Casual Fling #4
Series Next

Casual Fling #4

Writer: Jason Starr Artist: Dalibor Talajic, Marco Lesko Publisher: AWA Release Date: May 26, 2021 Cover Price: $3.99 Critic Reviews: 3 User Reviews: 1
7.0Critic Rating
3.0User Rating

+ Pull List

Jennifer Ryan has the perfect life. A loving family. A high paying job in corporate law. A luxurious apartment in upper Manhattan. Then one day she steps out of her marriage... and finds that her new lover isn't the one night stand she expected. Stalked and threatened with exposure, Jennifer attempts to unravel the true identity of her tormentor, discovering valuable clues in the trail of destruction left in this mysterious man's wake. In this concluding issue, Jennifer turns the tables on her masked adversary.

  • 8.1
    Graphic Policy - Logan Dalton May 28, 2021

    With emotionally open art and color palette from Dalibor Talajic and Marco Lesko and honest writing from Jason Starr, Casual Fling #4 is a strong finish for a comic that was a decent erotic thriller and still had plenty of time for tough, nuanced conversations. I would definitely love to read more monthly books like it in the future. Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    Comic Crusaders - Johnny "The Machine" Hughes May 26, 2021

    Casual Fling is a mini series that, initially, presents a great idea for a story, but ultimately gets a tad waylaid by the weight of its own nuances and fails to deliver any true closure for the problems that beset Jennifer and Matthew before golden masks and video tapes. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    ComicBook.com - Jamie Lovett May 26, 2021

    Casual Fling started as the kind of sex thriller you don't see much of in comics and lost its focus a bit in the middle, but at least it wraps up tidily, even if the finale lacks flair. Read Full Review

  • 3.0
    Big Dumb Jay Jun 7, 2021

    Disappointing story choices taint issue #4, which is too bad, since this series WAS a trashy-fun read before this installment. The "twist" from the last issue has virtually no impact. Now, out of nowhere, the antagonist is revealed to be a flat-out rapist, removing any and all of his subtlety, which conveniently helps avoid dealing with the questions the previous installments raised about how much one should be held accountable for their infidelity when they are seduced by someone with ill-intent. Somehow, despite making the villain more despicable, they manage to reduce his level of menace, and everything gets wrapped up far too tidily.

    Also, there's an implication by one of the side characters (who seemingly speaks for the writ more

Reviews for the Week of...

June

May

More