We Stand On Guard #3

We Stand On Guard #3

Writer: Brian K. Vaughan Artist: Steve Skroce Publisher: Image Comics Release Date: September 2, 2015 Cover Price: $2.99 Critic Reviews: 14 User Reviews: 13
8.4Critic Rating
8.1User Rating

What will torture look like in the future?

  • 10
    Buccaneer Book Reviews - Cap'n Aldous B. Adder Sep 4, 2015

    From the first few pages of the first issue you find yourself utterly drawn into this story that places massive emphasis at first on world-building and drawing you in and as we've gone from there to this third issue, we are slowly getting more character development to balance out the brave new world and it has been a joy to read. Read Full Review

  • 10
    Comic Bastards - Pablo Arriaga Sep 4, 2015

    I know I've recommended this title to several people in the LCS I work at, and they've told me they would probably wait for the trade paperback to come out. In the case of We Stand On Guard, I truly think it benefits from reading it month to month, allowing the story to simmer in your mind, allowing for re-reads of the same issue that let you find new things in both the story and art, hidden Canadian Easter eggs translating LaPage's crazy French, or even reading that back and forward between Chief Vic and the worst American ever. Read Full Review

  • 9.6
    Comicsverse - Danny Rivera Sep 8, 2015

    That's the struggle of creating something that so nearly approaches perfection: any misstep is noticeable. The standards at which you're judged are now that much higher. For the most part, WE STAND ON GUARD #3 is the latest step into the future of the medium, but it's slowed by some irksome adherence to the past. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    AiPT! - David Brooke Sep 1, 2015

    This is an enjoyable buildup issue that raises the stakes but also builds the characters too. This is possibly the best war comic published today. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Comic Book Resources - Jim Johnson Sep 4, 2015

    "We Stand On Guard" #3 excels because it's disquieting, yet utterly addictive. Vaughan and Skroce successfully take elements from today's headlines and, with the slightest of nudges, turn them into something decidedly threatening, surprisingly believable and tremendously engaging. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Flip Geeks - Paul Ramos Sep 6, 2015

    Nevertheless, We Stand On Guard #3 delivers as what the creative team promised. Torture is indeed barbaric, but war shows the best and worst human traits ever. Brian knows this and unafraid to remind readers this terrible fact of life. However, humans never learn after all from their mistakes, and thus continuing repeating these over and over. Next issue promises Skroce's best illustrations yet, and hopefully, we invested readers/fans will be delighted on that one. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Fox Force Five News - Keven Skinner Sep 4, 2015

    Steve Skroce's art continues to kick all kinds of epic ass and apparently next issue will feature one of the best action sequences ever drawn for a comic if you can believe what Vaughan is hinting at in this issue's letter column. I cannot wait. Read Full Review

  • 8.9
    Big Glasgow Comic Page - Marco Piva-Dittrich Aug 31, 2015

    Very interesting read, with the plot getting thicker and thicker. Well worth reading. Read Full Review

  • 8.7
    Black Nerd Problems - Jordan Calhoun Sep 2, 2015

    Overall, We Stand On Guard continues to be a great series, and Vaughan's unique dystopic vision of the future is enough to make the series worth reading. The dialogue is great, our antagonist shows a fascinating look into the fictional US government, and the tension is written incredibly well. You have every reason to continue reading this book. Read Full Review

  • 8.5
    Fanboys Inc - Jeff Ayers Sep 2, 2015

    Still a real strong issue, even with some of the larger implications brought on in the meat of the story. Through three issues We Stand On Guard has continued to be a favorite of my monthly pull list, and I continue to look forward to learning more about the war and Amber's past. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Graphic Policy - Karcossa Aug 31, 2015

    This issue is not a good jumping on point; if you're not readingWe Stand On Guard by now, then you should start at the beginning. This is a series that you should absolutely read. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Word Of The Nerd - Caleb Palmquist Sep 2, 2015

    Of course, the crushing hopelessness of the story is brought to dismal life by the mega talented Skroce and colorist Matt Hollingsworth. The incredible artwork shines in the torture scenes, especially in the contrast between McFadden's reactions to physical and emotional torture. Her pain is evident in Skroce's skillful portrayal of her reactions. He even manages to humanize the officer administering the torture in a single poignant panel that gives us a brief look behind her rough exterior.This issue builds intensity and raises the stakes of the series, establishing the inhuman cruelty of the U.S. armed forces and the desperation of the Two-Four rebels. Everything is coming to a head, and we are sure to see a major conflict between the U.S. forces and the rebels in the upcoming issues. Vaughan and Skroce have built a world that is compelling and bone-chillingly terrifying at the same time. If you are not reading We Stand On Guard yet, you really should be. Read Full Review

  • 5.4
    IGN - Sep 3, 2015

    The concept of a massive war between the US and Canada is full of potential, but it's taken to such a silly extreme that the book fails to offer any sort of insightful commentary on contemporary politics or the ongoing War on Terror. Read Full Review

  • 5.0
    Newsarama - Richard Gray Sep 1, 2015

    Not to labor a point, but some may not get beyond the confronting elements of this issue, while others may just rightfully feel that after three issues we are yet to connect with any of the principal characters. The beefing up of the single-minded antagonist promises to push the momentum forward rapidly, although this issue may just be indicative that We Stand On Guard is struggling to find its own identity. Read Full Review

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