Jeff Lake's Comic Reviews

Reviewer For: IGN, Lyles Movie Files Reviews: 1036
7.8Avg. Review Rating

7.6
1872 #1

Jul 9, 2015

Duggan's script possesses many of the requisite Western tropes"the solo lawman, the self serving mayor, the more-than-he-seems-drunkard"and populates it with a number of Marvel standouts. It's familiar with a capital F, but it's also well executed and engaging.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
4001 A.D.: Warmother #1

Aug 4, 2016

Whether or not there's more to the character beyond her seeming one-off usage, artist Tomas Giorello does well in putting her to use. His strong sense of movement, particularly when combined with Brian Reber's vibrant backdrops, establishes Ana as a tactile and formidable combatant, and one we hope to see more of in the future, hers and ours.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
A&A: The Adventures of Archer and Armstrong #1

Mar 17, 2016

It's a wonderfully absurd start that only gets better the more players that get involved, and Roberts shows a keen understanding of the unique camaraderie and depth the often at-odds companions share.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.2
A&A: The Adventures of Archer and Armstrong #2

Apr 14, 2016

The success of A&A: The Adventures of Archer and Armstrong's first issue was in large part due to the surprising lunacy of its premise. With the narrative cat out of the bag (or in the bag, as the case may be), issue #2 sees somewhat of a dip in terms of overall engagement.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
A&A: The Adventures of Archer and Armstrong #4

Jun 16, 2016

Giant drunken gods, jealous frat-bros, perpetually un-rushed baristas " A & A's first arc concludes in the same bananas fashion in which it began, Rafer Roberts and David Lafuente again delivering their own brand of methodical madness.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
A&A: The Adventures of Archer and Armstrong #6

Aug 11, 2016

Archer and Armstrong has been a crowd-pleaser from the start, but Rafer Roberts looks to be creating something special as we enter the book's second arc.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
A&A: The Adventures of Archer and Armstrong #7

Sep 8, 2016

Clown cars, Armstrong clones, a talking bear - it's no surprise that the circus proves a perfect fit for Archer and Armstrong's irreverent brand. Perhaps the most impressive aspect of Rafer Roberts' script (beyond, you know, the talking bear) is how well he balances the series' obvious absurdity with well-plotted progression.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
A&A: The Adventures of Archer and Armstrong #9

Nov 10, 2016

As far as bumbling buddy comedies go, A&A continues to be one of the best.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
A&A: The Adventures of Archer and Armstrong #11

Jan 5, 2017

It's that assured tone that prevents the book from ever falling into try-hard territory, making for a reliable constant month in and month out.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
A-Force #2

Jul 2, 2015

The first issue of A-Force provided a fine mix of boisterous action and engaging character work, all of which effectively tied into the larger Battleworld picture. Issue #2 offers much of the same, C. Willow Wilson and Marguerite Bennett both focusing the direction of the main narrative as they expand their characters place within it.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
A-Force #3

Aug 13, 2015

There's still a lot of potential here, we just need a bit more event book freedom to see it realized.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
A-Force (2016) #1

Jan 6, 2016

A-Force had one of the tougher transitions to make from its Secret Wars beginnings, and that difficulty shows in this first issue. G. Willow Wilson has a clear handle on her cast, but by making Singularity the narrative glue, the rest of the read doesn't have a whole lot of room to breathe. The art by Jorge Molina and Laura Martin does its part, but we're definitely hoping for a more pronounced return to form come next issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
A-Force (2016) #2

Feb 4, 2016

When combined with another round of action packed visuals and pitch perfect humor, you get an issue much closer to the original series' spirit.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
A-Force (2016) #3

Mar 3, 2016

Bucking the usual slow roll-out most super team books enjoy, A-Force's latest is again a high energy affair. Where last issue saw Kelly Thompson and G. Willow Wilson provide a welcome jump in character development and explored relationship dynamics, issue #3 offers a more action oriented focus.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
A-Force (2016) #4

Apr 14, 2016

With the roster firmly entrenched and an old name made new again, A-Force appears prepped to put your pull-list on notice.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
A-Force (2016) #6

Jun 2, 2016

When it comes to A-Force, the team's chemistry goes hand in hand with its success. Case in point " issue #6 is a solid, if unspectacular affair, with a familiar villain and a by the numbers plot. What makes the issue click is its fantastic characterization, writer Kelly Thompson continuing to build off of the great chemistry generated in the book's first arc.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
A-Force (2016) #8

Aug 11, 2016

Paulo Siqueira makes his mark as the new series artist, but ultimately this tie-in isn't quite possessing of the same charisma the series is known for.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Afterlife With Archie #9

May 26, 2016

With its compelling narrative and vibrant palette, Afterlife with Archie's return makes for a frighteningly good read.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Afterlife With Archie #10

Sep 1, 2016

It may not offer much to the main tale, but it's still very much a worthy aside.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Airboy #1

Jun 4, 2015

It's hard to say just yet if Airboy is truly great (just how meta is it?), but it's so willfully different that it merits a look.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.4
Alien vs. Predator: Fire and Stone #1

Oct 8, 2014

Creators Christopher Sebela and Ariel Olivetti unleash a veritable host of horrors upon their unsuspecting cast, delivering a tense debut that unfortunately suffers from continuity baggage. For a first issue there's an almost crippling amount of unspoken back-story to the narrative, requiring at least a general knowledge of Dark Horse's shared universe or the celluloid monsters within.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
All-New All-Different Avengers #1

Nov 12, 2015

All-New All-Different Avengers #1 takes the tried and true route to start, and the result is a solid and engaging issue that never quite gets going. Mark Waid shows a clear understanding of his characters and the universe they inhabit, but doesn't give them much to do at the onset. Thus far it's more same-old same-old than all-new all-different, but there's enough here to expect even better yet to come.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
All-New All-Different Avengers #2

Dec 3, 2015

Reading more like an issue #1.5 than a true follow up to the series debut, All-New All-Different Avengers sees Mark Waid finish getting the band back together as he pushes forward with the book's presumed all new, all different direction. That same direction still doesn't feel all that new, but Waid nonetheless delivers a solid dose of enjoyable superhero action.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.7
All-New Hawkeye #1

Mar 4, 2015

All New Hawkeye is off to a great start thanks to Lemire and Prez' refreshing take. The two show a clear understanding for who Hawkeye is, utilizing beats of humor and heart to showcase his personality. The plot itself is little more than a Team Hawkguy stomping ground, but as far as debuts go, these guys did it right.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
All-New Hawkeye #3

May 27, 2015

Speaking of great stuff--Prez again knocks his pages out of the park, each page loaded with nuance and personality. The artist shows a deft hand in switching from action to humor and back again--one moment Kate is making mince meat out of a full room of assailants, the next Lucky the dog is wagging his tail like it's going out of style. The only misstep comes courtesy of the book's flashback sequences. Though again visually stunning, they don't tie in quite as well as they have before, their wordless inclusion feeling slightly out of place running at the bottom of each page. The end setup makes up for it in terms of progression, but overall the flashback inclusion reads as distracting this time around.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
All-New Hawkeye #4

Jul 23, 2015

So far the most involving parts of All-New Hawkeye have been those centered on the Barton boys, Clint and Barney. Issue #4 devotes its focus almost entirely to their relationship, Jeff Lemire mostly skirting the present to further flesh out the past. It's a move that mostly works, as we not only see the early evolution of Clint's skill as an archer, but the root of the brothers' strain as well.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
All-New Hawkeye #5

Sep 17, 2015

As two separate stories each Hawkeye yarn is arrow sharp; it's the melding that hasn't quite found the mark.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
All-New Hawkeye (2015) #1

Nov 12, 2015

Team Hawkeye get their second #1 of the year, but luckily the change in numbering doesn't affect the ongoing work of Jeff Lemire and Ramon Perez. If anything, the step back allows for a pointed change in direction, as Lemire really hones in on the expanding rift between Clint and Kate. The result is a surprisingly serious debut, as we see the inevitable fallout and future repercussions play out hand in hand.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
All-New Hawkeye (2015) #2

Dec 10, 2015

Considering that All-New Hawkeye is pretty much a direct continuation of his first crack at the character, its impressive just how new Jeff Lemire's latest run feels.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
All-New Hawkeye (2015) #4

