Scott Cederlund's Comic Reviews

Reviewer For: Newsarama, PopOptiq Reviews: 108
7.4Avg. Review Rating

8.0
Abigail and the Snowman #1

Jan 5, 2015

Roger Langridge combines whimsy and wisdom into a comic that enjoys the imagination of children in Abigail and the Snowman #1. Children's imaginations can see so much more than most adults can. We see jobs, paychecks and responsibilities. Children see invisible dogs or bigfoots. These are things we never question when we're young but can't even understand once the weight of adulthood sets in. This is the world that Abigail and the Yeti inhabit, a world where children see so much more than those of us who are supposedly older and wiser.

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5.0
Action Comics (2011) #4

Dec 12, 2011

It's funny to say, but Morrison's Superman in Action Comics may be a more street-level character that his Batman has been lately. At least we could have said that up until the moment when he decided to focus less on Superman fighting big business or the military establishment and made Action Comics #4 a story about an alien invasion. Morrison's run began as a story about a boy who thought he had the power to change and inspire a city. Hopefully that is a story that we can get back to.

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6.0
Action Comics (2011) #12

Aug 6, 2012

After 12 issues, do we have any idea who this new Superman is? Much like how his alter ego has been in flux ( is he Clark Kent or Johnny Clark?), Superman himself has been poorly defined as Morrison tries to figure out who the 21st century Superman is. With this issue, he defines part of who Superman is as the secret identity story gets resolved but now he's got only a few more issues to tells us about the "super" part of the man. This isn't the Superman from Morrison's All Star Supermam. That was a hero at the end of his career, saving the world one more time. Morrison's Action Comics Superman is only a man who has to learn how to save Metropolis before he can save the world.

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3.0
Alien Legion: Uncivil War #1

Mar 19, 2014

Alien Legion: Uncivil War #1 does everything it possibly can except to tell a story. Neither the writing or the art move in any way that develops and grows. It starts out full of noise and bluster and basically flat lines from there. Without real characters or stakes, Dixon, Stroman and Potts produce a comic book that lacks even the most basic elements of a story- a reason for its audience to care about anything that they have just read.

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7.0
All Time Comics: Bullwhip #1

Feb 21, 2017

From a slightly-perplexing and contradictory villain in The Misogynist to the throwback artwork, All Time Comics: Bullwhip feels slightly less than its predecessor All Time Comics: Crime Destroyer but still feels as much of a past time as the first book did. It's telling that in launching a comic book line, Fantagraphics, Bayer, and Marra aren't aiming to imitate Brian Michael Bendis or Geoff Johns but are instead recreating comics of the past. By embracing a narrative and visual approach that feels more at home in comics that were found on an old newsstand instead of in the modern comic shop, All Time Comics: Bullwhip serves as a reminder of just how far comic storytelling (both of the superhero and non-superhero variety) has come while also showing us just how much of the charm of comics have been lost as they've become more a technological production.

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8.0
All Time Comics: Crime Destroyer #1

Jan 17, 2017

By revisiting all of these old elements of comic books, Bayer, Trimpe, Marra, Rota, and Parker create a low-tech comic book that revels in its retro approach to superhero comics in 2017. It’s fascinating to watch today’s comic creators trying to recapture the feeling of old comic bookss as they’re adding to the traditions that they’re trying to faithfully recreate. All Time Comics: Crime Destroyer #1 is right there with Ed Piskor’s Hip Hop Family Tree or Tom Scioli and John Barber’s Transformers vs. G.I. Joe as a modern comic that lovingly and unironically recaptures the spark of older comics. All Time Comics: Crime Destroyer #1 is a comic book unlike most today and one that would have been perfectly at home on the newsstands when such things still existed.

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9.0
All-New X-Men #5

Jan 7, 2012

Jean Grey makes the stand; they'll stay and fix the present. They'll do what Wolverine, Storm, Cyclops and Charles Xavier weren't able to do and they'll create a better future. Of course, thanks to the Beast, she sees her own future as well " the one where she dies and is reborn as Phoenix; the one where she destroys an inhabited solar system just because she's hungry; the one where her husband has an affair with an enemy who one time tried to destroy her. Bendis shows Jean Grey a future where she is not exactly as innocent as she wants to be.

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8.0
All-New X-Men #12

Jun 6, 2013

While it feels like in 12 issues that not much has happened, Bendis and Immonen continue to reveal to us how our present days are a broken dream of the past. All New X-Men #12 isn't about the past or the future; it's about now and maybe it's about how dreams need to change.

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9.0
All-Star Western #34

Aug 28, 2014

Jimmy Palmiotti and Justin Gray create a pitch-perfect closing to Jonah Hex's story, never backing away from the desperado he was while acknowledging that he does not need to be that outlaw forever.

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8.0
Amazing X-Men #1

Nov 12, 2013

Of course, this is the X-Men so no one really ever stays dead so Aaron and McGuinness get the dirty work of Amazing X-Men #1 out of the way immediately and give us back Nightcrawler in the opening pages. Any moroseness or pity the character might have had about being dead is immediately discarded as pirates invade Heaven and he gets to be a swashbuckling hero once again. Aaron and McGuinness show us that even the rougher parts of the X-Men's history can be twisted around until the absurdity of it becomes what the stories are about and you've just got to sit back and enjoy the ride.

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8.0
Animal Man #5

Jan 9, 2012

Jeff Lemire and Travel Foreman have created one of the creepiest books from DC right now. There is just enough of a Vertigo taste wrapped up in Animal Man #5 to show you can do fantastic horror with characters who run around in their long johns. It does not try to hide what it is. Usually you want to hide your cards but Lemire and Foreman show you just how far they'll so to make you scared about what you can see as much as you're scared about what you cannot.

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5.0
Avengers (2012) #3

Jan 24, 2013

Jonathan Hickman and Jerome Opea's Avengers #3 is less a conclusion of a storyline and more a wrap up of a prologue as the Avengers travel to Mars to rescue their teammates and fight the aliens who bombed the Earth from that distant planet.

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9.0
Avengers (2012) #20

Sep 26, 2013

Avengers #20 reaches heights of grandeur that has been lacking so far in Infinity. Jonathan Hickman, Leinil Francis Yu and Gerry Alanguilan create vistas and characters that finally feel like they belong in a grand cosmic story

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7.0
Avengers: Endless Wartime #1

Oct 2, 2013

Avengers: Endless Wartime is an Warren Ellis book but it follows the blueprints that Ellis laid out years ago without ever being able to take that next evolutionary step to set it apart from everyone that Ellis has ever influenced.

