Robert Reed's Comic Reviews

Reviewer For: AiPT!, Newsarama, DC Comics News Reviews: 215
8.1Avg. Review Rating

9.5
Age of Reptiles: Ancient Egyptians #1

Jun 3, 2015

Age of Reptiles: Ancient Egyptians #1 is a comic unlike any other in the stands, offering a slice-of-life tale about one of the Mesozoic's most fascinating creatures while simultaneously setting up a longer thread for the rest of the mini-series. Each panel tells its own story and while the issue can be read through quickly, it offers much more to the reader that lingers on each image, discovering the detail and nuance within. Age of Reptiles: Ancient Egyptians #1 is a fantastic comic, and dinosaur fans would be foolish not to pick it up, as would anyone who enjoys purely visual storytelling.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Age of Reptiles: Ancient Egyptians #2

Jul 2, 2015

Ancient Egyptians: Age of Reptiles #2 is a fairly drastic change of pace from its predecessor, and that may throw off returning readers. However, Ricardo Delgado handles the acceleration well, utilizing punctuated moments of violence to emphasize character traits and relationships. Colorist Ryan Hill is up to the challenge, balancing the naturalistic approach with thematic coloring that aids the drama of this tale. Ultimately this is another strong chapter in a delightful miniseries.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Age of Reptiles: Ancient Egyptians #3

Aug 5, 2015

The third outing inAge of Reptiles: Ancient Egyptianshelps solidify both the themes and the pacing of the series. Ricardo Delgado's artwork depicts a violent world where loss is met with loss and every kill has a consequence. Ryan Hill's coloring helps to emphasize the real world brutality of the violence while juxtaposing with calmer moments with elegant lighting.Age of Reptiles: Ancient Egyptians#3 is an exciting read in a series that every dinosaur fan will love.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Age of Reptiles: Ancient Egyptians #4

Sep 2, 2015

Age of Reptiles: Ancient Egyptians#4 is the conclusion this series deserved. Ricardo Delgado's master storytelling is on full display here. This action-packed finale delivers an exciting and fitting end. Ryan Hill's colors aid the poetic nature of the narrative, providing for some moving moments as the series closes. For a story about a Spinosaurus, this series has been incredibly moving. The final pages are a nice callback to the series' opening, while tying up one of the smaller loose ends.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
All-New All-Different Marvel Point One #1

Oct 6, 2015

All-New All-Different Marvel Point One #1 is able to accomplish what many of these Point One issues have lacked. This feels like a singular piece of entertainment, and the issue is stronger for it. While the hefty price tag is sure to scare away some readers,All-New All-Different Marvel Point One #1 is a surprisingly entertaining read, featuring the talents of many artists and writers. A stronger female presence would have been appreciated in this debut, but the contents of the issue show that the Marvel Universe is still going to be an exciting place for new and old readers alike.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
All-Star Batman #7

Feb 8, 2017

Beautiful in its execution, All-Star Batman #7 gives readers a new angle in on Poison Ivy. While vines and pheromone-laced kisses are still at play, Scott Snyder eschews the normal seductress angle in favor of a botanist who is still very much at work in her field. Tula Lotay’s vivacious colors breathe life into Poison Ivy – never have the more subtle powers in her arsenal looked so impressive or inviting.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
All-Star Batman #9

Apr 21, 2017

The "Ends of the Earth" arc comes to a close with the fantastic All-Star Batman #9.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Avengers (2012) #44

Apr 29, 2015

Avengers #44 has an odd job for a comic in that it is serving two narrative functions. On one hand, it is the culmination of a three-year epic. On the other hand, it is the prelude to Secret Wars. Ultimately, the book is successful in both of these endeavors. However, pieces like the emphasis on the Ultimate Universe draw away attention from many of the other characters readers have come to enjoy during this series and its sister-title New Avengers. As a conclusion, it is hard to recommend this issue to those who have not been reading these titles, especially since the debut issue of Secret Wars will likely recap these events. However, if you've been following the title, it'd be a mistake not to pick this up.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Awake #1

Sep 17, 2015

Awake #1 is an entertaining debut, but not without its flaws. Susan Beneville's script clearly has the foundations for its cast of characters, but while Regn and her partners are endearing, there's nothing that makes them stand out at this point. Brian Hess' artwork in this issue will likely be the real draw for readers, with a cartoon-like style that brings some liveliness into the story. The transitions between scenes and the introduction of so many elements make this issue a clumsy, yet lively beginning to the new series.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batwoman: Rebirth #1

Feb 17, 2017

The problem with Batwoman Rebirth #1 is that, in spite of how well it reads, it feels like little more than an advertisement for the upcoming series. While that may be one of the purposes of these "Rebirth" issues, it's almost impossible to tell what type of book Batwoman will be once the first true issue hits the stand. What will the pacing be like? What will the focus be in the first arc? How will the dialogue read when the issue isn't focused on a highlight reel of "big" moments? Other than the artwork, Batwoman Rebirth #1 leaves too much of that a mystery. Readers will likely come away still very much interested in Batwoman, but feeling a bit like they paid full price for an advert.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Black Canary (2015) #1

Jun 18, 2015

With a solid premise, a great script, and beautifully fitting artwork,Black Canary#1 is a fantastic debut that shows how diverse stories in the superhero genre can be. Brenden Fletcher, Annie Wu, Lee Loughridge, and Steve Wands are a creative team with all the synergy of a four-man band and it shows in the book's quality. Dinah Drake is back with attitude, andBlack Canary#1 is the debut that both long-time fans and new readers have been waiting for.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Black Cloud #1

Apr 3, 2017

Inventive and beautiful, Black Cloud #1 is both ethereal and utterly human, as dreams often are.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Black Panther (2016) #1

Apr 4, 2016

Black Panther #1 is a stellar debut that delivers an intriguing premise, backed by interesting characters and beautiful artwork. The cumulative effect of Coates' writing and the art by Stelfreeze and Martin is what makes the book shine. There's an energetic flow that feels less like three individuals collaborating and more like a singular vision coming to the forefront. It is a testament to the creators that Black Panther #1 is able to impress in spite of heightened expectations.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Black Panther (2016) #2

May 16, 2016

It's a tribute to the craft involved, that Black Panther #2 succeeds in building these thematic questions, but future issues must reply just as strongly, otherwise the mythos risks being torn asunder.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Black Panther (2016) #4

Aug 1, 2016

All told, Black Panther #4 is an engaging read, even if it isn't completely satisfactory. Ta-Nehisi Coates, Brian Stelfreeze and Laura Martin have crafted a layered world that asks readers to question the structures that have been in place since the inception of the titular hero. However to maintain momentum, future issues of Black Panther must begin answering these questions or else the title may find itself spinning its philosophical wheels.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Black Panther (2016) #5

Aug 15, 2016

After previous issues stumbled a bit in their pacing, Black Panther #5 feels like the series finally got running full speed. This isn't an issue with a heavy focus on action, but the moral complications of being a superhero and king have rarely been this riveting.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Black Panther (2016) #6

Sep 19, 2016

Pacing issues aside, Black Panther #6 is one of the stronger issues in the series, thanks in part to the fact that Ta-Nehisi Coates places T'Challa firmly in the leading role. The artwork by Chris Sprouse and Laura Martin is gorgeous to look at, and one can't help but be excited to see what happens when T'Challa's reinforcements get into the fray.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Black Panther (2016) #7

Oct 24, 2016

Black Panther #7 benefits from a renewed sense of urgency. From the Crew's attack on Stane, to Shuri taking the lead in her quest for self-discovery, to Changamire and Tetu pleading for one another's allegiance, the issue builds momentum for the series. Chris Sprouse, Laura Martin, and Karl Story bring out each other's strengths for a visually dynamic issue that brilliantly gives life to Ta-Nehisi Coates' dramatic script.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Black Panther (2016) #10

Jan 30, 2017

It is these subtle details, along with the explorative character work that has made Black Panther an entertaining read. At times, the protagonist's struggle has been frustrating, how does this mastermind fail to outmaneuver these upstarts? The brilliance of Black Panther #10 is showing that the conflict has never quite been between T'Challa and antagonists Tetu and Zenzi, but rather between T'Challa, the monarch that could swiftly bring the country under his heel, and T'Challa, the man who would lift his people up onto his shoulders.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Black Panther (2016) #11

Feb 22, 2017

Black Panther #11 isn't entirely a failure, the individual pieces of the battle readers do get are wonderfully illustrated, and it's nice to see each of the major combatants show off just what they can do on an individual level. But in terms of showing a large battle between the heroes and enemy forces, the issue is a bit of a dud. Coates' weaknesses at a comic book writer are on display here, but as issue twelve looks to truly close out the arc, perhaps his deft handling of politics can close out the arc on a high note.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Black Panther (2016) #12

Mar 22, 2017

Representative of the series thus far, Black Panther #12 is a political drama, with eloquent and layered dialogue by Ta-Nehisi Coates, and beautifully staged artwork. There are some moments where characters don’t feel quite like themselves, and some that feel like revelations. There are some references to T’Challa’s deep supporting cast that hint at what’s to come, and an electric final page. It is a fitting conclusion to a season that, while a little overlong, has given a new perspective on the Black Panther and the man that bears the mantle.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Black Panther: World of Wakanda #1

Nov 14, 2016

Whether focusing on a blossoming romance or the tale of a refugee, it's hard to understate how important Black Panther: World of Wakanda #1 feels in today's world, especially given the results of the election. However, separated from that context, this is still a solid comic book that develops the personal history of characters that factor heavily into Wakanda's present crisis. While World of Wakanda #1 is still a satellite book, it presents its characters in such a way that makes one look forward to what comes next.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Black Panther: World of Wakanda #3

Jan 23, 2017

With solid characterization and beautiful artwork, Black Panther: World of Wakanda #3 makes for an entertaining read. While a storytelling choice does feel like a missed opportunity, the work Roxanne Gay and Alitha Martinez put into building the characters and this world is solid. And yes, this is a book about romance between supporting characters in a small niche of the Marvel Universe. But it's nice that Marvel is supporting the variety of genre represented in this book.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Black Panther: World of Wakanda #6

Apr 24, 2017

Black Panther: World of Wakanda #6 is an excellent example of what can be done with a single issue story. Rembert Browne does excellent in his debut, and brings a nice energy to the page and the character. Joe Bennett's artwork is phenomenal, giving the action beats a kinetic energy that most comics struggle with. While it's unfortunate that Black Panther: World of Wakanda is ending, it's nice to see it go out on such a high note and with a promise of what the future holds.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Britannia #1

Sep 22, 2016

The craftsmanship behind Britannia #1 makes it a truly enjoyable read. Peter Milligan's script works incredibly well with Juan Jos Ryp's artwork so that neither the dialogue nor the visuals are redundant. When combined with Jordie Bellaire's stellar color artwork, Britannia #1 comes together as a jam-packed debut well worth the investment. Some may find it a tad overwhelming, but it's nice to see a series get so much accomplished in the first issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Britannia #2

Oct 16, 2016

Britannia #2 continues the medieval horror tone established in the debut to great effect. Peter Milligan continues to build upon the mystery and Juan Jos Ryp's art shows just how monstrous men can be to one another. In the end, this is Jordie Bellaire's issue, and her remarkable colors bring Britannia #2 to life in horrific detail. It's the gripping atmosphere that her art brings that makes Britannia #2 such an entertaining and suspenseful read.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Cannibal #1