Feb 10, 2016

It's not a bad start to an arc, but it's ultimately not a memorable one either.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
All-New Hawkeye (2015) #5

Mar 24, 2016

All-New Hawkeye's three tiered story structure " past, present and future " has been hit or miss thus far, and that same feeling holds true here in issue #5.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
All-New Hawkeye (2015) #6

Apr 21, 2016

It's not necessarily a disappointing end, but it's definitely a quiet one.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
All-New Inhumans #1

Dec 3, 2015

The new breed of Inhumans have mostly failed to make an impact thus far, but All-New Inhumans looks like the book to buck that trend. The strong characterization and global premise provides a welcome hook, as does the inviting art by Caselli and Mossa. New readers may find the overall navigation a bit muddy, but overall this title does a nice job in distinguishing itself as a worthy Inhumans solo.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
All-New Inhumans #2

Dec 17, 2015

All-New Inhumans may lack the overall star power of its Uncanny cousin, but when it comes to story its sure putting up a good fight.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
All-New Inhumans #3

Jan 28, 2016

All-New Inhumans is an ambitious title. James Asmus and Charles Soule have (mostly) ignored the usual action heavy instances first arcs like these are usually known for, instead choosing to focus mainly on the personal and political ramifications the Inhumans' mission creates. Issue #3 offers much of the same, and then some, the writers again working hard at fleshing out their expanding cast even as they navigate the book's underlying conflict.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.2
All-New Inhumans #4

Feb 25, 2016

While still finding its footing on a narrative level, All-New Inhuman' strong team element and great art teases a book on the rise.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
All-New Inhumans #5

Mar 17, 2016

James Asmus takes over sole scripting duties with All-New Inhumans' latest arc, and it's not long before his comedic impact is felt. Whereas the first arc felt a bit bogged down by drawn out politics and needless asides, issue #5 is noticeably lighter in tone.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.4
All-New Inhumans #6

Apr 14, 2016

When the plot catches up to character, this book might move from good to great.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.2
All-New Inhumans #7

May 5, 2016

Already on its third arc, All-New Inhumans continues to feel sporadic in its focus. Issue #7 furthers that trend, the book's latest direction almost completely separated from the events that came before.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
All-New Inhumans #9

Jul 21, 2016

Though nine issues in this is still a new team, and while the combined efforts of Asmus and Caselli haven't fully solidified the new recruits as Marvel members in their own right, they get closer with each passing issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
All-New Inhumans #10

Aug 18, 2016

As is often the case with a series cancelled barely out of its infancy, All-New Inhumans reaches its end just as it's starting to get better. While not an actual finale (that would be issue #11) the latest still serves as a solid wrap-up to James Asmus' final arc, one that saw his focused attention to character finally pay off.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
All-New Ultimates #5

Jul 24, 2014

Amilcar Pinna also experiences a bit of a down issue, the artist delivering a solid if not particularly noteworthy installment. Though the action is clean and tight, it lacks any real 'wow' moments, ultimately making this issue of All-New Ultimates a tad lackluster as a whole.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
American Legends #1

Nov 6, 2014

Visually, the book's painterly art is provided by the appropriately named Studio Hive. A group effort will undoubtedly have its faults, yet those involved do a solid job of generating a mostly consistent visual quality. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said of the characters themselves, faces and likenesses changing noticeably from page to page. Much like the writing, the art tends to even out the further in you get, but again, it may be too little too late.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
American Vampire: Second Cycle #3

May 22, 2014

Snyder doesn't do a lot to advance the story here, but he does enough, returning THE fan favorite and delivering the Trader ever closer to Pearl and her charges.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
American Vampire: Second Cycle #4

Jul 10, 2014

With a dazzling, sand-strewn opening that makes a sharknado look like a guppy sprinkle, the latest chapter of American Vampire's Second Cycle is light on plot but heavy on awesome.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
American Vampire: Second Cycle #4

Jul 24, 2014

With a dazzling, sand-strewn opening that makes a sharknado look like a guppy sprinkle, the latest chapter of American Vampire's Second Cycle is light on plot but heavy on awesome.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
American Vampire: Second Cycle #6

Feb 4, 2015

Balancing the many spinning plates yet again is artist Albuquerque, his signature style as sharp and kinetic as ever. He and colorist Dave McCaig do a great job in maintaining interest, their historical footnotes every bit as interesting as their vampire melees. The two make great use of space, as even the sparsest of panels enjoy solid color and design. Issue #6 is undoubtedly a setup issue, but when setup is done this well and rendered this beautifully, it's not in a bad way that we say we're left chomping for more.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.6
American Vampire: Second Cycle #7

Apr 15, 2015

Though slower compared to recent arcs, there's enough momentum building to expect some full-fanged fun to come.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
American Vampire: Second Cycle #8

Jul 2, 2015

Scott Snyder lets the fangs out here in issue #8, he and Rafael Albuquerque combining for a nasty affair with no shortage of blood or dismemberment. It's a nice change of pace given the series' recent focus on history and mythology, yet Snyder is careful not to let the rampant action derail the book's narrative drive.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
American Vampire: Second Cycle #9

Aug 6, 2015

At one point in issue #9, a monologuing ne'er do well catches himself and snarks "But enough history." That statement can be applied to American Vampire's current arc in full, as Scott Snyder's script continues to swell with excessive back-story and unseen links.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
American Vampire: Second Cycle #10

Oct 1, 2015

Scott Snyder's script, already a powder keg of double crosses and hidden agendas, lights an effective final match, setting up what's sure to be a similarly explosive finale.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Aquaman (2016) #1

Jun 23, 2016

It's not a total win, but there's plenty of early promise to suggest more depth beyond these initial waves.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Archie (2015) #1

Jul 9, 2015

Archie #1 is just a fun read. Waid and Staples show a clear appreciation for the character and his history, his new look still maintaining a distinctly classic feel. Waid's great characterization and effortless dialogue makes for easy enjoyment, and Staples' emotive art is both affecting and warm. Whether you're a fan new or old, there's something for everyone.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
Archie (2015) #2

Aug 20, 2015

Issue #2 proves that initial magic was no fluke, the creators turning in another delightfully offbeat, remarkably layered installment.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
Archie (2015) #3

Oct 1, 2015

Archie wouldn't be Archie without the Archie/Betty/Veronica triangle, making Veronica's role in the proceedings an expected one. What's unexpected, however, is the way Mark Waid and Fiona Staples portray the haughty heiress.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Archie (2015) #5

Jan 7, 2016

Now five issues in, it's tough to really call Archie's continued excellence a surprise. And yet, considering the series' early artistic carousel, it's amazing how each new issue manages to find new ways of further enhancing and enriching Riverdale's eclectic cast with nary a blip in quality.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Archie (2015) #6

Feb 18, 2016

So far one of the more enjoyable aspects to Archie's new look has been the depth given to the book's extensive cast. Mark Waid has done an excellent job in crafting unique, multidimensional characters thus far, and in issue #6 he uses the partial absence of the book's title lead to advance other players, such as Reggie and Veronica, even further.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Archie (2015) #7

Apr 7, 2016

While not the strongest issue in the series, it's nonetheless an entertaining one.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Archie (2015) #8

May 12, 2016

Archie continues to be the gold standard when it comes to updates, and in the ever confident hands of Waid and Fish that doesn't look to change any time soon.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.7
Archie (2015) #10

Jul 28, 2016

The amazing thing about Mark Waid's Archie run is that he's not reinventing the wheel. He's not even reinventing the characters. He's just taking the property's long-running themes and character quirks and giving them a modern air.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.4
Archie (2015) #11

Aug 25, 2016

It's still far and away a good comic, just not quite so good as what we've come to expect.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Archie (2015) #12

Sep 22, 2016

Issue #12 is itself a great example of Waid's range. The various events range from slapstick funny to relatable to downright affecting, culminating in an end that very cleverly opens the door for new characters to join the fray.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Archie (2015) #13

Oct 20, 2016

Another month, another hit for this Archie team.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Archie (2015) #14

Nov 17, 2016

We've talked time and again of Mark Waid's ability to pair the humorous with the heartfelt, but what else is there to discuss when it's consistently done so well? Issue #14 is a perfect showcase of that balance.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Archie (2015) #15