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6.0
Avengers: Rage Of Ultron OGN #1

Apr 6, 2015

Avengers: Rage of Ultron had the potential to be the next X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills or The Death of Captain Marvel. Remender, Opea and Larraz have the story and the characters to create a ,ighty Marvel Graphic Novel that could have all told this great, timeless conflict that would define what these kind of stories would be for years to come. There's so much in this comic that's excellent but the inconsistent art and the cheated resolution damage any weight that this story could have had. And sadly it feels like all of these pieces were rushed just to have this comic book out before some big Hollywood event. Art and story were sacrificed at the altar of deadlines and bottom lines. What could have been a great, character defining comic ends up having all of the emotional impact of a inconsequential one shot comic that will be retconned in two to five years.

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8.0
Bandette #2

Sep 24, 2012

Get ready to fall in love with Bandette, the hero with the heart of a thief. Or maybe it's just the opposite, as Paul Tobin and Colleen Coover show us how Bandette can stop a bank robbery at the request of the police but maybe get herself a little something out of it, as well.

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7.5
Batman (2011) #46

Nov 15, 2015

Snyder and Capullo are charging ahead with this Gordon as Batman plot, but Batman #46 is an issue that shows how many narrative balls they can juggle in the air without really taking the time to get to dive deep into any of those stories. With a lot of characters, Snyder and Capullo spend a little time with character A and then with character B and C before heading back to the beginning again. The snippet of character moments creates the sense of a lot happening, but none of the stories are developed in a completely satisfying way. Luckily, Mr. Bloom carries the weight of the issue, creating a threat for Batmen new and old.

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7.5
Batman (2011) #47

Dec 20, 2015

Instead of telling a story about James Gordon, this issue demonstrates that he isn't the driving force of this storyline. "Superheavy" isn't about Gordon learning to be a superhero instead of a cop, which would have been a much more fascinating story to see. It's about Gordon doing his time filling in the role of Gotham's Dark Knight protector. There's no purpose or greater calling for Gordon and that's why his story ultimately ends up feeling so inconsequential. Even at the beginning of his time as the Batman, his role in the cowl feels so much more meaningless than previous replacement Batmen.

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8.5
Batman (2011) #48

Jan 24, 2016

Gotham still needs its Batman, but Snyder and Capullo are questioning whether Bruce Wayne needs to be Batman. And right now the answer looks like that there's no other man alive who could possibly be Batman.

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8.0
Batman (2011) #49

Feb 17, 2016

Waynes sacrifice for Gotham City is what echoes throughout the alternate realities that Snyder, Tynion IV, and Paquette illustrate. The idea of Bruce Wayne giving up his life in the name of Batman and Gotham City is the bonding agent in this issue as well as in Snyders whole run. As his Batman has been about the ways that Gotham City has kept its secrets from Batman, his Bruce Wayne continually runs into parts of his life that he has had to give up for the safety of Gotham City. And inBatman #49, he has to give himself up over and over. And worse yet, his closest alliesand lovers need to sacrifice their Bruce Wayne as well. The tragedy of Scott Snyders Batman is front and center as Bruce Wayne pays the ultimate price to be Batman.

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8.0
Batman (2011) #50

Mar 29, 2016

Even when Snyder and Capullo "killed" Bruce Wayne, his return was a foregone conclusion. So the story was never going to be about "Will Bruce Wayne return?" The story that Snyder and Capullo had to tell was "How?" and "Why?" Batman #50 highlights the costs that Bruce Wayne is willing to pay to be Batman but it also shows why James Gordon was the Batman that Gotham City needed to defeat Mister Bloom. This issue features the most optimistic ending to a Snyder/Capullo Batman arc. The battle over the heart and soul of Gotham may be never ending but Gotham has its heroes that are willing to be Gotham's champions.

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8.0
Batman (2011) #51

May 11, 2016

Batman #51 is a strong reminder of the mark that Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo have left on Gotham City and Batman himself. Through one night in the city as Batman races the clock to discover an unseen threat to Gotham, Snyder and Capullo are leading the reader through one last look at their version of Gotham, a city that has hidden its secrets from Batman throughout their run on the book. As the capstone to their run, Batman #51 looks back at everything that theyve accomplished over 50 issues while promising a future full of more stories. And thats what Gotham is; a city that for as many stories have been already told about it, there will always be stories to be told about it and its hero, Batman.

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4.0
Batman Incorporated #0

Oct 1, 2012

With an unfocused story and uninspiring artwork, Batman Incorporated #0 is a scattershot collection of deleted scenes from a much larger work. While Morrison has used this approach before, his and Burnham's attempt here to fill in the gaps just highlight the gaps (where have these heroes been all this time) without showing us anything new or revealing about Batman or any of his international partners. It's an issue put together by editorial decree without finding a unique place within the story that's being told in this series.

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6.0
Beasts Of Burden: Hunters & Gatherers #1

Mar 13, 2014

Evan Dorkin and Jill Thompson one-shot featuring their four-legged supernatural crusaders is a welcomed but too brief visit to Burden Hill and its protectors.

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8.0
Black Magick #3

Jan 5, 2016

Narratively trying to follow Black Magick from point A to point B to point C and beyond may give off the impression that Rucka and Scott are moving slowly with the plot, only inching it along. That type of reading basically ignores the forming of the characters that is happening on each and every page. Rucka, always an economical writer, let's Scott's artwork tell so much of the story here as she visually fills in all of the elements of a life that reveals character. Whether it's a flannel t-shirt tied around her waist when she has to cast some protection wards around her house or the fire extinguisher that seems to be placed to satisfy some municipal ordinance in some secret, shadowy lair, Rucka and Scott are shaping real lives for these characters that exist beyond the boundaries of the comic page.

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7.0
Black Science #3

Jan 30, 2014

Rick Remender's story feels like it's running in place as the idea of anarchist scientists seems put aside and the characters lack any real definition. The scientists have become standard adventurers and the comic feels like a retread of Lost in Space as the characters all fit into neatly into the roles of the space family Robinson.

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8.0
Casanova: Acedia #1

Jan 27, 2015

At this point, Casanova: Acedia #1 may not be as cute or playful as Sex Criminals or as formalistically invigorating as Hawkeye, but it contains Matt Fraction's best writing as he continues to build upon themes that he began years ago. The view of Casanova as a continuum that began in 2006 shows a book and a writer who has continued to grow and it has become something very different than it was almost nine years ago.

