There’s only one issue left in this event and there are still so many questions and so few answers. These are not only questions about whatever shred of a plot might be left, but also about the validity of event books in general. Obviously, they’re meant to help introduce change in a world that can be fairly inflexible sometimes. It’s much easier than to introduce new publishing initiatives, but readers will grow frustrated with a main title that doesn’t deliver a satifying story. If most of the changes are introduced in tie-in books around the Marvel Universe, might the line be better served with crossovers that didn’t feature a main narrative book? Maybe those questions are all we can take out of Original Sin. As it stands, this book is every bit as disappointing now as it was promising at the start of the series, and that’s a shame.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Original Sin #8

Sep 3, 2014

Events need to be “go big or go home” affairs. Readers are plunking down extra cash on top of their normal pull lists and they want to be treated so something special. With Marvel’s (and to a lesser extent DC’s) insistence on inundating the market with event books, we’ve been left with a significant dip in their quality, effectiveness and lasting consequences. You can’t give a story stakes when your next event has already been announced. You can’t give characters meaningful roles when we already know their status quo in their own title. Aaron and Deodato might have had no shot at creating something coherent and entertaining. The realities of the current comic book marketplace were stacked against them from the start. Maybe publishers need to rethink how they do event comics. But it’s an ouroboros. So let’s just hope that AXIS avoids the pitfalls of Original Sin.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Original Sin: Hulk vs. Iron Man #1

Jun 30, 2014

Overall, Waid, Gillen and company create a justifiable entry into Original Sin. Fans might feel that the events of this book throw too much of Marvel continuity into flux but it's hard to argue with the craft at work here. Waid has consistently prove that he writes some of the best scripts in the business and he's able to make a potentially divisive decision at least a palatable one. Bagley and the rest of the art team are definitely in sync and despite a couple of minor missteps, pull together a consistent look. This isn't a world-changing issue that you'll want to read again and again, but it is a solid entry in an otherwise scattered event.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Paknadel & Trakhanov's Turncoat #3

May 19, 2016

Overall, this is a hidden gem in BOOM!'s publishing line that deserves more attention.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Paper Girls #1

Oct 7, 2015

The look of Paper Girls will draw you in. The familiar feel of the story will pique keep you turning the pages but the characters will get you hooked. Paper Girls is a book that's indebted to what has come before it but arguably, you can say that about all of BKV's best work. He's a master of remixing stories that we take for granted as a known commodity. Time will tell if this book blows up to be a big a phenomenon as Saga or Y: The Last Man, but it certainly has the DNA to make people pay attention.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Phonogram: The Immaterial Girl #2

Sep 10, 2015

Despite some exciting moments, this book is a bit of a slow burn but if you're paying attention, it's an incredibly rewarding one.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Phonogram: The Immaterial Girl #3

Oct 13, 2015

The longer and longer this creative team works together, the more their brilliance crystallizes. It's amazing to see a team work this in sync with each other. This volume of Phonogram is bar far the weirdest and most ambitious yet and the whole team is up to the challenge. There's a lot about this book that might turn people off. It's joyfully weird and unapologetically silly sometimes. And for the people that doesn't work for, I'll point you to the back-up story in which David gets a girl to leave him alone by unabashedly enjoying something he loves (in this case, My Chemical Romance). Gillen and company aren't going to change. They're exploring the reasons that we are the way we are and doing it the only way they know how - with no guilt or shame about how much of the stuff they love they can cram into a comic book.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Plutona #1

Sep 1, 2015

I want Plutona to surprise me in #2, and I think it will. Lemire, Lenox and Bellaire have put a lot of really good pieces in place, even if they are a little bit familiar. The key will be in turning readers' expectations on their head in subsequent issues. For a five-issue miniseries, this is paced about as well as I could have hoped, I'm just hoping that there's more to the characters than what we've seen here. For now, we've got a fairly by-the-numbers set-up with a chance to deliver big.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Poison Ivy: Cycle of Life and Death #1

Jan 20, 2016

I kind of hope the ending is a red herring. Chu can obviously understands the character, but this issue reads like she didn't have a surefire home run for a plot. Considering Ivy's stature as a B-list Batman rogue, it's going to take a lot more than half-baked murder mystery to get reader to buy in. Mann's art is aesthetically pleasing but he doesn't really push the envelope and he's going to need to if Chu's plot doesn't improve. I like the idea of giving a character like Poison Ivy a chance to be in a spotlight but creators have to remember that it also puts them under a microscope. Right now, this title isn't holding up under scrutiny.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Polarity #1

Apr 3, 2013

Polarity looks to be a breakout hit for Boom! and not just because of the background of its writer. While Bemis brings a very dedicated fanbase, he's at least created something here that doesn't require any previous knowledge of his work to get into. Coupled with excellent artwork of Coelho and Sobreiro, this issues sets to the stage for what is sure to be an entertaining miniseries that fans of Infinite Vacation and Luther Strode would definitely be into.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
POP #1

Aug 26, 2014

Music and comics go together quite well, and they’ve been fairly popular in recent times. Pires and Copland’s Pop has some of the sci-fi DNA of David Lapham’s Young Liars and they almost certainly have a stronger concept than that book did, but they aren’t able to put it all together on the page. The talent is there, though. If the team can fix the pacing issue, Copland and Toms should be able to carry the broad strokes characterization that Pires has given us thus far. There’s a good story brewing here. Hopefully, it doesn’t take too long to bubble to the surface.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Prez #1

Jun 18, 2015

A book like this is definitely a risk for a publisher that makes its money on capes and cowls, but it's exciting to see DC truly expanding their publishing line in a way that their competitors haven't.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Prez #3

Aug 27, 2015

Prez continues to be a pitch-perfect send up of the American political system.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Prophet #24

Apr 17, 2012

Prophet is not for everyone. This is a far cry from what people will think of when they think about the words" Rob Liefeld's Extreme Studios" but that's what so perfect about it. The willingness to take a chance and allow this kind of work to sit on the same shelves that are inundated with spandex and cheesecake and zombies each week should be applauded. This book is for the kinds of people that don't want the main premise explained succinctly in the title of the book. It's for the kinds of people that would rather read than watch TV. It's for anyone that believes that comics can be good art and that good art should make you think.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Prophet #26

Jul 2, 2012

There's no denying that Prophet is one of the best books out right now. Graham's vision (and especially the last few pages in this issue) would make Jack Kirby a very happy man. "Bigger is better" and "less is more" might seem like two opposing mantras but here they work swimmingly.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Punisher (2016) #1

May 3, 2016

Women are never applauded for writing male characters well. They aren't applauded for writing female characters well, either. And that's because that's what they were hired for, right? Well, this is one way to make a statement. Good writers just write well. They can write a variety of characters or different genders and backgrounds and sexual orientations. Becky Cloonan is a good writer and she proved it way before being offered the Punisher gig. This book is just a reminder that when you put a team of good creators together, you'll likely get a favorable outcome. Is there room for improvement? Sure. This is a fairly by-the-numbers plot for Frank Castle. Drug busts aren't exactly reinventing the wheel for the character. But it's the execution that is important here. This issue is the assurance to fans that says, "Hey, we know what you want. Stop worrying and let us do our jobs."