Dec 22, 2016

From the inimitable Archie/Jughead bromance to the deliciously diabolical Veronica/Cheryl pairing, Eisma clearly gets what best exemplifies each, making for yet another excellent chapter.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Archie (2015) #16

Jan 19, 2017

For being one of Riverdale's better known supporting characters, Dilton Doiley has been criminally underutilized so far in this Archie run. While issue #16 seeks to correct that, it does so at the cost of a more compelling narrative " Cheryl Blossom's arrival at Riverdale High.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
Archie (2015) #17

Feb 16, 2017

While the extended bout of courtship has its amusing moments"Jug Handle is as perfect a Blossomization as could be"the initial lack of teeth leaves the read feeling light, right up until the book's final page.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Archie (2015) #19

Apr 20, 2017

Pete Woods continues to prove a solid fit on art, his loose style playing particularly well with the comedic physicality of Waid's script.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.6
Archie Vs Sharknado #1

Jul 22, 2015

Archie vs. Sharknado is a loopy smoothie of wholesome goodness and unnatural destruction, a blend that somehow goes down smooth. It's not the best of stories, but it doesn't aim to be, Anthony C. Ferrante and Dan Parent working hard to ensure that the "R" on Archie's Letterman jacket stands for "ridiculous." Those not gaga for the cultural juggernaut that is Sharknado may leave wanting, but there are enough fun set pieces and shark vs. teen shenanigans to leave even the most hardened grump with a grudging smile.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.7
Archie vs. Predator #1

Apr 15, 2015

Archie vs. Predator may seem like the most random pairing ever to share a page, but in the hands of Alex de Campi and Fernando Ruiz, it's a pairing we're glad to have. Predator's inclusion to the Riverdale world comes off without a hitch, the story as funny as it is biting. Whether you like Archie, Predator, or both, this one is worth checking out simply to see two worlds collide.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Archie vs. Predator #2

May 21, 2015

As mentioned, much of the read comes off as classic Archie, something wholly attributed to artist Ruiz. His characterization and world building is spot on, unnervingly so given the rather gruesome subject matter that ramps up throughout. At one point a supporting character takes a laser shot to the face, his exploding noggin' staining the childhoods of those reared on Double Digests. This is an Archie tale unlike any other, and while at times the characters don't quite seem as wholesome as you remember (do you really need to eat that cake now, Jughead?!), de Kampi and Ruiz ensure its an offshoot you won't forget.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
Archie vs. Predator #3

Jun 18, 2015

Much of the enjoyment of this series has come from Alex de Campi's balance of gruesome gore and biting humor, and unfortunately the latter falls off a bit here in issue #3.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Armor Hunters #1

Jun 12, 2014

Whether intended or not, Aric and his X-O Manowar armor are proving to be the linchpin of the Valiant universe. Much like Unity's first arc, Aric's armor is again the focus of dastardly intent, this time in that it's very existence serves as a beacon to the alien Armor Hunters. There's a lot to digest in this first issue, particularly if you didn't read the book's Free Comic Book Day lead in, yet collaborators Robert Venditti and Doug Braithwaite do their best to make their solid debut accessible to all.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Armor Hunters #2

Jul 10, 2014

With the premise set and new entrants like Bloodshot set to make some noise, Armor Hunters is off to a great start.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Armor Hunters #3

Aug 13, 2014

There are still a number of Armor Hunter related tie-ins still to come, Venditti and Braithwaite teasing an assumedly epic confrontation. It's anyone's guess as to whether they can pull it off, but with the fate of the world at stake, we're willing to bet they'll do just fine.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.6
Armor Hunters #4

Sep 25, 2014

In the end, Armor Hunters is definitely an event that belongs firmly in the win column.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Armor Hunters: Aftermath #1

Oct 2, 2014

It's a slower issue, yet it doesn't feel that way, CAFU's expert layouts and impressive character work making for a surprisingly captivating affair. Simply put, the future of Valiant looks bright indeed.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
Armor Hunters: Bloodshot #1

Jul 23, 2014

Armor Hunters: Bloodshot #1 isn't quite on par with the other books in its name, with very little tying in to the event's larger scope. Harris and Hairsine appear prepped to change that quite soon, however, their final pages setting up a standoff of assumedly grave importance.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
Armor Hunters: Bloodshot #2

Aug 21, 2014

At this point it's safe to say that Armor Hunters has begun to suffer from tie-in syndrome, the book's secondary titles failing to capture the same gripping stakes as their flagship series. Armor Hunters: Bloodshot #2 is a prime example of this, the issue revolving entirely around the nano-bot fueled assassin's battle with the alien Hunter, Lilt.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Astonishing Ant-Man #1

Oct 22, 2015

Nick Spencer and Ramon Rosanas turn in their second #1 of the year, their easy humor and great characterization very much intact. Their latest debut has a lot to offer, both in terms of entertainment value and as a solid lead in for new readers, but it also feels somewhat flat in areas.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Avengers: Ultron Forever #1

Apr 1, 2015

Ultron is King of the Mountain in this solid but underdeveloped tale.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Baltimore: The Red Kingdom #1

Feb 2, 2017

With a mythology as complex as the one Mike Mignola has constructed over the years, it's hard to consider any book a true jumping-on point. And yet, that's exactly what Baltimore: The Red Kingdom #1 offers " a new reader-friendly continuation of an ongoing story.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
Baltimore: The Red Kingdom #3

Apr 6, 2017

The creative team here is top notch--they've just yet to fully deliver on their immense potential.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Batgirl (2011) #32

Jun 12, 2014

The book's newest arc proves a decent jumping on point, though new readers will likely struggle a bit in placing characters and motives. Simone's Batgirl is never better than when she or a loved one are threatened, and issue #32 sees her personal life begin to crumble yet again as Knightfall increases her stranglehold on the city and its inhabitants named Ricky.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batgirl (2011) #34

Aug 13, 2014

Gail Simone brings her run on Batgirl to a close, offering a fitting, if not slightly convenient, finale. She manages to tie up a number of loose ends, and while not everyone gets a chance to shine, her portrayal of Barbara remains as engaging as ever, leaving behind a high bar indeed.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batgirl (2011) #35

Oct 8, 2014

Batgirl #35 is decidedly fresh in feel, but the verdict is still out as to whether or not that's a good thing. There's promise to be sure, but as of now the character's departure feels more sensational than earned.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Batgirl: Futures End #1

Sep 11, 2014

Overall, Barbara's swan song is fun, surprising and very, very Simone.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Batman '66 Meets The Green Hornet #1

Jun 5, 2014

Batman '66 Meets The Green Hornet #1 manages to entertain both old and new readers alike, bolstered by the reverence the creators hold for the properties involved. Creators Smith and Garman balance the book with just the right amount of camp, and Ty Templeton's enjoyable art ably returns these pop culture icons to prominence.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Batman '66 Meets The Green Hornet #2

Jul 3, 2014

Holy perfectly practiced plot lines, Batman! The second installment of this terrific team-up proves just as entertaining as the first, though by issues end it's readily apparent that nostalgia and familiarity are key to the book's long term appeal.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Batman '66 Meets The Green Hornet #3

Aug 7, 2014

Writers Kevin Smith and Ralph Garman continue to mine the vast wealth of material from the original show, their capers so spot on that you can practically hear the theme song playing. We've stated the importance of nostalgia before, and while it certainly helps, it's not needed in enjoying the sheer exuberance emanating from every page.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman (2011) #32

Jun 25, 2014

Batman #32 is a great issue, setting up Zero Year's finale with flair. Snyder and Capullo continue their storytelling mastery, aided again by the surreally brilliant colors of FCO Plascencia. The stakes have never been higher, and anticipation has never been greater.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.7
Batman (2011) #41

Jun 10, 2015

Batman #41 is different in look and feel, a character driven opening that features just the right amount of action and heart. Snyder and Capullo both acknowledge and embrace the challenges their new direction presents, allowing for a Batman tale that feels decidedly fresh and unique. Though the issue does little in telling us where the arc is set to go, Jim Gordon's time at the helm looks to be a fun one to follow.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Batman (2016) #18