Oct 5, 2016

Cannibal#1 is a good debut that makes its mark with a creative twist on the “zombie” premise. Matias Bergara's art is atmospheric and has a nice rhythm to the pacing, keeping the story moving at a nice pace. And by focusing on the characters, Jennifer Young and Brian Buccellato have crafted a story that should be able to overcome the superficial similarities toThe Walking Dead.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Cannibal #2

Nov 14, 2016

Cannibal#2 is a good comic that never quite gets to being great. While the artwork by Matias Bergara and Brian Buccellato is atmospheric and helps to build tension, the script by Buccellato and Jennifer Young runs the risk of disengaging the reader from the characters for the sake of quick-pacing. As the mystery unfolds in future issues,the pacing and story choices made here may become clearer, but for nowCannibal#2 is an entertaining comic but not necessarily one to write home about.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Captain America And The Mighty Avengers #8

May 14, 2015

In many ways,Captain America and the Mighty Avengers is the most classic feeling of the current Avengers titles. Its focus on character interaction and the familial nature of team dynamics hearkens back to a number of popular runs on Earth's Mightiest Heroes throughout the years. This most recent entry is no different. Al Ewing's script is emotional and complex, taking risks that many writers would avoid, and the art by Luke Ross drives the issue forward. The tie-in toAvengersandNew Avengers both strengthens the issue while providing its biggest flaw, butCaptain America and the Mighty Avengers#8 is a good entry in a title that anyone who likes character work mixed in with superheroes should be reading.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Captain America And The Mighty Avengers #9

Jun 11, 2015

Expertly scripted and gorgeously drawn,Captain America and the Mighty Avengers#9 is the finale readers deserved. It a beautifully emotional coda, not just to this series, or Hickman's epic inAvengers andNew Avengers, but to the Marvel Universe itself. Readers would be wise not to pass this issue up.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Captain Britain and the Mighty Defenders #1

Jul 16, 2015

Captain Britain and the Mighty Defenders #1 is an entertaining debut that hits most of the marks perfectly. Al Ewing's characters blend nicely with Alan Davis' artwork and the use of parody and meta-humor help the creators take full advantage of theBattleworld premise. It remains to be seen however, if the late start to the conflict will be a detriment to the series or if the second issue can close strong.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Captain Britain and the Mighty Defenders #2

Aug 20, 2015

Captain Britain and the Mighty Defenders #2 is an entertaining, though brief, tie-in to the Secret Wars event. Wrapping together great artwork by Alan Davis and fun beats by Al Ewing into a Judge Dredd homage, the book provides enough to keep fans satiated. While not striking the same emotional chords of Ewing's earlier work inMighty Avengers,Captain Britain and the Mighty Defenders #2 is still well worth a look, especially for readers who may only want to dip their toe into the larger Secret Wars frame.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Captain Marvel And The Carol Corps #3

Aug 31, 2015

Ultimately, Captain Marvel and the Carol Corps #3 is an above average book, but it doesn't quite enter "good" territory. While the art is fantastic, the story is hindered by its overreliance on the makeup of Battleworld, diminishing the stakes. Fans of Carol will still find plenty to enjoy, but new readers are likely going to be underwhelmed by this outing.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Captain Marvel And The Carol Corps #4

Sep 28, 2015

Fortunately, Captain Marvel and the Carol Corps #4 ends on a high note, touching not only on some of the unanswered questions Carol had about Battleworld, but also giving new meaning to this series' motto. It's a powerful ending, made more affecting by the heartfelt letter from Kelly Sue DeConnick at the end of the issue. The issue, like the mini-series, has some bumps, but Captain Marvel and the Carol Corps #4 makes for an emotionally satisfying end to a series that always looked up to the stars.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Constantine #18

Oct 9, 2014

CONSTANTINE #18 is a solid entry to the series and the a fun start to the next arc. Fawkes' script is smart and well paced, and the art by Jeremy Haun provides the right amount of grit needed for the series. Though the issue lacks some tension, the setup for the arc promises to deliver a conflict that may not be so easily dealt with.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Constantine #19

Nov 13, 2014

Constantine#19 is a tricky book to judge. It clearly wants to be a more meditative tale, focusing more on establishing its tone and style than forwarding the plot. And so the contents of the issue itself are strong, delivering a story with a quieter focus. But its overall place in the arc remains to be seen. As of right now, it doesn't seem to match both the previous issue and where it seems this arc is headed. Still, a good issue is a good issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Constantine #20

Dec 11, 2014

Constantine #20is a near perfect issue. Fawkes and Haun have doubled down on the atmosphere from issue #19, but now that Constantine and his Earth-2 counterpart re together, there's plenty of subtle character moments. The consistency in pacing from the previous chapter to this one also helps solidify the arc, and a final page reveal suggests that the tension that's been building is going to pay off in a big way.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Constantine #21

Jan 15, 2015

Ray Fawkes and Jeremy Haun have worked in tandem to create an excellent comic.Constantine#21 is an exciting read that sucks the reader into a moral dilemma and stages it against some amazing action. This arc has been fun from the start, and things are only looking to get better and more personal.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Constantine #22

Feb 12, 2015

Constantine #22 is not quite as strong as its predecessors, sacrificing some of the apocalyptic tension to emphasize the rift between Constantine and his companions. However, this doesnt mean its not good in its own right. The issue sets up an incredible conflict between Constantine and Apokolips as the series comes to a close next March.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Constantine #23

Mar 12, 2015

Constantine#23 is a powerful finale to the series. Ray Fawkes is in fine form here, and Jeremy Haun's art excels at both the cosmic elements and the unstable emotions experienced by the protagonist and the people he tries to save. Fawkes and Haun took a risk in focusing on inner turmoil rather than external forces for the finale toConstantine, but with the final issue they've proven why that was the right choice.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Constantine: The Hellblazer #2

Jul 9, 2015

This issue is another haunting chapter for the fledgling series. The script by Ming Doyle and James Tynion IV reveals some of Constantine's personality flaws while presenting a brisk story that does a lot of world-building. Riley Rossmo's art takes on a level of versatility that was lacking in the debut, and the atmosphere present here shows that this comic can easily transition from Constantine's cocksure attitude into terror.Constantine: The Hellblazer#2 is a comic that deserves a look, and readers who thought the previous iteration of John Constantine to be too dour are sure to like what they find here.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Constantine: The Hellblazer #3

Aug 13, 2015

Constantine: The Hellblazer#3 takes its time in order to expand readers' understanding of John Constantine's past while also introducing an entertaining foil for him in the form of Georgiana Snow. The use of two art teams pays off as the switch between past and present is easily discernible and emphasizes the change in Constantine's outlook. While the detour into John's past may leave some readers wanting more horror,Constantine: The Hellblazer#3 lays the foundation for some intense emotional stakes in the future.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Constantine: The Hellblazer #5

Oct 20, 2015

Constantine: The Hellblazer#5 is a powerful issue and rewards the buildup of previous issues. Ming Doyle and James Tynion IV not only have a great grasp of John Constantine, but also the skills necessary to build the atmosphere. Rossmo's art is powerful, able to capture the wide array of emotions in his characters, with a sense of dread and anxiety throughout the issue.Constantine: The Hellblazer#5 demonstrates the series' ability to balance the supernatural with human emotion, and that duality is what makes the title a fantastic read.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Contest Of Champions #1

Oct 12, 2015

Ultimately, Contest of Champions #1 is a decent debut for the "All-New, All-Different Marvel" initiative. Readers may find the premise a little too familiar in the wake of Secret Wars but Ewing's penchant for strong characterization keeps the story engaging. The art in both stories is effective, with Paco Medina getting to show off his skill in action. Thomas Labourot gets the short end of the stick, with an underwhelming back-up. In a competitive market, Contest of Champions will need to offer more in the way of narrative to be successful.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Convergence: Swamp Thing #1

Apr 23, 2015

Convergence: Swamp Thing #1 lacks any immediate sense of danger, causing some of the scenes to fall flat. However, with the threat of the other worlds upon him, it looks like a nice lead in to the next issue. And having Len Wein writing the character is always a pleasant experience.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Convergence: Swamp Thing #2

May 21, 2015

Len Wein and Kelley Jones come together to tell an enjoyable tale inConvergence: Swamp Thing#2. It's nice to have a two issue tie-in that feels like it told a complete tale, even a simple one. That being said, this often feels like a Batman story rather than a chapter in Swamp Thing's narrative. And with so many Bat-related titles on the market, it's unfortunate that the Muck-Monster often feels overshadowed by the Dark Knight in his own book. Still,Convergence: Swamp Thing#2 is an enjoyable tie-in to the Convergence event, an a definite must for horror fans.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Cyborg #1

Jul 23, 2015

With Cyborg #1, Victor Stone finally gets his place in the sun. David F. Walker and Ivan Reis have crafted a solid debut for the Teen Titan and Justice League member. Not everything is perfect, some of Walker's captions are overwritten, but he demonstrates a great grasp of Cyborg's voice. The artwork by Ivan Reis, Joe Prado, and Adriano Lucas is fantastic and brings Victor to life in a nuanced manner.Cyborg#1 is a good debut, only time will tell if the series lives up to the promise here.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Cyborg #2

Aug 28, 2015

Bumpy transitions aside,Cyborg#2 improves on its predecessor and expands on both the world and Victor's place in it. Cyborg's internal struggle makes for a compelling read and Walker's grasp of Vic's voice means that it doesn't feel trope-filled like so many young adult books do. Ivan Reis and the entire team give an excellent sense of momentum to the issue, even when the scene involves Victor talking to his cat.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Cyborg (2016) #1

Sep 26, 2016

Readers who missed out on the Rebirth issue may be miffed by the lack of action here, but Cyborg #1 is largely about the anxiety Victor feels surrounding his own identity. His father's fears that Victor may be a machine simply replicating a man has shaken him, and his journey to rediscover his own soul makes for a touching read. That human journey is what makes Cyborg #1 such an engaging read. Between John Semper's dialogue and the art by Paul Pelletier, the layered nature of the characters gives the issue some depth that the previous chapter lacked. And with a stellar opening sequence and a strong teaser at the end, Cyborg #1 promises readers that like more action in their superhero books won't be dissatisfied for long.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.5
Dead Squad: Ayala Tal (One-Shot) #1

Jun 25, 2015

Dead Squad: Ayala Tal #1 is not a bad comic—it's got good action and artwork. But it's hard to recommend it to anyone outside of readers of Dead Squad. While it is promoted as a one-shot,much of the story's depth relies on knowledge of the main series. In many ways, it works as an epilogue or a segue into a new series rather than something on its own. For those who have been following Dead Squad, this is a nice appetizer for a potential sequel, but this will do little to satisfy readers who picked the comic off the shelf.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Deathstroke (2016) #1

Aug 24, 2016

Deathstroke #1 builds on the story from Deathstroke: Rebirth #1, building up Slade Wilson both as a man and as a killer. Both in Priest's script and Pagulayan's art, Deathstroke #1 performs a great balancing act by ensuring that while the titular assassin's background is explored and he is humanized, that he isn't made into an anti-hero. The biggest flaw in the book is that the plot depends a bit on the reader having picked up the Deathstroke: Rebirth #1 issue. And really, considering the quality of the story, readers should do that.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Deathstroke (2016) #2