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9.0
Casanova: Avaritia #3

Apr 9, 2012

That's the book that Casanova: Avaritia is: it's about these messed up people who are just trying to make it through this life without getting any more messed up.

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5.0
Dark Avengers #175

Jun 6, 2012

Parker and Shalvey don't do anything to give us a reason to pay any attention to this fight. The introduction of the Dark Avengers vaguely refers back to some previous battle that we're supposed to know about that supposedly gives this battle some pathos. Instead, it's just an excuse to watch Thor pound on Luke Cage even if it isn't the real Thor but it is the real Luke Cage. Dark Avengers #174 introduces a new twist on an old team but the concept already feels worn by the end of the issue.

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6.0
Dark Knight III: The Master Race #3

Feb 29, 2016

The first Dark Knight series was revolutionary. The second series was rebellious. But with this third series, attitude has given away to assuredness, as Miller, Azzarello, Kubert and Janson pull away from the new, young and unknown characters in favor of something a bit more commonplace. Batman and Superman overshadow their younger counterparts, making this latest issue a very conventional team-up of DC's two oldest heroes. Dark Knight III: The Master Race #3 is the most traditional DC superhero issue that either Frank Miller or Brian Azzarello have had their names attached to, playing this issue safe and tame rather than pushing the story forward for the daughters and futures of Batman and Superman.

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6.0
Dark Knight III: The Master Race #5

Jun 28, 2016

All of the politics and rage of Miller and Azzarello's story is purely surface level, which is really the biggest disappointment of this issue when you consider the pedigree of these two writers. Harkening back more to the innocent spirit of the 1950s than the grim-and-gritty 1980s, Dark Knight III: The Master Race #5, Miller and Azzarello's writing is fairly unambitious toward triggering any fanboy buttons that both writers have been known to push often in the past. And while Kubert and Janson are perfectly capable of recreating beats of classic comic books, it's only the rare instances where the artists are allowed to create their own moments where Dark KnightIII: The Master Race #5 gets to be anything other than a pastiche of an old-fashioned team-up comic book.

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5.0
Dead Letters #1

Apr 3, 2014

It's difficult to follow what is happening in the story until the end when a new character shows up to provide answers that are far more fascinating than the path we took to get there.

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8.0
Doom Patrol (2016) #1

Sep 19, 2016

Doom Patrol #1 is actually a fairly simple story as the individual parts of this issue are fairly straightforward even if the ways that the many sequences go together remain a mystery.

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8.0
Elephantmen #50

Jul 16, 2013

With this issue, Starkings continues to show us just how rich of a world that he and his multitude of artists have created. You can have these high concept stories, where mysteries take the characters to Mars in just the previous issue and here you have a very grounded story, a very realistic story about how the average elephantman had to assimilate into society while our main heroes and villains have had their celebrated and praised.

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9.0
Fatale #1

Jan 4, 2012

This is not a story about life or death; it's a story about salvation. You know from the start that everything has been shot to hell and know the characters are scrambling to make sure it doesn't get worse. The different stakes in this issue leads to a different kind of storytelling from Brubaker and Phillips. They keep you guessing throughout this book, trying to figure out what they are doing and where the characters are going.

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8.0
Fatale #4

Apr 4, 2012

Brubaker and Phillips are holding back as much of the true story as long as they can. Fatale #4 just shows how good of teases they are as the issue is captivating because of what we don't know just as much, if not more, than because of what we do know.

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8.0
Future Quest #3

Jul 27, 2016

Future Quest #3 expands the story and develops a history for it. And with the great art by Steve Rude and Aaron Lopresti, Parker has a Birdman story and a Herculoids story that shows just how great these characters are.

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7.0
Godzilla: Half-Century War #4

Jan 7, 2013

That little bit of thoughts of our own place in this wild universe adds a bit of texture to Stokoe's writing about monsters, robots and aliens in this issue. It's fun seeing giant kaiju fight and battle but that's not really a story. Godzilla fighting Space Godzilla isn't doesn't offer much other than the thrill of Stokoe's magnificent drawings bringing these creatures to life. The story that Stokoe offers in Murakami, a man whose obsessions have cost him a life, gets to the soul of Godzilla: Half Century War #5. In Murakami, we find a man who has outlived his obsessions and is stuck wondering what's next?

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8.0
Grendel vs. The Shadow #1

Sep 2, 2014

Matt Wagner revels in the pulp roots of Grendel vs. The Shadow #1. With Grendel and the Shadow, Wagner gets to have a field day playing with gangsters, villains and antiheroes. Over his long career, those seem to be his storytelling passions as he continually returns to characters like Grendel. This comic gives him room to play around in the moral darkness that allows Grendel and the Shadow to exist. In Wagner’s stories, Grendel is the “hero” but in Wagner’s dark context, the word means little. The Shadow is a “good buy” but when you look at his thoughts and methods, the extremeness of them border (if not fully tip) into the realms of fascism. Neither of these characters are good guys but each are our protagonist. Wagner creates a story where it’s easy easy to get lost in their seductive ideologies and root for both characters.

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8.0
Happy #1

Oct 1, 2012

It's too early to tell if Happy is invading Nick's world or is Nick invading Happy's. Maybe it's even too early to tell which world is real and which one is imaginary because with Morrison's work you can never tell. With Darick Robertson grounding this story in a recognizable if vulgar world, Morrison can use his magic words to distract us with cursing and cuteness. He draws us into the story even if it's only to figure out whether the cursing or the cuteness is the true heart and soul of Happy #1.

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9.0
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #4

Nov 26, 2012

"Don't lose it, Buttercup." Fraction is a smart writer and puts this line in there telling us what's going to happen later on in the comic. Of course he's going to lose it! That's the center of Fraction and Pulido's story. It's not the "what's going to happen?" question that we're left asking, but the how and why? But by the end, Fraction and Pulido turn it back around to "what's going to happen?" as they throw a twist into the story that makes you question and reexamine every other page of this comic book. It's a slick ending that just makes everything the creators have done up to that point so much more mysterious and intriguing.