Mar 1, 2017

Batman has been amazing since the I Am Bane arc began. Each issue keeps surpassing the last. King has firmly settled into this gig and delivering outstanding work and Finch is meeting that challenge on each page for a great and all too quick read.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Batman and Robin (2011) #32

Jun 18, 2014

With the Hunt for Robin now concluded and Robin Rises: Omega set to begin, it's clear that the fate of Damian Wayne is still very much up for grabs. The surprise reveal comes completely out of left field, but promises big things just around the corner.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #34

Aug 20, 2014

It's been said before, but it bears repeating again (and again) -- Patrick Gleason can draw. His mastery of mood and emotion is on full display, particularly in the aforementioned cave scene. The artist adds a certain gravity to his pages, his shadows and angles giving depth to even the most mundane moments. He can also draw some ridiculously cool splash pages -- if you didn't "oooooh" after seeing his final shot of Hellbats soaring towards the Apokopliptian fire pits, you're doing comics wrong.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Batman and Robin (2011) #35

Oct 16, 2014

Art wise, Patrick Gleason continues to dominate the pages. The opening page is a striking precursor of what's to come, Hellbat's imposing shadow streaking towards the Apokoliptian fire pits. It's yet another example of Gleason turning a fairly mundane image into something terrifically exciting, and he does it repeatedly over the course of the issue. His ability to craft big, iconic imagery lends itself perfectly to this particular arc, as Batman is able to cut loose in ways we aren't used to seeing. Inker Mick Gray and colorist John Kalisz also deserve mention, the former's crisp lines and mammoth shadows working in perfect concert with the latter's vibrant, flame-licked palette.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Batman and Robin (2011) #37

Dec 17, 2014

Batman and Robin #37 isn't a perfect comic, but it's still a darn good one, epic both in action and in heart. Peter J. Tomasi does a great job in finding a way to make the Bat family whole, even if that way arguably makes little sense. It's a fun read, one made even better by Gleason's expansive, grandiose stylings. Love him or leave him, Damian's return proves well worth the wait.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Batman and Robin (2011) #39

Feb 18, 2015

A super powered Damian may not be what anyone wanted or expected, but Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason are certainly getting the most of that current plot point. The book's renewed focus on Bruce and Damian's relationship proves welcome, as does the sudden introduction of the Justice League. Now will someone please tell Shazam that he's cool? Feel bad for the guy.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
Batman And Robin Eternal #4

Oct 29, 2015

Orlando does a solid job of advancing the main narrative, setting up a number of soon to be explored threads while adding some welcome characterization. Unfortunately, issue #4 also offers up some inconsistencies, as for the first time the writer/artist carousel makes itself noticeably obvious.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.5
Batman And Robin Eternal #5

Nov 5, 2015

It's too early to say just how Batman and Robin Eternal will eventually compare to its weekly predecessor, but as of now the early returns are mixed.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Batman And Robin Eternal #6

Nov 12, 2015

The return of James Tynion IV and Tony Daniel also means a return to form for this series. Tynion grabs many of the freewheeling threads of past issues and mostly ties them together, resulting in an issue that serves to both advance the narrative and the characters within it.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
Batman And Robin Eternal #22

Mar 3, 2016

Following last issue's flashback heavy focus, scripter Genevieve Valentine allows the team a chance to regroup, reassess, and refocus. It's a move that leads to some emotional, if forced, exchanges, Valentine using the aside to explore the team's shared legacy and the overall weight of the cowl. Exploring the various personalities of each Robin has been part of the fun so far in this Eternal run, yet the look we get here does feel shoehorned to fit the eventual turnaround.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
Batman And Robin Eternal #24

Mar 17, 2016

As a standalone issue #24 isn't the most essential of installments, but as a stepping stone to bigger things it does its job.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.4
Batman And Robin Eternal #25

Mar 24, 2016

Despite the wide net the series encompasses, the actual impact of the series remains limited to a few choice characters. As such, issue #25 at times feels like filler in the same way issue #24 did. The difference here is that the filler mostly works, with Steve Orlando utilizing the vast supporting cast in a way that both highlights the varied members while also reinforcing the book's core drama.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman And Robin: Futures End #1

Sep 18, 2014

Batman and Robin: Futures End #1 is a powerful read, even if the majority of the issue proves a brutal slug-fest. Ray Fawkes shows that the ramifications of Damian's death remain wide reaching and raw, his Batman a walking wound waiting to be torn open. Dustin Nguyen's art effectively emphasizes this struggle, his detailed character work selling the tale just as well, if not better, than the words themselves.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
Batman Beyond (2015) #1

Jun 4, 2015

Artist Chang also does a fine job overall, his Tim noticeably fleet of foot and agile. There are a few oddly choreographed panels here and there, but by and large he does a nice job bringing Tim and his new world to crumbling, dilapidated life. The success of the read depends on Tim's current fish-out-of-time feel, so here's hoping his current predicament allows for plenty of further exploration of that nature.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman Beyond (2015) #2

Jul 2, 2015

The art is great and the story is solid, but for a standalone Bat tale there's not much that screams "must read."

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batman Beyond (2015) #3

Aug 6, 2015

Batman Beyond still very much feels like a read that hasn't entirely found its footing, and it's any wonder what kind of book we'll be left with when it does.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #1

Dec 9, 2015

A crossover long in the making gets off to a great start in the hands of James Tynion IV and Freddie Willams II. The dynamic duo show a clear knowledge and appreciation of their leads, delivering a debut that succeeds beyond its already brimming promise. There's still room for improvement, but as far as crossovers go you'd be hard pressed to find one quite so giddy giggle inducing as this one.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #2

Jan 13, 2016

Everyone expected (or at least hoped) that this crossover would be good. So far, it's been great, Williams' fluid line work meshing perfectly with Tynion's fantastic characterization. This book is truly the best of both worlds, and with some legitimately interesting plot threads now in play, it only looks to get better from here.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #3

Feb 11, 2016

We've said it before, we'll say it again"man you should be reading this book.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #5

Apr 13, 2016

The penultimate chapter of the series, issue #5 offers the same high level fan service and great art that's been a staple since its debut. Writer Tynion delivers another great batch of pitch perfect crossover moments, his excellent handle of the characters offsetting any narrative quibbles. The lack of further exploration of the Ra's/Shredder dynamic is somewhat disappointing, but the book's ending hook ensures the topic isn't dead so much as pending. The art by Williams and Colwell is again a highlight from start to finish, their strong collaboration lending a welcome sense of anticipation as the series enters its final stretch.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Batman: Eternal #6

May 15, 2014

Batman Eternal is starting to feel a bit like Game of Thrones. Each week offers a snapshot view of a few characters, only to switch to a different set the following week.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Batman: Eternal #11

Jun 19, 2014

Ultimately, issue #11 feels like filler--good filler, sure, but filler nonetheless.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Batman: Eternal #12

Jun 26, 2014

The last few issues of Batman Eternal have been high in content but low in forward momentum -- issue #12 fixes that, writer James Tynion IV giving traction to a number of stalled story lines.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Batman: Eternal #17

Jul 31, 2014

Fawkes really drives home the fanatical fervor from which he speaks, introducing a true supernatural threat amidst the many loonies already on the streets. Artist Dustin Nguyen attacks the supernatural angle with obvious glee, his shadows deep and menacing and his baddies suitably grotesque.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Batman: Eternal #20

Aug 20, 2014

Of course, the main talking point of the issue is easily the book's final pages. Stephanie Brown has been flitting in and out of the series for a while now, and while it was always assumed she'd be taking back the Spoiler mantle, we've still been waiting for it to actually happen. Well, happen it has, Seeley scripting the scene in a way that fits the story and serves the character well. Batman Eternal has been gaining momentum for a while now, and if the issues to come feature more arcs like this one, we're looking at some good stuff ahead.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
Batman: Eternal #28

Oct 16, 2014

Batman Eternal continues it's unfortunate pattern of setting up big events and then ignoring them, the latest arc yet another example of the series spinning its collective Bat-rimmed wheels.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Batman: Eternal #31

Nov 6, 2014

While there's still the sense that there's almost too much going on at any given time, Fawkes does a great job of hitting his beats and moving on, the book's pacing surprisingly smooth given the numerous events unfolding.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman: Eternal #33

