Trillium #5

Trillium #5

Writer: Jeff Lemire Artist: Jeff Lemire Publisher: Vertigo Release Date: December 4, 2013 Cover Price: $2.99 Critic Reviews: 11 User Reviews: 4
8.6Critic Rating
6.5User Rating

The last love story continues to amaze in the book the critics at Big Shiny Robot call unique in its storytelling, dense and well-rendereda work of artistic craftsmanship that you just dont see in comics anymorehave this title added to your pull list immediately. Indulge in the romance and discover how the fabric of the universe will never be the same.

  • 10
    Comic Vine - Jen 'Miss J' Aprahamian Dec 4, 2013

    I've never been so excited about turning a book upside-down before. TRILLIUM is firing on all cylinders, and this issue in particular is stunning in its perfectly-on-point reversal of Issue #1. The narrative is deeply engaging, the characters are easy to invest in, and Nika and William are decidedly brilliant in each other's shoes. Jeff Lemire is doing amazing things with sequential storytelling, and if TRILLIUM isn't on your pull list already, put it there. Read Full Review

  • 10
    DC Comics News - Chase A Magnett Dec 5, 2013

    In Trillium #5, Lemire continues to experiment with structure and work outside of his establishedcomfort zone. This results in another success, one which will encourage readers to revisit the entireseries and reflect on the purpose of its construction. This issue sets a standard to which othermainstream comics should aspire. Read Full Review

  • 9.5
    AiPT! - Jordan Richards Dec 4, 2013

    Trillium #5 pretty much took everything we knew about the series and spun it around, twisting and changing aspects of it so that it feels all different, but incredibly engaging. The characters are still great, the storytelling is completely unique, the artwork is outstanding, and the story is completely intriguing. The second half to Trillium is off to a fantastic start and you should be there. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Geeked Out Nation - Jess Camacho Dec 6, 2013

    I give this a 9 because the twist in the story has made me a believer. I can only hope that the rest of the series leaves me on the right side of the fence. Read Full Review

  • 9.0 - Alison "Boom" Baumgartner Dec 7, 2013

    Picking up ‘Trillium' on a whim, and a fondness for a story Jeff LeMire drew about a time traveler being eaten by a dinosaur in ‘Time Warp‘, has really been one of my better comic choices this year. For you more adventurous types, or those who like to get outside of the world of superheroes, this really is the book for you. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Following The Nerd - Julz Hendricks Dec 8, 2013

    With 5 issues to go in Trillium, it seems like we are still just getting started. Each issue brings something fresh and new to the table. I would like to see if the Trillium flower has the desired effect, because this is what started everything. I love everything about this comic. The art, the characters, the story, the romance; it's no wonder Trillium is getting huge applause. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    IGN - AllThatJas Dec 6, 2013

    The juxtaposition of Zeppelin-lined London and strange sci-fi surroundings on practically every page highlights how impressive and imaginative Lemire's artwork is; the structure produces some stunning pages. Retaining his trademark rough style, Lemire can express a lot of emotion with very little, this ability contributes immensely to his storytelling. Mention should also go to Jose Villarrubia whose more lush colours help differentiate the tones of our parallel narratives. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    All-Comic - Joey Caswell Dec 4, 2013

    Again, Trillium #5 didn't seem to push the overall plot forward in grand leaps. However, the enigmatic nature of this story has mired readers in confusion since the beginning, yet Lemire's writing and story pacing have somehow kept the book engaging and incredibly interesting. This is truly masterful organization of the various story elements, with each issue offering a tantalizingly obscured glimpse of the truth behind Trillium. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    ComicList - Brandon Borzelli Dec 7, 2013

    Trillium is mostly a fun ride. The characters seem to have spent a few issues feeling each other out with little plot movement occurring. It's made for a frustrating read at times but this issue clicks in several spots. What appears to be a gimmick is really a better way of telling two distinct stories without separating them into two issues or two stories within the issue. I liked this comic and recommend checking it out. Read Full Review

  • 7.5
    Comicosity - Roderick Ruth Dec 5, 2013

    It's obvious that we have still only touched the surface of the potential of the series. Jeff Lemire is clearly trying to break the molds of the science-fiction and romance genres with his auteur storytelling and visuals. Trillium may not be an easy pill to swallow for all comic book readers, but it undeniably unique and confidently beats to the rhythm of its own beautiful drum. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    Comic Book Resources - Jim Johnson Dec 9, 2013

    The flip-book gimmick and not-so-pleasing art tag-team to knock a couple notches off the score for this issue, but "Trillium" #5 is nonetheless a compelling story that makes it all worthwhile. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    harpier Dec 18, 2013

    Lemire's sci-fi love story continues to experiment with the physical and formal structures of the medium. "Starcrossed" employs a beautiful combination of juxtaposition and symmetry, the two stories colliding mid-page, visual and narrative mirrors of one another, as each protagonist is imposed into an alternate version of the other's world. Nika wakes in a Zeppelin-riddled early 20th-century London, a soldier suffering the trauma of her successful conquests in the Amazon. William wakes as a scientist and engineer working on humanity's Ark, the last hope against the viral Caul. But each, understandably disoriented in their new and strange surroundings, is haunted by flashes and hazy memories of the other. Trillium intricately weaves visual echoes into its story and artwork. Each protagonist's new story begins with waking and ends with remembering. And in between, the other is always just there, on the same page but entirely unreachable. There's a suggestive poetry to Lemire's flip-book structure that continues to develop the more consideration it is given. The format asks for the two stories to be read in tandem as well as sequentially, a pattern Lemire has already demonstrated in earlier issues. Sequence, even when instructions are provided as they are in "Starcrossed," isn't fixed. Eye-scan and proximity force a simultaneity that a more conventional structure would prohibit. The success of Nika and William's romance, however fraught with apocalyptic dangers, is made evident now that they are separated. Whatever the Atabithians' plans or prophecies, and however askew they might have been jarred by Commander Pohl's assault on the temple in "Entropy," the worlds emerging from that catastrophe are fundamentally unappealing, a kind of bleak recapitulation of the violence and conquest already performed by their earlier counterparts. It is easy in these circumstances to root so powerfully for the lovers, for an alternative path.

  • 8.0
    Synthozoid Jan 13, 2014

    The characters are confused, and so are the readers. I have faith that Lemire will put all the pieces together in the coming issues. I like the flip-book thing, it doesn't come across as a gimmick. It's something that can only be done in comics. Bravo Lemire!

  • 9.0
    Lotrbruno Jul 17, 2016

  • 1.0
    MrCervero Feb 19, 2015

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