Ultimate Nightmare #2

Writer: Warren Ellis Artist: Trevor Hairsine Publisher: Marvel Comics Critic Reviews: 6
5.8Critic Rating
N/AUser Rating

  • 8.0
    Comics Bulletin - Kelvin Green Sep 19, 2004

    Im enjoying this series much more than I thought I would, having been lured primarily by Hairsines art and having no particular love for the Ultimate line or Ellis work. Im a bit concerned about the pacing of the story, but for the most part this is a highly entertaining tale of mystery and horror. In fact, Im enjoying this a lot more than either of the parent titles. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Comics Bulletin - Shawn Hill Sep 19, 2004

    Remember when Winter rammed the Skywatch full of Aliens into the sun in the final arc that ended that team and was magnitudes better than it should have been? Expect as dramatic a final solution out of this series, too. Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    Comics Bulletin - Dave Wallace Sep 19, 2004

    Im pulled in by the militaristic, cinematic angle this issue plays like the set-up of a movie before you get to the action set-pieces - and the details that Ellis does let out concerning the nature of the underground Tunguskan installation promise an explosive finale to this mini (remember Chekovs old theatrical rule: If a Gun is shown in the first act, it should be fired in the third). With the promise of the two groups clashing again after the Ultimate War miniseries, Im definitely hungry for more. Lets just hope that further issues give us something more in the way of plot. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    Comics Bulletin - Jason Cornwell Sep 19, 2004

    Trevor Hairsine is a fine artist and he's given several moments in this issue to show impress upon the readers that he's got a bright future ahead of him. I mean the S.H.I.E.L.D. Helicarriers always make for a cool visual, but this issue offers up a fantastic looking establishing shot of one, and an equally impressive shot of it later in the issue where it releases its scouting party. There's also a nice bit of Jean Grey using her telekinetic abilities to deal with a locked door, and frankly it's always nice to see this element of her powers as far too often it takes a back-seat to her less visually impressive telepathic abilities. However, most of this issue is talking heads, and this does expose a bit of a weakness in his art, as Trevor Hairsine's characters could use a little more variety in their expressions, as frankly they all look a bit stone faced, though I did enjoyed the expressions on Logan and Piotr's faces after Jean demolishes the door. Read Full Review

  • 4.0
    Comics Bulletin - Jason Sacks Sep 19, 2004

    Come on, Ellis, get on with it already! You can write something other than this decompressed crap, will you please do it? You're wasting Trevor Hairstine! Read Full Review

  • 2.0
    Comics Bulletin - Robert Taylor Sep 25, 2004

    I'm really pissed about this book on several levels. Firstly how it was marketed as one miniseries until the first issue was published, only THEN did we learn it was the first miniseries in a trilogy (sharp readers will remember my complaints about the slow pacing). That is completely unfair to readers. Secondly, thus far it is much ado about nothing. The characters talk, talk some more, and keep blabbing before the promise of some big reveal at the end which will probably be held off because the characters will make small talk next issue all issue. Then there is Trevor Hairsine, one of Marvel's Young Guns. After Quesada made such a point of noting how Steve McNiven's art is original in style, I feel a bit cheated that he also chose such a blatant rip-off of Bryan Hitch. Same crazy amounts of detail, the characters look just like Hitch's characters, the panel layouts are in his style. Let's face it; if you picked this up and didn't know who was drawing it, you would probably say Bryan Read Full Review

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