Sep 19, 2016

Deathstroke #2 is a solid outing that builds its characters through their actions rather than their words. Priest's choice to present the narrative in different segments allows for the tension in the story to build even as the narrative jumps around in time. Carlo Pagulayan's artwork is a perfect fit for the character, and the synergy between he and Jason Paz and Jeremy Cox really makes the book come together visually.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Deathstroke (2016) #5

Oct 26, 2016

Deathstroke #5, while at first appearing to be a manhunt, finds life in its characters. Priest shakes things up by pairing Ravager with Batman and Robin with Deathstroke and letting those interactions bring out different sides in the characters. Joe Bennett’s dynamic pencils keep the story moving at a blistering pace, while inker Mark Morales and colorist Jeromy Cox provide beautiful work. Ultimately, Deathstroke #5 proves that Slade Wilson is a compelling character, even when Batman guest spots in his book. And a pair of twists in the final pages shows that there are still layers to Slade waiting to be dealt with.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Deathstroke (2016) #16

Apr 10, 2017

Deathstroke #16 continues to build on the series' excellence. The brutal artwork is bolstered by a script that isn't afraid to let the readers have a laugh and Priest continues to nail tonal shifts in a way that seems effortless. The book serves as a nice antidote to the melodrama that courses through so many comics, and it's nice to see humor that doesn't rely on biting one-liners. With two issues left in the arc, one can only hope that Priest and company can keep the quality as high as it is here.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Deathstroke: Rebirth #1

Aug 10, 2016

Deathstroke: Rebirth #1 is a solid prelude to the main series, giving the audience a good idea of how Christopher Priest intends to tackle the character, while still telling its own story. Carlo Pagulayan's artwork builds a world for the hardened assassin to explore, and makes sure that the supervillain is able to live up to his reputation. By covering two time periods, Deathstroke: Rebirth #1 is able to squeeze quite a bit of character into its twenty pages, giving readers a strong hook as the series begins.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Dept. H #1

Apr 20, 2016

Dept. H is a haunting debut that effectively sets up the whodunit mystery at the heart of the story. Both the writing and the artwork do an excellent job setting up the claustrophobic and dangerous environment that separates the title from so many other murder mysteries. Matt and Sharlene Kindt make for a great 1-2 punch, with good characters and art that is beautiful in its ability to create mood. Dept. H #1 is a must buy for fans of either science fiction or mystery.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Detective Comics (2016) #934

Jun 8, 2016

Detective Comics #934 is a solid debut that works to fold disparate members of Batman's extended family into one book. With another shuffle in the form of "Rebirth," James Tynion IV's simplified structure provides an excellent base for readers to hop onboard, while still providing some excellent bits of character. The real draw here though is the top-notch artwork. Eddy Barrows, Eber Ferreira, and Adriano Lucas have done a superb job bringing both Gotham and the heroes that protect it to life. With dynamic illustrations, heavy inks worthy of the Dark Knight, and colors that pop off the page, Detective Comics #934 is a great premiere for the Rebirth brand.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Detective Comics (2016) #936

Jul 18, 2016

It is this thematic weight to the story that really makes Detective Comics #936 a spectacular read. In just a few issues, James Tynion IV and his pair of fantastic art teams have made this series a must-have, especially for fans of the "Bat-Family" concept. Alvaro Martinez's art is gorgeous and intense and will leave readers wanting more in the best of ways. And while some readers might want a little more Batman, James Tynion proves just how independent and striking second-tier characters like Batwoman and Tim Drake can be.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Detective Comics (2016) #937

Jul 27, 2016

Detective Comics #937 may not quite match the thrilling pace of the previous issue, but Tynion's use of humor in the script keeps this chapter lively, and the vivid artwork by Alvaro Martinez, Raul Fernandez and Brad Anderson makes every page a joy to look at. Detective Comics has been a fantastic series since the DC "Rebirth" initiative took hold and it shows no signs of slowing down.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Detective Comics (2016) #938

Aug 10, 2016

With solid character moments, and exciting action, Detective Comics #938 continues the title's success. James Tynion IV has found a nice rhythm in rotating focus between the cast members and shows how much emotion can be added to a book in just a few pages. The art team of Alvaro Martinez, Raul Fernandez, and Brad Anderson keep the book's visuals dramatic and stirring. Detective Comics isn't necessarily doing anything new with its story, but it's still a terrfically entertaining book worthy of readers' attention.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Detective Comics (2016) #939

Aug 29, 2016

Detective Comics #939 is proof that characters can go a long way to making a comic book great. James Tynion IV has found a groove in his writing, balancing the cast members as they go through this turbulent time. The emphasis on Red Robin is well timed; after having built up the young man's indecision in previous chapters, his choices here are satisfying to read. Artist Eddy Barrows returns in top form, his expressive characters keeping the drama flowing even as the action slows for a moment. That won't be the case for long however, as Tim Drake's decisions look to have dangerous consequences.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
East of West #22

Dec 3, 2015

After the setup of previous issues, East of West #22 is a welcome adrenaline rush for the series.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Eleanor and the Egret #1

Apr 4, 2017

Gorgeous artwork by Sam Kieth and Ronda Pattison and a script by John Layman that subtly lays the groundwork for a magical world make Eleanor & the Egret #1 a fascinating debut. The characters of Eleanor and Belanger make for an instantly appealing pair thanks to Layman's great character work. With just enough mystery to go along with this solid first chapter, readers may find themselves waiting anxiously to get their hands on the second issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Elektra (2017) #1

Feb 22, 2017

Elektra#1 is the rare comic debut that will grab readers and refuse to let go. There isn't a complex plot requiring tons of exposition, but that allows for the visuals of the comic to flourish. Juann Cabral's illustrations tell readers so much about Elektra from the way she moves and fights, and coloristsMarcio Menyz and Antonio Fabelado a wonderful job giving the assassin new life in lively colors that poetically contrast with the death she brings. Comic book newcomer Matt Owens comes out swinging, showing a talent for knowing when to let the art tell the story while not forgetting that character comes through both action and words. For fans of the character, this issue was already a must-get, but all comic book readers should give this debut a look.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Future Imperfect #2

Jul 6, 2015

Ultimately, Future Imperfect #2 an entertaining book if a reader is looking for a superhero brawl. While the stakes won't hold up for readers new to comics, there's still some fun to be had. There's a lot of potential here if the series can better balance its plotting with its action set pieces. If it can't, it will remain a good-not-great, entertaining-not-exhilarating type of affair.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Future Imperfect #3

Jul 27, 2015

Ultimately, Future Imperfect #3 is a fun, albeit predictable, outing. Peter David injects enough character in his script to prevent the issue from feeling mundane, and Greg Land's action here is fun. The issue does have some flaws; the ending doesn't quite pack the punch it could have if the previous issue had not used the plot here for a twist. Future Imperfect #3 will not do much to draw in readers who had dismissed it in favor of other Secret Wars tie-ins. But for fans of David's Hulk run, especially the original Future Imperfect, this is a fun return to Maestro and his devious plans.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Future Imperfect #4

Aug 10, 2015

Future Imperfect #4 is an issue that helps get the Secret Wars tie-in back on track. By centering the issue around Ross and Maestro, Peter David crafts an issue that has both fun dialogue and entertaining action. Greg Land brings the world to life with strong visual storytelling that gives the issue momentum. If the series can close out with this quality, it will have been well worth the bumps in the road.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Ghost Rider (2016) #1

Dec 1, 2016

With a strong relationship at its core and a perfect number of guest stars,Ghost Rider#1 is a solid debut that isn't afraid to leave an arc set up for its guest stars in favor of focusing on Robbie Reyes and his brother Gabe which nicely counteracts a lot of the tropes most first issues find themselves using. Felipe Smith's script pops at every turn, giving good moments of brotherly love, as well as humor when Cho faces off against his unusual foe. And while the main story doesn't have much Ghost Rider in it, the back-up with gorgeous visuals by Tradd Moore delivers the action in the issue's final pages.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Godzilla in Hell #3

Oct 5, 2015

The shift in tone may jar readers, but it's a change of pace that was needed for Godzilla in Hell to work as a tribute to all things Godzilla. Dante's Inferno worked to show not only the variedness of Hell, but also the different aspects of Dante himself. In this way, Godzilla in Hell #3 shows the raw destructive power of Godzilla while highlighting his defiant personality. The creative team of Farinas, Frietas, Mowry, and Laguna Olimba make this issue a delightful read. Godzilla is in Hell. Hell should be worried.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Godzilla: Oblivion #1

Apr 4, 2016

Unfortunately, Godzilla: Oblivion #1 doesn't quite live up to the promise of its pitch. This isn't necessarily a bad comic; future issues may yet make this an exciting series. But the debut lacks anything to really grab hold of. The monster action is too brief for Godzilla fans, and the characters are too one-note for anyone seeking to become one. Ultimately, Godzilla: Oblivion #1 is just kind of there, which is a shame. Hopefully, the impending arrival of Godzilla can shake things up a bit.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Gotham By Midnight Annual #1

Jul 30, 2015

Gotham By Midnight Annual#1 is an entertaining issue, but ultimately stumbles in its presentation. Christian Duce's artwork and Lee Loughridge's colors give the issue a unique style compared to the art the series normally has and this matches the tone of the annual. But while Ray Fawkes' dialogue and character work is still strong, the delivery of information in the story doesn't quite meet the potential of the premise. Readers ofGotham By Midnight will likely enjoy this issue, but newer readers looking to get a feel for the series would be better off trying any of the previous chapters.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Gotham By Midnight #1

Nov 27, 2014

Gotham by Midnight #1 is one of the better comic debuts over the past few months. Fawkes and Templesmith make a great team and really bring out the supernatural underbelly of one of DC's most storied cities. Some of the characters are on the shallow side, but the book makes up for it in spades with its atmosphere and focus on its apparent leads.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Gotham By Midnight #2

Dec 25, 2014

With a great atmosphere, combining eeriness with true horror, Gotham by Midnight #2 is a thrilling read. The characters are beginning to find their footing and with two issues complete, Gotham by Midnight is looking to become one of the stronger books in DCs lineup.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Gotham By Midnight #3

Jan 29, 2015

Gotham by Midnight is turning out to be a stellar series andGotham by Midnight#3 is no exception. Fawkes and Templesmith are delivering fantastic work and some of the minor faults in previous issues have been alleviated by the cohesive whole that this chapter helps to solidify. No, this comic may not be for everyone, but it's certainly worth a try.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Gotham By Midnight #4

Feb 27, 2015

Gotham by Midnight is a sensational series, and unless you are truly averse to the supernatural, it's a book that should have your attention. Issue #4 is another great step forward for Fawkes and Templesmith, as the series looks to a clash between the Spectre and Batman in its climax.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Gotham By Midnight #5

Mar 26, 2015

Gotham by Midnight#5 further solidifies the series as one of the best in DC's lineup. Fawkes and Templesmith have an excellent chemistry on page, and the issue is executed brilliantly. When Batman can guest star inan issue and not cast his shadow over the main cast members, that's the sign that the series has found its true footing.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Gotham By Midnight #6

