Writer: Dan DiDio Artist: Keith Giffen Publisher: DC Comics Release Date: October 5, 2011 Cover Price: $2.99 Critic Reviews: 7
7.2Critic Rating
N/AUser Rating

Brother Eye gives Kevin Kho the ground rules to their new "arrangement." New players are introduced to the game as Sarge Steel and Checkmate begin their hunt for the One Machine Army Corp, but O.M.A.C.'s appearance may be short-lived when he faces the incredible threat of Rocker Bonn, the Amazing Man!

  • 9.0
    The Weekly Crisis - Grant McLaughlin Oct 9, 2011

    This is classic comic book fun. O.M.A.C. won't necessarily have you pondering the deeper meanings of life or whatever, but that's fine. Not every book needs to be infinitely complex, and I'm happy to have more low key books like O.M.A.C. to kick back and relax with. Read Full Review

  • 8.5
    IGN - Poet Mase Oct 5, 2011

    The most attractive part of this book (and the series so far) is that it's so much fun. By remaining exciting, intellectually interesting, and visually appealing all while keeping its tongue firmly in its cheek, it's hard not to be taken in by the book's charm. The next time Grant Morrison has your head hurting or your favorite anti-hero's emoting gets to be too much, pick up O.M.A.C. In terms of pure escapism, it would be tough to find a better option on the shelves. Read Full Review

  • 8.4
    Chuck's Comic Of The Day - Chuck Oct 11, 2011

    Don't pick this one up expecting a lot of deep thought - but it is a lot of fun. Read Full Review

  • 8.4
    The Fandom Post - Chris Beveridge Nov 7, 2011

    One of the reasons that I had fallen out of comics for such a long time came down to so little of it was fun. The 90′s killed a whole lot of that enthusiasm and then with all the real world drama of the last decade, the publishers brought in even more of those events to the books and it was just getting depressing. There are certainly dark books to be had in the new DC Comics relaunch, and there needs to be those books and I'm enjoying several of them, but the balance was hard to find. OMAC is definitely one of those really, really fun books that has so much content to it that you look at it and wonder how Giffen gets it out every month. There's a great structure to the layout of the book that helps to make the large but very enjoyable amount of dialogue and narrative here feel perfectly natural. It may not be deep – yet – but this is one of those books that I really find that with just two issues, I treasure and enjoy and already want to reread. Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    Comic Book Resources - Doug Zawisza Oct 6, 2011

    Through two issues, the titular character hasn't blazed a whole lot of new ground, but there is definitely potential in the story; the character of Kevin Kho does offer the reader a guide through the story as it expands. "O.M.A.C." can be taken as a part of the whole DC relaunch, or it can be enjoyed quite nicely by itself. Whichever the case, this is a read that treads into the realm of science fiction (borrowing heavily from comic book science) and peppers it with the intrigue of an espionage thriller. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    CHUD - Jeb Delia Oct 7, 2011

    It's not as crazily off-beat as Kirby's original (which is still pretty odd three decades later), which is too bad, since I think that surrealism might fare better with a modern audience. It's not brilliant, but it is fun in an old school rock 'em sock 'em way. Read Full Review

  • 3.0
    PopMatters - Andrew Ly Oct 16, 2011

    Near the beginning of OMAC #2, a minor character named Sarge Steel spars against three training robots that he's probably fought countless times before. He defeats them easily, but he isn't proud. Instead, he poses a question, which seems an appropriate sentiment for this review. “C'mon, this the best we can do?” Read Full Review

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