Russ Dobler's Comic Reviews

Reviewer For: AiPT! Reviews: 64
7.4Avg. Review Rating

7.0
3 Floyds: Alpha King #1

May 3, 2016

Alpha King #1 embraces the fun of beer while overloading on crunchy action the same way 3 Floyds overloads on ingredients. Both the brewery and the comic make no apologies for being outrageous and indulgent, so for many, it'll be a match made in Hop Heaven. But it's probably inessential for those whose cranks aren't turned by the idea of intra-industry conflict told through a Game of Thrones-style lens.

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6.5
3 Floyds: Alpha King #2

Jul 7, 2016

The titular character himself sums up 3 Floyds beer and the Alpha King comic in particular when he proudly proclaims, “Whatever happens to us … I want it to be intense.” Alpha King #2 is a gluttonous feast for human senses and desires, but it's a banquet we've gorged at once before. If what you're looking for is MORE MORE MORE, this issue won't disappoint.

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7.0
Aquaman (2016) #19

Mar 15, 2017

Flashes of brilliance, but less than the sum of its parts

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6.0
Black Science #12

Mar 3, 2015

Remender tries valiantly to remember that "every comic is someone's first," but for better or worse, his writing is just too layered to be condensed. Some long-term readers might find that rewarding, others may instead long for virtue in simplicity.

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6.0
Captain America: Sam Wilson #15

Nov 16, 2016

Captain America: Sam Wilson #15 is one of the lesser issues of an otherwise standout series, not because it deliberately changes the book's tone, but because it falls short of its goal, as Nick Spencer can't quite conjure the comedic magic he summoned in Astonishing Ant-Man and Superior Foes of Spider-Man. As powerfully well-done as Sam Wilson #'s 13 and 14 were, nearly any subsequent issue would have paled in comparison. This one was limping in with a folding chair-damaged kneecap before that bell even rang.

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7.0
Captain America: Sam Wilson #19

Feb 15, 2017

The events of Captain America: Sam Wilson #19 and the attempts by both Sam and Rage to make a difference lead to potentially even worse, unintended outcomes–pretty much just like in real life. It can be frustrating to rarely see the protagonist get a solid win, but maybe the fact the good guys can be brought down through no fault of their own is a painful lesson we need to learn. It's certainly something Sam Wilson readers should be used to by now, even if's a little more heavy-handed in this issue.

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8.5
Captain America: Sam Wilson #20

Mar 15, 2017

While Sam Wilson may have hit the emotional skids, his book is back on track.

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6.5
Captain America: Steve Rogers #8

Dec 28, 2016

Captain America: Steve Rogers #8 is a middling chapter in a sluggish saga that could still have a dramatic conclusion. It needs to hurry up and kick into gear, though, because if a climax happens in a comic, and no one's there to read it, it likely won't make an impact.

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7.0
Champions #3

Dec 7, 2016

It seems sort of unfair to give Champions #3 a numerical rating, as it's almost too experimental to judge on its own, as it's released. The issue feels like a more true-to-life turn from Marvel's typical political commentary, and while that may make some readers queasy, and others excited, the true impact and whether this begins a trend cannot yet be told. It's certainly different, intentionally so, and the individual reader will have to decide if it's a change they're on board with.

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6.5
Champions #4

Jan 4, 2017

Champions #4 is a much more typical Marvel comic than the previous issue, and suffers because of it. The book's original direction may have been off-putting to some, but it was unique and could have opened new avenues for storytelling. Waid and Ramos may still achieve that, as the next issue's guest star has a built-in backdoor to reality, but the shift in #4 is jarring, and stands as an avoidable stumble in Champions‘ momentum.

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8.0
Champions #5

Feb 1, 2017

Champions #5 is a return to veracity, with a well-played guest star offering crucial perspective. Tough topics are handled more tactfully than in previous issues, but there are still plenty of teeth-clenching “can't believe they went theres” to tweak the squeamish. Overall, this is the closest Champions has yet come to meeting its stated directive, which is impressive considering the high bar the creative team has set for themselves.

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8.0
Champions #6

Mar 1, 2017

Champions #6 is a lesson in how to develop character and personality through action and not exposition. Through suggesting that anyone could revel so in the misery of the innocent, however, it's also at complete cross-purposes with the book's mission statement. It's (deliberately) difficult to disentangle the tale from the message, so the reader will have to decide if they're willing to take that trade-off.