Jun 25, 2015

Even with the hiatus for Convergence,Gotham by Midnightis still one of the best books on the stands. Ray Fawkes keeps the story moving, and with the series and its characters firmly established, it's nice to see the dynamics between the team members change. New artist Juan Ferreyra brings exquisite linework along with eerie coloring to create a tingling sense of dread in readers.Gotham by Midnight#6 is a must-read comic.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Gotham By Midnight #7

Jul 23, 2015

Gotham By Midnight#7 stands as another issue from a titleon top of its game. It's becoming difficult to find new ways to praise this series which expertly weaves character and horror. Ray Fawkes has a great flow to his storytelling that allows readers to simply sit back and enjoy the narrative, and Juan Ferreyra is making the series his own with his creative layouts and nuanced character work.Gotham By Midnight #7 is an enjoyable read for both new and old readers, and well worth a look.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Gotham By Midnight #8

Aug 27, 2015

The ability to rotate focus around the various members of Corrigan's team allowsGotham by Midnightto feel fresh each issue. Ray Fawkes and Juan Ferreyra both work in sync here, with a focus on building horror through the readers' expectation for characters and revealing something new about them in the process.Gotham by Midnight#8 is another installment in a series that has become one of the most reliable buys in comics.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Green Lantern (2011) Annual #4

Oct 5, 2015

Green Lantern Annual#4 is an entertaining book, but its plot seems hesitant to offer real developments outside of the main run of issues. Luckily, the character work, both in the artwork and in Venditti's script makes up for it. Pascal Alixe's rendition of Jordan is a little unrecognizable at times, but otherwise he and the entire art team really nail a story about a man on the run and finding new aspects of himself.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Green Lantern (2011) #41

Jun 4, 2015

Green Lantern#41 is a solid and entertaining book. Robert Vendetti and Billy Tan have done an excellent job craftingan issue that both continues the story woven beforehand while inviting new or lapsed readers into the engaging narrative. While some elements are perhaps overly familiar to fans of space opera, it's nice to have the base established before the story pushes onward. Tan's artwork is gorgeous and fun, providing dynamic and inventive visuals without becoming overly detailed.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Green Lantern (2011) #42

Jul 2, 2015

The second installment of Hal Jordan's new role is a rocky one.Green Lantern#42 lacks some of the creative punch of its predecessor, and the setting in his spaceship is not visually interesting for the issue to keep any momentum. The new cast shines together, though, so Vendetti and artist Billy Tan should be able to get the series back in the air.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Green Lantern (2011) #43

Aug 6, 2015

While featuring some good character moments and great art,Green Lantern#43 struggles in finding a story to tell. Robert Vendetti still displays a firm grip of Hal Jordan's voice and the book is at its strongest when Hal interacts with Virgo, but outside of these quieter moments the book – like Hal – seems to be searching for a purpose. Die-hard Green Lantern fans may be satisfied by the events occurring here, but many readers will find that once they look past the art by Ethan Van Sciver and Alex Sinclair, there's not much unique in this story about a lone space-cop.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Green Lantern: The Lost Army #1

Jun 25, 2015

Green Lantern: The Lost Army#1 is a good start for a new series. The inclusion of both John Stewart and Guy Gardner should give the new series enough of a push to stand on its own. And the art by Jesus Saiz is well worth the price of admission on its own.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Green Lantern: The Lost Army #2

Jul 16, 2015

Green Lantern: The Lost Army#2 is an entertaining, but underdeveloped comic. Jesus Saiz's artwork is gorgeous, and Cullen Bunn comes up with some entertaining uses of the Lantern rings, but the comic stumbles in developing its plot. Two issues in, andGreen Lantern: The Lost Armyhas delivered two battles with ill-defined stakes. For the series to survive in this market, Bunn will need to give the Lanterns something to do other than to search for their way home.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Green Lantern: The Lost Army #3

Aug 20, 2015

Green Lantern: The Lost Army#3 sees some minor developments as John Stewart gambles by having his team join with Relic in order to learn more about their location. Unfortunately, these developments aren't quite enough to keep the series from losing steam. The art by Jesus Saiz, Cliff Richards, and Michael Atiyeh is good, but there's a lack of visual excitement here which only exacerbates the issues with the script. There's a lot of setup in Green Lantern: The Lost Army #3, and hopefully that pays off in later issues.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Green Lantern: The Lost Army #4

Sep 20, 2015

Green Lantern: The Lost Army#4 suffers from the inertia of previous issues. While the plot finally sees some real movement in this chapter, it's hard to get a sense of momentum with so many questions still unanswered and unclear stakes. Javier Pina is a talented artist, but the art doesn't quite match the cleanliness of Jesus Saiz's work on this series. Ultimately, this is another issue that never quite attains the intensity the story deserves.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #22

Jul 20, 2015

Long waits can build anticipation to points where a book cannot recover, no matter how solid the content is. But Hawkeye #22, through brilliant work by Matt Fraction, David Aja and Matt Hollingsworth, exceeds expectations and delivers a satisfying ending that doesn't lose sight of what the book was. In the end, Hawkeye #22 succeeds by staying true to its characters and itself. Goodbye, bro, and thank you.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Injection #1

May 11, 2015

With a weathered atmosphere, complex characters, and beautiful artwork,Injection#1 is well worth your attention. The pace will be jarring to some, make no mistake, as theissue is a slow burn as Warren Ellis focuses on introducing the readers to the characters and the acronym-filled world they inhabit. But Ellis' often poetic language works in tandem with the artwork by Declan Shalvey. And not enough can be said about Jordie Bellaire's color work, which here strikes a wondrous balance between the coldness of a techno-thriller and the heavy weight of a world that isn't what it was supposed to be.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Injection #2

Jun 11, 2015

Injection#2 is a sharply written spy thriller, highlighted by an intense action sequence worthy of a Bond film. As Ellis stretches the world outward,Injectionshows just how nimbly it will be able to move between genres. These fascinating characters are introduced to readers through their actions and their expressions, and Ellis' script allows the audience to know them intimately in only a few issues. Declan Shalvey's art, along with the expert coloring by Jordie Bellaire create a delectable reading experience. This issue has solidifiedInjectionas a series not to be missed.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Invincible #127

Apr 21, 2016

One of the highlights of Invincible is the series' ability to balance emotional beats with surprising plot developments, and the newest issue is no exception.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Justice League Dark Annual #2

Oct 30, 2014

Ultimately,Justice League Dark Annual#2 is a disappointing entry, especially after last week'sJustice League Dark #35. With a routine plot and few character moments, the annual ultimately feels shallow. Strong art and some good action beats save the issue, though if you aren't readingJustice League Dark, this issue is forgettable.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Justice League Dark #35

Oct 23, 2014

Justice League Dark #35 is a great entry in the series. The father-daughter dynamic between Zatanna and Zatara is well done and the artwork enhances the script at every turn. This comic is highly recommended, especially for fans of Zatanna.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Justice League Dark #36

Nov 28, 2014

Justice League Dark#36 is a solid issue with lots of great action and fun character work, especially from the villainous Felix Faust. Andres Guinaldo brings a welcome energy to the book's proceedings.Justice League Dark has always been a fun book, combining the supernatural with monstrous action, and the newest chapter is no exception.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Justice League Dark #38

Jan 29, 2015

Justice League Dark#38 is another solid issue in the series. With time itself coming apart at the seams, and the team reunited, the stage is set for a thrilling climax. While the issue does have some pacing issues early on, solid writing and artwork makeJustice League Dark#38 another entertaining chapter in the saga of these supernatural characters.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Justice League Dark #39

Feb 27, 2015

Other than that singular concern, however, Justice League Dark#39 is a solid issue with appropriately developed stakes and a new energy given by bringing the team back together after spending the last few issues on separate adventures. Pralaya is a formidable foe even for a team as powerful as the Justice League Dark, so it will be nice to see how the series concludes.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Justice League Dark #40

Mar 26, 2015

Justice League Dark#40 is a good issue, but not a great sendoff to the team. While both the characterization and artwork is strong, the story's pace and direction leaves a bit to be desired and precious little time for many that count those among the Justice League Dark.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Justice League Dark: Future's End #1

Sep 24, 2014

Ultimately, JUSTICE LEAGUE DARK: FUTURE'S END #1 is an oddity where the technical aspects of the book elevate a standard story to be something worth reading. The trio of artists on the book do a stellar job bringing the otherworldly environment to life, and Wein's script nails some solid character moments.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Justice League: Rebirth #1

Jul 6, 2016

Ultimately, Justice League Rebirth #1 struggles to get any real momentum. Essentially a giant action sequence, the issue offers no real insight into its characters or their motivations. There are bright spots however, Hitch's dialogue is lively enough, and the action by Hitch, Henriques, Hanna and Sinclair is exactly what this issue needed. It's unfortunate though that the story feels so perfunctory. Hopefully the true series debut will be more memorable.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Kill the Minotaur #1

May 22, 2017

Kill the Minotaur #1 excites with its well developed, and true-to-the-original, take on a classic mythological tale.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
King Tiger #1

Jul 23, 2015

King Tiger #1 is a fun but imperfect debut. Randy Stradley's script leans a little too heavily on readers knowing who these characters from previous books, and as a result, the issue isn't particularly inviting to new readers. That being said, there's a lot to like in the issue, and the art by Douglas Wheatley is incredibly detailed and made all the more lifelike by Rain Beredo's stellar color art.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
King's Road #1

Jan 31, 2016

King's Road #1 packs quite a bit of material within it's cover. For both readers new to this world as well as those who followed through Dark Horse Presents, the issue has enough content to make for a satisfying read. Unfortunately, King's Road #1 is hindered by its characters who aren't realized enough to match the interesting premise. This flaw isn't completely fatal to the comic, as there's enough visually interesting material, but for readers to buy into the stakes of the story, the characters have to make a stronger impression. Ultimately, King's Road #1 is an entertaining debut whose execution doesn't quite break the mold enough to make it stand from the pack.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
King's Road #3

Apr 11, 2016

King's Road feels like a callback to older monsters-and-babes stories, but it never quite does enough to make the return visit worthwhile. There's strong artwork on display inKing's Road #3, but it feels wasted on underwritten heroes and generic foes. Ultimately,King's Road #3 is too mired in genre conventions to be compelling. Lovers of the fantasy genre would be better off looking elsewhere for entertainment.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Klarion #1

Oct 9, 2014

KLARION #1 is a solid start to the new series. Nocenti's character work is great, and McCarthy's layouts add a flash of personality to the look of the book. If there is one flaw it is that the book's plot seems a bit unfocused, though that can be easily fixed in future issues.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Klarion #2

Nov 13, 2014

Klarion is a book with some serious flaws. Nocenti appears to have a good grasp on her characters and plot, but seems to be skipping key development scenes in the final product. With a number of moving parts and very little time for its characters,Klarion #2 makes the mistake of running forward and leaving its reader behind.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Klarion #3

Dec 11, 2014

A significant improvement over its predecessor,Klarion #3 shows more of the promise that the series debut contained. Ann Nocenti's plotting is quite strong, driven by the sometimes malicious Klarion. And McCarthy's artwork makes the story come to life with layouts that draw your eyes across the page and back again.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Klarion #5

Feb 12, 2015

Klarion#5 is one of the better issues in this short-lived series. Klarion's mischievous personality shines through and the artwork gorgeously drives the story forward. Unfortunately, the stakes in the story aren't clicking quite the way they should, and the story feels flat for it.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Klarion #6

