Little Monsters #5

Writer: Jeff Lemire Artist: Dustin Nguyen Publisher: Image Comics Release Date: July 6, 2022 Cover Price: $3.99 Critic Reviews: 5 User Reviews: 11
8.7Critic Rating
8.3User Rating

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Previously, the young vampires found themselves in a human compound, and it ended in a bloody mess. Now, running from the wreckage, they've split into two groups: one helping young human Laura, the other being hunted by an unknown assailant.

  • 9.6
    Comic Watch - Ross Hutchinson Jul 6, 2022

    LITTLE MONSTERS #5: Moves the story along narratively through exceptionally well captured and emotive interaction, from both the script and the art, between characters as it continues to examine the upheaval of change that the discovery of humans has brought to the children of the night after 300 years of being alone. Remarkable character writing combined with exceptional art continue to make this series a must read. Read Full Review

  • 9.4
    The Super Powered Fancast - Deron Generally Jul 6, 2022

    Nugyen delivers some beautifully dark and vivid art throughout the issue. The characters look amazing and the action is visually thrilling. There is a wonderful visual contrast between the character moments and the action. Read Full Review

  • 8.4
    You Don't Read Comics - David Harth Jul 29, 2022

    Little Monsters #5 strikes the right balance of atmosphere and plot. Lemire, Nguyen, and Wands are dropping a unique vampire story on fans with this one, giving fans more glimpses into the blasted world of the book. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    COMICON - Tom Smithyman Jul 4, 2022

    If choices are tough, the dealing with the repercussions of those decisions is even more difficult. The undead children chose to drink human blood for the first time, and that decision starts to haunt them in this new installment from the all-star team of Jeff Lemire and Dustin Nguyen. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    ComicBook.com - Tanner Dedmon Jul 6, 2022

    This issue was certainly more exposition-heavy compared to past chapters, but its stoic, decluttered art style left room for the dialogue to run heavier here without running the risk of being overloaded. Read Full Review

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