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7.5
Civil War II #7

Nov 23, 2016

Civil War II #7 is the lightest weight issue of the series thus far, although the rise in tension and the helplessness as events spin out of control is continually palpable. Still, it feels as though this and the added-on final issue could have been combined into one oversized, overall more satisfying edition. But then again, if that would have forced the art team to rush and not turn in the masterworks presented here, never mind. More Marquez and Ponsor cannot possibly be a bad thing.

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7.5
Civil War II: The Accused #1

Aug 10, 2016

Civil War II: The Accused is the kind of story that was sadly absent in the aftermath of the original Civil War, and its ultimate bookend, Siege. It's not perfect, but it is an important experiment in more intellectual super hero comics that convince the reader to think about the real implications of living in the Marvel Universe, and our own. Like the avenging archer himself, The Accused hits more than it misses.

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8.5
Clean Room #3

Dec 17, 2015

Clean Room #3 is an emotional turning point in the story, in that we unexpectedly (and uncomfortably) find ourselves feeling a little differently about Astrid Mueller. Maybe she's on to something, or maybe she's on something. Or maybe she's just as predatory as we've thought all along. Time will tell, and with the script so flipped, how can you not come back for #4?

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7.5
Clean Room #4

Jan 21, 2016

Clean Room #4 advances the narrative, but is still the first issue of the series that could be tagged with the dreaded “decompression” label. One could imagine not missing much by only reading spoilers, especially considering that the normally beautiful and powerful horror elements are somehow kind of cartoonish this time. There's a promise in the dialogue that things will pick up next issue, though, and the creative team has earned enough good will at this point to not doubt it.

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9.0
Clean Room #5

Feb 19, 2016

Clean Room #5 is the best issue of series so far, for all these reasons and more. Simone makes a few moments in these characters lives seem like a gripping saga, effectively highlighting that these are the major turning points of their stories. The art by Davis-Hunt and Winter is next level terror that all attempts at body horror should strive to emulate. The combined package is a psychological puzzle that simultaneously revolts and intrigues, makes us question what's right and wrong, and ensures that we stick around to find the answers.

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8.0
Comic Book History of Comics #1

Nov 21, 2016

Comic Book History of Comics #1 is a lesson on how a beloved medium came to be, told with that medium's same revolutionary techniques by two masters of the art. How could it not be good?

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7.0
Comic Book History of Comics #2

Dec 13, 2016

Comic Book History of Comics #2 is another comprehensively documented chapter in the strange and sordid story of a beloved medium's birth. That's perhaps to the detriment of the narrative, however, as this in-between period is more about page rates and bottom lines, before we get to the sweet Hitler punching. Nevertheless, the commendably fair portrayal of all parties involved, warts and all, should keep amateur historians coming back, as we know things get more interesting in short order.

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7.0
Comic Book History of Comics #3

Jan 25, 2017

Comic Book History of Comics #3 is a fine installment of the educational series, but it lacks a lot of the flourishes that made the first issue so engaging. The information is still good and presented well, so if you want a fun way to learn the rest of the story, this should remain your preferred source.

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8.0
Deadpool (2015) Annual #1

Sep 28, 2016

Deadpool Annual #1 delivers just as strongly as you'd hope it would from looking at the cover … and then stumbles while trying to overdeliver. It's nice to see new voices on Deadpool (and not just the ones from his head), but it's hard to compare to a creative team that has made the character their own in recent years. Still, Duggan and Posehn's destructive romp through shattered innocence may be worth the five-spot all on its own.

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7.0
Devolution #1

Jan 20, 2016

If you can get past how we got here, there's an interesting story in Devolution #1. Whether the hinted commentary on religion's place in society ever materializes, or it's been permanently jettisoned now that the narrative's in high gear, remains to be seen. A lack of follow-up would be sad, and likely resign Devolution to being just another book about a terrible future (that this time happens to look like the past), but even then the art team might make the mini-series worthwhile, if you're into snarling smilodons. It's hard to get a read on Devolution from this first issue, but there are enough hooks here to make you interested in checking out #2 for a closer look.

