Astronaut Down #2

Writer: James Patrick Artist: Rubine Publisher: Aftershock Comics Release Date: July 6, 2022 Cover Price: $3.99 Critic Reviews: 3 User Reviews: 1
7.2Critic Rating
7.5User Rating

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Inter-dimensional astronaut Douglas Spitzer has overshot his destination, and he's now in a world that is both familiar and different. In his home world, a cellular cancer has destroyed 90% of the planet and the people along with it. But this new, parallel world cured it. And while the green sky and clean air is enough to deal with, there's another reason Douglas is hesitant to complete his mission...love.
Meanwhile, mission control has to deal with the fallout from another failed launch and the rapidly encroaching cancer outside, all while trying to aid Douglas - who's the only hope to save their dying world.

  • 9.0
    The Fandom Post - Chris Beveridge Jul 6, 2022

    Astronaut Down is playing with a pretty familiar concept for a lot of comic readers but James Patrick is able to deliver it in a pretty engaging way. It doesn't feel like it has some of the usual fluff that we get or subplot material that's counterproductive to the tension. Watching our lead work through the situation and trying to grapple with it is definitely engaging and I love what Rubine brings here with the visual design and Briski's color work to highlight the way everything looks.The green hue to everything through the exposed light is intriguing to see play out and how it would re-color the way clothing and so much more would operate. I'm excited to see what's next. Read Full Review

  • 6.5
    COMICON - Tom Smithyman Jul 5, 2022

    After a strong first issue, the series takes a stumble in its second lap. Filled with awkward dialogue and sparse, but unmotivated action, readers are likely to ask what they've gotten themselves in to. Hopefully this is nothing more than a one-issue misstep. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    ComicBook.com - Chase Magnett Jul 6, 2022

    There's still plenty to explore in this story, but striking a balance that allows readers to appreciate the high concept and its grounding in Douglas' life is proving troublesome. Read Full Review

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