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Punks: The Comic #1

Oct 7, 2014

The beauty of Punks is that it doesn't take itself seriously. There's a story called "Depression" with a very quick reference to Morrissey, because of course there is. At one point, Abraham Lincoln straight-up tells the reader that the next story will be split in two just so that they have to buy the second issue, a hilarious nod to the way comics are traditionally formatted - and this one is clearly anything but. Image Comics has always been standing in front of the rest of the comic book industry shouting "Let creators do what they want and it'll work out." Punks is an obvious testament to that.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Quake: S.H.I.E.L.D. 50th Anniversary #1

Sep 9, 2015

Quake #1 is a great reintroduction to a character that many readers may not be familiar with. Rosenberg and Kindlon display a deft understanding of Daisy Johnson and her role in the Marvel U without leaning heavily on the Avengers to give her importance. They also remain true to their roots, writing a book that features the same outsider themes of their previous work. Daniel Warren Johnson and Jason Keith's contributions definitely help enhance the script, providing just enough of an edge balanced out with strong visual storytelling. As for Daisy Johnson, the writers have left her in a good spot. Maybe this is a sign of things to come for Daisy Johnson/Quake/Agent Skye (her TV counterpart), or maybe it's not. Either way, this issue serves as a decent primer for the character and sheds some light on an important part of her history.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Red Hood / Arsenal #1

Jun 15, 2015

Removing Starfire from the Outlaws equation seemed like a move that could work. (After all, the book wasn't great with her in it - could it get worse?) But Lobdell fails to do anything new with the characters that remain. That's the problem with the book. It's not going to be the worst book on the stands, but it doesn't even feel like it wants to be the best. I'd rather see creators try and fail to execute big ideas than deliver something so textbookly mediocre. That's not to say that this book can't get better, but it feels like this title has a low ceiling - and worse, that the creators are okay with that.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Red Lanterns #27

Jan 30, 2014

Despite its cover, Red Lanterns #27 isn't quite the fight comic you might expect. Charles Soule serves up a good mix of humor and intrigue as Guy Gardner takes part of his team to Earth

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Red Lanterns #28

Feb 6, 2014

Charles Soule has established a great voice for Guy Gardner and his team. He handles a very large cast with aplomb in this one before eventually getting down to the Supergirl portion of the story.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Red Lanterns #29

Mar 26, 2014

The plot crawls in this one but Soule keeps it interesting because the conversation is weighty - a Kryptonian with a red power ring is an extinction-level threat. Alessandro Vitti does his part, too. While his Superman is definitely too bulky, his Red Lanterns are on point.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Red Lanterns #30

Apr 25, 2014

Charles Soule is sticking with a formula that's worked so far in Red Lanterns. But this issue is so bogged down with character development that the dialogue actually crowds the panels.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Red Lanterns #31

May 29, 2014

Guy Gardner and his squad don't really get the face-off against Atrocitus that we were hoping for, but Charles Soule and Alessandro Vitti are doing an excellent job expanding the Red Lantern mythology.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Red Lanterns #32

Jun 26, 2014

Jim Calafiore excels with the non-human characters but completely misses the boat when trying to depict the emotions at play in Guy and Kara's mentor/mentee relationship. On the whole, he delivers as many great panels as the story allows, but the story itself is lacking.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Red Lanterns #34

Aug 28, 2014

Red Lanterns continues to be an underappreciated gem that's been flying under the radar for too long.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Red Lanterns #35

Oct 23, 2014

Gardner's beating himself up and without a strong cast for him to bounce off of, there's little joy in reading this comic. Obviously, mourning the death of your team/family is not supposed to be a joyous affair, but this one is hampered by the weight of the emotions at play trying to balance with being shoved into a crossover.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Red Lanterns: Futures End #1

Sep 25, 2014

This one is a bit shmaltzy but Charles Soule does introduce a few cool ideas.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Red Wolf #1

Dec 1, 2015

Red Wolf #1 is no way to quell those that said this book and this creative team wouldn't work. Hopefully, it's not an instance that allows Marvel to say, "Well, we tried and you didn't like it," because it's clear that they didn't really put their best foot forward. By the end, there's little doubt that Edmondson and his editors had any plans to actually keep Red Wolf in his original setting. Instead, they opted to go down the "man out of time" route that we've seen from Marvel so often. We get it. It worked with Captain America. But maybe it's time to try a narrative approach that's actually new.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Robin Rises: Alpha #1

Dec 24, 2014

Batman & Robin fans are going to wonder why they bought this, and Kubert fans are going to wish they were treated to more good Kubert pages than bad ones. It's kind of bad form all around. The script lacks the heart that's marked Tomasi's tenure as a writer on Batman & Robin. The art lacks the pizzazz of Kubert's better work. And overall, the issue lacks the fun of what's come before. You might be better served just skipping this one, chances are the back matter of any other DC book in the last couple of weeks already gave away the big surprise.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Robin Rises: Omega #1

Jul 17, 2014

The lengthy recap will be enough to catch up those unintiated with the saga of Damian Wayne, but it might worry more experienced readers. However, fret not, Bat-fans. This issue clocks in at 35 pages and most of it is an all-out brawl that teams Ra's al Ghul, Frankenstein and Batman against the forces of Glorious Godfrey of Apokolips.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Robin: Son of Batman #1

Jun 17, 2015

Robin: Son of Batman really digs into the nuts and bolts of the boy who may someday become Batman. This is a title where he finally has the room for self-exploration that doesn't come with the caveat of being someone's sidekick. And if nothing else, the art is gorgeous. Gleason, Gray and Kalisz are a finely tuned machine that is adept at creating mood and tension. Gleason clearly believes in the potential that Damian Wayne has as one of the more complex members of the DC Universe, and you should, too.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Robin: Son of Batman #2

Jul 15, 2015

Let a creator work on a character they feel strongly about and they'll turn in their best work. Gleason's clear affection for Damian shines through this issue and makes it easier for readers to appreciate what he's doing with the character. While other books rely on snap status quo changes and divisive retcons in order to bring curious readers in, Robin: Son of Batman treads lightly on established continuity to create something fun and exciting that doesn't inherently change anything about the character or his world. That's how you build a character up. Gleason and company are providing the perfect balance of reverence and strong storytelling.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Robin: Son of Batman #3

Aug 20, 2015

Gleason is a very talented creator who takes a step back here in writing and art. Hopefully, though, it's just a minor hiccup.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Robin: Son of Batman #4

Sep 17, 2015

This issue is laden with exposition, but Patrick Gleason manages to work in a few good character moments and an inventive fight sequence to buoy this one.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Robin: Son of Batman #8

Jan 21, 2016

So Fawkes and Bachs don't really reinvent the wheel here but for new readers that are wondering what this whole "Son of Batman" thing is all about this a good primer.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Rockstars #1

Dec 13, 2016

This ground is well-trodden and not without potential, but they're going to have to dig a lot deeper to find their unique way in.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Runaways (2015) #1

Jun 16, 2015

Runaways definitely has a unique voice and style when put up against many of the other books spinning out of Secret Wars, but in a grander scheme, it's not all that original. The book will live and die with its characters and Stevenson's ability to make the readers care about a plot that they've seen over and over in Hollywood in the past five years. and for all his great character work, Greene will need to pick up the slack in terms of building out the world. Comics are a collaborative medium and this team isn't synced up just yet but if they do, watch out. Runaways has the DNA to be one of Secret Wars's best books.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
S.H.O.O.T. First #1

Oct 17, 2013

S.H.O.O.T. First has a solid concept at its core but subpar art is likely to clip its wings.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Saga #8

Dec 19, 2012

Saga is unstoppable. In it's second issue back from a brief reprieve, we still find Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples "firing on all cylinders" and other critical cliches that we usually only reserve for Batman and the first six months of those DC Dark books.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Samurai Jack #1

