The Black Beetle #0

The Black Beetle #0

Writer: Francesco Francavilla Artist: Francesco Francavilla Publisher: Dark Horse Comics Release Date: December 19, 2012 Cover Price: $2.99 Critic Reviews: 10
8.2Critic Rating
N/AUser Rating

When a powerful totem of dark magic shows up at the Colt City Natural History Museum, Hitler sends his fearsome Werwolf Korps to collect the piece. Unfortunately for the führer, Colt City’s protector, the Black Beetle, is on the case!

From the mind of 2012 Eisner Award winner Francesco Francavilla (Batman: The Black Mirror). Collects three Dark Horse Presents stories from issues #11–#13.

  • 10
    Following The Nerd - Shane Kildea Jan 3, 2013

    The issue mostly revolves around an ancient, supposedly powerful object being fought over by the titular character and a group of jetpack powered Nazi tough guys. It's a nice little set-up for what Francavilla wants to do in the next mini-series and its an intriguing glimpse at the Black Beetle, his world, his motivations for wanting the artifact and a look at the possible big bad behind everything. Based on the strength of this issue and the gorgeous art, I'll definitely be picking up the next Black Beetle adventure and if it upholds the quality set here, we are all in for a treat. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Comic Book Bin - Andy Frisk Dec 19, 2012

    Easily one of the year's best debut issues, The Black Beetle #0 is opening salvo of what looks to be one of the best ongoing series of its kind. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Comicosity - Matt Santori-Griffith Dec 21, 2012

    Pulp heroes are, of course, making quite the comeback in comics these days, but Black Beetle stands up strongly against his senior counterparts The Green Hornet, The Shadow and The Spider, and is beautifully reminiscent of a more recent, but currently absent, creation The Blue Beetle. An original creation of the artist, Black Beetle captures so much of what we love about feeling nostalgic for simpler times where dialogue may be a little more blunt, but it came through a magic sound box called radio, so it mezmerizes us nonetheless. With original stories beginning next month with a four-part tale subtitled No Way Out, Black Beetle is guaranteed to satisfy any reader who wants to experience a little bit of that nostalgia you didnt know you had. It seems the best things in comics, like life, are simply timeless. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Den Of Geek! - Mike Cecchini Dec 24, 2012

    Francavilla provides the words, art, and the colors, and just knocks it all right out of the park. His art style plays right to all of my favorite Golden Age sensibilities, and his color choices are appropriately subdued and smoky. If you're not familiar with his work already, this is the perfect place to start. The Black Beetle looks like an exciting hero, and Francavilla looks poised to populate this world with all manner of colorful, vintage-style characters. For fans of old pulp adventure heroes, or just fans of darn good storytelling,Black Beetle #0 is a can't miss. While reading the full color comic, I could practically hear the breathless tones of an old radio drama, or see the Black Beetle as the star of his own Republic serial. There's no doubt about it, boys and girls! The Black Beetle #0 was the best thing I read all week! Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    SciFiPulse - Patrick Hayes Dec 29, 2012

    Nice intro to the character, who I'll probably check out again. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Comic Book Therapy - MrComicBook Dec 18, 2012

    The Black Beetle was a big surprise for me. I wasn't expecting a fun short story. But I now have another book added to my ever growing pull list. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Comic Book Resources - Ryan K. Lindsay Dec 19, 2012

    "The Black Beetle" has everything readers want from a pulp Saturday afternoon special. The hero is unique and shrouded in mystery, the plot is twisted and aching to grow into more, and the craft of both writing and art are spectacular. If you enjoyed Francailla's work at DC then you owe it to yourself to get on this. "The Black Beetle" is a delightful slice of skewed madness from one of today's finest artists. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Comic Bastards - Ed Allen Dec 20, 2012

    The strength of Francavilla’s artwork alone should be enough to sell this comic, cloaking a straightforward action romp in a gorgeous pulp aesthetic and making each a page a genuine delight. If you enjoy gritty retro-styled costumed capers or are simply looking for an easily digestible yet highly cathartic diversion from your usual comics then look no further, Francavilla’s expertly crafted Black Beetle #0 is an ideal choice for you. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    Bloody Disgusting - GeorgeShunick Dec 21, 2012

    This is a fun book to read. Its got a strong aesthetic narrative to it. This isnt a deep comic, or a well-fleshed out one, but it's a solid piece of entertainment. And, obviously, a well-drawn one. So if youre looking for a comic with excellent art, good action sequences, and Nazis, this is worth a look. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    The Weekly Crisis - Grant McLaughlin Dec 23, 2012

    This is a story of high adventure, where moral dilemmas are pretty black and white (with that assumption being put into question towards the end of the issue), and it's an awful fun adventure to be on. Knowing that Fracesco Francavilla did every single part of the comic - from writing to art to colours - on his own makes the entire endeavour that much more impressive. The Black Beetle is clearly a labour of love, and it reads that way. Read Full Review

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