Zero #4

Zero #4

Writer: Ales Kot Artist: Morgan Jeske Publisher: Image Comics Release Date: December 18, 2013 Cover Price: $2.99 Critic Reviews: 8 User Reviews: 7
8.6Critic Rating
9.5User Rating

Belfast, 2001. Zero is nine years old. The Agency sends him on his first mission. Zero's target: a supposedly ex-IRA terrorist.

  • 10
    Newsarama - David Pepose Dec 18, 2013

    Ironically, if this issue of Zero has anything holding it back, it's that it doesn't quite finish the job. Yes, there is resolution to Edward's mission - the done-in-one nature of this book makes this particularly accessible - but the ending of the actual comic comes off surprisingly abrupt and surprisingly quiet, considering all the heaviness of the previous 23 pages. The question throughout this series - who is Edward Zero? - still takes precedence, and we know that Kot and company will continue down that relentless road. But Zero #4 is really a love story - or maybe, more accurately, a romantic tragedy - underneath all that brutal spy game. It's the kind of book that, despite its rugged first impression, will unexpectedly steal your heart - that is, before it tries to rip it straight from your chest. Read Full Review

  • 10
    AiPT! - Sam Roche Dec 18, 2013

    Zero is the best. I would read this story over and over tens of times and draw new inspiration each time. Gareth is such an amazingly written and drawn character and will be branded into my memory forever. This is a powerful, moving, beautiful example of comic storytelling at its very best. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Nerds Unchained - Connor Frigon Dec 20, 2013

    This issue doesnt change everything, but nothing can stay the same. The issue's title,Vision Impairment, is very fitting: Zeros worldview shifts with each mission. Im desperate to see how dark it can go from here. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Multiversity Comics - Zach Wilkerson Dec 20, 2013

    Like much of Kot's work, “Zero” #4 isn't afraid to push boundaries, or to make you feel something, even if you're not quite sure what it is you feel. It's hard to describe this story as either character or plot driven, but it certainly is driven. I for one can't wait to see what plans Kot has in store for Agent Zero and the menacing Agency. Read Full Review

  • 8.5
    Rhymes With Geek - Kyle Overkill Dec 17, 2013

    Ales Kot has done something amazing with Zero. Issue #4 furthers the trend set by issues 1-3. If you want to read the issue for its politically spy thriller tones and brutal action you get that. If you want to take the time to examine the issue and the larger story of Zero as a whole you get to do that too. Jeske had some tough to shoes to fill from the previous artists and he has hit it out of the park. Zero continues to be one of the books you should be reading each month and thinking about long after you put it down. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Unleash The Fanboy - Eric Bridges Dec 17, 2013

    The story, as I stated before, is very interesting and keeps the readers on their toes through psychological intrigue. You really get into the minds of, both, Zero and Carlyle. It is a really interesting dynamic that works well. The one thing that I have to say is that the questions and answers that are between the two agents is very exciting and works well with this comic. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Comic Bastards - Steve Paugh Dec 19, 2013

    While being a bit unbalanced between its text-heavy beginning and action-drenched second half, and suffering from an odd "listen to our hearts" scene, which fell flat for me, I found Zero #4 to be a great extension of this series, further firming it as one of my favorites currently on stands. Read Full Review

  • 6.5
    Geeked Out Nation - Philip Suson Dec 18, 2013

    The art is done by different artists each week, which leads to many inconsistencies between the look of the comic issue to issue. The look of Carlyle and the backdrop of Rio de Janeiro are almost exactly the same dull shade of orange. A highlight of the art has to be Carlyle's flashback scenes. The images are stark black and white except for certain items which are a shade of orange. It is visually striking. When the action finally starts some of it feels rushed. It looks choppy and distracts you. Read Full Review

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