DC/Hanna-Barbera: Green Lantern/Huckleberry Hound #1

Writer: Mark Russell, J.M. DeMatteis Artist: Rick Leonardi, Tom Mandrake Publisher: DC Comics Release Date: October 31, 2018 Cover Price: $4.99 Critic Reviews: 13 User Reviews: 5
7.9Critic Rating
8.6User Rating

+ Pull List

Set against the turbulent backdrop of the early 1970s, Green Lantern and Huckleberry Hound join forces to take a stand on the issues of that era. Returning from recent duty in Vietnam, veteran Marine John Stewart-now a member of the Green Lantern Corps-contemplates what, if anything, he should do about the issues tearing his country apart. Meanwhile, Huckleberry's comments against the Vietnam war have left him a celebrity outcast, and a visit back home to Mississippi puts him face to face with the Civil Rights Movement. What can one man-and one hound-do? Plus, part two of a Secret Squirrel backup story written by J.M. DeMatteis.

  • 9.4
    Comic Crusaders - Daniel Clark Nov 1, 2018

    If you tend to dismiss comics based on a concept you will be making a major mistake if you assume Green Lantern / Huckleberry Hound Special #1 is just another forgettable crossover story. Mark Russell has proven time and time again when his name is attached to a comic you can trust him no matter what character is on the cover. He is one of today's best satirist regardless of medium. For now, comics should just be happy to have him. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Comicosity - Amy Ziegfeld Oct 31, 2018

    Green Lantern/Huckleberry Hound Special #1 is another excellent, and unexpected, cartoon crossover from DC, a powerful lesson on history and power in a brightly-colored, entertaining package. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Forces Of Geek - Atlee Greene Oct 31, 2018

    It can be hard to take these one-shot comics seriously because the Hanna-Barbera side of things is a far cry from what we used to know. Putting that aside makes a pairing such as Green Lantern and Huckleberry Hound an exceptional way to approach serious issues without trivializing them while using a unique hook to provide enough of the escapism readers look for in comic books. Read Full Review

  • 8.8
    Shoot The Breeze Comics - Marcus Freeman Nov 2, 2018

    DC teamed John Stewart with Hanna-Barbera's Huckleberry Hound in a story examining the cost of war, and racial injustice in our society. The duo seems like the ultimate odd couple, but just like the other one-shot crossovers we've seen, they make a great team. Both characters turn hardship into triumph and learn to channel their inner strength to stand up for those who can't stand up for themselves. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    DC Comics News - Ari Bard Nov 4, 2018

    While a little scattered and awkward at times, Russell crafts a masterful story that has something for everyone. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Kabooooom - Matt Morrison Oct 31, 2018

    Still, the first story makes Green Lantern/Huckleberry Hound worth picking up, if you enjoy the old Hard-Traveling Heroes style of topical commentary. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    ComicBook.com - Matthew Mueller Oct 31, 2018

    For the most part though, the subjects don't seem forced onto Huck and Stewart, and while the message probably won't surprise you, there's no arguing it's a message worth revisiting, and who knew it would be a blue dog and a Green Lantern to get the point across so effectively. Read Full Review

  • 7.5
    Geek Dad - Ray Goldfield Oct 31, 2018

    Overall, it's an effective story, but not a particularly effective crossover. Read Full Review

  • 7.5
    GWW - Deron Generally Oct 30, 2018

    Leonardi does great work with the art in the issue and conveys a gritty style that matches the seriousness of the subject matter. Read Full Review

  • 7.5
    Multiversity Comics - Brian Salvatore Nov 2, 2018

    John Stewart bewares his power while Huckleberry Hound is...also there. Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    Weird Science - Jim Werner Oct 31, 2018

    Why the heck is Huckleberry Hound even in this??? If this was an annual with his part being replaced by some random washed-up star that they made up for just one issue then I'd probably give it an 8. Instead, they made this a crossover with a headlining Hanna Barbera co-star... who basically did nothing. There was no point in having this specifically feature Huckleberry Hound. For that, I'm taking a point off. Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    Newsarama - Pierce Lydon Nov 2, 2018

    At the end of the day, the DC/Hanna Barbera hit-or-miss streak continues, but Mark Russell's socially conscious comic booking reputation remains intact. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    Comic Book Bin - Philip Schweier Oct 31, 2018

    It's a good story, but Huck's presence is somewhat superfluous. He serves as a sounding board for John's doubts, and provides some pithy life advice, but such a role could have been filled by almost anyone. Read Full Review

  • 8.5
    Gizmo Nov 4, 2018

    Mark Russell takes us on a journey through the turbulent 60s, from the Vietnam War, to the 1967 Detroit Rebellion, to Watergate (featuring an unexpected appearance of Prez Richard). You don't need to be a Green Lantern or a Huckleberry Hound fan to enjoy this. And I appreciate the use of the Green Lantern Corps as a vehicle to portray the proper time to be disobedient. Unfortunately, the artwork needs refinement.

    I had no idea what was going on in the Secret Squirrel backup as this was part two of four and I didn't buy any of the other DC/Hanna Barbara crossovers this week. I would have preferred to omit the secret squirrel story and save the extra buck on the cover price.

  • 7.5
    Br'er Lapin Nov 3, 2018

    This is basically a solo John Stewart story where Huckleberry Hound takes the place of a washed up comedian in a bar that he shares his stories with. In other words, Huckleberry Hound is really only an aesthetic to the story and doesn't help nor detract. The story itself is pretty solid, but only recommended for Green Lantern fans, like myself.

  • 10
    Greg Hound Nov 6, 2018

  • 9.5
    ComickerPerson Nov 1, 2018

  • 7.5
    Grifter Nov 5, 2018

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