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9.0
Hellblazer #300

Feb 25, 2013

Hellblazer #300 reminds us of just what a bastard John Constantine really is and just how much we enjoyed reading these dark tales. Constantine was the ultimate cheater, a character who never showed all his cards even as he made sure that he had a wild card hidden up his sleeve. Milligan, Camuncoli and Landini play this issue the same way. We think we know the game and how this book, series and character are going to end. It's an ending 25 years in the making that still manages to trick us with its magic. A John Constantine may be showing up in comics with Batman and Superman now but our Constantine is gone. Milligan, Camuncoli and Landini pull off a final trick, giving us everything we expect from the final issue of Hellblazer while denying a finale that leaves us mourning the character.

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9.0
Hellboy in Hell #1

Dec 10, 2012

Hellboy's survived the storm and the fury, but here is something new for him to face. One storm is over but Hellboy in Hell #1 reads like the hours before another storm. Each panel is a clap of thunder. Some of those claps are in the distance acting as an early warning while others rattle your very soul. That's the power of Mignola and Stewart's images. Mignola reminds us of the primal forces that exist unseen in the shadows while Stewart provides some hope in the form of light against the darkness. As the character has to face his own past like a modern-day Ebenezer Scrooge, he will need to understand everything he has lost. That may be too much to ask of Hellboy, and Mignola knows this.

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9.0
Hellboy in Hell #6

May 14, 2014

Hellboy in Hell #6 explores death in a way that’s quite a different than what we usually see in comics. Most of the time we’re waiting for the heroes miraculous resurrection because there’s a new event around the corner or a new movie is coming out next week. Even here, that hope is always going to be there; you’ve got to hope that one day you’ll see Hellboy fighting alongside the B.P.R.D. again to save the world but it doesn’t feel as inevitable as knowing that Peter Parker will be alive again. Hellboy is dead and Mignola’s story is about how death can truly change you. Visually we’re starting to see this character as a dead man and that flips around the story. So that as Hellboy enters his third decade of publication, Mignola has fundamentally changed his character by killing him. It sounds so stupid and simple to say “death changes everything” but Mignola is showing just how complex an idea that really is.

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9.0
Hellboy: Into The Silent Sea #1

Apr 11, 2017

Mike Mignola continues to create this rich mythology around the Hellboy character. Hellboy: Into the Silent Sea builds off of the rich history of the character and his world, giving Mignola the opportunity to pay homage to Herman Melville while adding to the legendary narrative of Hellboy. Working with Gary Gianni, this new comic book creates a moody and lovely chapter in the life of a character that feels as if it was ripped out of a sea shanty to simultaneously enchant and frighten off kids dreaming about life on the open ocean.

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8.0
High Crimes #8

Nov 17, 2014

"Climbing teaches you that you're all alone," is the wrong lesson for Zan to have learned in her lifetime. She isn't alone because that's the natural state of things; she's alone because she pushes everyone away. That's her story. We continue to see it in High Crimes #8, as one of the few allies she has leaves her because she wouldn't tell him the truth about why she was climbing Everest. Sebela and Moustafa's thin-aired thriller takes us to the top of the world where we begin to see the person that Zan wants to be. She might think that climibing teaches a person to be alone but that doesn't mean that she wants to believe in that lesson.

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6.0
Insufferable #1

May 3, 2012

It's not motion comics bad, but Waid and Krause still haven't gotten beyond the contrived feeling of wanting to recreate the kind of jump cuts that you can do with video.

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9.0
Invisible Republic #1

Feb 17, 2015

It may be a cliche to tell your story using a reporter who is trying to find that story, but it's a fantastic device that allows the storytellers to work on multiple levels. Using Babb as the eyes and ears of the reader in this issue, Bechko and Hardman get to tell multiple, related stories. With Babb and Maia's stories unfolding, we get a before and after image for this series. We see a bit of what presaged these events and what the result has been while Bechko and Hardman open up the mystery of what happened to this world. Invisible Republic #1 is all about those mysteries. It's not world building that they're practicing here but world revealing. The world is familiar enough that they don't need to walk us through it to explain it to us. Instead they reveal the world to us, revealing the specific details of these worlds and characters.

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9.0
John Carter: The Gods of Mars #1

Mar 26, 2012

In John Carter: The Gods of Mars , Sam Humphries and Ramn Prez create a Mars that I want to dream about.

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7.0
Justice League: Darkseid War Special #1

Apr 6, 2016

Power Ring and Grail have been central to the story that Geoff Johns is telling in "The Darkseid War" but neither of them has really been at the forefront of the story until now. Justice League: The Darkseid War Special #1 gives both characters nice spotlights and stories that create personal stakes in this large, grand story about heroes and gods. Even as Johns is writing this huge story that has multiversal ramifications, he -- along with Reis, Jimenez and Pelletier -- strike with these moments that aren't about being Batman, Superman or Wonder Woman, but about being Power Ring and Grail: two women whose destinies are tied into the fates of gods, monsters and heroes.

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7.0
Kamandi Challenge #1

Jan 30, 2017

In some ways, each issue of Kamandi Challenge is about living fast and leaving a beautiful corpse for the next creative team to deal with in 30 days. That seems very anti-Kirby, who was all about creating these rich and grand narratives. He created Kamandi roughly around the same time as he created The Demon and OMAC and after he created the Fourth World saga, all of which are these large worlds that he built up over time in layers, adding narrative block to narrative block to create these concepts that still intrigue and amaze us. Through its artwork, Kamandi Challenge #1 hints at the legacy of Jack Kirby but misses the spirit and chutzpah that Kirby put into each and every page he drew.

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8.0
Kinski #2

Jun 17, 2013

A dog, a bartender, an enabling co-worker, an irate boss and a woman working at the hotel who knows that no dogs are allowed. While Joe may honestly believe that he's rescuing Kinski from a negligent family, Hardman is setting up this circle of witnesses, judges and accomplices around Joe. I think it's obvious to say that he's not acting in any rational way and we see him continue down a path of questionable choices. Kinski #2 is about what most truly captivating stories are about: obsession. A man sees something and has to have it. Whether it's a woman or a dog, obsessions lead men to do stupid things and Joe is no different than anyone else that way.

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9.0
Lazarus #4

Oct 3, 2013

Lazarus is a book that's measuring out its story as Rucka and Lark masterfully control each and every page.

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7.0
Locke & Key: Grindhouse #1

Aug 30, 2012

With no visual secrets in this book, Rodriguez's art captures the shock that the reader experiences and the normalness of it for the family who lives in the house.