Mar 12, 2015

Klarionhas been a series of missteps buttressed by some truly fantastic art. Ann Nocenti demonstrated a strong take on the titular character, but the plot seemed overly compressed so that none of it left a true impression. It's unfortunate that the series didn't get more room to breathe, but it was a zany ride while it lasted.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Luke Cage (2017) #1

May 22, 2017

Font size aside, Luke Cage #1 is an entertaining debut for a hero that's had a mixed bag of solo efforts. Writer David Walker uses his experience with Luke Cage to exciting results, first lulling readers into a sense of familiarity and then quickly transitioning to something new for the character. The artwork by Nelson Blake II and Marcio Menyz gives the book the sense of personal drama that it needs, while also showing off some great action beats. With Luke Cage out of his element, fans should be excited to see just what the series has in store for the hero.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Martian Manhunter (2015) #1

Jun 18, 2015

Providing a jumping on point for new readers,Martian Manhunter#1 is a fine debut for the shapeshifting alien. Rob Williams and Eddy Barrows have crafted a science fiction tale with a nice hook. While the characters take the back seat to establishing the stakes, there's plenty of room for this series to grow.Martian Manhunter#1 is definitely worth a look for sci-fi fans.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Martian Manhunter (2015) #2

Jul 16, 2015

Martian Manhunter #2 builds on its predecessor in some fun ways, with developments that reveal both character and allow for some great action. The script by Rob Williams has some solid twists, and the art by Eddy Barrows, Eber Ferreira, and Gabe Eltaeb makes for an atmospheric read. The one thing holdingMartian Manhunterback is that it hasn't quite found its own selling point. There are a number of great science fiction books on comic book racks, andMartian Manhunter may need to draw more heavily on the special qualities of its cast to stand out from the pack.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Martian Manhunter (2015) #3

Aug 20, 2015

Martian Manhunter#3 is another good chapter in this sci-fi thriller. The art team, led by penciler Eddy Barrows turns in some fantastic character work and horrifying aliens, while Eddy Barrows brings together some of the disparate plot elements of previous issues. IfMartian Manhuntercan close out its opening arc as strong as this issue, the series will quickly find itself in stellar territory.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Martian Manhunter (2015) #4

Sep 20, 2015

After disjointed early issues,Martian Manhunterhits full stride in its fourth outing. By bringing together the disparate cast, Rob Williams develops some great character moments that speak, not only to these protagonists as individuals but to the many good qualities of J'onn J'onzz. Eddy Barrows, Eber Ferreira, and Gabe Eltaeb have always provided this series with great art, but their narrative skills as a team really lend an intensity to not only the action, but the overall tone of the book.Martian Manhunteris part superhero, part sci-fi, and part-horror, and most importantly, good storytelling.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Master of Kung Fu #2

Jun 4, 2015

Master of Kung Fu#2 continues the good start the series had and actually improves on its predecessor by better establishing the characters around Shang-Chi. His school of misfits is a clever way to work in several X-Men characters, and its nice to see the foes pursuing him are equally diverse. This issue also better establishes the stakes compared to its preceding chapter.Master of Kung Fu has already solidified itself as one of the best tie-ins toSecret Wars. The only real flaw now is that it is halfway over.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Master of Kung Fu #3

Jul 9, 2015

Master of Kung Fu#3 is another entertaining chapter in thisSecret Wars tie-in. While the nature of the title being a mini-series does create some pacing issues, this is still one of the best series available. Haden Blackman's script is a fun ride, and the artwork by Dalibor Talajic does a great job of conveying the martial arts wizardry in Shang-Chi's arsenal. New and returning readers alike will find this to be an enjoyable issue with enough of a build-up to draw them back for the final round.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Master of Kung Fu #4

Aug 13, 2015

Master of Kung Fu#4 proves to be just the combination needed to close out thisSecret Warstie-in. While there are some missed opportunities and relationships that could have been further developed, Haden Blackman and Dalibor Talajic have crafted a wonderful four issue mini-series that stands as one of the highlights to the Secret Wars event. When it comes to hard-hitting action,Master of Kung Fuis the undisputed champ.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Moon Knight (2016) #2

May 9, 2016

Moon Knight #2 is a stunning piece of work that plays well into the titular hero's muddied history. While Marc's sanity has been played with throughout the character's history, it's never been brought to the forefront in such fashion as it is here. Lemire's script allows for Marc and his supporting cast to come through as characters, while the artwork by Greg Smallwood and Jordie Bellaire creates the mystery of Marc's circumstances. In some ways, Moon Knight #2 feels reminiscent of a story readers have read before, but the craftsmanship and presentation of the issue make it a haunting read.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Moon Knight (2016) #3

Jun 6, 2016

Moon Knight #3 continues this title's stellar run, providing an entertaining tale of a man who doesn't know if the world around him is the work of malicious gods or the trappings of his own mind. By maintaining that sense of doubt at every level of the story, Jeff Lemire, Greg Smallwood, and Jordie Bellaire ensure that Moon Knight has its own corner of the Marvel Universe. The synergy between the creators ensures that Spector's story is incredibly focused, and the work is more complete for it.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Moon Knight (2016) #4

Jul 11, 2016

Moon Knight #4 is another fantastic issue in the young series. Jeff Lemire, Greg Smallwood, and Jordie Bellaire allow the book to question at every level whether what Marc sees or the Marvel Universe is real, or if it even matters. The creative team is clicking on all cylinders, with the art and words complimenting each other to serve the issue. And just when it seems that the story might be getting repetitive, a final-page reveal calls everything into question.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Moon Knight (2016) #5

Aug 8, 2016

Moon Knight #5 is a powerful ending to the initial arc, concluding a section of the titular hero's life while also propelling him further along, hinting at just how far into insanity Jeff Lemire, Greg Smallwood, and Jordie Bellaire intend to send him. The use of other artists to show the different personalities of Marc Spector is a choice that pays off in spades, and it will be exciting to see just how far the series is willing to go with the fracture.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Moon Knight (2016) #6

Sep 12, 2016

Ultimately, Moon Knight #6 is a solid entry that furthers the story of a psychologically broken protagonist. While it doesn't quite invite new readers in the way that one might hope a new story arc would, writer Jeff Lemire, and the talented artists still deliver a story that continues to find new ways to show a hero lost in his own mind. Moon Knight might have escaped the confines of his mental hospital, but it appears his journey is only going to get more mind-bending from here.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Moon Knight (2016) #8

Nov 7, 2016

With a talented roster of artists, Moon Knight #8 tells a riveting story of a splintered mind crashing back together. The contrasting styles of Francisco Francavilla, Wilfredo Torres, Michael Garland, James Stoke, Greg Smallwood, and Jordie Bellaire make for a visually arresting narrative, especially with the coordination between teams to the point that the panels can transition between art teams without becoming disorienting for the reader. Writer Jeff Lemire does a great job with the narrative, creating the transitions for the art teams and utilizing minimal dialogue so that the story can be told in a wondrous visual chaos that works perfectly for the character.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Moon Knight (2016) #9

Dec 13, 2016

With a very human core, Moon Knight #9 continues the series' string of excellence. Jeff Lemire's script is unexpectedly touching, and the talented art teams make the book a visual joy to read. Moon Knight #9 shows that character progression can be just as riveting as a good plot and gives a nice pay off to the setup of previous issues. And now, with all of his personalities back within him, Marc can finally face off against the god that has been haunting him.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Moon Knight (2016) #12

Mar 6, 2017

Moon Knight #12 is what happens when a book's creators are all working at the top of their game in a cohesive manner. Artists Greg Smallwood and Jordie Bellaire are fantastic visual storytellers, and writer Jeff Lemire's script presents many opportunities to show off their talents. At the same time, the narrative here continues to build upon previous chapters, and it's a pleasant surprise to see Spector's alternate personalities prove an aid to him in his time of need rather than a continued hindrance.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Moon Knight (2016) #13

Apr 21, 2017

Moon Knight has been a beautiful, horrifying epic thus far, and it will be exciting to see how it all concludes next month.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Mrs. Deadpool and the Howling Commandos #4

Sep 14, 2015

Ultimately, Mrs. Deadpool and the Howling Commandos #4 is an entertaining book sure to give its readers some laughs while delivering entertaining action that undercuts some of the dead-serious nature of the Secret Wars event. Not every book needs to aim for lofty themes and, though Mrs. Deadpool and the Howling Commandos #4 could be said to have a message of love conquering death, it never overreaches, being perfectly satisfied in being the zany comedic book that it is. Both Gerry Duggan's script and the art by Salva Espin and Val Staples have made for a fun reprieve from the end-of-the-world somberness that has taken hold of the main Secret Wars event. While Mrs. Deadpool and the Howling Commandos has flown under the radar of a lot of readers, the book is highly recommended to those looking for a light-hearted escape, especially if the event has worn thin for the reader.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Ms. Marvel (2014) #17

Aug 6, 2015

Ms. Marvel #17 is not perfect, but it maintains the youthful energy that has made the title so endearing.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Mycroft Holmes #1

Aug 4, 2016

Mycroft Holmes and the Apocalypse Handbook #1 is a stellar debut. Those questioning Kareem Abdul-Jabbar for entering into the medium will find themselves pleasantly surprised at the work here. While this comic firmly belongs in the world of his novel, it doesn't alienate the reader who stumbles upon it and offers a great take on a oft-overlooked character in the Sherlock Holmes mythos. With great artwork by Joshua Cassara and Luis Guerrero, readers should definitely check out this comic.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
New Avengers (2015) #1

Oct 19, 2015

All told, New Avengers #1 is an exciting debut. The stylized artwork by Gerardo Sandoval and Dono Sanchez Almara really gives the proceedings the energy they need, and Ewing's strong characterizations and sense of humor keep the story from being a routine first issue. There are some problems with the depth of the villain, but this issue gets the setup for the series out of the way. New Avengers #1 makes good use of its youthful cast and offers a lot for both existing and, perhaps more importantly, younger readers to enjoy.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
New Avengers (2015) #2

Nov 2, 2015

Ultimately, New Avengers #2 continues the successes of the series debut. Swift pacing and character-based action keep the issue flowing smoothly. The trio of Al Ewing, Gerardo Sandoval, and Dono Sanchez Almara have created an entertaining title that brings together a varied cast of characters. However, the series will need to address the motivations of its characters, especially its villains, in order to succeed.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
New Avengers (2015) #10

Apr 21, 2016

The artwork by Marcus To, Juanan Ramirez, and colorist Dono Sanchez Almara keeps the issue lively, and the fight between Avenger Five and the American Kaiju is a blast.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
New Suicide Squad: Futures End #1

Sep 11, 2014

SUICIDE SQUAD: FUTURE'S END #1 ultimately fails to deliver on its own promises. Despite some tight pacing and interesting ideas, the execution is ultimately lacking. There have been great issues to the Future's End month, but unfortunately, SUICIDE SQUAD is not one of them.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
New Superman #1

Jul 13, 2016

Thanks to both Gene Luan Yang's writing and the artwork by Viktor Bogdonovic, Richard Friend, and Hi-Fi,New Super-Man #1 succeeds inits debut outing. Kenan Kong is an engaging protagonist whose motivation has driven him to bad behavior, and reading his growth is going to be fascinating.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
New Superman #2

