Starve #1

Starve #1

Writer: Brian Wood Artist: Danijel Zezelj Publisher: Image Comics Release Date: June 10, 2015 Cover Price: $3.50 Critic Reviews: 17 User Reviews: 7
7.8Critic Rating
7.6User Rating


Once the world's most famous chef, Gavin Cruikshank's been in a self-imposed exile for years. His little foodie television program has since evolved into STARVE, an arena sport that pits chef against chef for the pleasure of their super-rich patrons. It's a stain on a once-noble profession, and Chef Gavin is ready to go to war to stop it. Two things stand in his way: his arch rival Roman Algiers, and his adult daughter Angie, who probably just wants her dad back and acting normal.

Whipsmart world-building and a creative dream team (DMZ, The Massive, Star Wars, Loveless, Hellboy, The Sandman) come together for a brand new monthly series!

  • 10
    ComicWow!TV - Bhavna Bakshi Jun 11, 2015

    Modern journalism is put under the microscope, as is a truly messed up idea of Wood’s, that has come to life not by solely words, but by the characters that Wood has created to help him tell the story. I’d say the first issue was a success, and I’m sure the subsequent issues will be, too. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Comic Book Resources - Matt Little May 22, 2015

    "Starve" #1 is a well-paced and entertaining introduction to a character driven story about a man who is forced to take back the life that was once his. Wood gives readers a mission statement to end the issue, and Zezelj and Stewart are a dynamite pair on visuals. The writer's track record of great characters and compelling plots bodes well for the future of this series, and it has the potential for cross-media appeal. Image may have another hit on their hands with this series. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Comics Bulletin - Justin Giampaoli May 17, 2015

    One need only look at work like DMZ and The Massive to know that Wood has dealt in things like global economic collapse, global climate change, or military adventurism run amok. And while that tendency toward the post-apocalyptic crashing down is present in Starve for contextual reasons, Wood is smart to ground the story in personal struggle. It's fabulous world-building. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Flip Geeks - Paul Ramos Jun 12, 2015

    Starve #1 proves once again that comics are truly gearing to more mature and daring direction that independent comic publishers like Image Comics and others unleash. It also presents the direct and confrontational approach for creators like Wood and others to show the readers the present day problems that need serious actions/remedies from the central powers and the society itself through the usual template of science-fiction: critiquing the present by showing the possible future. It even illuminates the power of the comic medium of highlighting FOOD as the paragon of social, economic, political and cultural dysfunctional and eventual malfunctioned indicator if the ruling classes and the cultural elites never ever learn the mistakes of the past. Wood et al give us already the hors d'oeuvre but Starve #1 reads like the main course alright. Are they going to treat us some tasteless desserts in succeeding chapters? I hope Wood et al provide us more to starve on" EAT THIS! Read Full Review

  • 8.5
    Overmental - Matt Overstreet Jun 11, 2015

    Overall, though, in a world riddled with post-apocalyptic comic series,Starvepresents something entirely different that could still easily be classified into that category. It's fresh and entertaining, and I'm damn interested to see where this is going. It may honestly be one of the best first issues I've read in a long time. Read Full Review

  • 8.2
    Graphic Policy - Brett Jun 9, 2015

    Overall, the first issue is a fascinating start. It's a comic I've been looking forward to since it was announced at Image Expo. The first issue doesn't disappoint, and sets up a strange world and topic that's rarely seen in comics. It's unique for sure, and that helps it make it beyond entertaining. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Newsarama - Oscar Maltby May 12, 2015

    Starve #1 certainly is an evocative first issue. Brian Wood, Danijel eelj and colorist Dave Stewart have produced a striking comic book that'll stick in your mind long after you put it down. Although this first issue isn't narratively without fault, there's a sense of cohesion and forethought to Starve #1's pages that place it above and beyond the rest of the rack. Starve #1 hits on June 10, and it's well worth a look. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Newsarama - Richard Gray Jun 9, 2015

    Starve is a fascinating premise, mostly due to the compelling nature of the characters Wood has introduced here. Wood takes what would otherwise be a tried and true concept and elevates it into not just a critique of modern media, but a potential character study of operatic proportions. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Bloody Disgusting - Zac Thompson Jun 10, 2015

    Starve #1 is great read from start to finish. With Brian Wood, Danijel Zezelj, and Dave Stewart as the creative team, the Starve series cant be beat. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    All-Comic - Erik Gonzalez Jun 12, 2015

    Starve is a simple premise, but a complex narrative. This is definitely on track to be another strong Image title. One may try to note direct influences or pigeon-hole the comic, but its difficult. This creative team was able to deliver something that feels familiar, but still refreshing. Its dark, dramatic and definitely is all about elevating the mundane! This is a comic absolutely worth picking up and trying. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Comic Spectrum - Shawn Hoklas Jun 19, 2015