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8.0
Minimum Wage #2

Feb 10, 2014

The best thing about Minimum Wage #2 is the genuineness of it. And even if it isn't completely authentic, Fingerman makes it work within the boundaries of his story. Fingerman's story rings true for his characters. Rob may be directionless right now and his relationship/sex life with May feels that way as well as even after spending the night together, Rob ends up finding out things about May that he has trouble processing. Bob Fingerman takes the risqu magic of the old underground comics shows us that it can still be revealing in 2013.

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9.0
Multiple Warheads: Alphabet to Infinity #2

Dec 3, 2012

Multiple Warheads: Alphabet to Infinity #2 shows the same creativity, the same freshness and the same world building that Graham has done in both King City and Prophet but here it is so much more warmly welcoming to the reader. It doesn't approach the reader as someone new to the world and therefore show off how different it is from everything else (even though it is.) In this book, we find a world that is about love as much as it is about the weirdness of its landscapes. Graham easily moves between a story about a bounty hunter and her odd jobs and two lovers trying to discover a new life for themselves. For both parts of the issue, he settles into a groove that lulls the reader into it and welcomes them into Graham's imagination.

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8.0
Nameless #1

Feb 3, 2015

It may take a reading or two to decipher but this is really one of Morrison's least convoluted stories. Since he can let Burnham do a lot of the heavy, psychedelic maneuvering, Morrison's plot in this issue is one that can be easily boiled down to one or two snappy lines, but that doesn't make it any less exciting than Morrison's best reality-bending stories. It even allows him to include lines like "Welcome to the real world," and it works perfectly as Burnham effortlessly shifts you from one reality to another and you need to be grounded by Morrison's words.

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8.0
OMAC #4

Dec 12, 2011

Even as all of that is going on, DiDio and Giffen are creating a thrilling conspiracy story. What's Maxwell Lord's endgame? What's Genesis? Why Kevin Kho? On almost every page, they are giving us big, loud action but they are also sowing the back-story seeds, building their story by creating new questions with almost every issue. And that's also recapturing the fun of monthly comics, where every 30 days you get an issue that makes you want more.

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8.0
OMAC #8

Apr 9, 2012

For this final issue, Giffen and Koblish show the O.M.A.C. rampaging Hulk-like through Checkmate, tearing the organization down as it tries to get to Maxwell Lord. Using all of Kirby's techniques from emotive figures to thunderous sound effects to the ever classic but effective Kirby crackle, Giffen and team serve up a tour-de-force of Marvel action.

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7.0
Omega Men #2

Jul 1, 2015

King and Bagenda demonstrate how far these leaders, the Viceroy and Primus, will go in the name of their conflicts, there's no morality or lack thereof behind either side. At this point, it makes this issue into empty posturing as both sides show just how cruel and unjust their actions are. It cannot be as simple as the good guys versus the bad guys because the creators are going out of their way to color the protagonists of this story as morally compromised as the protagonists are. Omega Men #2 is a war comic but who are we supposed to be rooting for? This isn't as easy as old Sgt. Rock comic books ever were.

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8.0
Pretty Deadly #5

Apr 3, 2014

Sometimes it's not the story that's being told but the journey that the creators take you on that counts. As Kelly Sue DeConnick and Emma Rios have marched us along with their characters into Death's domain, Pretty Deadly has been a confounding yet fascinating story

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4.0
Prometheus: Fire and Stone #1

Sep 12, 2014

You can't say that Ridley Scott's Prometheus is a graceful story, but it ages pretty well compared to Paul Tobin and Juan Ferreyra's comic sequel.

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8.0
Prophet #25

May 22, 2012

By the end of this issue, maybe you'll think you have Graham figured out and you know what Prophet is about. Maybe you'll think that you know what the story is and who the true John Prophet is. And just maybe, well... more than maybe... Brandon Graham will throw up a surprise on the first page that just shatters all of your notions about the book you've just read. He's done it at least a couple of times already. I honestly don't think I ever want to know what's going on in this book; I just want to be swept up in the Prophet current and carried along into the story and wherever it may take me. And I'm perfectly content to believe that the current will shift and that we'll be heading in a different direction next month.

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7.0
Rasl #12

Nov 29, 2011

Smith's focus on Tesla makes everything else in this series that much more possible. It makes the danger that Rasl is racing to prevent that much more dangerous because there is a hint of reality in Smith's story and a hint is just enough sometimes.

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9.0
Revival #1

Jul 14, 2012

With their exploration of the undead, Seeley and Norton are asking different questions about the undead. Are they truly zombies or are we seeing the dead being given new bodies as part of a Heavenly resurrection? Why shouldn't we be happy that our aged mothers and too-soon killed family members are seemingly impervious to death. "Oh, Death, where is thy sting?" could be a triumphant statement as much as it is a dreadful question. Revival #1 may look like another zombie book but that's a line that Seeley and Norton carefully walk, never letting us know quite what's going on at the start of their story.

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9.0
Satellite Sam #1

Jul 2, 2013

There are elements of Satellite Sam #1 that you could point to and say "that's a Chaykin comic" or "that's a Fraction comics" but that misses the fusion of these two creators who are creating a true fusion of their two styles. Fraction has learned from Chaykin that glee in pushing comics boundaries. You would almost think a book by the two of them would be full of both of their excesses. Instead Satellite Sam #1 offers the best of both creators; a strong family story told through images that excite, that tease and that have so much energy in them that you can't help but get excited to see what's going to happen on each new page.

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7.0
Secret Avengers #22

Feb 9, 2012

In some ways, there is very little sense of awe in Hardman's images because you look at everything and think "yup, that's the way it would look if miniature versions of the Avengers just popped out of a woman's body." He doesn't make that seem as weird as it should be. But then when you stop and thin about it, it's amazing how wonderful these images are that you can easily accept that the fantastic is happening right before your eyes. "

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8.0
Secret Wars #9

Jan 18, 2016

So when the dust clears, the good guys have won, the worlds are restored and the Marvel Universe goes on and on. Thanks to "All-New All-Different Marvel" debuting a few months ago, there are few surprises here, but Hickman and Ribic still manage to sneak one or two of them in. Hickman and Ribic have set a world ticking away and take their bows. Worlds lived. Worlds died and, other than a few things here or there, nothing much changed. And that's what happens with these things. The modern event is not about the destination, but about the journey there. And while it took eight issues before the heart of Secret Wars came into focus, this final issue gets to the soul of the Marvel Universe like no other event has before.

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8.0
Sex Criminals #4

Jan 9, 2014

Fraction claims that he's writing a sex comedy, but Sex Criminals #4 may be one of the most honest comics that he's ever written.