Nov 20, 2014

Handling art duties once again is Jason Fabok, his detailed lines and excellent choreography again on fine display. Obviously the book's weekly pace makes it impossible to lock down one specific artist, but Fabok needs to be in the rotation as often as possible. His work lends an added gravity to the proceedings, each punch and scowl loaded with a real and visceral weight. If you passed on this weekly in the beginning, now is a heck of a time to start.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.6
Batman: Eternal #35

Dec 4, 2014

As the stakes have raised so too has the book's quality, Hush's sinister and expansive machinations making for one of the more involving arcs we've seen thus far.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.6
Batman: Eternal #41

Jan 15, 2015

Focusing mainly on the rampant nano-bot infection tearing through Gotham's young and restless, Higgins deftly explores the changing dynamic between Harper and the Bat family, intoning that with great costumes and great abs comes great responsibility. This focus on choice is given further gravity as the book's events spiral out of their control, leading to Harper finally committing to the cause in grand, Bat-garbed fashion. It's fun stuff, made even better by Joe Quinones' emotive art.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
Batwoman (2017) #2

Apr 20, 2017

Steve Epting's art is as gorgeous and well constructed as ever, but with so little context his characters read as more stock than anything else.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Bee and PuppyCat #1

May 14, 2014

Bee and Puppycat is one of those love it or hate it type of books, an incoherent jumble of ridiculousness that somehow manages to be totally enjoyable. Whether or not the comic can maintain the same manic energy of the series remains to be seen, but if you're looking to take a step off the beaten path you can't get much further.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Betty & Veronica (2016) #1

Jul 20, 2016

Adam Hughes has a bit of an uphill climb ahead, his debut overstuffed and undercooked in some key areas. His fun, expressive art is continually overrun by the book's non-stop consciousness, resulting in a cluttered read that's tough to get into. Nevertheless, there are enough solid character beats and entertaining exchanges to hope for better down the road, making Betty & Veronica a book to keep an eye on as the Archie machine continues to roll.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Betty & Veronica (2016) #2

Nov 10, 2016

Betty & Veronica is a book you want to like. It's funny in places, gorgeously illustrated and is clever enough to catch you off guard a time or two. And yet, for all the things that work, there's still so much that doesn't.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.2
Birthright #1

Oct 8, 2014

Birthright #1 is what every debut hopes to be; expertly plotted, infinitely interesting and just plain cool. Billed as what happens when one story ends, the book's final page makes it abundantly clear that our journey has only just begun.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Birthright #2

Nov 6, 2014

If you're a fan of high concept fantasy and, y'know, awesome, this is a book you need to be reading.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Birthright #3

Dec 4, 2014

Birthright continues to stake its claim as one of the best new books on the block, marrying inventive fantasy with compelling drama. Add it to your pile.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Birthright #4

Jan 7, 2015

With its setup firmly out of the way and its characters on the move, Birthright's latest eases off the flaming swords and fisticuffs in lieu of some welcome familial development.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Birthright #5

Feb 5, 2015

Andrei Bressan is again a powerhouse force of fantasy goodness, his storytelling enjoyably large and finely detailed. Not to be outdone, Adriano Lucas turns in some of his best color work to date, nailing everything from blood soaked battles to serene swamps.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Birthright #6

Apr 8, 2015

When not content to simply let his art team run free, Williamson does a solid job checking in with the more Earth based members of his expansive tale. There's a nice bit between the Rhodes' parental units that stands out, but by and large the fun of the book revolves around Mikey and Brennan making up for lost bro time. It's here that the book's character work, particularly Mikey's, proves a bit divisive. It's tough to gauge in what light we're meant to view him"troubled solider, possessed lackey, returning hero"and as such some of his bits don't fully register. Add in the fact that Brennan's wait-a-minute" light bulb continues to be slow illuminating and you get an issue that's fun, but incomplete.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Birthright #9

Jul 23, 2015

I'm not quite sure where it happened, but somewhere along the line adult Mikey's tale became the least interesting thing in Birthright. Thankfully, Joshua Williamson and Andrei Bressan have stepped things up in other areas, especially in regards to the increasingly blurred lines between Mikey's two worlds.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Birthright #10

Aug 20, 2015

After a few maddening issues wherein Mikey's characterization seemed to continually dip, dive and dodge, Joshua Williamson at last drops the hammer with some "ooooh" inspiring reveals. It's a welcome leap that pays off in uniquely investing ways, and it serves to knock the ongoing narrative into completely uncharted territory.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Birthright #11

Nov 12, 2015

While the oversized issue leads to many visually arresting fantasy moments " which Andrei Bressan absolutely kills, per usual " even the lurch in time does little for Mikey's overall development.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Birthright #12

Dec 10, 2015

It's taken a while, but the many freewheeling threads that make up Birthright have begun to feel cohesive. Joshua Williamson has done a great job crafting a solid sense of direction over the last few issues, focusing less on the then and more on the here and now.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Birthright #13

Jan 14, 2016

The last issue of Birthright did well in moving the overarching story back in the right direction, but the overall sense of narrative momentum remains a work in progress.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
Birthright #15

Mar 24, 2016

It's been a while since Birthright quite matched the magical heights of its earlier installments, but the changes made here offer definite promise for the series going forward.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Birthright #17

Jul 14, 2016

Artist Andrei Bressan, mostly limited to talking heads here, shines with that final page, proving that while the magic has dimmed a bit on this series, it's still capable of delivering when it counts.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Birthright #18

Aug 11, 2016

Birthright has had its issues, but damn if it can't sell its big moments. The somewhat slogging adventure gets a much needed shot in the Nevermind-infested arm, as at last we get some honest to goodness advancement.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.4
Birthright #19

Sep 15, 2016

It's still as strong a fantasy epic as you could hope for "it's just one that'll keep you waiting.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Birthright #23

Mar 23, 2017

Birthright still has its bumps, but payoff such as that found here makes them worthwhile.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Bitch Planet #1

Dec 10, 2014

Bitch Planet is a lot of things, but first and foremost it's an excellent comic. The twists found throughout are almost impossible to see coming, a hopeful glimpse of even further madness yet to come. Not only is Bitch Planet one of DeConnick's best issues to date, it also stands out as one of the best new releases of the year.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.7
Bitch Planet #2

Jan 29, 2015

Though only two issues in, Bitch Planet is already proving an electric force of bare-knuckle beauty.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.1
Bitch Planet #3

Feb 19, 2015

Seeing as we'd only just begun to tap into the main narrative, it feels a bit early for Bitch Planet to be focusing on character specific offshoots, especially on one so often seen but rarely heard. That said, issue #3 serves to further flesh out DeConnick's increasingly dreary world, in turn adding depth to the previously one note Rolle.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Bitch Planet #6

Jan 7, 2016

This is a hard tale, one made harder by the message it delivers and the blanks it fills. But it's also a chapter very much reminiscent of the character it follows - strong, unyielding, and defiant to the end.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
Bitch Planet #8

Jun 23, 2016

Bitch Planet #8 is one of those issues that's impossible to unpack over a single read through. Not only is it dense narratively " particularly so given the now expected delay between issues " but also topically, with an added focus put on the treatment of the prison's transgender inmates.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Bitch Planet #9

Nov 3, 2016

There's no denying this book's impact is best felt in trade, but that doesn't make its return any less welcome.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
Bitch Planet #10

Apr 27, 2017

From the extended delay between issues to its increasingly complex narrative, Bitch Planet is not an easy book to pick up on the fly. Such a long lull would fell a lesser title, but yet again the book manages to overcome any rust by the sheer strength of its content and the vision of its creators.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Bizarro #2

Jul 2, 2015

Issue #2 may struggle a bit to consistently maintain it's all ages appeal, but nevertheless the read am not a lot of fun.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Bizarro #3

Aug 20, 2015

If you weren't a fan before this issue isn't likely to change your mind, but in a landscape overcrowded with dark and dour, Bizarro provides a welcome splash of light.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Black Canary (2015) #3

Aug 20, 2015

Brenden Fletcher's new-look Black Canary has been equal parts style and substance so far, but in issue #3 the split tilts heavily towards the former.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Black Canary (2015) #4