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7.0
Devolution #2

Feb 16, 2016

Devolution #2 could probably use another pass across the editor's desk to address things like pace, and to make sure certain plot threads don't get neglected, but it might be easy to overlook that when the art team is turning in such stylistically pleasing work. The very last panel promises a different turn from the typical dystopian tale, but the loss of several elements from issue #1 could make the reader nervous that the implied follow-up might not actually come.

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6.0
Devolution #3

Mar 16, 2016

Devolution #3 is a bare-bones story supported by superior art. Plenty of stuff happens, but it's a lot of whiz-pow that seems largely unrelated to either of the two preceding issues, making it hard to identify a continuous narrative throughout the series. It's a high risk, experimental decision that isn't necessarily doomed from conception, but here falls short of the desired high reward. It's impossible to predict what will happen in Devolution‘s final issue, but it's a good guess the end product will wind up unsatisfying.

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6.5
Devolution #4

May 4, 2016

Devolution #4 returns to the story's roots, with a somewhat unexpected twist on the twist we all saw coming. It succeeds in subverting some tropes of the post-apocalyptic genre, but wholeheartedly plays into others. There are some pointed questions remaining for the characters in this penultimate issue, but it's hard to invest in them when the bigger, more enticing question is what Devolution wants to accomplish.

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5.0
Devolution #5

Jun 14, 2016

Rick Remender is a great writer. Usually. An identity crisis prevented Devolution from coming together and clicking though, as philosophic questions flitted between grindhouse action and character focus shifted so quickly that the narrative suffered. The art of Jonathan Wayshak and Jordan Boyd was a draw for the overall mini-series, but even that succumbs to aimlessness in this final issue. Devolution #5 is a rushed conclusion to a disjointed series, one that could have been more focused with some editorial tidying.

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7.0
Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency #1

May 20, 2015

The first issue of Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency is a fair introduction to the scenarios the character often finds himself in, complete with wry jokes and wide-reaching events. Existing fans will likely enjoy becoming part of that web, but the uninitiated will have to decide if the wordplay and plot-weaving keeps their interest over the adequate yet unspectacular art.

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6.5
Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency #2

Jul 8, 2015

Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency #2 is as much of a conundrum as the man himself. It loses a lot of the fun interplay and character work from the first issue, but that's somewhat offset by improved artistic choices and the clearer focus on how Dirk operates. It's almost as if these first two issues were produced by separate creative teams, which is probably not what they were going for. The ride's still enjoyable, though, just for different reasons.

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7.0
Ether #1

Nov 16, 2016

Ether #1 so far fulfills its solicited promise of analyzing the magical with a critical eye, illustrating the usefulness of oft-maligned empiricism through a Sherlock Holmes-style detective story. The potential return of respect for the importance of observation? Fascinating!

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8.5
Ether #2

Dec 21, 2016

Ether #2 is a step up from an already well-done first issue, by all members of the creative team. With the characters established, the drama kicks into high gear, and as the otherworldly detective story unfolds, your heartstrings will be tugged. Kindt and Rubn both show impressive range, as if reaching across a portal from the bleak to the beautiful.

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9.0
Foolkiller (2016) #2

Dec 14, 2016

Foolkiller #2 is a progressive book, in many different meanings of the term. Most importantly, it actually moves the story from the first issue down the field and leaves it in a completely different place for #3. That might sound trivial, but it's something many comics can't accomplish, potentially leading to that "decompressed" feeling. This is the opposite of that. You'll find yourself wondering how writer Max Bemis packed so much story development, pathos and genuinely funny humor into 20 paltry pages.

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8.5
Foolkiller (2016) #3

Jan 11, 2017

Foolkiller #3 continues the series' massive momentum, delivering more in one issue that many books can muster in an entire arc. Don't come looking to this one for laughs, though, as the developments here are deadly serious. Meet the new guy, same as the old guy.

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7.0
Foolkiller (2016) #4

Feb 8, 2017

Foolkiller #4 is a disappointing turn for what is otherwise a standout series. The inclusion of Deadpool hinders the story rather than strengthening it, and not much changes on the way to the book's ultimate conclusion. One can hope Bemis will recapture some of that early magic when the focus returns to where it should be in Foolkiller #5.

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7.0
Foolkiller (2016) #5

Mar 23, 2017

It's good, but it should be better. Fizzling out after a great start.