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7.0
Snarked #4

Jan 16, 2012

Snarked #4 almost feels like a comic book that we should know all too well. It features ne'er-do-well heroes that have to help out cute kids because there may be a reward for doing so. And the heroes may end up learning valuable lessons in the end that there's more to life than trying to make a buck on any given day. The ne'er-do-wells may even end up liking the kids in the end. Imagine that! It's a simple formula but the charm to Snarked is in Langridge's storytelling. The charm is in these characters that look like they could be Muppets trapped in these situations where humor is often found with a dash of true adventure and danger. Snarked #4 is a kid's comic book wrapped up in an adults' subversive and humorous point of view.

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8.0
Spaceman #2

Dec 5, 2011

It's a collaboration that's constant but the result for Spaceman is something different than what we've seen before. While its obviously the same creative team that created 100 Bullets, every aspect of the book feels different than that conspiracy story. Spaceman #2 shows that we should expect the new out of our comics. Of course you can recognize thew work of Azzarello and Risso in these pages but this looks and feels nothing like any of the stories that the've done before this.

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6.0
Spaceman #4

Mar 5, 2012

Spaceman is full of ideas, possibilities, dreams and nightmares. And that's all in the things that are suggested through the way that Azzarello and Risso have built their world. Around the story of the rescue of a kidnapped girl, the creators have suggested so many possibilities for their characters and their settings that the narrative hasn't been able to explore yet. After four issues, those possibilities remain far more intriguing than the story that is actually being told.

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7.0
Spider-Man (2016) #1

Feb 8, 2016

Miles Morales is a unique superhero, even if Spider-Man #1 doesn't really give any insight into what could make him a great one.

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6.0
Star Wars (2014) #1

Jan 19, 2015

For many, Star Wars #1 will meets their goals. It's a Star Wars comic. It looks and feels like Star Wars. But underneath this overwhelming devotion to the George Lucas aesthetics, this comic fails to generate the excitement that the first movie did. Aaron and Cassaday easily capture the feel of the original movie but never quite connect with the tone or excitement of it. Cassaday's artwork never becomes alive and vibrant, while Aaron cannot quite overcome the legends of these characters. Despite one or two bright spots, such as Chewbacca as a sniper and C-3PO possibly forced to use a blaster, this comic lacks the anything-is-possible feeling that existed in 1977.

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8.0
Star Wars: Darth Vader #25

Oct 17, 2016

Darth Vader #25 concludes Vader's own version of Game of Thrones, where Vader has learned about the cost of power and the even higher price of keeping it. His Machiavellian maneuvers throughout the past 24 issues lead to this final issue and confrontation with the Emperor, himself no stranger to this game. And really, knowing that this series takes place between A New Hope and The Empire Strikes Back, the fate of Vader wasn't really in question. It was just going to be how much more of Anakin Skywalker's soul he was going to need to sacrifice to make his next grand cinematic gesture. For as iconic of a villain that Darth Vader has been since 1977, Kieron Gillen and Salvador Larroca show us that there is far more to the bad guys than their quests for evil and domination.

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8.0
Stray Bullets: Killers #1

Mar 13, 2014

Ultimately, the nihilistic ending tells the tale of desperate men and dangerous men. Lapham's world isn't about life being meaningless; it's about life being mean and unforgiving.

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8.0
Stumptown Vol. 2 #3

Nov 19, 2012

The guitar is a catalyst to a deeper mystery that Dex is getting pulled down into. Rucka and Southworth know that they mystery isn't simply who took the guitar but why? Why was the guitar taken? Why was Dex hired? And why did it simply show up at her house? You'll want to turn in next issue for that.

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7.0
Stumptown Vol. 2 #5

Jan 28, 2013

Rucka and Southworth make their readers pay attention to the story that they're telling. The reveal of the true thief at first seems like a trick, an easy solution to get out of this story. But as you start to backtrack the story, to follow the clues and see what Dex has been seeing, you can see how Rucka and Southworth have been seeding this mystery from the very beginning. Rucka's assured and measured storytelling is as strong as usual but Southworth and Renzi's sometimes shaky artwork makes part of this comic feel unfinished. Even with the rough artwork, Stumptown #5 delivers a fantastic modern mystery that has both been about just what it seemed to be about while building an even deeper well of trouble for Dex in future stories by Rucka and Southworth.

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8.0
Superman (2016) #19

Mar 16, 2017

Peter Tomasi and Patrick Gleason are trying to pull a fast one over us and they're doing a pretty good job at it. As "Superman Reborn" continues, each new revelation is quickly followed by a new mystery.

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5.0
Superman: Rebirth #1

Jun 1, 2016

Attempting to tell a cohesive story of the once, current and future Supermen, Superman: Rebirth #1 really doesn't get to say anything other than, "Hey, it's Superman." There's no great revelation about the "New 52" Superman and everything it has to say about post-Crisis Superman just repeats old Dan Jurgen stories. This issue lives in the space between yesterday and tomorrow as it closes out one chapter of Superman before beginning another, but there's no story in it about today, or what either version of the character should mean to readers.

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9.0
The Bunker #2

Mar 26, 2014

Playing off of each other, Fialkov and Infurnari build a sense of dread in this issue one moment at a time while slowly revealing the more questionable motivations of a few of the characters.

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3.0
The Flintstones #3

Sep 7, 2016

By chasing after every joke they can think of, Mark Russell and Steve Pugh don’t spend any time developing or exploring any of the jokes. There’s one great panel riffing on David Bowie’s song “Major Tom” that goes nowhere while they keep coming back to this depressed veteran without ever making it funny. It’s a labored attempt at humor which is representative of most of the humor in this issue. If this is satire, it’s hard to tell who or what Russell and Pugh are trying to skewer with their humor, because there’s no focus to any of the jokes in The Flintstones #3.

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9.0
The Greatest of Marlys! #1

Aug 16, 2016

Childhood may be innocent but it's never simple. That's probably the biggest lesson anyone can take away from Lynda Barry's The Greatest of Marlys! As we see the world through the eyes of Marlys, her brother, and her cousin, Lynda Barry crafts children's stories without ever resorting to telling childish stories. Barry perfectly captures the innocent complications of childhood that resonate in all our hearts, whether we're young or old.

