The Fade Out #1 Reviews
  • 10
    Comicosity - Sam Marx

    Ill wrap up this review by saying this book is primed to be the best crime story Ive seen sinceCriminal, maybe. Weve got a highly untrustworthy cast of characters, a naive dead girl, and a lot of questions to be answered. What more can we ask for with this kind of tale? Building upon everything Brubaker and Phillips have done before, we get something that feels both familiar and fresh. Which leads me to ask: if you enjoyed this, might I recommend going back and readingCriminal?

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  • 10
    Comic Vine - Tony 'G-Man' Guerrero

    It's time to reconfigure your comic buying budget as the latest new series from Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips, and Elizabeth Breitweiser is calling out for you. As you would expect, this is a pure story with amazing visuals. It's a great look at this dark time period in Hollywood during the late 1940s and you'll immediately find yourself hooked. You've read any of Brubaker and Phillips' previous series, you pretty much know exactly what to expect. If you haven't read any of their work before, you are indeed in for a treat. Bottom line: buy this book.

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  • 10
    Rhymes With Geek - J. Reifler

    Rarely does a creative team mesh together so perfectly to tell a story. Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips are a rare team-up of talent and drive the story-telling possibilities of comics to an entirely new level. Their stories are challenging and grip the reader as they unfold. The Fade Out will occupy a special section in my collection next to Stray Bullets and other excellent examples of crime-drama storytelling. It's a period piece that unfolds itself with brutal honesty. Both the beauty and the horror of this world are on full display. Reading this story feels almost a bit voyeuristic,as if you are peering through a peephole intothe private lives of a rich and corrupt society. Rarely does a comic deliver on such high expectations. The Fade Out #1 delivers.

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  • 10
    Big Comic Page - Shane Hoffman

    Before I started this review I was already impatiently waiting the next issue, and now the anticipation has been multiplied and Im not sure what Im going to do with myself for a month until the next comes out. Seriously. It's that good. I guess thats the beauty of comics and of a story like this, and while I wait I can begin to formulate my own guesses as to where Brubaker and Phillips will take us next on this utterly compelling mystery

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  • 10
    Comics: The Gathering - RobertJCross

    Pick this up. You will NOT be disappointed. Instant classic.

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  • 10
    All-Comic - Ian Stephen

    The Fade Out hit a homerun right out of the gate. A talented group of creators, working together on a project they love always reflects off of the pages onto the readers. You can definitely feel the love in this comic; the love of the period, the love of the genre, and the love of the medium. Now that is a lot of love considering it's coming from a dark murder mystery.

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  • 10
    Comic Book Resources - Greg McElhatton

    "The Fade Out" is a killer comic, thanks to Brubaker and Phillips. After reading this issue, you'll wish that every new series had such a strong debut. Wherever this crime noir goes next, I'll be eagerly following. A fantastic job from start to finish.

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  • 10
    Comic Bastards - Samantha Roehrig

    The comic is a pretty straightforward story, but when the actress is put in a suicide position, it makes you think there is more to this story than you think. You really can't trust anyone, as of yet. Not even Charlie. We don't know what happened at the party either, so as Charlie pieces it together so does the reader. It is a fun detective game that will no doubt drive Charlie to find out the truth. Brubaker and Phillips have another hit on their hands, so avid readers of these two can expect something good. And first come readers can get hooked with this pair that will be giving the story of their life.

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  • 10
    Bloody Disgusting - Zac Thompson

    I don't usually throw my two cents into reviews, but I can't help but entirely echo the above sentiments about this book. It's a perfectly crafted genre piece that fills a void you didn't even know was empty. Holy shit guys, the Brubaker and Phillips train just keeps gaining speed.

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  • 10
    Geeked Out Nation - Jess Camacho

    “The Fade Out” is off to an excellent start. In just one issue the world is built up, the mystery set and we get a nice introduction to each one of these characters. And special mention to the magazine format. If you can get your hands on that, please do. It's even more beautiful to look at in that format. Image Comics struck gold when they got Brubaker and Phillips exclusively for 5 years. And so did readers. Because this is the kind of comic we'll get month in and month out.

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  • 10
    Infinite Comix - Oscar Bergeron-Oakes

    This book is absolutely fantastic. The Fade Out is a culmination of a fifteen-year partnership between writer and artist, and issue one proves that this team is working in perfect harmony. Be prepared for a wild ride through the dark streets of Hollywood. If this issue is any indication, it is going to be awesome.