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8.0
Huck #2

Dec 17, 2015

Huck #2 feels pretty much the same as the debut issue, and that's not necessarily a bad thing. The stakes are raised as Huck's world and the knowledge of his place in it expand, but the pacing and art are familiar enough to remind you this is one, unfolding tale. Although some of the tropes employed here are kind of standard, their precise execution still elicits the desired outcome — you're hooked in and waiting for more.

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8.0
Huck #3

Jan 13, 2016

Huck #3 can feel less like a chapter and more of a single scene, but it's one that deserves to expand and breathe within the greater scope of this story. The events themselves, while surely pointing toward a higher-level confrontation down the line, currently aren't as important as the overall emotional architecture this issue builds — one that continues to distinguish our shiny knight from the tarnished world he inhabits. The eventual, climactic clash of concepts will feel much richer thanks to the laying of this painstaking groundwork.

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7.5
Huck #4

Feb 17, 2016

Huck #4 is the definition of uneven, especially when you consider how rock solid the book has been up to this point. The exposition in the beginning might be necessary, though, and the conclusion of the issue is about as thrilling as a family reunion can get. Still, it's overall not as satisfying a read as the rest of the series. But with things looking to really hit the fan in #5 it'll be interesting to see how the pace progresses and how Huck will react now that his back is against the wall for the first time.

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7.5
Huck #6

Apr 21, 2016

Huck #6 is like the climax of a movie adapted to a comic book series. It's pop media in reverse! If you can get past that head-trip, there's still a good story here, with likeable characters(!) and truth and justice triumphing in the end; a deconstruction of the modern meta that totally goes against type for Mark Millar. So all at once it's neat, tidy, expected, and completely incongruous. It's making a statement while hedging its bets. Huck #6 is a unique animal in the year 2016, but it might be one a lot of comics readers aren't hunting for.

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8.5
Kingpin (2017) #1

Feb 8, 2017

Kingpin #1 already stands head and shoulders above the previous mini-series also penned by Rosenberg, thanks to Torres' art and the introduction of a new protagonist for Fisk to play off of. Dewey's principled hesitancy is palpable, as is her growing acquiescence as the gravity of her situation sets in and the Kingpin works his magic. An out-of-character decision toward the end of the book is maybe the one stumble in this opening installment of what should be a riveting, character-driven crime drama.

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9.0
Kingpin (2017) #2

Mar 8, 2017

Kingpin #2 shows writer Rosenberg's total commitment to getting the character right, minus the strange decision from the first issue. The reader can feel Fisk's tendrils wrapping around Dewey as she becomes further trapped and willingly forced to do the big man's bidding. Kingpin is shaping up to be a can't-miss series for anyone interested in character development and the ways that both good and bad people can end up in situations they don't deserve.

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9.5
Mockingbird #1

Mar 9, 2016

Mockingbird #1 is a tour de force of humor, intrigue, creative chemistry, science and skepticism unlike anything you'll see this year. It's a book that inquires as it appeals and so subtly provokes thought between laughs that the reader may not even realize they've been conned into critically considering the material. Bobbi Morse might be full of it when she asserts, “I am not a superhero,” but Mockingbird #1 is so much more than just a superhero book. It's a beautiful conundrum. The impossible melding of art and rigor. It's the complete package.

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7.0
Occupy Avengers #4

Feb 22, 2017

While Hawkeye and Red Wolf continue to be distinct, well-written characters, the fleshing out of Deadly Nightshade in Occupy Avengers #4 goes awry, as she becomes a repetitive parody of character growth. It's increasingly unclear what these Avengers are occupying, and where this title belongs in the grand scheme of the Marvel Universe. Walker's ground-level series started out well before stumbling, so one can only hope things will get back on track once the more artistically suitable Walta comes on board.

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7.5
Scarlet Witch #1

Dec 8, 2015

Scarlet Witch #1 starts a tough road to rehabilitating and reestablishing a much-maligned and battered character. In doing so, it falls into some standard tropes while doing things just differently enough to keep our interest. Kind of like the character herself. It's hard to tell if rotating artists will be the book's triumph or downfall, as the practice could be appreciated by those looking to broaden their horizons, but ignored by readers who crave consistency. If only Wanda's powers could still alter probabilities.

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7.0
Slayer: Repentless #1

Jan 24, 2017

Slayer: Repentless #1 is the beginning and end of two different, better books sandwiched together to make something less satisfying than either. What starts as a thought-provoking crime drama ends as a record advertisement"either of which could be a fine story in their own right, but are noticeably incongruous together. Do you want clean singing in your Cannibal Corpse? Or growls in your Manowar? Then don't combine genres here, either!