Aug 10, 2016

Gene Luen Yang and Viktor Bogdanovic have done a fantastic job creating Kenan Kong and setting up his world. While the “secret military organization recruits a superhero” story has been done before, Yang's script takes a self-aware tone to it all that keeps the book refreshing. And the artwork by Viktor Bogdanovic,Richard Friend, and Hi-Fi gives the book some great storytelling sequences.New Super-Manis a book that banks on the strengths and flaws of its characters to provide the entertainment and so far, it's been a gamble that's paid off.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
New Superman #3

Sep 15, 2016

New Super-Man#3 is the best entry in the series thus far. Between Gene Luen Yang's humorous script and the thrilling artwork by Bogdanovic, Friend, and Hi-Fi, the issue is the most exciting to read and the most human. And with a few subplots developing,New Super-Manfeels like a series that has found its stride after getting off the starting blocks.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
New Superman #4

Oct 16, 2016

Ultimately, New Super-Man #4 is a good installment in a great series. The pacing issues in the script hold the book back a bit, but Gene Luen Yang's Kenan Kong makes for a fun protagonist to follow. The exciting artwork by Viktor Bogdanovic and Richard Friend keep the action thrilling, and the color work by Hi-Fi gives New Super-Man #4 a great tone and real stakes.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Nick Fury (2017) #1

Apr 24, 2017

Nick Fury #1 is one of Marvel's best debuts in years. Taking influence from Jim Steranko, ACO and Rachelle Rosenberg deliver a visually arresting story that feels utterly different from the moody spy stories that have come through the market. James Robinson's dialogue has a real bite to it, but the writer pulls back and lets the art dictate the narrative here, to brilliant results. One can only hope that #2 continues the excellence presented here while building Nick Fury up as a character.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Nick Fury (2017) #2

May 22, 2017

After a scintillating debut, Nick Fury comes through again with its second outing. But while that first issue's narrative may have been anchored in a traditional spy narrative, writer James Robinson brings the story into the realm of the truly weird in this issue. Artists ACO, Hugo Petrus, and Rachelle Rosenberg continue to display their utter mastery here, the strength of their work making Nick Fury #2 an absolute must-read.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Nighthawk #6

Oct 31, 2016

Though the series comes to an early end, Nighthawk #6 gives the series a fitting conclusion. With the gorgeous and often brutal artwork by Ramon Villalobos and Tamra Bonvillain bringing the cold world to life and scripts by David Walker that never minced words, Nighthawk was a powerful series that deserved more attention from readers than it received, but always rewarded those who sought it out. Nighthawk #6 was no exception.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Nonplayer #2

Jun 4, 2015

Nonplayer#2 is a solid return for the long-delayed series. Nate Simpson's artwork still dazzles, and while the plot is somewhat dense (especially for those who have not read the first issue), the book offers a lot of promise for things to come. This is a chapter that greatly expands the world beyond the limited scope of the first entry.Nonplayer #2 is a book that is well worth a look for all science fiction fans, especially those who like a blend of fantasy with their sci-fi.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Omega Men #1

Jun 4, 2015

Omega Men#1 is a nice opening to the new series, with exciting visuals from Barnaby Bagendra. The script by Tom King is sharp, but the story this issue is very light, serving only as an introduction to the characters. It would have been nice to get a better understanding of the stakes involved before falling directly into the action.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Omega Men #2

Jul 2, 2015

Providing deeper content than the previous issue,Omega Men#2 allows the series to take off. Tom King's script allows for readers to better know Primus via his argument with Rayner, and this helps the reader understand the criminal group even if what they do is despicable. Barnaby Bagendra's artwork is gorgeous in its design work and lines, but also in the way it makes this grimy universe come to life. The world ofOmega Menis a beautiful, but broken one, and the Omega Men are merely trying to survive it as best they can.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Omega Men #3

Aug 6, 2015

Powered by Barnaby Bagenda's electric artwork and Tom King's sharp script,Omega Men#3 is the best issue yet in a series that continues to improve upon its foundation. Princess Kalista makes for a fascinating cast member and it will be nice to see her dynamics with the Omega Men evolve as the issue moves on. For fans of rogues and science fiction,Omega Menis proving to be can't-miss material.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Phonogram: The Immaterial Girl #1

Aug 11, 2015

As a reader new to Phonogram, I had concerns that this debut would be inaccessible. Thanks to the series having a strong protagonist in Emily, the story itself is quite easy to get into, but there are places where Phonogram: The Immaterial Girl is a little more cryptic. This is largely due to my own taste in music not overlapping with the many references in the story. Fortunately, Gillen has anticipated this need and created an entertaining glossary in the back of the issue. Other than that, most readers should be able to find something to enjoy Phonogram: The Immaterial Girl #1, and those looking for a more in depth understanding of the characters can retroactively visit the previous two collections of Phonogram.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Poison Ivy: Cycle of Life and Death #4

Apr 21, 2016

Poison Ivy joins up with Catwoman in the newest installment of her miniseries. Unfortunately, Amy Chu's script doesn't take full advantage of the guest star.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Power Man and Iron Fist (2016) #1

Feb 22, 2016

With an emotionally touching story, complex characters, and stylistic artwork, Power Man and Iron Fist #1 is a fantastic debut. David Walker instantly captures the friendship between Luke and Danny and gives them a spark that makes the issue a delight to read. The artwork by Sanford Greene and Lee Loughridge makes for a truly unique read. The "All-New All-Different" initiative by Marvel has had its hits and misses, but Power Man and Iron Fist #1 stands as one of the top debuts in the lineup. Sweet Christmas, indeed.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Power Man and Iron Fist (2016) #3

Apr 25, 2016

Power Man and Iron Fist #3 continues the excellence that David Walker, Sanford Greene, and Lee Loughridge have shown in the first two installments of the series. The main strength of the book is its ability to keep up the juggling act between the heroes and villains, the action and humor. If they can add Jessica Jones to the mix, the series will truly be superb.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Royals #1

Apr 10, 2017

Though Royals #1 can't quite escape some first issue tropes, Al Ewing still crafts an engaging series debut with a good hook and some good character moments. For now though, the issue's strengths are in its art team of Joboy Meyers and Ryan Kinnaird, whose visuals give Royals #1 a grand sense of adventure and mythic scale. And one has to assume that Ewing, whose recent work has been developing the cosmic side of Marvel's universe, will hit his stride now that the Inhumans have left Earth. There's a sense of new and promise to Royals #1, which has all the makings of a blockbuster in waiting.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Saga #30

Jul 13, 2015

While not one of the strongest entries in the series, Saga #30 still offers some great emotional moments and promises of changes to come. Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples offer some great character work, especially with the supporting cast in this issue, but the reunion between Marko and Alana comes across as forced due to how quickly it came. Saga #30 may have been better focusing on developing stories in the future rather than trying to tie everything together in such a concise manner. It's a small stumble for a series that has been running full speed since its inception.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Savage Highway #1

Feb 17, 2017

Desolate post-apocalyptic settings are no strangers to comic books, but Savage Highway carves its own niche thanks to its origins as a novel in the 70s. The tone here that Masmondet and Zhang strike here is unique, resembling a grindhouse film. Detailed artwork and a taut script will keep readers engaged as they embark on the journey with Helene and Mo.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Secret Wars #5

Aug 13, 2015

Ultimately, Secret Wars #5 is not a bad comic book, but one that feels redundant in an event where it shouldn't.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Secret Wars #7

Nov 16, 2015

Overall, it's impossible to deny the visual power of Secret Wars #7 and while certain elements feel glossed over or lost in the editing process, the issue has enough punch to be a satisfying read. Secret Wars is a grand tale told grandly, and Jonathan Hickman, Esad Ribic, and Ive Svorcina have the creative synergy to make it work. While the delays have made Secret Wars a bit frustrating for many readers, the series has maintained the epic feel that it started off with.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Secret Wars: Secret Love #1

Aug 24, 2015

Luckily, what readers do get is high quality. With five stories, each with different tones, there's a lot to digest and readers should be able to find at least one segment that makes Secret Wars: Secret Love worth their while. The quality of the art and writing really gives the issue a lot of energy, and the arrangement of the stories by editor Emily Shaw allows the issue to carry momentum forward. Secret Wars: Secret Love may not be a title for everyone, but for those looking something different from Marvel will, pardon the pun, find a lot to love here.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Shaft: Imitation of Life #1

Feb 12, 2016

With solid characterization and a unique look at 70s New York,Shaft: Imitation of Life#1 is a fantastic debut. David Walker's script allows for Shaft to be both a certified badass while being surprisingly vulnerable. Dietrich Smith and Alex Guimares give the book a fantastic swagger worthy of the character while also excelling at creating tension in the smaller character moments. If the future issues can further the plot as well as this issue develops its characters,Shaft: Imitation of Lifewill end up an excellent miniseries and entry into the Shaft mythos.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Shaft: Imitation of Life #3

Apr 20, 2016

Shaft: Imitation of Life #3 does a wonderful job building towards the series' climax as David Walker brings several threads together. The artwork by Dietrich Smith and Alex Guimaraes is lusciously detailed and will keep the reader's eyes glued to the page. Walker's ability to bounce between humor and tension keeps the story engaging and ensures that readers will want to come back for the finale.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Shaft: Imitation of Life #4

May 24, 2016

Shaft: Imitation of Life#4 is a tense issue that concludes the series in terrific fashion. David F. Walker's script balances the action with thematic content, giving a layer of depth to the issue that could have easily spiraled into simply being a fiery conclusion. Artist Dietrich Smith and colorist AlexGuimares' bring the world to life in theatrical fashion, heightening the drama of the story. In short,Shaft: Imitation of Life#4 is a fantastic ending to a superb series, worthy of John Shaft.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Solarman #1

Jul 11, 2016

Solarman #1 takes a different approach when telling an origin story. Rather than an earnest do-gooder, Joseph Phillip Illidge and Brendan Deneen present a more nuanced character in Ben Tucker. And while there isn't much of a supporting cast to speak of at this time, the lead character is intriguing enough on his own. The artwork by N Steven Harris and Andrew Dalhouse does a great job balancing the tone of the more personal moments with the grander events that are in the background here, but are sure to burst into the front in future issues.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Soulfire (2017) #1

Mar 15, 2017

The artwork can't quite overcome the feeling that All New Soulfire #1 is a bit too crowded. J.T. Krul clearly has a lot of ideas at hand, and while he's able to execute the issue in terms of pacing between scenes, the scenes themselves are overstuffed. For a series debut, the world of All New Soulfire #1 feels like it got started without the new readers that it seems to want to draw in. The end result is an attractive looking book that may have needed a few more pages to avoid feeling bloated.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Spider-Man (2016) #3

Apr 7, 2016

The Ms. Marvel crossover hinted at on the cover is fun, though readers may be disappointed at the lack of action this issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.5
Spirit Hunters #1

Nov 6, 2016

Unfortunately, Spirit Hunters #1 squanders a good concept with its flat execution. Between the underdeveloped world and the characters that fail to register, the story by Joe Brusha and Ralph Tedesco never takes off. Artist Julius Abrera's artwork is great when given room to breathe, but the wordy script ends up crowding the page, limiting both Abrera's illustrations and Jorge Cortes' colors. These flaws ultimately ma