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  • 10
    Comic Spectrum - Adam Alamo

    The Fade Out #1 continues the great Brubaker/Phillips tradition of creating engaging noir stories that plunge the reader into the dark recesses of their created world. It was a strong debut issue that was beautifully crafted and executed by these two masters of the craft. If this is only the beginning of the Brubaker/Phillips deal with Image Comics, then I cannot wait to see what comes next from this creative team. Until then, you can find me enjoying every bit of the seedy Hollywood underbelly found in The Fade Out.

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  • 10
    Horror Talk - James Ferguson

    The Fade Out cements Brubaker and Phillips in the noir genre with the likes of Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler.  This first issue gives you everything you need to fall head first into this world of murder, mystery, and intrigue and will leave you wanting more.

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  • 10
    ComicList - Brandon Borzelli

    The Fade Out looks like an instant classic. It's a noir style set story in the original noir time period. The book clocks in at twenty-eight pages and includes an essay in the back. It's truly a reading experience. It's definitely one to pick up.

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  • 10
    Forces Of Geek - Atlee Greene

    This is probably my favorite single issue of the year so far. The world is ugly in a sense that things aren't going to go well for those involved which has me beyond enthralled with what's to come.

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  • 10
    Doom Rocket - Andrew Stevens

    Lastly, The Fade Out lends itself a skin of reality with its back pages that skip the standard letters to the writer, and instead offer essays on noir, pulps, and the historical period, which willnot be made available when the issues are later collected in trades. This issue's essay presents the real suicide of the little known actress Peg Entwistle, moving The Fade Out past simple escapism into the realm of art.

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  • 10
    Comic Booked - Newell Turner

    If the first issue is any indication, I would say Brubaker and Phillips have another winner on their hands. I don't know how long this series will last, but I'm in it for the long haul.

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  • 9.6
    Multiversity Comics - Keith Dooley

    Historical accuracy is just one piece of evidence that proves "The Fade Out" is a labor of love. With an intriguing story, ingenious methods of storytelling, and flawed characters that beg to be understood, Brubaker, Phillips, and Breitweiser are a team worth following through the enigmatic streets of 1940s Los Angeles.

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  • 9.6
    Weekly Comic Book Review - Minhquan Nguyen

    Brubaker and Phillips pull off a convincingly grounded mystery with the smoothness of two people who know exactly what they're doing.

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  • 9.5
    Adventures In Poor Taste - John F. Trent

    The Fade Out #1 is great; Brubaker tells a compelling and believable mystery-murder book filled with moral quandaries and an overarching theme of lying and how pervasive and commonplace it is in post World War II Hollywood.

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  • 9.5
    Nerds Unchained - Jeremy Radick

    The rain hadn't tapered off by the time I got back to my car, but it didn't make me feel any cleaner, just heavier. I got into my car and put the copy of The Fade Out on the passenger seat. Tipping my hat back, I started the engine and headed out into the dark night. At least with Brubaker and Phillips, I'd have some company.

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  • 9.5
    Big Glasgow Comic Page - Alessandro Spitoni

    A very strong start for this new series.

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  • 9.2
    IGN - Tres Dean

    It will surprise nobody at all if this story becomes Image's next big thing. It should. The Fade Out is vintage Brubaker/Phillips and sets the stage for a dirty, ugly mystery with style and grace. Don't miss this one.

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  • 9.0
    Newsarama - Edward Kaye

    There's some obvious similarities with several of the duo's past collaborations here, but if it ain't broke, don't fix it. The secret ingredient is a phenomenal writer/artist team.

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  • 9.0
    Unleash The Fanboy - John McCubbin

    The Fade Out gets off to an amazing start, with Brubaker and Phillips latest mystery being very enticing. Highly recommended.

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  • 9.0
    Coming Up Comics - David Melton

    This story promises that it will be entertaining and suspenseful. Anyone that has found themselves being a part of a Brubaker and Phillips book knows that they're in for a wild ride that will keep you sucked in until it is over. A strong start to an exciting chapter from these two creators.

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  • 9.0
    Newsarama - Pierce Lydon

    The Fade Out is already looking like another highlight in the prolific partnership between Brubaker and Phillips. It's always fun to have creators that so consistently work together and turn out a great product. This book might be a bit lighter than some of their other noir but there are plenty of openings for it to take more violent and unexpected twists and turns. The Fade Out is a master class in art and writing. And it's definitely a book worthy of your dollars especially if you're looking for a break from the usual slog of the monthly spinner rack.

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  • 9.0
    We The Nerdy - Randy Z. Ochoa

    Elizabeth Breitweiser brings it on every page she colors and this is no different. I think the best thing, for this issue at least is that the green that covers Charlie when the focus is on him. Even if things are in full color, there is usually a touch of green. There is one page where Charlies green palette slowly fades to red when the story turns focus to Valeria Sommers, a Hollywood actress. It isnt subtle, but something you may miss on the first read. Her colors alone make this required reading.