Sep 17, 2015

Even with a guest artist Black Canary doesn't miss a beat. Of course, when your guest artist is Pia Guerra it's pretty easy to keep things humming, her clean lines bringing an easy energy and human humor to the proceedings.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.7
Black Cloud #1

Apr 6, 2017

As intricately crafted as it is downright wild, Black Cloud #1 is the kind of debut you'll want (and need) to read twice.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Black Magick #1

Oct 29, 2015

Black Magick has all the makings of a good book, starting with the stellar talent behind it. Greg Rucka appears to have another engaging lead on hand, and Nicola Scott's art is as immersive as it is gorgeous. There's just not a whole lot to go on in this first issue, and while the ending hook certainly makes things interesting, it's not yet enough to fully entice with its spell.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Black Market #1

Jul 17, 2014

The premise of stealing meta DNA for personal gain is a compelling one, and with high stakes, personal drama and, oh yeah, super heroes, Black Market is a book brimming with promise.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.9
Black Science #7

Jul 31, 2014

Given the shocking events of last issue and the subsequent hiatus that followed, no one would have faulted writer Rick Remender had he decided to ease into the book's next arc. Of course, being Remender, issue #7 does the exact opposite, immediately returning his characters to the same high danger, higher stakes adventures we've come to expect.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Black Science #8

Aug 28, 2014

It's clear that Remender has a clear vision as to where the story is going next, but in order for Black Science to continue its streak of excellence he'll need his remaining cast to step up.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Black Science #9

Oct 8, 2014

Rick Remender's latest trip through the Onion is a sporadic one, the narrative bouncing around a number of different characters in ways equal parts puzzling and enticing. His tale is so stuffed with big ideas and lofty musings that some of the urgency of recent issues has started to wane.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Black Science #10

Oct 29, 2014

Despite the frequent squabbling, Matteo Scalera is still given plenty of room to flex his artistic muscles. His pages remain as breathlessly kinetic and expansive as ever, the artist again serving as the book's driving force. He does seem to favor certain poses and expressions, as they tend to repeat throughout, but in terms of sheer motion there are few that can rival his level of investment. Dean White serves as the final cherry to this loaded sundae of a book, his otherworldly colors and subtle shading meshing perfectly with Scalera's meticulously savage pencils.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Black Science #12

Mar 4, 2015

Art wise, Scalera again gives the book its distinctive edge, his pencils brash and fluid. At times his embellishment goes a bit overboard for the scene at hand, but said flair aids in keeping the quieter scenes visually arresting. The real challenge to the issue is the switch in colorists. Moreno Dinisio does an able job filling Dean White's impressive shoes, but unfortunately the change doesn't entirely escape notice. Dinisio's colors prove a bit muddier than we're used to, his concert with Scalera strong but not quite on the same level as of yet. He does manage to strike the appropriately off kilter alien tone, so in a few issues we could be singing a different tune.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Black Science #13

Apr 1, 2015

Not to be outdone, artist Scalera turns in a phenomenal issue, deftly managing the script's breakneck pace. His action sequences are always good, but here he delivers a master class in kinetic movement, Grant and Shawn's jetpack escape an exhilarating blend of dynamic angles and fluid design. He and colorist Moreno Dinisio do an equally fine job rendering the issue's quieter moments, showing a soft touch and cool palette when detailing Pia's troubled younger days. The issue's final pages show just how good this duo can be, and also make it clear that we can expect some even darker adventures to come. Bring it on.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Black Science #15

Jun 11, 2015

It's riveting stuff, especially given the characters involved and the events that precede it, and when all is said and done the damage is all but irrevocable.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Black Science #17

Nov 5, 2015

While still possessing the usual moments of wild action and creature features (as electrically illustrated by Matteo Scalera), overall there's a much more contemplative feel to this installment then what we've seen previously. That same introspection may hinder new readers " Remender's mythology is itself a labyrinthine maze " but as the kick off to a new story it does a fine job in creating questions we want answered.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
Black Science #18

Dec 3, 2015

By taking time away from the series' running interdimensional strife to focus on Grant's own specific personal hell, the duo have crafted a riveting (and wonderfully bananas) look at how the past informs the present " with puppets!

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Black Science #19

Jan 7, 2016

Black Science has had its ups and downs, but with a truly triumphant finale and one heck of a forward push, this is a book that again belongs at the top of your read pile.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.4
Black Science #20

Feb 11, 2016

Rick Remender and Matteo Scalera were going to have a hard time topping themselves following last issue's excellent introspective adventure, so it's not a huge surprise that their latest doesn't fully measure up. That said, issue #20 does a solid job of maintaining the momentum said issue generated, Remender taking Grant back to the beginning in a bid to save his family and fix the Onion.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Black Science #21

Mar 31, 2016

Having spent most of this arc exploring Grant's attempt at redemption, issue #21 further explores the ramifications of Grant's Onion traversing, while also presenting the newly focused Dimensionaut with an opportunity too good to pass up. The sizable gap in issues robs the aforementioned moment of its full impact, but Remender's presenting of it is nonetheless engrossing and oh-so-satisfying.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Black Science #24

Sep 15, 2016

Black Science is heading back to the beginning, and things are feeling fresher than ever.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Black Science #25

Oct 13, 2016

There's not an undamaged character in the bunch, and while issue #25 does succeed in laying out further the machinations in play, the bulk of the issue is dedicated to their continued torment. Such a barrage could backfire if handled improperly, but Remender has done such a strong job at building such flawed characters that the constant emotional yo-yo always seemingly fits the subject matter at hand.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Black Science #26

Dec 8, 2016

Black Science, at least by its usual standards, has been taking it easy of late, Rick Remender more focused on the holes left in the McKay family than those of the realities they plowed through. Issue #26 shakes that sentiment up in a big way, and uses an often seen but rarely utilized character to do so.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Black Science #27

Jan 5, 2017

Issue #27 is exceptionally varied in its content, each new swerve and sudden entrance seemingly building in visceral pull. If you've been waiting for Black Science to blast back into orbit, you'd best strap in tight.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Black Science #28

Feb 9, 2017

Ignoring the fact that Remender's roster could carry a book on its own"there is literally nothing cooler than a telepathic anteater"this is just a strong issue, with plenty of dynamic action and strong character development.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Black Science #29

Apr 20, 2017

A long game that continues to pay off, Black Science's latest direction is shaping to be a doozy.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Black Widow (2016) #3

May 5, 2016

Few books can rely as heavily on visual storytelling alone as Black Widow, but then again, few collaborations are as strong as the one shared by Mark Waid and Chris Samnee.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.7
Black Widow (2016) #7

Oct 20, 2016

As a character, Black Widow is as complex as they come. It's that fact that makes the latest from Chris Samnee and Mark Waid all the more impressive, issue #7 both intricately layered and entirely accessible.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Black Widow (2016) #10

Jan 19, 2017

When it comes to wordless storytelling, Chris Samnee may just be the best in the business. He's so good that even in an issue that would be considered "down" when compared to past works, engagement and immersion is never anything less than total.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.7
Black Widow (2016) #11

Feb 9, 2017

Having spent the better part of the last arc focusing on various betrayals and hidden secrets, issue #11 lets Natasha do what she does best. The resulting read offers an electric display of the skill set Black Widow is known for, the one-woman army facing off against a bevy of similarly trained foes.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.6
Bloodlines #1

Apr 7, 2016

Alien parasites, street level heroes, nineties names like Loose Cannon and Ballistic; the original Bloodlines had it all, and reflected the more ridiculous aspects of the era. And maybe that's what's missing in Bloodline's #1. It follows the same basic path of the original, with the appearance of an alien threat assumedly leading to a new brand of heroes, but where the nineties version had moxie to spare, this new incarnation feels hollow by comparison.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Bloodshot U.S.A. #1

Oct 27, 2016

The book's final pages offer the most compelling hook as to what kind of dangers lie ahead, making for an easy in to what is shaping up to be one of Bloodshot's biggest tales.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Bloodshot U.S.A. #3

Dec 22, 2016

Those who have been on board since The Valiant will come away impressed with the myriad layers Lemire peels back here, but it's safe to say that the uninitiated will walk away more confused than enthused.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Bloodshot: Reborn #0

Mar 23, 2017

While the amount of wrap-up may confuse new readers looking for a numerical jumping on point, the content here is much needed for anyone following the series in recent months.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Bloodshot: Reborn #1