Oct 23, 2013

On the first page, Jack slowly rises over a ridge, and it's evident that Zub and Suriano know what they are doing. By combining their reverence for the source material with a strong desire to move it forward, they've created a new beginning for a character with a considerable history and made it an excellent jumping on point for new and old fans alike. They've done a good job translating what was once animated to a static format but they've left a lot of room to grow and I suspect they'll only get better at it. Samurai Jack is more than just a trip down memory lane. Zub and Suriano may be nostalgia surfing, but they're also shredding new and exciting waves.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Savage Wolverine #14

Jan 8, 2014

For a first time writer, Isanove has a sense of what works in a Wolverine story but that's only because it's worked a hundred times before. At the very least, Isanove's art is a great fit for both the tone of the story and the character. Hopefully, as his arc continues, we'll get to see a bit more reasoning behind Isanove's storytelling choices. Why is this setting an important moment to Logan? What will this story reveal about him? He's a character that, despite the many stories about his past, is still cloaked in mystery. There's a lot of room to grow.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Secret Avengers #24

Mar 29, 2012

Still the artwork complements the story and as the book enters the final issue of this arc, it's clear that Remender has something special brewing.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Secret Empire #1

May 3, 2017

Secret Empire #1 fails because at best, its hook is a gimmick. It's a cheap trick. And at worst, it attempts to stand on the shoulders of the legacy of some of Marvel's greatest creators and then do a disservice to one of their greatest heroes.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Secret Empire #2

May 17, 2017

It’s true, sometimes you do find hope in the strangest places, and we’re still very early on in this event. That final splash is might be the best hope we can hope for, but even with this markedly improved sophomore installment, Secret Empire still has a ways to go before it will feel like it has truly turned the corner.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Secret Warriors (2017) #1

May 10, 2017

Secret Warriors is one of the best things to spin out of Secret Empire so far, and it really helps flesh that story out. I honestly don’t know how someone could read one without the other. This book stands as an examination of a more intimate betrayal of trust, reminding readers that smaller stories that still have big implications are historically some of the best in Marvel history. You only need to look to the original Secret Warriors for proof. Matthew Rosenberg is solidifying himself as one of the best writers in Marvel’s stable right now, and artist Javier Garron is certainly no slouch, either. Secret Warriors #1 is on track to be the definitive Daisy Johnson story, and that’s a very, very exciting thing.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Secret Wars #1

May 7, 2015

Two universes are colliding and while there's a lot of potential for confusion down the line, Secret Wars is off to a big, fun, bombastic start.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Secret Wars #3

Jun 3, 2015

Secret Wars has a lot of silly superhuman dressing for what is ultimately a story about humanity, morality and the burden of power. It's right in line with the kinds of stories that Marvel has been putting out for over 50 years. But we're still in the early goings of this event and many other events have started similarly strong only to completely lose their way when trying to stick a landing.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Secret Wars #5

Aug 12, 2015

Call it event fatigue. Call it whatever you want. I can't believe we still have three more issue of this. Hickman's the type that doesn't include details for no reason. Molecule Man's appearance is a sort of Chekhov's Gun that almost inevitably will pay off somehow. Which side will wield it has yet to be seen, but hopefully Hickman picks up the pace a bit. Convergence suffered from a similar problem of slogging through exposition and by the end, the payoff wasn't worth it. Hickman and Ribic have three more issues to avoid that same fate.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Secret Wars #7

Nov 12, 2015

You might still be scratching your head as to why we have two more issues of Secret Wars coming down the pike, but at least Ribic is giving us something to look at.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Sex Criminals #1

Sep 25, 2013

This issue suffers from a lack of a real hook. Fraction has a lot of range as a writer. He can tell any story, from very down-to-earth ones that have no frills and are incredibly moving to plots that seem completely insane but actually have a lot of heart. Sex Criminals has yet to be defined because the creative team has barely scratched the surface. They spend so much time in the past that we don't get to see the present or move into the future. A few questions are raised by the events in this book but nothing that will really grab anyone. Fraction buried the lead. Let's just hope it's not six feet under.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
She-Hulk (2014) #1

Feb 13, 2014

Marvel's slice-of-life comics are some of the best in their publishing line right now. Saving the world is relative, and Charles Soule starts us out with a done-in-one story to set the stage for a book that fits on the shelves right between Daredevil and Hawkeye.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
She-Hulk (2014) #12

Feb 19, 2015

She-Hulk debuted with a bang, but it goes out with a whimper.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Shutter #1

Apr 8, 2014

There's a lot to like on the surface of Shutter #1 but it only feels like a rough introduction. Joe Keatinge has shown a penchant for writing strong female characters and he starts defining his lead but there are so many questions about the world of this story that some readers might become distracted. Newcomer Leila Del Duca demonstrates a knack of clean and consistent cartooning but her work is brought down by inconsistent colors from Owen Gieni. Shutter is a book on the cusp that will need a few issues to really hit its stride.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Silver Surfer (2014) #1

Mar 25, 2014

Slott and company can probably right the ship given enough time, but right now this is a mess. The plotting relies too heavily on the tropes of another property altogether. (Although, I wouldn't put it past Slott to somehow include continuity from Marvel's short Doctor Who comic from a few decades ago.) The art relies too heavily on digital effects and subsequently it undermines it's greatest setting: space itself. Marvel's solo titles usually do a great job of delivering compelling adventures outside the context of a team, and that's very valuable, especially to fans of those characters. But this book won't be enough to entice new fans or satiate old ones.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Silver Surfer (2014) #2

May 1, 2014

The ending is a cute little twist on expectations, but I'm eager to see Slott get back to writing the kinds of more nuanced characters we're used to seeing from him.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Silver Surfer (2014) #3

Jun 23, 2014

Dan Slott delivers on what he said this book was all along: a love story. The Impericon's origin is the kind of gooey, heartfelt sci-fi that typifies Doctor Who but it works well here because it's balanced by the Surfer and Zed's fight.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Sinestro #2

May 22, 2014

Dale Eaglesham has been sorely missed in comics over the past few years and he's a perfect fit for Cullen Bunn's Sinestro, a book about a tyrant's reclamation of power. Sinestro is one of the most interesting villains in the DC Universe and arguably, Hal Jordan's most worthy foe.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Southern Bastards #1

Apr 30, 2014

Southern Bastards is just beginning but so far it has all the makings of a riveting crime-noir. By using the American South as their setting, Aaron and Latour are firmly in "write what you know" territory and it's working for them. This issue makes it evident that hey have an excellent grasp of where they want to take this story and what they want to accomplish. As Earl gets sucked deeper and deeper back into Craw County, we'll learn more about the town and how the places that you grow up can grow to define you. Southern Bastards is a country-fried gem of a comic book dripping in blood and BBQ Sauce. Can I get a hell yeah?