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7.0
The Massive #1

Jun 13, 2012

The odd thing about The Massive #1 is that it's hard to tell if this is a book about the environment or an adventure book about life on the high seas. Those introductory short stories in DHP really placed the character's in their broken environments. We saw how the world's upheavals affected the lives of people. In the first issue of the series, Wood and Donaldson are still finding a balance between their story and their themes. With the whole world as their stage, their first issue's broad storytelling doesn't seem angry at the world or yet overly concerned with these environmental changes. Like his earlier work, Wood's writing on The Massive #1 feels eerily prescient but Wood and Donaldson focus more on the characters in this issue rather than the environment. The thought of activism exists in the deep background of this issue, waiting for themes and issues to emerge to inject some emotion and energy into an otherwised reserved first issue.

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8.0
The Multiversity: Ultra Comics #1

Mar 30, 2015

As Morrison finishes up the victory lap that is Multiversity, his grand comic ultimately remains about good guys fighting bad guys. It's all manufactured and produced from the same place. Ultra Comics and the Gentry are each their own constructions in the comic and they're the constructions of the very real Grant Morrison and Doug Mahnke. The creators push and pull you down the paths that they want you to go and we follow, looking for meaning in every panel and line of dialogue. Even as in the end, Ultra Comics returns to the beginning, so to does Morrison in his career as Multiversity: Ultra Comics #1 echoes his Animal Man and Flex Mentallo stories. If there is any infestation going on with these comics, we should be investigating how these ideas have lodged in Morrison's mind and how he can't escape them.

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8.0
The Private Eye #3

Jul 1, 2013

P.I. is a detective hero for the internet age. Hiding in the backgrounds are posters declaring "Free Assange" and searches and keywords are the detectives' tools as much as stakeouts and interrogations. Even as other people hide behind complicated masks, disguising their true identities as they do something as simple as riding the bus, P.I.'s sole mask is some black face paint, striped across his eyes. It's less a mask and more a symbol, a black bar over a face like on television used to protect someone's identity but it hides nothing here. Maybe P.I. is the one man in all of Los Angeles with nothing to hide. In The Private Eye #3, Vaughan and Martin speculate on what the post-internet age will look like and it looks a lot like an old 1950s movie where a femme fatale could knock on a door and a unwitting sap would be pulled into the mystery of his lifetime.

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6.0
The Sandman Overture #3

Aug 4, 2014

Sandman Overture #3 has a lot to live up to with 75 issues of history that have already told the story of Dream. Neil Gaiman and J.H. Williams III know that history and are trying to fill in the cracks of that story. This issue is that filler. It's full of those patented Gaiman magical stories and J.H. Williams III wonderful artwork but it is ultimately empty because Gaiman has no need to retread old ground and doesn't have anything new to build here. Sandman Overture #3 contains things we've seen in both creators works before. It was wonderful the first few times but here it's just a repeat.

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6.0
The Sandman Overture #5

Jun 1, 2015

The Sandman: Overture #5 sadly adds nothing new to Gaiman's past stories, even as Williams and Stewart draw a Sandman story unlike any before it.

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8.0
The Shade #4

Jan 12, 2012

Cooke pulls you ever closer and closer into the confidential discussions of these two men and then quite literally broadens your horizons with large panels as Shade begins telling the man about his grand adventures. And it all works because Cooke makes you privy to the personal moments just as skillfully as he gets you excited by the fighting and punching.

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8.0
The Sixth Gun #50

Jun 14, 2016

For 50 issues, Cullen Bunn and Brian Hurtt have been telling the story about the end of one world and the race to recreate it. This seemingly endless cycle has been the sole purpose of the six mystical guns and Drake Sinclair, their human human agent of destruction and recreation time and time again. The fiftieth issue, the finale of the series, sees Drake Sinclair once again at the center of the chaos of the guns but instead of acting for the guns, Sinclair and Becky Montcrief fight to end the cycle through one final recreation of the world. Bunn and Hurtt conclude the series staying true to the characters. And while they maybe don't give the characters the ending they want, they give them the ending that they deserve.

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6.0
The Valiant #1

Dec 16, 2014

This issue is a quarter of this series, the first issue of a planned four-issue run. It feels like a wasted issue where more should have happened. Kindt, Lemire and Rivera put together a solid comic book that serves a function but never rises above that function. Rivera's art is stunning, as it humbly opens up a world of uncertainty and danger. The quietness of his artwork sets up for foreboding atmosphere of evil in this world. Kindt and Lemire's story walks us through these characters, giving them all their moment in the light but it is hardly able to find anything for them to do with the spotlight. The Valiant #1 is a story of introductions, but it gets bogged down in those introductions and forgets to actually do anything with its colorful characters.

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8.0
The Wicked + The Divine #2

Jul 21, 2014

As their characters perform their roles, Gillen and McKelvie, you’ve got to read The Wicked + The Divine #2 as you would any gossip rag or TMZ-like website. This is about celebrity, the people who have it and the people that want it. Godliness and worshippers are just another type of fame in Gillen and McKelvie’s world; it’s a fame that has all of the highs and lows of any fame that someone on the top of the charts right now has. You’ve got to wonder who these people are. What are the differences between Lucifer and the girl she was before she became a god? There’s the story that Gillen and McKelvie are telling here about stars and fans but then there has to be the story that they coyly are-but-aren’t telling about fans who became the stars of their own stories. In this story, Lucifer tells her story, but we all know that Lucifer lies, don’t we?

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8.0
Thoughts on a Winter Morning #1

Aug 20, 2012

For the boy that Busiek used to be, that rock on the front lawn of his parent's house may have just as well been Mt. Everest. That's the way it seemed to him whenever he climbed it and shoved off of it with his sled. Today, even with his dimmed memory, it was just a rock. He realizes that in hindsight even as he wonders what his newborn daughter will remember from her own childhood. Will she have her own version of Busiek's rock and will she someday be able to separate the fantasy from the reality? Or, like her father, will there be parts of his dreams of his childhood that she'll want to hold onto forever?

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7.0
Trees #1

Jun 2, 2014

Jason Howard delivers lively and energetic artwork over an Ellis story that is cold and calculated. With the patterned plot of a world changed by the extraordinary, Ellis is creating the prototypical #1 issue of an Ellis series. The names, faces and events have been changed but the by-the-numbers approach to the story leaves little room for any surprises or delight in a first issue. Full of ideas, Trees #1 hints at a lot of potential for the series but they are only hints in this issue as Ellis and Howard just tease at what this series could be about.