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  • 9.0
    Major Spoilers - Chris Wilson

    Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips have struck gold with The Fade Out, crafting a compelling mystery with a dramatic setting. Those who love film should have a blast as the book is almost a movie within a movie. With fascinating backup material, you're getting more than your $3.50 worth. I can't recommend The Fade Out #1 more and it is one of the best books to come out this week. Based on how it's selling, I suggest you go get it now.

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  • 9.0
    Comics Bulletin - Lisa Wu

    Even without Phillips' intense and detailed artwork, the rapid-paced dialogue exchanges, phrasing, and word choices are enough to transport you into the world of The Fade Out. Keep your eyes out for the next issue, GHGers.

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  • 9.0
    The Weekly Crisis - CeeJay

    Sean Phillips masterfully captures that film noir style and blends it with a hyper-dramatic real world sensibility. The colors are muted, which is to be expected. There are a lot of differing shades of grey at work, so when brighter colors like reds are used, they really pop off the page. The character designs fit well with the thematic aesthetic; movie stars, bodyguards and even secretaries look like they jumped right out of "The Maltese Falcon." "Fade Out" was a great read and I can't wait to follow Parish down this rabbit hole of a murder mystery.

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  • 8.1
    Entertainment Fuse - Jim Bush

    The film industry has a long history (especially in its early days) of bad behavior and resulting scandals. The Hays Production Code, which sanitized movies beginning in 1930, partially resulted from the fallout of the Fatty Arbuckle controversy. The Fade Out is not the first tale to be set in this milieu (and might not even be the first comic). In fact, the premise of The Fade Out is somewhat similar to the 1950 Nicholas Ray noir In a Lonely Place.Although the issue at times feels too closely in the line of modern-day noirs like Chinatown, there is enough promising character work done in issue #1 that The Fade Out seems like it will be another strong series from Brubaker and Phillips.

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  • 8.0
    Kabooooom - Matt Morrison

    While unlikely to hold much appeal for those who aren't already part of the creators' established fanbase and genre enthusiasts, there is much to admire about The Fade Out. Those who give this series a shot will find it an enjoyable piece of pulp fiction.

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  • 8.0
    Graphic Policy - echoblueprint

    I am tempted to give Brubaker a free pass here though. Admittedly this is the kind of story which might be well suited to the medium of comics, but it is seems equally to be a story that depends on a fair amount of setup before it gets going. It is not a superhero story where characters interact with one another in a superficial sense, rather these are honest characters being established. While it might not be up to the level of its predecessor from Image yet, it still does have some potential, and is probably worthy of being picked up by most people that are interested in crime noir.

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  • 8.0
    Razorfine - Alan Rapp

    Although it lacks the strong female lead of Velvet or Josephine, there's much to recommend here as Brubaker and Phillips go all-in for a period crime story with all the trimmings (making use of research assistant Amy Condit) whose motives may take quite some time to unravel. Worth a look.

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  • 6.6
    Word Of The Nerd - William

    Overall, the book was entertaining and kept it's hold on me for the duration of the read, but with nothing truly outstanding or unique" either in picture or words" I doubt I'll pick up issue two" making the title oddly appropriate.

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  • 6.5
    Buccaneer Book Reviews - Have-A-Peg Pete

    All-in-all, I am cautiously optimistic about this series.

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  • 10

    the magazine version of this issue was amazing. authentic and beautiful.

  • 10

    I just have to mention how perfect the coloring was. Good job Elizabeth Breitweiser for helping Sean Philips look even better!

  • 10

    So happy to write that this book is the shiznit. I LOVE IT! Noir perfection from beginning to end. I'm in for the full run.

  • 9.0

    . . . $3.50, 28pgs!! . . . Bear with me. I am royally %$#^$#@ PISSED at Brubaker & Phillips right now! I have enjoyed the hell out of their DareDevil, Captain America & Winter Soldier stories. SO its no surprise i have followed them to Image for Fatale & Velvet (both highly recommended). I figured i could check this out, and get the TPB later. Oh no, they get their hooks in quick! This promises to be the best crime series on the market, and i am in for another thrill ride with this incredible crew!

  • 9.0

    Very intriguing set up to what promises to be another great collaboration by this talented team.

  • 8.5

    I really like the simplicity of this first issue. Easy to follow. Characters that are unique to each other (complete with a great character glossary at the beginning). And a story that has a few fun twist and turns but doesn't get too crazy and confusing. Hopefully this all stays true to the entire series run.

  • 8.0

    Very promising first issue and the back matter is interesting too.

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