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Spider-Gwen (2015) #1

Oct 14, 2015

This isn't necessarily a bad outing by this creative team, but after their dynamic debut, this #1 can't help by feel a little light. It feels too early to be rehashing old storylines already. Considering how long Spider-Gwen has lasted, we'll hopefully get to see more of her world and the other characters that inhabit it. Latour and Rodriguez are taking their time building the world and there's nothing wrong with that but there's nothing in this issue to really entice anyone to read it. I mentioned a reveal at the end and it's kind of cool but it feels inorganic and tacked on. Here's hoping that Spider-Gwen can swing back to its previous level of quality next month.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Spider-Man & The X-Men #1

Dec 11, 2014

The Daily Show head writer Elliott Kalan is at the helm, but a throwaway cast and a concept borrowed in part from the last few years of young Avengers titles doesn't help this one.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Spider-Man (2016) #7

Aug 31, 2016

Brian Michael Bendis is clearly the architect of the Marvel Universe at this juncture, but his books aren't always worldbeaters. After so many years with certain characters, maybe it's time for fresh perspectives to inject them with some sense of urgency rather than trapping them in a seemingly endless cycles of inciting incidents followed by half-hearted rumination. Bendis doesn't ask bad questions or even the wrong ones, but he's not concerned with answering them, and in doing so takes agency away from his characters but also his artists. Kudos to Nico Leon and Marte Gracia for at least making this book look like a Big Two comic book - it's not easy to find interesting ways to draw talking heads. But if characters are going be the core of an issue like this, the creative team, editors included, need to make sure that meaningful work is being done.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Spider-Man 2099 (2014) #1

Jul 8, 2014

Spider-Man 2099 #1 is a missed opportunity to bring back a fairly popular series. The title character is there, but the world that made his book unique is absent. Fans hoping that this would be a return to form for Peter David will have those expectations met with a middling plot and lackluster character development. The art team is biggest letdown, especially considering that Sliney has drawn some good-looking comics in the past. Going back to the future, Spidey 2099 could still bring about some great stories, but we're not seeing even the start of them here.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Spider-Man/Deadpool #4

Apr 20, 2016

Spider-Man/Deadpool #4 is a lot more fun than I thought it would be, and that's definitely a win. The ending of this book will obviously garner a lot of questions, but considering that everything is a set-up, I'm kind of excited to see how Kelly hilariously writes himself out of this one. It's great to see him teamed with Ed McGuinness again and they are very clearly in sync here. Funnybooks aren't usually all that funny anymore outside of a couple of titles, so it's nice to see Marvel give their marquee characters a chance to do something a little silly for once. It's a great change of pace and a great way to give readers a better understanding of their favorite heroes.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Spider-Verse Team-Up #1

Nov 6, 2014

Two more stories are here to expand the Spider-Verse story, and they're both a bit saccharine and feel extraneous.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Spider-Woman (2014) #5

Mar 5, 2015

The tone and the unique little hook in this arc is sure to engage readers new and old.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Spider-Woman (2014) #6

Apr 9, 2015

I'm really starting to like this Jessica Drew. A huge departure from what we're used to seeing from the character, Dennis Hopeless' take on Spider-Woman has a lot of heart.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Spider-Woman (2014) #9

Jul 23, 2015

Hopeless seems to have lost the momentum that he had in the previous arc, and half this book is Jessica and company aimlessly solving cases around the U.S. in a lengthy montage fashion.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Spread #1

Jul 8, 2014

Spread isn't a bad comic, but the writing comes across as purely utilitarian, and it's completely outclassed by the art. The familiarity of the book could work for or against this title, depending on the reader. But if Strahm and Sobreiro continue their strong work, they should be able to buy Jordan enough time to really get this story going. Jordan has put himself in a position to deliver on a book that is much more than the sum of the parts presented here, and that's better than many creator-owned comics can say.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Star Wars (2014) #1

Jan 14, 2015

But overall, the Force is with this one. Big-time Cassaday fans will definitely overlook some of the artistic shortcomings, but it's really Aaron's script that's the draw here. Even at a whopping 36 pages, Aaron provides us with action, humor and gravitas. Most importantly, the characters that we know and love are recognizable through their actions and dialogue. There was a lot of bellyaching about Marvel relaunching the Star Wars comic book universe, but it turns out that we should all have a very good feeling about this one.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Star Wars (2014) #2

Feb 5, 2015

This is title is a must-read for Star Wars fans of all ages.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Suicide Squad (2011) #25

Nov 14, 2013

Writer Matt Kindt has a little fun with both teams as they realize how they've been brought together while Harley Quinn helps reveal the Thinker's true plot. Patrick Zircher's art doesn't have any real highlights but it is mostly consistent.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Suicide Squad (2011) #28

Feb 13, 2014

It's probably for the best that this book will soon be put out of its misery.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Suicide Squad (2011) #29

Mar 20, 2014

Matt Kindt's run on Suicide Squad ends with a whimper.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Suicide Squad: Amanda Waller #1

Mar 26, 2014

Fans of Amanda Waller's current incarnation might like seeing her in action but this is by no means a must-read issue. For those unfamiliar with Waller, this isn't a great place to start. Her New 52 characterization has been uneven, and this just adds to it. Here's an issue of a comic that, at the end of the day, is mostly inconsequential. There was no big demand. It takes place over six months ago (in terms of the publishing schedule). No other notable DC characters make an appearance. DC didn't try to put out a top-tier product by placing big-name creators on it. I'm sure that the creative team gave it their all, but it's not enough. The Wall might be the big dog at Belle Reve, but this issue is all bark and no bite.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Super Sons #1

Feb 16, 2017

Peter J. Tomasi has another great debut for his resume, and Jorge Jimenez is a big part of that. Most artists have a blindspot when it comes to drawing kids but Jimenez embraces the challenge and delivers greatness. It's so exciting to see the potential for these characters to grow over time. It's not something we get to see all that often.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Super Sons #2

Mar 16, 2017

Super Sons might have taken a long time to get started but it's been more than worth the wait.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Super Sons #3

Apr 21, 2017

Super Sons needs to be on your pull list if you're into solid, over-the-top fun in your capes comics.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Superboy (2011) #30

Apr 11, 2014

I'm not in love with the New 52's take on Superboy but there's a lot to like here. Aaron Kuder has proven himself a capable writer and he attempts to make sense of the recent events of the book.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Superboy (2011) #34

Aug 14, 2014

This was as good an ending as we could've hoped for, a big ridiculous paradoxical and actually kind of fun conclusion to a title that has been that severely needed that.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Supergirl (2011) #26

Dec 19, 2013

here's not too much substance in this issue but it is a good starting point for new readers. Bedard and Cinar sum up Kara's New 52 existence thus far quickly and concisely.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Supergirl (2011) #27

Jan 24, 2014

The star this issue is Yildiray Cinar. His artwork is very strong, particularly as Kara's rage builds. There are some choices he makes regarding angles that are fairly pedestrian but Cinar's take on Kenneth Rocafort''s Lobo redesign is sinister and true to the original, making the last Czarnian a worthy adversary for Kara.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Supergirl (2011) #29

Mar 20, 2014

We're backtracking a little with this issue, since it takes place before recent events in Green Lantern and Red Lanterns, but it's a solid issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Supergirl (2011) #30

Apr 17, 2014

There's no doubt this book will bounce back next month in part two of the battle with Atrocitus, but this one doesn't make the case for being essential reading.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Supergirl (2011) #31

May 22, 2014

"Red Daughter of Krypton" is a solid crossover so far but we need to see the marquee matchups soon or it will start to drag.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Supergirl (2011) #34

Aug 21, 2014

This is the comic book equivalent to catching up on a story via Wikipedia.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Supergirl (2011) #37

Dec 18, 2014

Supergirl definitely stumbled after the "Red Daughter of Krypton" storyline but it looks like it might be picking back up here.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Superior Foes of Spider-Man #8

Feb 6, 2014

Superior Foes is still a must-read month and month, because if we could, we'd all at least try being super villains - just, y'know, not very evil ones.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Superior Iron Man #1

Nov 12, 2014

Superior Iron Man doesn't give us anything to cheer about yet. In the back matter, editor Mark Paniccia explains that a bit about the history of "the unlikable Iron Man" and how this book returns Tony to that point in his characterization and cranks it up. The problem is that Tony was pretty unlikable when he was tolerable. Making him even more unlikable and saddling him with a concept as groan-worthy as the creation of a killer app (pun half-intended), doesn't do the character any favors and it forces Tom Taylor to write a character bereft of any dimension.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Superior Spider-Man #20