Apr 15, 2015

Jeff Lemire continues his great work with the Bloodshot character, adding a new layer of depth to the reborn killer. Mico Suayan makes his presence felt with some fantastic art, though Lemire's Bloodsquirt takes some getting used to. If you've been looking for an in to Bloodshot, you've found it.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Bloodshot: Reborn #2

May 21, 2015

Aiding Lemire in this slow burn approach is Mico Suayan. The artist again turns in some ridiculously realistic pages, each open pore and tightened tendon on full display. At times said realism leads to some static looking pages, but they're all rendered so gorgeously that it's almost worth the pause in pace. When paired with David Baron's excellent color work, Bloodshot is arguably the best looking book that Valiant is currently putting out.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Bloodshot: Reborn #3

Jun 18, 2015

Bloodshot Reborn is not so quietly taking claim as Valiant's best new title, so best get on it, and quick.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Bloodshot: Reborn #4

Jul 9, 2015

Jeff Lemire has done an excellent job exploring the anti-hero's fractured mind in recent issues, and issue #4 is no different.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Bloodshot: Reborn #6

Sep 17, 2015

All told, as both a continuation and a jumping on point, issue #6 delivers.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Bloodshot: Reborn #7

Oct 8, 2015

Whereas Bloodshot: Reborn's first arc read like a television procedural, its latest is more akin to a horror thriller, each issue further investing us in its characters even as the foreboding sense of tension mounts.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Bloodshot: Reborn #8

Nov 19, 2015

Much like its nanite inhaling lead, Bloodshot: Reborn continues to get stronger with each passing issue. The book has been on quite a tear of late, much of which can be attributed to Jeff Lemire's improved pacing.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Bloodshot: Reborn #10

Jan 28, 2016

Bloodshot's latest presents the perfect on ramp for new readers, as Jeff Lemire and Co. leave the narrative of the present behind in lieu of exploring an all too familiar future. It's tough to read this issue without calling to mind other dystopian fiction " from the obvious Max Max comparison to other heroes-in-a-world-gone-bad tales such as Old Man Logan " but Lemire nonetheless manages to introduce these familiar tropes in a way that's still investing and world specific.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Bloodshot: Reborn #11

Feb 25, 2016

Issue #11 continues to move the story along a well worn path, Lemire again relying on familiar plot beats to advance his unfolding story. Such presentation makes for a somewhat predictable issue, but considering how well it's done that same expectation does nothing to dull the overall enjoyment of the arc.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Bloodshot: Reborn #13

May 26, 2016

For as enjoyable as The Analog Man arc has been, there's always been the sense that things are too familiar, too easy to predict. That notion goes out the window here in issue #13 as Jeff Lemire and Lewis Larosa deliver a powerful and emotionally shattering finale.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Bloodshot: Reborn #14

Jun 30, 2016

It's only the first issue, but this Hunger Games-style romp looks to be a potential return to form for this fan favorite series.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Bloodshot: Reborn #15

Jul 14, 2016

While Bloodshot Island definitely fits the bill as another bombastic, action oriented arc, it's Lemire's ability to weave a connected web from story to story that continues to pay dividends.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.1
Bloodshot: Reborn #16

Sep 1, 2016

When compared to recent arcs, Bloodshot Island feels smaller in narrative scope - more summer blockbuster than conspiracy thriller. That being said, it's also one of the more purely entertaining acts Jeff Lemire has put out, driven by its action heavy plot and the consistently fantastic art of Mico Suayan.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
Bloodshot: Reborn #17

Sep 29, 2016

Bigger doesn't always equal better, but with this stellar creative team on a roll unlike anything we've seen yet, we're willing to bet that in this case it does.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Bloodshot: Reborn Annual #1

Mar 24, 2016

All told the annual offers a different and mostly entertaining look at everyone's favorite albino samurai, even if the quality of the book's extended page count doesn't entirely match its higher price tag.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Bloodshot: Reborn #0

Mar 23, 2017

While the amount of wrap-up may confuse new readers looking for a numerical jumping on point, the content here is much needed for anyone following the series in recent months.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Bloodshot: Reborn #1

Apr 15, 2015

Jeff Lemire continues his great work with the Bloodshot character, adding a new layer of depth to the reborn killer. Mico Suayan makes his presence felt with some fantastic art, though Lemire's Bloodsquirt takes some getting used to. If you've been looking for an in to Bloodshot, you've found it.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Bloodshot: Reborn #2

May 21, 2015

Aiding Lemire in this slow burn approach is Mico Suayan. The artist again turns in some ridiculously realistic pages, each open pore and tightened tendon on full display. At times said realism leads to some static looking pages, but they're all rendered so gorgeously that it's almost worth the pause in pace. When paired with David Baron's excellent color work, Bloodshot is arguably the best looking book that Valiant is currently putting out.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Bloodshot: Reborn #3

Jun 18, 2015

Bloodshot Reborn is not so quietly taking claim as Valiant's best new title, so best get on it, and quick.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Bloodshot: Reborn #4

Jul 9, 2015

Jeff Lemire has done an excellent job exploring the anti-hero's fractured mind in recent issues, and issue #4 is no different.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Bloodshot: Reborn #6

Sep 17, 2015

All told, as both a continuation and a jumping on point, issue #6 delivers.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Bloodshot: Reborn #7

Oct 8, 2015

Whereas Bloodshot: Reborn's first arc read like a television procedural, its latest is more akin to a horror thriller, each issue further investing us in its characters even as the foreboding sense of tension mounts.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Bloodshot: Reborn #8

Nov 19, 2015

Much like its nanite inhaling lead, Bloodshot: Reborn continues to get stronger with each passing issue. The book has been on quite a tear of late, much of which can be attributed to Jeff Lemire's improved pacing.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Bloodshot: Reborn #10

Jan 28, 2016

Bloodshot's latest presents the perfect on ramp for new readers, as Jeff Lemire and Co. leave the narrative of the present behind in lieu of exploring an all too familiar future. It's tough to read this issue without calling to mind other dystopian fiction " from the obvious Max Max comparison to other heroes-in-a-world-gone-bad tales such as Old Man Logan " but Lemire nonetheless manages to introduce these familiar tropes in a way that's still investing and world specific.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Bloodshot: Reborn #11

Feb 25, 2016

Issue #11 continues to move the story along a well worn path, Lemire again relying on familiar plot beats to advance his unfolding story. Such presentation makes for a somewhat predictable issue, but considering how well it's done that same expectation does nothing to dull the overall enjoyment of the arc.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Bloodshot: Reborn #13

May 26, 2016

For as enjoyable as The Analog Man arc has been, there's always been the sense that things are too familiar, too easy to predict. That notion goes out the window here in issue #13 as Jeff Lemire and Lewis Larosa deliver a powerful and emotionally shattering finale.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Bloodshot: Reborn #14

Jun 30, 2016

It's only the first issue, but this Hunger Games-style romp looks to be a potential return to form for this fan favorite series.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Bloodshot: Reborn #15

Jul 14, 2016

While Bloodshot Island definitely fits the bill as another bombastic, action oriented arc, it's Lemire's ability to weave a connected web from story to story that continues to pay dividends.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.1
Bloodshot: Reborn #16

Sep 1, 2016

When compared to recent arcs, Bloodshot Island feels smaller in narrative scope - more summer blockbuster than conspiracy thriller. That being said, it's also one of the more purely entertaining acts Jeff Lemire has put out, driven by its action heavy plot and the consistently fantastic art of Mico Suayan.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
Bloodshot: Reborn #17

Sep 29, 2016

Bigger doesn't always equal better, but with this stellar creative team on a roll unlike anything we've seen yet, we're willing to bet that in this case it does.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Bob's Burgers #2

Sep 25, 2014

If you're buying this book chances are that you're a fan already, but those new to the concept may come out wanting.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
Bob's Burgers #3

Oct 30, 2014

Bob's Burgers remains a tough piece of beef to crack. On the one hand, the various writer/artist teams again do a great job of capturing the feel and tone of the show, using various in-jokes and character specific traits to bring the Belcher family to life. While that works to an extent (Tina's tale is spot on and hilarious), there are definitely some show specific quirks that don't translate quite so well in written form.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Book Of Death #2

