Avengers #12

Avengers #12

Writer: Brian Michael Bendis Artist: John Romita Jr. Publisher: Marvel Comics Release Date: April 20, 2011 Cover Price: $3.99 Critic Reviews: 7
7.3Critic Rating
N/AUser Rating

The conclusion to the Infinity Gauntlet arc takes the Avengers into the heart of the universe and reveals a new entity. Who will wield the gauntlet?

  • 10
    A Comic Book Blog - Geoff Arbuckle Apr 27, 2011

    I got two Marvel.1 issues this week and I have to say both of them knocked it so far out of the park that you better test these issues for steroids. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Chuck's Comic Of The Day - Chuck Apr 21, 2011

    (Can you tell baseball season is here?) Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    Weekly Comic Book Review - Alex EvansShare this:On the PopPressed RadarLoaded Apr 20, 2011

    While Bendis treats the readers like chumps at the beginning of the issue, a fantastic ending and excellent art just barely manage to carry the day. Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    Weekly Comic Book Review - Alex EvansShare this:On the PopPressed RadarRecycl Apr 20, 2011

    While Bendis treats the readers like chumps at the beginning of the issue, a fantastic ending and excellent art just barely manage to carry the day. Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    Razorfine - Alan Rapp Apr 25, 2011

    In the end the Hood goes back to jail, the Red Hulk becomes a permanent member of the Avengers, and we see Steve Rogers making a compromise he wouldn't have made three or four years ago. It may not be as good as the last issue, but it's still worth a look. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    Comic Book Resources - Chad Nevett Apr 21, 2011

    The first five issues of this story didn't quite blow the doors off, but "Avengers" #12 finishes things well. Not everything works, especially the first scene, and, yet, it's satisfying. The art is great-looking and the final pages are smart. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    Eye On Comics - Don MacPherson May 2, 2011

    One of the things I enjoyed about this story was how it ends up connecting to plot elements from the first story arc in the series, bringing the first year of the title full circle. But perhaps the most distracting element in the book was the fact that a captive Spider-Woman is depicted as being naked... again. The story really doesn't demand the skin, and the villains' apparent decision to deprive her of clothing makes them seem more like creepy pervs than significant threats to the world's most powerful super-hero team. And while it was a pleasure to see Bryan Hitch and Paul Neary paired again in these pages, I question whether they were the right choice for this particular comic. I'm not taking issue with the work they offer up here; it's detailed and really brings these characters to life. But given the nature of the cheesy, colorful, Silver Age villains, I wonder if a more stylized, exaggerated visual approach wouldn't have served the fun qualities of those characters better. Read Full Review

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