Oct 31, 2013

Giuseppe Camuncoli is the star here. He's grown exponentially as an artist over the past few years and he has a star turn here.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Superior Spider-Man #23

Dec 4, 2013

Superior Spider-Man is a book that's been merely good at its worst and one of the best books on the shelves at its best. But this issue is a new low. It does remind us of some major players that will undoubtedly rear their heads soon but for now, it seems like we're spinning our wheels just getting to the next big reveal. Characters are doing things because the writers wants them to do things and not because that's how the scenes would play out naturally. It's a rare misstep for an otherwise, solid run for Slott and company. Thankfully, we don't have to wait long to see if the quality of this book can catch up to the pace.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Superior Spider-Man #26

Jan 29, 2014

This prelude treads water. It fills the slot in the publishing schedule without telling us anything that could really be conceived as a big surprise. You could likely skip this issue and still keep up with Issue #27 because some of these facts will need to be retold to certain characters. Slott is an ambitious writer, there's no doubt about that but I think he's been juggling to many balls at once. I would have preferred finding out some of the details explained here through more deliberate moments in previous issues. Bogged down with too many artists, this is one of the few issues of Superior Spider-Man that's worth skipping.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Superior Spider-Man #28

Feb 26, 2014

"Goblin Nation" is starting to feel sisyphean. For every few steps forward that are taken with the plot, we realize that we're still in basically the same place we were at the start. Everything must come to a head soon considering there are only a few issues of Superior Spider-Man but knowing that Peter is coming back and knowing that this book is ending are really robbing Slott and co. of the big ending they are shooting for. Camuncoli continues to be as on point as ever, and he's really expanded his range. It's a shame that an arc that's supposed to go out with a bang looks like it's going out with a whimper.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Superior Spider-Man #33

Sep 18, 2014

"Spider-Verse" has proven to be a lot of fun so far, and this issue is no different. Eight different Spider-people team-up against a common foe (spider-energy vampires?) and Christos Gage proves once again why Otto Octavius is such a great Spider-Man.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Superman (2011) #26

Jan 2, 2014

Superman #26 is an enjoyable mix of character drama and action that might only seem pedestrian because of the big stakes and bigger names working in other Superman titles.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Superman (2011) #27

Jan 30, 2014

The Parasite had the potential to be an interesting foe after the last issue, but Scott Lobdell and artist Ed Benes opt to make him a roaring pile of purple puss with a wholly inconsistent power set.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Superman (2011) #30

Apr 25, 2014

As prelude issues go, this one is pretty dull.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Superman (2011) #32

Jun 25, 2014

Superman #32 might be lacking in a truly a original hook (for now) but it does wipe the slate clean for readers. It's a snapshot of Clark's life at this point and it lays the groundwork for future stories. Johns' pacing is excellent and gets better on multiple reads. Both he and Romita include small, unmentioned details that enrich this book and bring it to a certain level that hadn't been seen before. Going back to what's familiar might be a new approach for this book but it's definitely a good one. There's a tendency to overcompensate during reboots and change too much of a character in order to facilitate newness. By bringing Superman down to Earth a bit and reminding readers of Clark's place in the DC Universe, Johns and Romita have managed to make Superman someone you want to root for again. There's a solitary sadness here and beginnings of hope. The latter has been sorely missed from this title for some time.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Superman (2011) #38

Feb 4, 2015

"Men of Tomorrow" follows what's starting to become a "classic" New 52 tactic; build a character in a certain direction until pulling a flashy, no-substance detour for the sake of some publicity. Hopefully, this time they haven't gone completely off the road.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Superman (2011) #42

Jul 29, 2015

There are a lot of books featuring Superman on the stands right now and you'd probably be better served to pick up any of them than waste time with this formulaic snoozefest. Superman is a great character that is very flexible in terms of interpretation and execution of concept but Yang doesn't try anything we haven't seen before. Even Romita's work seems jilted by the switch from Geoff John's scripts to these. Other writers have used this new status quo as an opportunity to explore what makes Superman the hero that he has been for years. Yang doesn't get that chance, because his story exists before the status quo shift. He gets a raw deal because of the publishing schedule, but you'd have squint to find anything interesting here anyway.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Superman (2011) #43

Aug 26, 2015

With the release schedule the way it is, this creative team seems like they were doomed to fail. And that's a shame. But this title has burned through any goodwill it might have had. That's something that DC should take note of - you can only add a new creative team or relaunch a book or introduce a new status quo via a poorly executed event so many times before readers are going to start to feel like they're being fleeced. I'd love to write about how good Superman is. I really would. But DC hasn't given me a reason to, and they don't seem all that concerned with trying to.

View Issue       View Full Review
1.0
Superman (2011) #44

Sep 30, 2015

Yang's story buckles under the weight of its own importance. In trying to kickstart a new era for Superman, he's not able to deliver a character-defining piece of work. There is no twist. There are very few turns. This was a story that always had a very clear ending but the ride didn't have to be this boring. Yang and Romita have proven themselves to be talented storytellers in their own right but to let a pillar of your publishing line be so grossly misused clearly falls on the editors, Andrew Marino and Eddie Berganza. This story would have worked for various B- or C-list heroes with much less to lose than Superman and far fewer means to avoid a situation like this one. It's a shame, but with Howard Porter joining the title next month, there's one silver lining: things can only go up from here.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Superman (2011) #48

Jan 27, 2016

For full issue, this one is a little light. The highlight might be he Clark/Steve Trevor soap opera dramatics, but I think that Diana would be rolling her eyes if she heard Steve's speech. I want to say that Porter doesn't give the script the turn that it deserves, but the script isn't even particularly inspiring so who can blame him. Maybe I'm giving him too much credit, but it feels like there's a story that Yang is trying to tell somewhere underneath all the back and forth about Superman's powers and his identity. On some level, comic books are escapist fantasies, and the thing about Superman was that we could never be like him. He's super. We're not. Unfortunately, as we've seen these past few months, putting Clark Kent down to our level hasn't humanize him - it's just made him boring.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Superman (2011) #52

May 25, 2016

This finale will be overshadowed by the dawn of Rebirth, and this version of Superman is unlikely to be fondly remembered. The New 52 was an interesting experiment. It showed us how strong concepts like Batman can be while also showing us how easy it is to miss the mark with characters that are supposed to be constants in their universe. Tomasi and Janin try their damnedest to make this issue something memorable, but it's not enough. The reactions of the other heroes feels disingenuous. This is a Superman that didn't make a lasting impact on readers or his world of story. That's a glaring mistake, and one that I hope DC can fix moving forward.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Superman (2016) #1

Jun 15, 2016

Superman #1 is head and shoulders above the rest of the Rebirth titles despite its flaws, because all of the awkward hoops that needed to be jumped through to get us here are in the past. Tomasi and Gleason get to actually dive into their concept rather than make excuses for it (a la Wonder Woman), and we start to see the true potential of the book. Add that to the fact that Gleason, Gray and Kalisz are such a cohesive artistic unit, and you've got something really special on your hands. This creative team might be going back to the well with a central idea but they've proven that they can twist that concept in the past to tell great stories. Their work here is no different. For the first time in a long time, we are getting what feels like a truly definitive take on Superman.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Superman (2016) #2

Jul 6, 2016

After plenty of fits, stops, relaunches and revamps, the Man of Steel is back. Tomasi and Gleason have a clear concept for the character that works on every level and provides new and exciting lenses to view him through. Lois kind of gets the short end of the stick here as it seems like they might have tried to wrap everything up a little bit too neatly from issue one but that's hardly a grievous mistake. Despite the fact that it still feels like the team is testing the dynamics of these characters to see what they can do with them, the heart of the book remains strong. There hasn't been this much fun in the DC Universe for some time, so it's good to see the company returning to its roots.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Superman (2016) #4