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9.0
Two Brothers #1

Oct 16, 2015

Everything improves after the end of a war, but what if theres no end to war? Two Brothers begins in the days following World War II,but thats really just the beginning of the emotional cold war that develops between Yaqub and Omar. Fbio Moon and Gabriel B tragic family saga is about people who should be bonded together by blood but have uncrossable gulfs between them that just spread and grow with every passing year. The space that the cartoonists unfold in this comic gives the readers the room to move around in and inhabit the same spaces occupied by Yaqub and Omar.

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6.0
Umbral #1

Nov 5, 2013

Umbral #1 is the beginning of a comic series that is still trying to figure out what it wants to be. While Christopher Mitten quickly cements the look and feel of this world, Antony Johnston stumbles as he tries to put together the language and sounds of it. As he blends modern curse words with made up words and names, the words just clash against one another without ever falling into a natural cadence. Umbral #1 is a comic book that is interested in world-building, but it doesn't settle into anything coherent or established in this first issue, as the dialogue clashes with itself and with the visual tone of the issue.

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8.0
Umbral #2

Dec 18, 2013

Johnston and Mitten quickly built their world and now they're getting to play in it. Umbral #2 lets the creators run free through their story, creating the look and feel of it as they go. From Mitten's wildly impressive artwork to Johnston's carefully planted details strewn throughout the issue about the characters and the world they inhabit, Johnston and Mitten's Umbral #2 perfectly blends their skills to produce a fun and gorgeous-looking comic book.

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9.0
Uncanny X-Force #18

Dec 19, 2011

Remender and Opena's Uncanny X-Force #18 caps off a story that's been running for a while even as it sets up so many questions and so many conflicts for the future. It's great to see that Marvel's mutants are capable of stories that can still shock the audience even as the stories break their hearts.

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7.0
Uncanny X-Force #29

Aug 20, 2012

It's a cliche that actions have consequences but that's just what Rick Remender and Julian Totino Tedesco are exploring in Uncanny X-Force #29, the actions of the team, stretching back to the killing of Apocalypse. In this issue, we see the future and the mutants win. They're the heroes that saved the world. But it required killing Betsy has been forced to kill too much. She's losing herself in her actions and Remender, in this issue, is showing us a glimpse of hope that Betsy may be able to pull out of the cruel path that she's been on.

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4.0
Uncanny X-Men (2011) #3

Jan 3, 2012

Uncanny X-Men #3 is a book suffering from an identity crisis. There are things that Gillen and the artists want this to be and those things are hinted at in this issue but there's never any true connections made between the writing, the art and the audience. It may not be fair, but Wolverine and the X-Men works better because that book has an energy behind it powered by lively characters and energetic art. Gillen's Uncanny X-Men has a better story behind it but he's missing the elements that bring his story to life. He's made Mr. Sinister into an intriguing villain but he's done that at the cost of letting us know who these X-Men are. There's no energy or momentum behind the characters or the action to make this a compelling issue.

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7.0
Uncanny X-Men (2013) #31

Feb 23, 2015

Eva was the first of the new mutants, so it's only fitting that she's the first to graduate. But like her teachers, her future is so uncertain. After using her powers to set everything "right," she has a final discussion with a young Professor X. "You are either the greatest or worst mutant in the history of mutants," he admonishes her. "Right back at you, Professor," she answers without missing a beat. She's part of his legacy the same way that Magneto and Scott Summers are. Bendis is writing these broken characters and he may not be that interested in putting them back together. And that's all right. He doesn't need to because under his pen, the X-Men are much more conflicted and interesting than they've been in a long time. Their broken nature is far more fascinating than their heroic adventures.

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8.0
Veil #1

Mar 5, 2014

That fuzziness is what makes this the anti-Rucka comic. Look at almost any comic series from Rucka and in the first few pages, you get a clear sense of time, place, character and narrative direction. In his comics and novels, that's how Rucka builds his story. He does all of it so economically that you hardly notice it. Veil #1 has all of those but Rucka's writing here doesn't feel as tightly clenched as it usually does. This comic feels much more improvisational as he opens this story with a very narrow focus on these characters and gives so much freedom to Fejzula to visually tell the story with shapes and colors. It is a different Greg Rucka that you see at work behind the story in Veil #1, a writer more willing to follow a darkly playful path than we've seen before.

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8.0
Velvet #1

Oct 22, 2013

This isn't an espionage story; it's a mystery, a whodunnit set in a world of spies. As Velvet tells us, "The Agency where every mission is a Black Op" and every dollar of funding is hidden"" These are people whose very lives are secret and off the books. Brubaker and Epting create the best James Bond comic in Velvet #1 by murdering James Bond and then leaving the secretary to be the one who has to find the killer. They're playing with the toys of a spy story while changing the game up by recasting familiar cliches of the genre to transmogrify it into a whodunnit.

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9.0
Vision #11

Sep 26, 2016

This issue is the brashest in a series about the bad choices that are made by good men and women in the middle of the night in their nice suburban neighborhoods.

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7.0
Wild Storm #1

Feb 21, 2017

In The Wild Storm #1, Warren Ellis and Jon Davis-Hunt declare that the future of Wildstorm begins now. As the issue opens with what is understandably another kill and another salvo in a war of secret organizations, it ends with the various sides of this war realizing that they're on the verge of something new and revolutionary. This issue itself isn't the revolution but it does hint at the future and it promises that our old ways of looking at the world will change just like the characters' views have to update with the changing times.

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7.0
Winter Soldier #2

Feb 16, 2012

This is less a second issue of a new series and feels more like it should be the continuation the more interesting aspects of Brubaker's Captain America, namely the redemption of a good man who was made to do bad things.

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7.0
Wolverine and the X-Men #4

Jan 12, 2012

Who knew school could be so much fun? By rebuilding the school for mutants, now dubbed the Jean Grey School for Higher Learning, Jason Aaron and Nick Bradshaw have given us "The Breakfast Club" of the X-Men as we get to see these kids in a class that's just a thinly veiled fortune telling session.

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8.0
Zaucer Of Zilk #2

Nov 19, 2012

McCarthy and Ewing have created an ode to the old Marvel comics of the 1960s the same way that Jim Starlin and Steve Gerber were homaging the House of Ideas in the 1970s. Like those older creators, Ewing and McCarthy take the Stan Lee formula and ratchet up the hyperbole, the purple prose, the hallucinogenic landscapes and the action wrapped around character moments to create a modern day Peter Parker of the Zaucer. This comic is more of a Marvel comic than anything Marvel has actually produced in 2012, enjoying playing in Stan Lee and Steve Ditko's sandbox.

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