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Strange Fruit #1

Jul 7, 2015

Strange Fruit #1 is an engrossing debut with a provocative premise. J.G. Jones and Mark Waid develop the world that instantly lives in the minds of their audience. While it would have been nice to see the characters move beyond their archetypes in this issue, this comic does a lot of things right in terms of establishing this scarred world. And with recent real-world events, Strange Fruit proves to be not just a comic of the past, but one of the present as well.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Swamp Thing (2011) Annual #3

Oct 30, 2014

Charles Soule and the many talented artists deliver the goodsinSwamp Thing Annual#3. This is a somber tale, for sure, but it's one that fits perfectly into Swamp Thing's mythos. And guest-star Etrigan doesn't hurt.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Swamp Thing (2011) #35

Oct 2, 2014

SWAMP THING #35 is another great entry in Charles Soule's run. Jesus Saiz's artwork dazzles as always, and the combination of both art and narrative makes SWAMP THING a must read series, even if the arc looks a little standard at this point.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Swamp Thing (2011) #36

Nov 6, 2014

Swamp Thing #36is another solid entry in the series. Though not as tight and polished as recent issues such as last week's annual, Soule and Saiz each provide enough moments to make the issue entertaining. With tension building between the Machines and the other Kingdoms it will be intriguing to see just who ends up as friend and foe in the coming months.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Swamp Thing (2011) #37

Dec 4, 2014

Swamp Thing#37 is a stepping-stone issue in the larger arc. There are important developments here, and Charles Soule and Jesus Saiz continue to be a perfect duo for Holland as his adventures. That said, this issue definitely feels like a piece of a larger whole, and a slight pacing issue towards the beginning of the chapter only exacerbates that feeling.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Swamp Thing (2011) #38

Jan 8, 2015

Charles Soule and Jesus Saiz deliver a fun, fast-pacedcomic inSwamp Thing#38. While a quick read, the issue's great villain-work and quality art make it a blast and a welcome change of speed from previous issues.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Swamp Thing (2011) #39

Feb 4, 2015

Swamp Thing#39 is another great chapter in what has been one the New 52's strongest series since its inception. Charles Soule and Jesus Saiz have both contributed to the series' quality, and while it's unfortunate that the series is ending in a month, the stage is set for the finale to be stellar.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Swamp Thing (2011) #40

Mar 5, 2015

Swamp Thing#40 sees a big risk taken by Charles Soule in crafting a story that is self-aware. The metafictional gamble pays off though, bringing an added layer to not just the finale, but the entire series. That being said, some readers may feel like the conclusion didn't fully address the emotional state of Holland or his supporting cast thoroughly enough. Ultimately, though, this is not just an enjoyable finale, but one that will make you think on both the storytelling choices and letting Jesus Saiz's gorgeous art sink in.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Thanos (2016) #1

Nov 16, 2016

Solid scripting by Jeff Lemire along with gorgeous artwork by Mike Deodato and Frank Martin makeThanos#1 fantastic to read. The stylized narration helps to keep readers in the world and establishes the stakes for the reader. It will be interesting to see if this distance will continue to keep readers engaged as this cosmic conflict escalates. While it suffers some of the same flaws as most introductory issues,Thanos#1 is a stellar debut worth a look from anyone with even a slight interest in the character.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Thanos (2016) #2

Dec 22, 2016

Anchored by some fun exchanges between father and son,Thanos#2 works great as a dark space opera. Jeff Lemire's voice for Thanos feels perfect for a being discovering a new vulnerability. The artwork by illustrator Mike Deodato and colorist Frank Martion is what gives the comic such a foreboding tone. There's always a sense of oncoming dread, and it givesThanosa dramatic weight that a story revolving around the Mad Titan deserves.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Thanos (2016) #3

Jan 25, 2017

Easily the title's most action packed issue thus far,Thanos#3 doesn't forget its beginnings as a character piece, utilizing the character's long history for some entertaining cameos by otherwise minor players. Jeff Lemire gives the issue a great structure, balancing the character and electrifying action as brought to the page by Mike Deodato and Frank Martin. The comic is a visual splendor worthy of the Mad Titan.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Thanos (2016) #4

Feb 22, 2017

Though the titular character barely makes an appearance,Thanos#4 continues the series' winning streak. By having the Mad Titan absent,writer Jeff Lemire gives himselfthe narrative space to carve a new way for Thane to progress as a character, while tying the son back to his father. Mike Deodato and Frank Martin keep the book an intense visual masterpiece.Thanos#4is a depraved space-opera, and one of the best books on the stands.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Thanos (2016) #5

Apr 3, 2017

While it lacks some of the epic feel of its predecessors, Thanos #5 presents new dimensions to its characters.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
The Fade Out #7

Jun 29, 2015

While smaller in scope and much more intimate, The Fade Out #7 doesn't forget that it is a murder mystery, and the final pages prove that while a sea can seem calm, waves can come crashing in at any moment. Ultimately, his is an issue that's concerned with showing characters in their vulnerability. It's a credit to the synergy between Brubaker, Phillips, and Breitweiser that a series can slow down to a pace like this without missing a beat. Their ability to focus in and deliver solid character moments really shows in this issue. The Fade Out #7 is another enthralling chapter in a great series, and will please new and old readers alike with its intimate character work and exquisite art.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
The Fade Out #8

Aug 17, 2015

That being said, The Fade Out #8 is still a fantastic read, relying on Brubaker's strong character work and the dark beauty of the artwork by Sean Phillips and Elizabeth Breitweiser. The mystery of Valeria Sommers' murder is still going strong, and if the upcoming third act can match the quality found here, than The Fade Out will make for a great tribute to the film noir of the '40s and '50s

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
The Fade Out #9

Sep 21, 2015

By focusing on the relationship between Charlie and Gil, The Fade Out #9 is able to propel the plot forward without miring itself in exposition. These two characters have been through a lot, and Brubaker, Phillips, and Breitweiser give their history the weight it deserves. The characters are what makes this series emotionally satisfying, and it certainly appears it will stay that way as The Fade Out makes its way toward its conclusion.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
The Fade Out #12

Jan 11, 2016

The final image of the book encapsulates the series. Phillips depicts Charlie drunkenly stumbling down the strip, with the lights of the studios behind him. Though he is completely broken and distraught, the studio will move on, with or without him. The Fade Out #12 does a wondrous job concluding the story, as it both solves the mystery in a satisfying way for the readers while still letting its characters move on in a realistic way. Brubaker, Phillips, and Breitweiser stick the landing by staying true to their genre and to their characters.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
The Flintstones #1

Jul 6, 2016

The Flintstones #1 is a great debut, backed by a creative team that seems to understand the property and what made it endearing to so many. Avoiding the pitfalls that plague many reboots, Mark Russell, Steve Pugh, and Chris Chuckry all use their talents to bring the Flintstone family into a modern aesthetic without going "dark" with it. For readers seekinga fun book to sink their sabre-teeth into, look no further thanThe Flintstones.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
The Flintstones #2

Aug 11, 2016

Mark Russell and Steve Pugh improve in their second outing, as The Flintstones #2 continues to build and expand on what the series debut put forth. Russell's humor here is great, and he makes sure that the issue has a bit of heart as well. The artwork by Pugh and Chris Chuckry is stellar, and works well to make Bedrock feel real. Like the original cartoon, The Flintstones #2 is a great satire of modern life, the prehistoric world is only as crazy as our real one.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
The Flintstones #3

Sep 7, 2016

The Flintstones #3 is flat-out excellent. The artwork by Steve Pugh and Chris Chuckry is stellar, but the scripting by Mark Russell stands out this issue. Both humorous and touching, it displays the great range of emotions a twenty-page comic can elicit. Previous issues showed Russell's grasp of the characters, but this chapter helps to cement the tone the book is going for as the broader world of Bedrock comes into play. Joe's story is moving, and the way he and his fellow vets are treated by society provides powerful commentary on the treatment of real-life veterans.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
The Flintstones #4

Oct 8, 2016

In spite of this,The Flintstones continues to be an excellent comic. Mark Russell and Steve Pugh have found a great rhythm with the humor and drama in a way that is always entertaining. Color artist Chris Chuckry makes it all come together with a palette that can be both natural and zany at the same time, reflecting the wild but human world that makesThe Flintstones a book everyone should check out.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
The Flintstones #5

Nov 6, 2016

The Flintstones#5 doesn't quite come together as well as previous issues had.While learning about Fred and Barney's involvement in the war gives both their actions as well as the actions of their fellow vets in previous issues weight, the themes in this story and the B plot with Bamm-Bamm and Pebbles never feel as united as they perhaps could have. Nevertheless, The Flintstones#5 is still an entertaining comic, and Mark Russell's measured approach to focusing on the supporting cast pays off here. Steve Pugh and Chris Chuckry have been making magic with their artwork the whole series, and between the jungle locale and expanded cast, The Flintstones#5 only shows off how amazing their talent is. While not as strong as previous chapters, The Flintstonesis still one of the better comics on stands.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
The Flintstones #7

Jan 5, 2017

The Flintstones #7 continues the excellence that has been the series' defining quality. While some readers may miss the more fantastical asides from previous issues, Mark Russell utilizes one of the weirder characters in the mythos to tell a story of the human experience. Rick Leonardi and Scott Hanna bring a different feel to the artwork, while still maintaining an aesthetic consistency with the previous issues within the series. Their work here is perfect for such a human story.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
The Flintstones #8

Feb 2, 2017

The Flintstones #8 is ambitious in scope, attempting to tie together overarching social issues with personal drama. And while much of it succeeds " the artwork is gorgeous, the dialogue nimble and clever, some of the best scenes feel like they're competing to get enough room on the page. The issue is held back because of it, giving the series its weakest chapter. That being said, this is still high quality stuff and makes for a fun, if flawed, read.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
The Infinity Gauntlet #1

May 28, 2015

Gerry Duggan and Dustin Weaver have made a very entertaining and engaging comic. Anwen Bakian is a great new face to Marvel's pantheon of characters, and Weaver's artwork really sells the broken nature of this Battleworld domain. That said, thebook is titledInfinity Gauntlet, and it would have been nice to see more of Thanos in the first issue.Infinity Gauntlet#1 is a book well worth your attention, and is a great example of what theSecret Warstie-ins can be.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
The Infinity Gauntlet #3

Aug 6, 2015

Dustin Weaver and Gerry Duggan have created a solid tie-in toSecret WarswithInfinity Gauntlet.The new series is a worthy successor to its namesake and finds its success in not trying to recreate the original epic, but rather in doing something new the concept. This is no more evident than with its use of Thanos, now a more active and tactical thinker, rather than a being that contemplates the cosmos. The continued growth of the Bakian family is where the heart of the issue lies, and readers looking for a nice balance of humor and action will find themselves satisfied withInfinity Gauntlet#3.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
The Infinity Gauntlet #4

Sep 20, 2015

When Weaver and Duggan narrow their focus onto the Bakian family, the issue excels, and this take on Adam Warlock is a welcome change to the norm. Overall,Infinity Gauntlet #4 is a fun read, but the series feels bogged down under the weight of its ensemble cast.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
The Last Dragon #1

May 3, 2016

The Last Dragon is a visual feast that recalls classic fantasy fiction. Jane Yolen's story doesn't necessarily reinvent the wheel, but it does show how entertaining the genre can be when conventions are played with. Rebecca Guay's artwork provides a timeless feel to the book as well as providing the tempo for the story. The Last Dragon is a beautiful and fulfilling read that leads its audience through a wondrous tale of adventure and wit.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
The Little Mermaid #5