    Starve is about so much more than a cooking show. There are many layers to the story and Wood is slowly peeling them back to show its complexity. I'm intrigued by this series and hope that Wood explores just as much of this world's past as he will the present. Gavin Cruikshank isn't the most like-able of characters, but he's interesting and complex much like the world around him. I'll be back to see where this story goes next, as Brian Wood and Danijel Zezelj have whet my appetite for more of Starve. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Pop Culture Uncovered - John A. Jun 9, 2015

    Even in today's age of celebrity chefs and endless amounts of food porn being delivered on multiple cooking channels, I really couldn't picture a story about a chef and his personal journey engaging me, but it certainly did. What will come of this tale in the future is up in the air, but this first issue does a great job of cementing the reader's interest and curiosity. Brian Wood again proves his ability to turn the unusual into gripping stories, and Image may just have their next hit on their hands. I'll only be starving until issue two comes out. Read Full Review

  • 7.5
    Multiversity Comics - Walt Richardson Jun 2, 2015

    The first issue of "Starve" shows a lot of potential. However, the majority of the issue is just that: potential. While fans of Wood, eelj, and Stewart will likely trust the team enough to pick up the second issue, this first issue might not have enough meat to it to sell the next one to the average reader trying something new, who doesn't know whether or not these three can walk the walk. Still, it's a great looking book with a neat premise, well worth trying out " and, for what it's worth, I think these guys are well-equipped to give us a great show. Read Full Review

  • 7.3
    Florida Geek Scene - Brian Downes Jun 10, 2015

    Another complaint is that the art, while bold, is so stylized that it is sometimes hard to follow. But nothing is perfect, and this dish is recommended. Brian Wood is the writer, Danijel Zezelj is the artist, and Dave Stewart is the colorist. Image is the publisher. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    Comic Bastards - Dustin Cabeal Jun 10, 2015

    Because it is all set up and character introduction (and a lot of that is trying to be cute), and because the artwork is difficult to look at and actually detracts from the story; I only partially recommend this title. I would get it off of Image's site so you can get the digital price rather than putting down nearly four bucks for the issue, but that's me. It's rare that I would say this because I think you should support the print first and foremost, but if I take that approach with this issue then it would be a pass. Use this info to decide for yourself. As for me, I'll give the next issue a shot and go from there. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    Comic Booked - Alice Hudson Jun 15, 2015

    I'm at a dilemma with this book. It looks like it could be really good. And I'm not paying for it. But reviews of his work, especially good ones, give him press. I don't want to give him press. So I'm at a crossroads that asks me to look critically at my role as a fan, a critic, and a human being. How complacent does this make me in misogyny in the comics industry? It's a question I'll be asking of myself, and a question I hope anyone who reads this asks of themselves as well. Read Full Review

  • 4.5
    AiPT! - Jordan Richards May 21, 2015

    Starve #1 is a pretty disappointing experience. While the main character and the premise show promise, the setup going on here and the execution are not handled too well while the writing and artwork leave a lot to be desired. I'm all for a good cooking series, even one that wants to be as serious and gritty as this, but this first outing did not really sell me on this comic at all. As such, I can't recommend the comic at this current point. Read Full Review

  • 9.0 Mar 24, 2016

    This book was free on Comixology, and you know me- I love free things. So I thought I would check this out. I assumed this book was older, and that the subject material was much different from what I actually got. The book is only a year old, and only has a handful of issues out at this point. So it was strange for there to be a giveaway of the first issue so soon- not that I mind, I will read anything from Brian Wood, and I have fallen head over heels for Danijel Zezelj’s artwork- it is so scratchy and rough-hewn, but still very emotive and expressive. This book is like iron chef, survivor and the apocalypse all rolled into one, with a main character who seems to be a very unlikeable, bad dude. He does have some redeeming qualities, though- his daughter seems to be his biggest soft spot, and I see that being played up to his detriment in this story. Like I said- the art is stellar, but the worldbuilding in this issue is what really got me; without a ton of infodumping, or an over-the-top flashback sequence, this first issue pulls off the often impossible- dropping the reader in a dystopian future, without an exposition heavy start, and really makes you care about the world and it’s inhabitants. The big reveal at the end, for what chef Gavin would be using as his secret special ingredient, and what it meant for the society at large, and also his reaction- were both big moments that blew my mind. I really don’t think I made many judgments about this book prior to reading it- except that I thought it was a cannibal murder story (and who knows- maybe that’s what it becomes) but the story that I got was much different, and so much MORE, than what I was expecting.

  • 8.0

    4/5 Rating... This first issue was great; Gavin is already a great character; I can't wait to see what this cooking comp is all about and how the rules work! I don't know if this comic is going to be a horror, or a thriller, or a mystery, or what - all I know is I'm going to keep reading, and already have issue #2 at my side to read... Read the full review at

  • 7.0
    Gizmo Jun 16, 2015

    The premise is interesting but I'm also skeptical how a cooking show theme will work in the comic medium. Can't say I care for the art, it's very muggy.

  • 8.5
    Soyner Jul 2, 2015

  • 7.5
    Sayrus Sep 4, 2015

  • 7.0
    batman_forever Sep 27, 2015

  • 6.5
    Nick Jul 17, 2015

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