Seven Soldiers of Victory: Shining Knight #1

Event\Storyline: Seven Soldiers of Victory Writer: Grant Morrison Artist: Simone Bianchi Publisher: DC Comics Critic Reviews: 5 User Reviews: 1
9.6Critic Rating
7.0User Rating

  • 10
    Comics Bulletin - Ray Tate Mar 13, 2005

    Simone Bianchi is likely unknown to American readers, but readers who have a broader palate are aware of Bianchis experience in European comic strips and comic books. His work here impresses with visceral fight scenes that nevertheless still radiate an ethereal beauty that fits with the time in which the battles take place. The colors enhance Bianchis atmosphere, and the art team inflate Morrisons tale with the kind of majesty it deserves. Read Full Review

  • 10
    Comics Bulletin - Bob Agamemnon Mar 13, 2005

    As he often does, Grant Morrison has placed an apt motto for this issue in the mouth of one of his characters: I took her on a little spin to the upside-down world, the topsy-turvy place. This reviewer cant wait to go again. Read Full Review

  • 10
    Comics Bulletin - Michael Deeley Mar 13, 2005

    The only downside to this mini-series is the high standard it sets for the rest of the Seven Soldiers project. Read Full Review

  • 10
    Comics Bulletin - Shaun Manning Mar 13, 2005

    If Shining Knight is an indicator of the other Seven Soldiers titles, Morrisons ambitious project is golden. With two to three issues shipping every month, the quality of each series will have to be superb to justify the expensebut, with Seven Soldiers #0 and now Shining Knight #1 , Grant is two-for-two so far. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Comics Bulletin - Jason Cornwell Mar 17, 2005

    Simone Bianchi is quite a find for DC, as his art gives this opening issue the visual impact that this story needed to get Grant Morrison's newest project off to a roaring start. The issue opens with a wonderful double-page spread that places the readers in the middle of a heated Medieval battle, and it then follows this up with several equally impressive moments, from the amazing shot of Justin's arrival in the present day to the sense of confusion and terror that the art manages to convey as Justin is confronted by the police. There's also a number of solid little moments that carried a tremendous impact from the final moments of Lancelot, to the final panel of the issue that nicely establishes the idea that Justin shouldn't be expecting help from his loyal steed. The issue's cover perfectly sells the novelty of the character, and I loved the various reaction shots on the faces of the people in the background. Read Full Review

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