Aug 3, 2016

Superman has continued to be a bright spot in DC's "Rebirth" era publishing line. Tomasi and Gleason are writing a compelling narrative that puts the characters first, even if they aren't exactly as many fans would remember them. Their work with Jonathan has greatly improved since the debut issue, even as Lois is still getting the short end of the stick. The art, however, is still some of the best in comic books right now, so hopefully the writing will catch up. Superman reminds us that there is no such thing as a bad or broken character. Tomasi and Gleason and the rest of the art team are elevating the concept of Superman while keeping the character's core intact. It's a model that many other creators could stand to learn from.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Superman (2016) #22

May 4, 2017

Superman continues to be a pillar in DC's new lineup and that's exactly how it should be.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Superman (2016) #23

May 18, 2017

This is just a brutal, brutal book. Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason have been really good at winding up readers and making the revelations of the mysteries they're weaving very impactful.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Superman/Wonder Woman #25

Jan 21, 2016

All in all, this is a solid issue that might be overlooked considering its lack of relevance to the DCU at large, but it's a reminder that you don't have to do too much to make Superman a compelling character.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Superman: American Alien #1

Nov 11, 2015

American Alien has lofty goals, but there isn't an inkling of execution here. I don't think Landis' approach works here, especially when you compare it to similar stories like Mark Waid and Leinil Yu's Superman: Birthright and Geoff Johns and Francis Manapul's Superboy: The Boy of Steel. American Alien has no hook or framing device to give readers a reason to jump onboard with this title. Nick Dragotta is an incredible artist, but he doesn't show up here for whatever reason. It might have been the subject matter, but we're used to seeing much better work from him. American Alien is a disappointment in every sense of the word, and Landis would be wise not to dial up expectation for his next project the way he has with this one.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Superman: Doomed #1

May 14, 2014

Lobdell promised that this wouldn’t be a “cover band version of ‘Death of Superman’” and he’s absolutely right. There’s no way that Doomed will play out like that at all. But as far as being a Superman story for the ages, this one has a ways to go. There are a lot of balls in the air plot-wise and if they’re resolved in the other titles that cross over with Doomed then the main narrative will suffer. This is definitely the most ambitious Superman story that has been done in the New 52 and hopefully, it will clear away some of the detritus that has built up across the Superman titles and really allow future iterations to fly. But for now, this issue stands as a red herring that does little to make us care about the arc as a whole.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Superman: Earth One #2

Oct 31, 2012

Superman: Earth One, Volume 2 a not a perfect book by any means. It gets by on being marginally better than the rest of the Superman product out there, and definitely having the best art. But it's time for some iconic villains. JMS has done a good job building Clark up at this point but he hasn't faced a threat that actually feels like it's going to beat him. Thankfully, he hints at something big coming soon in the closing pages. Hopefully, if the art remains the same, the writing can pick up and this team can deliver some really meaningful entries in the future.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Superman: Futures End #1

Sep 25, 2014

Lee Weeks' pages are a dream. They perfectly capture the size and scope of the story and the impactful nature of the choices these heroes have made.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Superwoman #1

Aug 10, 2016

All in all, Superwoman #1 is a great outing with a bit of a surprise ending. The Superman family of titles might seems a bit crowded at times, but I like this as a way into the mythology. It's a totally different flavor than what we're getting in the other Super-titles, lending DC the kind of variety that was lacking in the "New 52." Some may argue that imbuing so many characters with Superman's gifts might make him less special, it does allow for DC to touch on a few different aspects of the idea of Superman without having to cram it all into one book. In the same way that it's felt like there's a type of Batman title for many different readers, this is a way to make the Superman concept broader and potentially more palatable, as Jimenez is able to utilize some supporting characters in a way that enriches Clark Kent's world. Superwoman isn't your average Superman title, and that's its biggest strength.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Supreme: Blue Rose #1

Jul 22, 2014

Supreme: Blue Rose is as rare as its namesake. Books like this one don’t come around all that often, and the pairing of Warren Ellis with a brilliant new artistic talent in Tula Lotay will remind you why. By placing the initial focus on Diana Dane, Ellis and Lotay are able to ground this superhero story with a fleshed out human character that is not content to play the victim. Ellis might be playing in someone else’s sandbox, but he’s taking the property into new territory. Fittingly, so is Lotay. This is only the beginning of what’s sure to be an interesting examination of the superhero archetype.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Swamp Thing (2011) #27

Jan 9, 2014

Jesus Saiz is another in a line of great artists on this iteration of Swamp Thing but as the Seeder arc reaches its finale, great art isn't enough.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Swamp Thing (2011) #28

Feb 6, 2014

Charles Soule doesn't balance these scenes with Capucine's origins very well and it makes the issue seem back-loaded with exposition.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Swamp Thing (2011) #40

Mar 5, 2015

Pacing issues hamper the overall effect of this one because of page constraints and Soule's decision to put his meta narrative front and center but this is a solid conclusion to a generally well-regarded run.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Teen Titans (2011) #28

Feb 27, 2014

Most of the key ingredients for a solid Teen Titans story are in place here. It's the execution that's lacking.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Teen Titans (2014) #1

Jul 16, 2014

Teen Titans is a welcome surprise. It’s doesn’t have the style or the substance of other teen superhero books that are out there but it definitely has it’s merits. After the more melodramatic, grim n’ gritty take we had gotten before, it’s nice to read a book that’s a bit lighter superhero fare. Kenneth Rocafort’s thin lines and Dan Brown’s expressive coloring help highlight the book’s new direction and dedication to making its heroes actually heroic (despite a couple of more dubious moments). The tone is closer to DC’s animated entries into the Teen Titan/Young Justice universe, and it’s about time. There’s definitely room for improvement, but Teen Titans overcomes most of its pitfalls with aplomb.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #8

Apr 2, 2012

As a package though, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles is an absolute joy to read. It's clear and concise enough for new readers. It's compelling and enticing enough for old fans. And best of all, it's a comic that transcends age. All-ages books can be done right, and this is one of the best examples of that.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Micro-Series #3

Mar 5, 2012

The TMNT Micro Series is a must-read for dedicated fans of the mutant martial artists. It provides an additional layer of characterization on top of what the main series already delivers. It's refreshing to read about the solo adventures of the turtles because we're so used to seeing them together all the time. It's exactly what you would expect for a TMNT story: something fun, easy to read and a combination of totally radical and tubular. Or as Donatello would say, "Perestroika?"