Jun 29, 2015

Grimm Fairy Tales: The Little Mermaid was never aiming to be a masterpiece. Zenescope's books have always been about delivering sexy women and brutal combat. But in abandoning the series' sensual antagonist and focusing on a bland conflict, Meredith Finch and Miguel Mendonca have wasted an opportunity to give a satisfying conclusion to this limited series. A lack of focus on Erica as a character results in a comic that can't pull its audience in, especially when the book veers off to a battle that she only joins in the end. Ultimately, this is a disappointing conclusion to a subpar title that couldn't deliver on its own promises.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Transformers: Robots In Disguise #50

Feb 23, 2016

Transformers: Robots in Disguise #50 is a issue with a blockbuster feel. The story has just enough depth to engage readers both new and old to the series, and the artwork throughout the issue is a blast. This isn't a series with an overly complex plot or powerful characters, but it's a fun chapter in the franchise and certainly worth any Transformers fan's money.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Trinity Of Sin #1

Oct 16, 2014

Trinity of Sin#1 is by no means a bad book. It's a fair debut that features three interesting leads and an enigmatic foe. J. M. DeMatteis' writing already displayssome intriguing existential themes for the series to delve into, and Yvel Guichet's art shows that the series will be able to easilytransition between contemplative and action-packed. And whileTrinity of Sin #1 does a great job of balancing time between its leads, there's a bit to be desired in terms of the equilibrium between comic book action and the plot.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Trinity Of Sin #2

Nov 20, 2014

Trinity of Sin #2 is a disappointing misstep after last month's debut. Yvel Guichet's artwork continues to be the series' strongpoint, but it would be nice to see the series give its reader a chance to know its lead characters and become invested in their ordeals. Right now it feels like a lot of empty bluster.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Trinity Of Sin #3

Dec 18, 2014

Ultimately, the third issue ofTrinity of Sin is stronger than its predecessors, having solved the pacing issues that troubled the series. J. M. DeMatteis has given the main characters some defining actions, and Yvel Guichet's artwork dynamically contributes to the storytelling. The issue does end on a strong point, adding another layer for the series to build off of.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Trinity Of Sin #4

Jan 22, 2015

Ultimately, whileTrinity of Sin#4 contains some interesting ideas, J. M. DeMatteis' script never develops them enough to give them a real impact, and it's disappointing not to have a more in-depth look into the Stranger's mindset. Yvel Guichet's artwork remains a strong point on the series, but it can't help the issue from feeling a little empty.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Trinity Of Sin #5

Feb 19, 2015

The tighter focus on the Question helps to drive the issue and makes it a solid improvement over its predecessors. Unfortunately, the art is not as strong as previous issues, though the images continue to excel in the bigger pieces the issue provides. UltimatelyTrinity of Sin #5, makes for a good, fun read leading into the series finale.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Trinity Of Sin #6

Mar 19, 2015

Trinity of Sin#6 is a strong finale to a series that stumbled a bit out of the starting blocks. J.M. DeMatteis delivers a script with a solid ending that provides an emotional punch. And Yvel Guichet's artwork is strong as ever, providing some exciting visuals and softer emotional touches that strengthens the catharsis inTrinity of Sin#6.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Trinity of Sin: Pandora: Futures End #1

Sep 17, 2014

TRINITY OF SIN: PANDORA FUTURE'S END #1 is a nice tie-in, and a good send off to the series before it is merged into TRINITY OF SIN in October. While it isn't perfect, it's a good example of what a tie-in can do when it is still allowed to tell its own story.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
U.S.Avengers #2

Jan 20, 2017

U.S.Avengers #2 is quite a bit of fun, though some may find it too expository in nature. The artwork really helps the narrative flow quickly, and Ewing's grasp of the characters keeps the read from getting too bogged down. While not as strong as the debut issue, U.S.Avengers #2 helps set the table for the conflict at hand.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
U.S.Avengers #4

Mar 15, 2017

With a unique structure, and meta humor, the newest issue of U.S. Avengers is a kaiju-sized amount of fun.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
U.S.Avengers #5

Apr 19, 2017

Anchored by a tense conversation between Steve Rogers and Bobby da Costa, U.S. Avengers #5 does a nice job of tying into the Secret Empire event without feeling derailed.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Ultimates (2015) #2

Dec 14, 2015

The Ultimates #2 is an extremely well-crafted piece of comic book story telling. Ewing's tight focus, while it does relegate some of the team to merely being plot devices, helps to develop the issue's two leads in Black Panther and Galactus. Rocafort's artwork not only makes the book a visual marvel, but his layouts guide the pacing of the book, preventing this issue from feeling rushed or overstuffed. As the close to a two-part opening arc, The Ultimates #2 sets a good foundation for a series that aims to push the boundaries of the "All-New, All-Different" Marvel Universe.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Ultimates (2015) #3

Jan 11, 2016

The Ultimates has quickly become one of the best books in Marvel's output. Unafraid of both the immensity of Marvel's continuity or the powers this team wields, the book at times feels like Marvel's take on Star Trek, boldly going where no book has gone before. Al Ewing and Kenneth Rocafort bring out the best in one another, making The Ultimates #3 a sleek yet complex book in both design and storytelling. And a final page reveal of a character from Blue Marvel's past shows they haven't yet let readers in on all they plan to offer.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Ultimates (2015) #4

Feb 16, 2016

The Ultimates #4 is an example of how a team book can fall prey to focusing to singularly on an individual member. Blue Marvel's narrative is an entertaining one, full of the drama and character so many comic books lack. But it's unfortunate that the rest of the team falls into the background to the degree that they do. That Ewing's script is able to overcome this shortfall is a testament to his ability, and the artwork by Rocafort and Brown is mesmerizing. If the next issue of The Ultimates can deliver more narrative balance between its cast, then the series can rise to new heights. If not, readers will have to "settle" for well-told stories focusing on singular members.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Ultimates (2015) #5

Mar 28, 2016

The Ultimates #5 is an interesting read, but not necessarily an entertaining one. Al Ewing shows a clear grasp of his characters and the artwork by Rocafort and Brown make the issue as visually grand as the cosmic Marvel universe demands. But the story suffers a bit as the heroes are subject to an exposition dump. The scale to the challenge is huge, but the heroes have yet to take action. The promise of Thanos' involvement should change that in future issues, and hopefully the groundwork Ewing and Rocafort have laid here pays off.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Warhammer 40,000: Revelations #1

Mar 15, 2017

Solid characterization and the promise of action-packed war? Sign me up.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Weirdworld #2

Jul 23, 2015

Jason Aaron and Mike Del Mundo have crafted an visually stunning book inWeirdworld#2. While Arkon doesn't quite escape the tropes of his character archetype, he makes for an entertaining enough protagonist for readers to navigate this bizarre world with. Jason Aaron and Mike Del Mundo have come up with enough unusual imagery that it will keep readers on their toes, even as they stop to stare at Del Mundo's images.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Where Monsters Dwell #1

May 28, 2015

Where Monsters Dwell instantly solidifies itself as one of the better tie-ins toSecret Wars. Its off-color humor may not be to everyone's liking, but this is a book that knows exactly what it is and never looks back. Garth Ennis and Russell Braun have a fantastic title on their hands, and readers should make sure not to pass this one up.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Where Monsters Dwell #2

Jun 25, 2015

Where Monsters Dwell #2 is another great entry in this Secret Wars limited series. Like the films that made up Ray Harryhausen's career, there's a sense of adventure to this comic, alongwith a dash of Ennis' trademark humor. This is not a comic concerned with the Secret Wars event at all. In fact, until the encounter at the end of the book, it doesn't even necessarily feel like a Marvel title. That's a good thing. One of the promises of Secret Wars was that it would give creators opportunities to go wild, pulling what they wanted from the Marvel Universe. Warren Ellis and Russ Braun are not only delivering on that promise, they're making one of the best books on the stand today.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Where Monsters Dwell #3

Jul 16, 2015

By focusing on the interactions between Karl and Clemmie as the power dynamic between them changes,Where Monsters Dwell#3 maintains the humor that has made the series a must-read. However, in taking this detour, the issue also stumbles a bit. It's one thing to not include any of the titular monsters, but the issue doesn't appear to progress the plot in any substantial way. While Garth Ennis and Russ Braun have crafted a fun series, they have a challenge ahead of them to close this title out in a well-paced manner.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Where Monsters Dwell #4

Aug 27, 2015

Where Monsters Dwell#4 is another great chapter in this fantasticSecret Warstie-in. No, readers won't find references to Battleworld or God Doom, but this title has made the most of the opportunity the event provides. Garth Ennis' script perfectly balances the tropes and offensive stereotypes of the adventure genre with great humor and awareness, and Russell Braun makes the script come to life with nice actionand impeccable comedic timing.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Where Monsters Dwell #5

Nov 2, 2015

Where Monsters Dwell #5 provides a satisfying conclusion to the mini-series. This series has never really been concerned with the physical monsters as much as the human ones, and here we see Clemmie Franklin-Cox show her predatory nature. The reveal of her background does mean that a good portion of the issue is dedicated to exposition, and that kills some of the momentum built up in the series. Russ Braun and Dono Sanchez Almara do a fantastic job providing a moody atmosphere with expertly picked angles and colors that enhance the story.Where Monsters Dwell #5 is not the strongest issue in the series, but it provides a satisfying and entertaining ending to one of the strongestSecret Wars tie-ins.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Wolf #1

Jul 20, 2015

Wolf #1 is a captivating debut from Ales Kot, Matt Taylor, and Lee Loughridge. Kot's impeccable ability to build a world by dropping the reader straight into it makes for a pleasantly disorienting experience. Readers may find themselves rereading the issue immediately in order to get a better bearing on the proceedings.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Wolf #2

Aug 23, 2015

Wolf #2 is an effective and entertaining second chapter in the series. Ales Kot does a great job building not only the world, but the characters who inhabit it. Anita forms a nice foil for Wolfe, and the interaction between the two is entertaining to watch. Matt Taylor's artwork nicely captures the look of Los Angeles while seamlessly blending in the supernatural, and Lee Loughridge's palette is a perfect fit for the series.Wolf#2is a nice balance between horror and southern California detective crime and fans of both genres will have a blast reading it.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Wolf #8

Jun 9, 2016

Wolf#8 is a nice change of pace for the series, with good humor and gruesome action, all while keeping a strong focus on character. Ricardo Lopez Ortiz and Lee Loughridge make for a visual splendor. While Anita, Duane, and co. are close to rescuing Antoine, Ales Kot throws another twist into the mix that will be sure to bring readers back for more. With a great main issue, and a brilliant addendum,Wolf#8 is one of the series' most entertaining issues.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Zodiac Starforce #1

Aug 25, 2015

With an energetic script by Kevin Panetta and lovely artwork by Paulina Ganucheau,Zodiac Starforce#1 is a charming debut. While the characters haven't escaped their tropes yet, there's enough to keep readers interested.Zodiac Starforce#1 isn't a comic for everyone, but for fans of the youthful team dynamics seen in animation, this is a comic to look out for.

View Issue       View Full Review

Reviews for
the Week of...

May

April

More