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7.5
The Skeptics #1

Oct 24, 2016

The Skeptics #1 is a promising start to what could be that most unbelievable of occurrences — a positive portrayal of honest, critical thinking. The protagonists are genuinely concerned about national security and the allocation of resources, rather than just deriving pleasure from raining on parades. Precedent suggests that the honeymoon won't last long, but for now, The Skeptics gets the benefit of the doubt.

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7.0
The Totally Awesome Hulk #1

Dec 2, 2015

Stuff the haters who say that Totally Awesome Hulk #1 isn't a “true” Hulk book because, as we've seen, there's really no such thing. Still, it's clear the creative team is aiming for something never quite seen before, despite the maintaining of certain overarching themes. Whether they hit or miss is up to the individual, and while Totally Awesome Hulk #1 might give a different generation a slightly tweaked version of the classic power fantasy, it may leave some long-time fans scratching their heads.

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8.5
The Unstoppable Wasp #1

Jan 3, 2017

Unstoppable Wasp is off to a great start, and could provide science-minded girls with a well-rounded role model if the creative team can let her actions speak louder than her words.

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8.5
The Unstoppable Wasp #2

Feb 1, 2017

Unstoppable Wasp #2 is a suitable follow-up to the stellar debut issue, as it better explains Nadia's need to search out more girls like her. Whitley continues to define and strengthen Pym's character while Charretier and Wilson perfect their cute yet crunchy imagery. Outside the actual story, the science in this science-heavy book could be presented a little better, but the professional interviews in the back partially make up for that.

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7.0
Thunderbolts (2016) #7

Nov 30, 2016

Thunderbolts #7 is possibly the best issue so far of a series that began slow and is only now harnessing its momentum. One can only imagine what could have been with a more sure-footed Zub and Izaakse's art from the start. At least the ship is finally moving in the right direction.

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8.0
Thunderbolts (2016) #10

Feb 22, 2017

Thunderbolts #10 is maybe the best issue yet by Zub and Malin, even if their story is a little overshadowed by a well-tuned aside from the guys who made it all possible. This is not the huge, tribute-to-all-history anniversary issue that you might be expecting, though. It does, however, highlight the conflicting feelings of these characters as they wonder who they can trust and how they should go, which, given the past 20 years of Thunderbolts history, may be tribute enough.

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8.5
UFOlogy #1

Mar 31, 2015

UFOlogy #1 is a breath of fresh air, standing apart from the gore and grim of many comics with its sense of suspenseful awe. With a designated endpoint and the chance to tell a self-contained story, this book has the potential to become a gem that many look at fondly for years to come.

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8.0
UFOlogy #3

Jun 24, 2015

This third issue is a quick read, not for lack of substance or appeal, but because you just can't wait to learn what's going on. You're left still tense by the end, which I guess is exactly what the creative team intended. Always leave them wanting more. When does #4 come out?

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8.0
UFOlogy #4

Aug 5, 2015

The best thing about UFOlogy #4 is the return of the offbeat humor in the face of potential global catastrophe. It glimmered a bit in the previous issue, but finally shines again here. The apparent upping of the stakes might seem a little out of place for what's been a smaller, quainter story until now, but it's nice to see the creative team can balance worldwide threats against personal growth. Not many people can.

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9.0
UFOlogy #5

Sep 15, 2015

UFOlogy #5 is kind of shocking in how it departs from the tone of the the previous four issues, but it's not unwelcome. I expected more intrigue but got Close Encounters on acid instead, and I'm not complaining. The hurried pace here makes me expect things will only get crazier to close out, and I've warmed to the enormity of the stakes enough that my body's ready. The creative team continues to bob when you expect them to weave, which might be disappointing, but it just makes the journey all the more exhilarating. UFOlogy continues to be a special book, for the clear reasons and for the ones you never anticipated.

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6.0
UFOlogy #6

Nov 4, 2015

UFOlogy #6 is a disappointing end to what was shaping up to be a uniquely fun series. The conclusion is sort of satisfying, but it's a little ambiguous exactly how the day was saved. The tacked on trailer not only seems out of place, but takes this story in a completely different, unfamiliar direction that probably just won't align with the characters as we know them. It's worth picking up if you're already invested, and I wouldn't shy away from recommending the eventual collected volume, but it's a shame to see a talented creative team with a great hook stumble at the finish line like this.

