Civil War II: Kingpin #1

Civil War II: Kingpin #1

Event\Storyline: Civil War II Writer: Matthew Rosenberg Artist: Dalibor Talajic, Ricardo Lopez-Ortiz Publisher: Marvel Comics Release Date: July 6, 2016 Cover Price: $4.99 Critic Reviews: 11 User Reviews: 11
7.9Critic Rating
8.0User Rating

+ Pull List

An Inhuman with the ability to predict the future has helped the heroes of the Marvel Universe clamp down on crime before it can even happen. While this thwarts most criminals, one man has found a way to keep doing what he does best. Wilson Fisk has managed to stay one step ahead of the good guys and his crime enterprise is BOOMING. But what's his secret?! Rising stars Matthew Rosenberg (We Can Never Go Home) and Ricardo Lopez Ortiz (Wolf) present a gritty, street-level view of CIVIL WAR II starring the Kingpin in a world without crime!
Rated T+

  • 9.0
    Comics: The Gathering - Hctor A Jul 9, 2016

    The portrayal of Wilson Fisk is really solid here, but the true highlight of the book is how Kingpin #1 gathers some of the most distinctive talents currently working at Marvel and builds a very interesting character in Janus. Oh, and Kingpin wears a tracksuit. Read Full Review

  • 8.5
    Graphic Policy - Logan Dalton Jul 6, 2016

    If you'd rather watch old Sopranos episodes on HBO Go instead of the latest Marvel Cinematic Universe blockbuster for and are okay with a touch of Philip K. Dick to go with your turf wars, Civil War II: Kingpin#1 may be the comic for you. Read Full Review

  • 8.5
    Weird Science - Dan Mayhoff Jul 18, 2016

    Ultimately, I found myself enjoying one part of this bookfar more than the other but still found both intriguing and very well executed.Usually a book that has two parts sees the stories fail to mesh well together.That said, this issue did not fail in that regard. It's basically like tellingtwo different parts of the same story and I like that. The dialogue was niceand the art was interesting. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    All-Comic - Jessica Petrecz Jul 7, 2016

    Civil War ll: Kingpin #1 is off to a great start with this fun, fresh first issue. It was a welcomed, unexpected title that added some excitement to a pretty exhausted event from Marvel. If you want to be in on this summers event without all the commitment from the endless titles of tie-ins, you can add Civil War ll: Kingpin. This hopeful book has all the promise to be a standout title from this summers Marvel event thanks to dynamic art combined with inventive storytelling. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    IGN - Jesse Schedeen Jul 7, 2016

    Matthew Rosenberg paints a compelling portrait of Wilson Fisk as he settles back into New York and finds a way to take advantage of the city's power vacuum while evading the all-seeing eye of Ulysses. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    411Mania - RobF Jul 14, 2016

    Like the legendary phoenix the Kingpin again rises from the ashes of obscurity to once again plague the Marvel U. Of all the Civil War tie-ins this one has the most promise. Let's hope Rosenberg can keep the momentum going. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Fortress of Solitude - Rick Austin Jul 16, 2016

    If you're looking for a break from the grim-and-gritty Civil War II titles, Civil War II: Kingpin #1 is just what's needed. It's great to see that not every installment in a major crossover has to be serious, and Marvel has to be credited for that. Is it for everyone? No. But it's still a great read! Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    ComicList - Eric Bradach Jul 9, 2016

    The Daredevil Netflix series has been a massive success for Marvel and one of the standouts in that show was Vincent D'Onofrio's portrayal as the Kingpin. So it makes sense that he'd get his own mini-series in which ties itself to Marvel's summer event. The fact that it's good is greatly satisfying considering that the majority of the Civil War II tie-ins have largely been a miss. Matthew Rosenberg has taken a strong idea capitalizing off the constant infighting amongst our heroes, which is becoming excruciatingly tiresome, and created an intriguing story with memorable and engaging characters. If this issue is an indicative of what's to come, then this is the Civil War II tie-in to be reading. Read Full Review

  • 7.7
    Heroes Direct - Adam Fitch Jul 6, 2016

    Overall,Civil War II: Kingpin #1 doesn't give you too much to chew on but provides the perspective of the criminal underbelly of the Marvel's comic universe. Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    The Source by SuperHeroStuff - Marc Buxton Jul 8, 2016

    Old school Marvel fans will enjoy some cameos from some of Marvels esoteric street level players like Fancy Dan and Man Mountain Marko. This issue was like a Marvels most wanted bit of crime fiction combined with the huge doings of Civil War II to form a street level bit of grit that really gets under your nails in a good way. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    Comicosity - Doug Zawisza Jul 7, 2016

    Fisk's attitude overreaches his station, but rather than come across as confidence, it reads like arrogance. There's no humility in this version of Wilson Fisk. That lack of humility keeps him from being a relatable character and keeps Civil War II: Kingpin #1 from being an immersive read. This is the type of comic fans read to hope to see bad things happening to bad people. It's not particularly eventful, nor is it particularly memorable, but it does point readers in a direction that has potential. I just hope Wilson Fisk lives up to that potential. Read Full Review

  • 9.5
    dimyourlights Aug 10, 2016

    Great, twisted street-level tale that does a great job of existing within the current event without being inaccessible. Anyone who loves villain-centric books or street-level crime will be satisfied.

  • 8.0
    SavleCZ Jul 15, 2016

    A solid issue as an introduction into the book. The art is decent and Wilson Fisk looks intimidating.

  • 7.0
    Kreniigh Aug 24, 2016

    On its own, this is a perfectly fine story with a good art style. In relation to the wider universe, it's got a couple of problems... First, and this is a common one, it's set in the sort of "generic" New York crime scene where every boss and underling is always the same, always just out there doing mobster stuff, infighting, hanging out in villain bars, etc. no matter what happens in any given story. No matter who makes a bid to take over all the crime, no matter who succeeds or is killed or dramatically transformed, everything resets for the next story. I'm pretty sure the Owl and Madame Masque and Hammerhead have had different status quos in other books recently, but here they are being generic mob bosses again. But hey, that's how it goes. It's also a weird fit for Civil War II. The Kingpin's realization of how Janus's powers work only makes sense if, as is implied throughout the issue, Ulysses is predicting 100% of all criminal activity in NYC and the heroes are stopping all of it. If some crimes are slipping through, there's no reason for Fisk to think Janus is anything except lucky. That level of enforcement isn't reflected in any of the other Civil War II titles, where Ulysses and everyone else is busy with other things. Possibly the writers of these miniseries were given vague details of how the main plot works and had to fill some thing in themselves.

  • 10
    DetroitSkyline Jul 7, 2016

  • 10
    Above Ground Pools Sep 30, 2016

  • 8.5
    Bleemak Oct 6, 2016

  • 8.0
    StanielK Jul 6, 2016

  • 8.0
    Alex Mackay Aug 6, 2016

  • 7.0
    Juanpk26 Jul 7, 2016

  • 6.0
    Destraction Jul 7, 2016

  • 6.0
    DXO Aug 31, 2016

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