Twilight Zone #1

Twilight Zone #1

Writer: J. Michael Straczynski Artist: Guiu Vilanova Publisher: Dynamite Entertainment Release Date: January 1, 2014 Cover Price: $3.99 Critic Reviews: 15 User Reviews: 3
7.3Critic Rating
8.2User Rating

Trevor Richmond is a Wall Street investor who embezzled millions and is about to tank the economy. Again. Desperate to avoid the consequences for his actions, he goes to Expedited Services, Inc., which offers to help him disappear and enjoy a life of leisure in a new life. But what exactly is this new life, how much is freedom worth, and what happens to the old life when someone else shows up to claim it? This is the first installment of three interlocking stories that will push the boundaries of The Twilight Zone into new and uncharted territory, a journey that will travel into the past and the future, into murder and revenge and the sunrise of nuclear Armageddon. From J. Michael Straczynski, Hugo-winning creator of Babylon 5, writer for Thor and Changeling and World War Z as well as the 1988 Twilight Zone.

  • 10
    Unleash The Fanboy - Max Delgado Dec 31, 2013

    Overall, this Twilight Zone reboot is off to a beautiful start. And I hope it stays that way. Read Full Review

  • 10
    Comic Booked - Aaron Clutter Jan 6, 2014

    Dynamite has done a great job pulling together multiple movie and TV properties to build a very solid foundation for themselves. These kinds of comics are a satisfying diversion for the constant superhero struggles of most other companies while extending the life of TV series and movies that have ended on the screen. I hope they keep this up in the year. Read Full Review

  • 10
    The Fandom Post - Josh Begley Jan 1, 2014

    Twilight Zone issue one is a strong start in a revitalizing of the old, great series. Straczynski's writing coupled with Vilanova's art and Andrade's colors make for a great read that manages to capture the feel of the original show while at the same time promising something new and different. I'm certainly on board for the next issue. Highly recommended. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Geeked Out Nation - Jess Camacho Jan 1, 2014

    Overall this was a great start to this series. I'm not a disappointed fan. I will be picking up the next issue because I need to see where Trevor's story ends. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Comics: The Gathering - kanchilr1 Dec 31, 2013

    There is a really simplistic, but interesting story going on in The Twilight Zone #1. JMS and artist Guiu Vilanova suck fans into the new tale with ease. This does a great job at feeling close to the original series, with a slightly modern twist. Fans of the property will likely be amused by this story. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Comic Vine - Mat 'Inferiorego' Elfring Dec 31, 2013

    THE TWILIGHT ZONE #1 really captures the story and the feel of the original television series. It's a great start to this new on-going book. JMS has started something extremely cool here and will have the reader hooked in from page one. You don't need to be a fan of the original show to like this issue though. It's great for anyone interested in a bit of the bizarre or stories that are just a bit off in the world of science fiction. Overall, I highly recommend this issue. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Weekly Comic Book Review - Noah Sharma Jan 3, 2014

    This story is clearly just the beginning, but beautiful art, a strong premise, and considered writing make it quite a lovely beginning. Whether you just couldn't get enough over New Year's or you're just looking for something new on your pull list, this issue is a fine little vacation…into the Twilight Zone. Read Full Review

  • 7.8
    IGN - Benjamin Bailey Jan 1, 2014

    Guiu Vilanova provides the artwork, and it mostly looks good. There area few moments that feel incredibly stiff, and the artwork leans heavily on the colors provided by Vinicius Andrade, but the overall package does its job. There's nothing too fantastical here, just a lot of business guys talking about business stuff, and Vilanova manages to keep it engaging. There's nothing that'll blow you away, but the story moves briskly and the art keeps up nicely. This is a fine start to what looks to be a fun series. Read Full Review

  • 7.5
    Rhymes With Geek - Wesley Messer Jan 5, 2014

    The ultimate verdict for The Twilight Zone #1 is a good start with a great story but erratic art. The art is where The Twilight Zone takes a massive hit, because this is a quality story. If you're a fan of The Twilight Zone or just a fan of science fiction in general, you'll dig this. The art I think is going to be make or break for The Twilight Zone overall. That being said as the series goes on things could improve rapidly. I'm in for the long haul with this, the story is great and I'm looking forward to seeing where this is going to end up. The Twilight Zone, my issues with the art aside, is still well worth reading. Read Full Review