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Ten Grand #1

Apr 30, 2013

JMS is a notorious for slow pacing in his work. But in the past (think Thor), he was at least giving us something to come back for. The world of story here isn't something we haven't seen before in other supernatural-tinged work, but it might be too early to actually say that. Certain elements (such as the way Joe summons the angel) are interesting but not enough to pick up a book. Templesmith's art really carries this issue along but JMS is going to have to step it up to keep readers coming back.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
The Archies (One Shot) #1

May 23, 2017

The Archies one-shot doesn't take itself too seriously, and that's a very good thing. It's a heartwarming story about the birth of the Archies complicated by egos, just like so many other bands before them. And I think that speaks a little bit to the enduring nature of these characters and the concept of Archie comics.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
The Big Moose (One Shot) #1

Apr 26, 2017

The Big Moose special is a fine issue for Archie fans, but it would have been stronger if it could decide what it wanted to be. Jumping between classic pastiches and more emotional, grounded storytelling takes away from the cohesiveness of the work. Is Archie truly looking to deepen this character's core? Or do they want to celebrate his past? There are certainly ways to do both, but the clashing tones of these three narratives casts a wide aesthetic net that also feels destined to disappoint readers at least part of the time.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
The Clone Conspiracy #3

Dec 7, 2016

It's tough to see exactly where The Clone Conspiracy will go, but readers that are familiar enough with Slott's work will probably see the writing on the wall. It's unlikely that any major changes stick; very few have over the course of his run. But that doesn't mean we aren't in for a fun story. Slott always has good artistic collaborators, and his ideas are always entertaining enough. But there's something hollow about constantly looking back especially when so many other characters are looking forward. Here's hoping that Slott proves me wrong. He's still got time to do so.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
The Covenant #1

Jun 8, 2015

The Covenant isn't an offensively bad comic book - it's just an unrefined one. Horak's art feels amateurish at some points, and that's not particularly encouraging. Liefeld's scripting is utilitarian and dull. The sum of those parts is a boring book that stands out against Image's other offerings because it lacks the imagination and flair that those books possess. The concept at the title's core is somewhat interesting - the Ark is a compelling artifact on it's own and a biblical heist sounds like fun - but Liefeld and Horak aren't able to fully realize the concept in this issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
The Fade Out #1

Aug 19, 2014

The Fade Out is already looking like another highlight in the prolific partnership between Brubaker and Phillips. It's always fun to have creators that so consistently work together and turn out a great product. This book might be a bit lighter than some of their other noir but there are plenty of openings for it to take more violent and unexpected twists and turns. The Fade Out is a master class in art and writing. And it's definitely a book worthy of your dollars especially if you're looking for a break from the usual slog of the monthly spinner rack.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
The Flash: Futures End #1

Sep 25, 2014

The Flash and his creative team are really buckling under the weight of their own story.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
The Forevers #1

Sep 13, 2016

I like the themes that Pires has worked with in the past and the ones that he seems to want to explore here. But this is a disjointed attempted at making some sort of statement. Is is decrying fame? Does it even want to? If ruminations on fame are essential to the book, the, uh, "cameos" (to put it lightly) at the end ring even more hollow. Pfeiffer's art is so referential that it feels manufactured and cold. When fans buy comic books, they buy it for the medium that it comes in just as much as for the story that's contained within those pages. Pires and Pfeiffer fail to use the medium to their advantage, and unfortunately only succeed in delivering a product that feels like an imitation of titles that tread similar territory.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
The Green Hornet (2013) #1

Mar 27, 2013

The Green Hornet #1 is a strong debut with a lot of potential. The art is holding it back for now but that's a bound to change as the creative team gels with future issues. With Mark Waid at the helm, Green Hornet can definitely hang with the best superhero books on the shelves.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
The Infinity Gauntlet #1

May 27, 2015

I guess the problem with The Infinity Gauntlet #1 is that it is completely unfulfilling and totally unsatisfying. There are no stakes. There is no fun to be had. This comic doesn't actually say anything or help us understand its larger role in Secret Wars. I'm not saying that this comic needed to be a meditation on mortality like the original. I'm not saying that it needed to give us a detailed explanation of how it ties in to everything else. But on a base level, a decent comic should be one that makes you think, "Hey, cool. Glad I read that." Unfortunately, this issue can't even achieve that.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
The Infinity Gauntlet #2

Jun 25, 2015

I think it still has some issues with pacing. And Duggan is clearly playing the long game in terms of the Thanos payoff but we'll get there. For now, this book has made a significant improvement.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
The Infinity Gauntlet #4

Sep 17, 2015

High-octane action through the lens of family superhero melodrama is recipe for success for Gerry Duggan and Dustin Weaver.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
The Lone Ranger: Snake of Iron #3

Oct 19, 2012

Lone Ranger: Snake of Iron #3 is a fine book and a solid Western but it doesn't particularly need its title character and that is where it fails. Chuck Dixon's script is full of action and some snappy dialogue but he doesn't ever make the Lone Ranger and Tonto quintessential to the story. Esteve Polls artwork is effective though, and hopefully we'll see more of him.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
The Mighty Thor (2015) #2

Dec 16, 2015

The Mighty Thor is a solid book. It's a light read right now but the danger is really mounting against Jane Foster and despite Loki's sinister machinations, the odds might be stacked against him as well. Dauterman really anchors the book but Aaron clearly has a vision for the future of the title. By calling back to so many different pieces of the Thor mythology and combining them in new and interesting way, the creative team is able to keep things fresh without overdoing it the way some of the other "All-New, All-Different" books have tended to.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
The Mighty Thor (2015) #4

Feb 17, 2016

The Mighty Thor continues to quietly be one of the better superhero books on the stands. Aaron seems to be directly addressing any opposition that people had to putting Jane Foster under the helmet within his narrative while also telling a good story. He's blessed with the opportunity to continue working with Russell Dauterman. They are proving to be one of the strongest creative teams in the post-Secret Wars Marvel Universe, and that's no small feat.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
The Mighty Thor (2015) #17

Mar 16, 2017

Mighty Thor might be off in its own little cosmic corner of the Marvel Universe, but it's definitely one of the most bombastic books on the stands.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
The Multiversity #1

Aug 25, 2014

There are a few slight missteps in this one but nothing that should really take reader out of it. Instead, it’s Grant Morrison doing some of what he does best: repackaging and redefining a basic take on caped crusaders by turning expectations on their head and amplifying the stakes. Sure, most superheroes have to save the world on an issue by issue and arc by arc basis. But what’s bigger than saving the world? Well, Morrison thinks it’s saving every world and fighting off a foe that threatens the very fabric of existence. If you can get behind that concept and you want to see a patchwork group of heroes pull together to save the day complete with all the twists and turns of a Morrison story, then Multiversity is for you.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
The Multiversity #2

Apr 29, 2015

The Multiversity was a huge undertaking, and one that Morrison himself has stated that he wanted DC to use as a platform for more stories. That's where this story succeeds. I could read an ongoing or a miniseries of almost any one of the one-shots, and Captain Carrot is something of a breakout character, maybe the kind that DC needs to diversify its publishing line. Morrison may have left readers wanting by the end of this story but maybe that was the plan all along. All the forethought and planning was to serve the greatest good that comics publishers can ever get: the almighty dollar. Maybe Morrison was reminding us of those famous lines from Macbeth, that at the end of the day comics are tales "told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing."

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
The Multiversity: Mastermen #1

Feb 18, 2015

Mastermen isn't the best book it could be. That's a shame because with a few more pages I think Morrison could have really done something with it and given us a more nuanced ending. The one he writes is big and bombastic but I don't think it help him achieve his goal. This issue also doesn't do a whole lot to open up the larger narrative of Multiversity and while I'm all for insular storytelling, this doesn't seem like the right place for it. I also think Morrison would've been better served with a more consistent art team. Obviously, we don't know the circumstances surrounding this book, but the army of names that follow Jim Lee's on every book he does are starting to become a regular occurrence.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
The Multiversity: Pax Americana #1

Nov 19, 2014

Multiversity: Pax Americana is a dense book. Every page is packed with panels. Every panel is packed with symbolism and it's all serving Morrison's bigger ideas for this series. Readers might be turned off by Morrison's somewhat haphazard approach to time in this issue, but it's almost as if he's letting the characters control their own fates. Atom loses some awareness of where and when he is the same way that the reader might. Time flips between forward and backward on a whim and without warning. Morrison and Quitely challenge the idea that anything you read is ever all that straightforward, and that's a scary thought. If you could prevent something from happening just by turning back a comic book page, would you?