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8.5
Ultimates 2 (2016) #1

Nov 23, 2016

Ultimates2 #1 continues the momentum from the previous series while still introducing all the players and plot points for a potential new audience. Travel Foreman's art is slightly less-suited to the story than that in the first volume, but writer Al Ewing still succeeds in feeding his readers a slowly unraveling epic where the journey is just as enjoyable as we hope the final destination will be.

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6.5
Ultimates 2 (2016) #2

Dec 23, 2016

Ultimates2 #2 is a stumble in an otherwise outstanding saga unfolding under the pen of Al Ewing. It lacks the humor and kinetic pacing of the previous issue, but the final outcome is interesting and promises continued intrigue in the near future. The art supporting the story, while well-intentioned, still makes this book feel less grandiose than it should. Despite the Ultimates' mantra, it's not always the huge problems that pose the biggest threats — sometimes it's the simpler, more fundamental ones.

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7.0
Ultimates 2 (2016) #3

Jan 18, 2017

Ultimates2 #3 is a step up from the previous issue, but sadly not a step away from the well-intentioned but poorly-realized artwork. Ewing is back to telling his story, though there's still no sight of Eternity's jailer, and we're given reasons to invest in an eventual conflict between the Ultimates and the Troubleshooters. While Order and Chaos seem to have overcome their logical conflict to rise above the rest in a reborn multiverse, the writing and art of the rebooted Ultimates has yet to achieve the same feat.

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7.5
Ultimates 2 (2016) #4

Feb 15, 2017

Ultimates2 #4 ramps up the action while simultaneously hastening the narrative's momentum and further defining many of the different characters in the cast. It's a nice little payoff package that sets the stage for further events at the same time. The art is better than it's been since the first issue, but still struggles to match the consistency of the story.

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5.5
Ultimates 2 (2016) #5

Mar 22, 2017

The worst issue of this volume. Multiversal collapse never felt so dull.

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5.5
Uncanny Inhumans #1.MU

Feb 8, 2017

While Uncanny Inhumans #1.MU is decidedly inessential, that's not its problem. There's nothing wrong with simple, self-contained stories if they're told well. The climax comes with a nice callback to an earlier discovery, but other than that, Swain's experience is rote. The issue's art might make for great pin-ups, but it struggles to communicate the narrative. Inhumans fans won't learn much about the characters here, and monster-watchers likely won't be satisfied by what they see, either.

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7.5
Venom: Space Knight #1

Nov 25, 2015

Venom: Space Knight #1 is a fun romp from a top-flight creative team with obvious chemistry that sets up a cute but curious status quo moving forward. There's nothing groundbreaking here, but if the market were still artist-driven, Ariel Olivetti's penciled masterpieces would be enough to keep the book going strong. With writers typically being the bigger sell now, though, Thompson will have to get over his trepidation and bring the goods we've seen in Silk to make sure this latest in a long line of Venom incarnations doesn't go the way of Angelo Fortunato and Mania (don't ask).

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6.0
Venus #1

Dec 26, 2015

Venus #1 admirably tries to accomplish a lot in a first issue, but it almost feels like the book concentrates on the wrong things. The title character, the planet itself, gets short shrift in favor of the rest of the cast and apparently extraneous details on the ship that's gone for good two thirds of the way in. Of course the people of the story need to be developed, but a book called Venus, written by a science guy, almost implicitly promises that will come after we first get a good look at the awesome and terrible place that real humans may never be able to visit. It's a little disappointing the creative team chose to do something more "standard" instead, but there are still three issues to go, so there's still a chance for Venus to meet its unique opportunity and not become Indie Sci-Fi Disaster Book #38.

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7.0
Venus #2

Jan 27, 2016

Venus #2 is the beginning of an impressive turnaround for a series that started out rocky. The character work is orders of magnitude better than in issue #1 and the plot thankfully diverges from the most clich of sci-fi tropes, although that does occasionally still lead to some baffling decisions. The pencils and colors are leagues ahead of what was previously presented, too. It's great to see that unlike with the Mayflower, the early damage to the good ship Venus was not irreparable.

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