  • 7.5
    Fangoria - Svetlana Fedotov Jan 8, 2015

    Overall, the new TWILIGHT ZONEseries starts strong and finishes with a heck of a cliffhanger; teasing at a strange and chaotic universe just out of our reach.This is indeed a perfect companion piece for the TWILIGHT ZONEfandom. Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    Newsarama - Aaron Duran Nov 19, 2013

    The Twilight Zone #1 is an interesting, but bumpy start. The ideas and pieces are all there. If the creative team can synch up their individual styles under one form, the book has the chance at being a modern classic. As it stands now, fans of the original television series will find elements to enjoy, if a bit lacking. New readers, however, will be an even harder sell. Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    Comic Spectrum - Andrew Sanford Jan 15, 2014

    The art team does a great job at conveying the action and characters in this tale. As I have often noted, it is an under-rated tale to craft a story full of ordinary looking people while making them unique and distinct but not too much so. None of the characters have impossible, typical super hero bodies, not that I wouldn't trade physiques with Mr. Richman in a heartbeat. Read Full Review

  • 5.0
    Comic Book Resources - Matt Little Jan 3, 2014

    The main issue here is that this story is a comic book. "The Twilight Zone" is a thinking man's franchise rooted in realism both physical and emotional. Because this is a comic book the concepts and reveals that would leave me in awe as a television show lacked the necessary impact. Read Full Review

  • 3.4
    Multiversity Comics - James Johnston Jan 3, 2014

    So, “The Twilight Zone” #1 is a pretty boring, weirdly drawn comic that could get better as more parts of the story come out. Then again, that last part flies in the face ofThe Twilight Zone's“One and Done” structure so let's just call it a bad comic. Read Full Review

  • 1.5
    AiPT! - Gregory Paul Silber Jan 2, 2014

    Given the durability of the franchise with the freedom and potential it offers storytellers, it's inexcusable for The Twilight Zone #1 to be such a mess. It's bloated, boring, and pretentious, with art that only further ruins an already weak story. Skip this and watch the original series. Something something something" in The Twilight Zone. Read Full Review

  • 7.5
    Word of the Nerd Jan 2, 2014

    Submitted for your approval… Yeah, I know Rod Serling only used the phrase in about three episodes, but it’s become so synonymous with The Twilight Zone, and Are You Afraid of the Dark?, for that matter, that it feels weird not seeing the phrase in a book entitled The Twilight Zone. But that’s an issue I’ll have to deal with along with a few others concerning this book. Announced at San Diego Comic-Con, writer J. Michael Straczynski, at the behest of Dynamite’s CEO Nick Barrucci, has created a 12-issue run for The Twilight Zone consisting of three standalone, yet somewhat interconnected, arcs. The first arc concerns Wall Street Executive Trevor Richmond who commissions a shady man named Mr. Wylde, and his behind-the-scenes operations to erase his identity and make him a new man before his fraudulent activities are discovered and he’s sent to prison. Offered a single pill to start the process, Trevor is slowly rebuilt from the cells out with his new persona, Thomas Riley, fully formed just as the shoe drops on his company. Content that he’s managed to dodge the bullet and live out the rest of his life as a new man without a care in the world, Trevor, or Thomas, discovers that leaving an old life behind doesn’t mean it can’t be picked up by someone else. The Twilight Zone is an interesting concept to put into the medium of comic books. The original television show ran from 1959-1964 with each half-hour episode, though the fourth season had a one-hour episode format, consisting of standalone stories that were only connected by the enigmatic narrator (Rod Serling) who essentially provided context by bookending the episode with brilliantly written prose about human nature, fear, vanity, the world at large, etc. It was a show steeped in Cold War mentality, highlighting major fears of the times or looking to the past through the lens of science fiction while forcing the audience to look long and hard at themselves in the process. One of the more

  • 9.0
    fivexfive Feb 21, 2014

  • 8.0
    Brandon Tindle Jan 2, 2014

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