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
The Multiversity: Society of Super-Heroes #1

Sep 17, 2014

Multiversity has featured an approach similar to that of Morrison's Seven Soldiers but instead of just focusing on one character at a time, we're getting a new slice of the Multiverse. That could make it tough for some readers to keep up but Morrison includes enough callbacks to his previous work that parsing together the plot shouldn't be all that hard. Plus, these issues have played very well as standalones even without the context of a larger whole.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
The Multiversity: The Just #1

Oct 22, 2014

Multiversity: The Just might end on an obvious note, but I think it's the one that anyone reading would want to see. The characters are starting to wrap their heads around the idea of these comics leaking through from other worlds. The writing is on the wall, er... it's literally in those books, and the heroes that are able to put it together quickly will be the ones who will be saved or able to save others. Morrison simultaneously puts the "lowest common denominator" superhero plot and the "heady deconstruction" of the superhero on the same pedestal in this issue, taking shots at both while still making it clear that he reveres both idea and that they have place in the same narrative. I think that Sister miracle's tweets at the end just about sum it all up. "The mayhem begins. #party to end all parties. Parallel world! Isn't it nuts?" Indeed, it is.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
The Multiversity: Thunderworld Adventures #1

Dec 22, 2014

This issue isn't a world-changer and it doesn't add much to the overall story of Multiversity but it is a master class in delivering a fully fleshed out one and done superhero story. But it's the optimism present that truly impressive. This book has big stakes and they're achieved without the hero having to suffer some great tragedy. That seems like a rarity in today's market. This issue might not have larger implications, but it proves that Multiversity is the gift that keeps on giving.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
The New 52: Futures End #2

May 19, 2014

The timeline is still dubious at best because the pieces haven’t quite come together. But these things take time as we’ve seen from DC’s other weekly series. Futures End is still barely in it’s infancy but those looking for a dose of old-school DC might find what they’re looking for here in terms of both art and writing.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
The October Girl #1

Jul 5, 2012

This series is straddling a line of expectation, with one foot planted firmly in "this is okay right now!" and the other foot dipping its toes into "this could be great somewhere down the line!"

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
The Returning #1

Mar 12, 2014

The Returning is a by-the-numbers horror jaunt that hits almost all the necessary tropes. Starr is definitely trying to open up the concept but most readers will need more than the appearance of a mysterious stranger to keep them interested. While Mutti and Starr do get better as the issue progresses, the whole package kind of feels stale. There's potentially a good story to be told here but the creators haven't unearthed it.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
The Shadow Annual #1

Oct 1, 2012

Shadow fans are better off leaving this one on the rack. Five bucks for inconsistent art and snooze-worthy storytelling isn't a great value and would be better spent on the next issue of the series proper.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
The Shadow #6

Oct 25, 2012

The conclusion of "The Fire of Creation" ends with a bang as Garth Ennis and Aaron Campbell continue to blaze a trail with their run on The Shadow.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
The Shield (2015) #1

Oct 20, 2015

This start isn't impossible to come back from. The idea of an eternal American warrior isn't a bad one. But the creative team needs to let loose. They had a blank canvas, and the best they could conjure up was the sort of thing that gets canceled after six episodes on USA Network. There's a lot of strong imagery that can be used here. I mean, plenty of characters have draped themselves in the flag with great success! The Shield can be one, too, but the creators need to show some vision first.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
The Sixth Gun #24

Aug 30, 2012

The latest issue of Cullen Bunn and Brian Hurtt's The Sixth Gun begins a new arc that kicks off with the Sword of Abraham and Gord Cantrell, and Bunn does a good job setting up conflict for what's to come.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
The Unstoppable Wasp #1

Jan 3, 2017

This feels like a book that’s going to make a certain section of comic book readership angry and I kind of hope it does. Science fiction, fantasy and superheroes have always existed as safe havens for outsiders but over time, they started catering only to certain sections of their fanbases. We deserve to get more stories that feature diverse casts, diverse experiences and diverse points of view. As readers, we deserve to see ourselves in the stories that we read. The Unstoppable Wasp may hew close to Marvel’s past success with Ms. Marvel in terms of approach but it is not apologizing for putting women at the center of its story. When was the last time you could realistically grab a Big Two book off the rack that someone of any age and any gender could realistically enjoy? It’s probably been a while but look no further.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
The Unworthy Thor #1

Nov 3, 2016

Jason Aaron clearly cares deeply about this character and this book marks his 50th issue (across a few volumes) writing Thor. A this point, he’s crafted a story that it seems only he can truly finish and his collaborators are onboard with bringing that vision to light. Corporate superhero comic books rarely see a creative team this in sync this early on just because of the nature of the medium and the process and yet, this team rises above. The book ends with a fun reveal and a lot of hope and excitement for the direction that the narrative is moving in. Aaron is creating a newly definitive take on this character. In thirty years, we’ll be talking about his work on Thor with the same regard we hold Walt Simonson’s.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
The Wicked + The Divine #1

Jun 17, 2014

The Wicked + The Divine embodies some of the weirdness of 90s Vertigo combined with the populism of more standard superhero fare. For the uninitiated, this might be the best introduction to this creative team’s work. It’s big and bright and over-the-top. It has all of Gillen’s trademark snark and that’s amplified by McKelvie’s continually improving grasp on expressions and body language. This is pop comics. It’s that song that comes on the radio that you’ll have stuck in your head for days. The beat is good. The lyrics hint at something bigger and you can’t help but wonder. Although what you are about to read is a work of fiction, it should never the less be played at maximum volume.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
The Wicked + The Divine #2

Jul 15, 2014

If The Wicked + The Divine’s bombastic debut issue didn’t do it for you, Issue #2 is sure to change your mind. Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie and company have already set up the concept and themes that they’ll be exploring, but now they get a bit more character-driven, and it really helps the books move forward. McKelvie and colorist Matt Wilson really expand the visual language of the book as well, allowing the narrative room to get even weirder as the team truly kicks it into a higher gear in the final pages.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
The Wicked + The Divine #3

Aug 21, 2014

Altogether, this issue is excellent and Gillen and McKelvie are continuing to set the bar high for their next creator-owned work.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
The Wicked + The Divine #14

Sep 10, 2015

A-plus for effort in trying to set this one apart, but the execution isn't all there.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Thor (2014) #8

May 18, 2015

Secret Wars has only just begun, but I'm eager to see where Thor fits into all of this. Marvel has really been playing up the idea of legacies for all their characters and creating those for new readers is important. Giving new readers new characters to latch onto without the weight of hundreds of issues of back story and multiple characterizations over 50 years of comics makes them much more palatable. Aaron, Dauterman and company have excelled in giving Jane Foster's Thor a solid base from which to grow. I just hope that this isn't the last we see of this creative team on a solo adventure for her.

View Issue       View Full Review
1.0
Thor: The Crown of Fools #1

Nov 4, 2013

Thor: Crown of Fools #1 likely exists to give new readers a more familiar starting point than Infinity or God of Thunder but its good intentions are outweighed by it's lack of quality.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Trinity (2016) #1

Sep 21, 2016

All stories have to start somewhere and after DC mucked up some of their characters in the "New 52," they’ve remained steadfastly dedicated to getting back to basics during "Rebirth." Trinity represents a doubling down on the hope and optimism that has been exhibited elsewhere in the line and Manapul proves that he’s the guy to bring these three characters to the top of the heap together. Artistically, the script is executed just about perfectly and while there are a couple of issues with dialogue and characterization, they aren’t big enough to derail the issue at all. It’ll be interesting to see what kind of threats these three will face considerings they have to be bigger than in their solo titles but smaller than a full-scale Justice League adventure. But if Manapul can mix in meaningful character work along the way, Trinity could be one of the books that makes DC Comics great again.

View Issue