Aug 20, 2015

Book of Death #2 is a prime example of a book managing to remain thoroughly entertaining even as the narrative mostly stands still.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Book Of Death #3

Sep 24, 2015

With one issue left, the action continues to flow throughout The Book of Death, even as the story moves at more of a trickle.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Book Of Death #4

Oct 29, 2015

The best thing about the Book of Death #4 is its focus. Most event books tend to throw everything but the kitchen sink at their finales, but Robert Venditti wisely chooses to keep the action limited to Gilad and Tama.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Book Of Death: The Fall Of Bloodshot #1

Jul 23, 2015

With the Book of Death threatening widespread curtain calls across the Valiant U, the latest batch of Valiant one-shots show us how exactly our favorite characters are set to go. Bloodshot is the first to draw the short straw, and initially the promise of a suitable finale feels unlikely given the book's single issue limitations.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Book of Death: The Fall of Harbinger #1

Oct 1, 2015

While not without their moments, thus far Valiant's run of The Book of Death finales have been more miss than hit, often feeling rushed in their push to deliver a solid end to their franchise leads. It's fitting then that they've saved the best for last, as Joshua Dysart and Kano's The Book of Death: Fall of Harbinger #1 is easily the most complete of the bunch.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
Book of Death: The Fall of Ninjak #1

Aug 27, 2015

Much like Bloodshot's recent fade to black, Book of Death: The Fall of Ninjak is a book that never quite consummates on its intended promise. Matt Kindt gives Colin King's exit plenty of interesting moments, from robot vs ninja battles to plummeting space real estate, but the overarching sum of these moments fail to fully capture.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Book Of Death: The Fall Of X-O Manowar #1

Oct 22, 2015

Robert Venditti brings the life and times of Aric of Dacia full circle, culminating in a tantalizing, if convenient, look at the legacy he's left behind.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Britannia #1

Sep 22, 2016

At first glance the book appears more typical in its Roman fare, with ample bouts of bloodletting, copulation and political scheming. However, as the book goes on and the horrors mount, it becomes clear that Peter Milligan has a different sort of story in mind, one that borrows from a number of physical and psychological influences intended to assail its steadfast hero.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Burning Fields #1

Jan 21, 2015

Colin Lorimer also aids in providing this consistent tone, his heavy shadows and etched faces proving a good fit for the book's escalating subject matter. The former Curse vet is clearly comfortable in his new surroundings, his layouts and backdrops impressive in their vision. His character detail can read a bit sparser in comparison, but he makes up for it in pure gritty tone, as exemplified by his wince worthy opening and equally unnerving climax.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
C.O.W.L. #1

May 29, 2014

Great galloping gargoyles, Batman, Rod Reis can draw. Every page and panel is worth an extra second's pause, the artist deftly marrying superhero melees with every day police work.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
C.O.W.L. #2

Jun 26, 2014

With the book's setup out of the way, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel deliver some excellent character work here is issue #2, the world of C.O.W.L. affecting those powered and unpowered alike.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
C.O.W.L. #3

Jul 31, 2014

After all the world building done in subsequent issues, issue #3 of C.O.W.L. is more character piece than anything else, writers Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel directing their attention to the team's lone female member, the telekinetic Radia.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
C.O.W.L. #5

Sep 25, 2014

With a new arc soon to come and a trade on the way, it's high time to enlist in C.O.W.L.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.6
Captain Marvel (2014) #3

May 14, 2014

On art, David Lopez yet again infuses his simplistic style with heart and weight, his use of expression and body language ably complimenting the scenes at hand. Much of the book places Carol in the role of ambassador, and the artist really nails the divide between Carol and the citizens of Torfa. He imbues Carol with just the right amount of wide eyed navet and steely self assurance, and his panel work features a number of dramatic angles and mood shaping close ups. Colorist Lee Loughridge completes the effect, the book's warm hues becoming noticeably bleaker as the pages tick by.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Captain Marvel (2014) #4

Jun 12, 2014

Considering the somewhat melancholy end to last issue, Captain Marvel's latest outing is actually quite a bit of fun. Kelly Sue DeConnick continues to hit the right balance of humor and heart, her Carol determined to prove that her aid in Torfa's plight is a boon, not a hindrance.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Captain Marvel (2014) #6

Aug 14, 2014

Kelly Sue DeConnick brings Captain Marvel's first arc to a close, the Avenger squaring off against Emperor J'son and his Spartax army. DeConnick has done a great job throughout the series establishing Torfa and it's citizens, making their final stand engaging and cheer-worthy.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.6
Captain Marvel (2014) #7

Sep 11, 2014

Though technically still in its first arc, the latest from Kelly Sue DeConnick reads more like a transition piece to the next chapter than a true conclusion to the first. It's a solid move, but when considering the numerous high stakes adventures we've seen recently, issue #7 comes off as quieter and more bizarre by comparison.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Captain Marvel (2014) #8

Oct 8, 2014

It's a silly and at times unnecessary aside to be sure, but it also proves that even an off issue of Captain Marvel is still pretty darn great.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.2
Captain Marvel (2014) #9

Nov 13, 2014

With so much emphasis on the words, artist David Lopez is tasked with keeping everything together, and he does so in his usual expressive fashion. Carol is a woman of many mohawked hats, and Lopez ably captures all of them, from the diplomat and warrior to the inner-screaming fangirl. Likewise, colorist Lee Loughridge gets the chance to strut his stuff, the book's more ridiculous moments allowing for a similarly heightened color palette. Issue #9's rhyming nature may not be for everyone, but there's no denying that DeConnick, Lopez and Loughridge make for one "marvelous" team.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Captain Marvel (2014) #10

Dec 17, 2014

Much like the narrative itself, the book's art duties are split between a trio of artists, led by series' regular David Lopez. Though different in visual style, each artist ably maintains the same warm and welcoming tone from one to the next, the book's outlandish events never detracting from its heart-on-its-sleeve message. Issue #10 may not do much to advance the character or her galactic adventures, but it doesn't have to, DeConnick and Co. content to let us simply bask in their appreciation for the character. Time will tell whether or not a second part to the story is truly merited, but as a standalone installment it's one no Carol fan should miss.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Captain Marvel (2014) #11

Jan 15, 2015

Carol Danvers returns for the second installment of her Christmas themed two-shot, writer Kelly Sue DeConnick ably building off of the many inspirational vibes that came before. While the necessity of said issue is easily debated, the resulting finale is nonetheless a fun and joyful romp that brims with holiday spirit.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Captain Marvel (2014) #12

Feb 12, 2015

David Lopez does a nice job creating vested interest in Carol's somewhat solo tale, his character work and expression again on point. There are a few confusing sequences in terms of choreography, but overall he does a solid job in getting Captain Marvel's latest adventures off the ground.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
Captain Marvel (2014) #13

Mar 12, 2015

At this point, Kelly Sue DeConnick has established herself as the preeminent voice of all things Captain Marvel. Her Carol is brash and funny, smart and loyal, able to turn the most ridiculous of events into the most unlikely of victories. That being said, the book's overall flow has begun to feel a bit detached lately, the narrative direction as adrift as her oft damaged space ship.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Captain Marvel (2014) #14

Apr 9, 2015

The issue as a whole offers little to the Black Vortex event at large, but the creative team does a nice job in ensuring that Carol's solid characterization remains on point.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Captain Marvel (2016) #2

Feb 4, 2016

Kelly Sue DeConnick's Captain Marvel run left quite the red boots to fill, yet only two issues in it appears that the creative team of Michelle Fazekas, Tara Butters and Kris Anka are up to the task.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Captain Marvel (2016) #3

Mar 17, 2016

Its premise is familiar (Captain Marvel teams up with a wisecracking super team and has wacky space adventures) but that doesn't make Carol's latest any less refreshing. Not only are writers Michelle Fazekas and Tara Butters mining a different side of Carol " one physically weakened and emotionally compromised " but they also continue to make the most of the book's supporting cast.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
Captain Marvel (2016) #4

Apr 21, 2016

There are a lot of moving parts to Captain Marvel's first arc, from alien assailants to space subterfuge and everything in between. It's strange then that even with everything going on, issue #4 feels somewhat disconnected.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Captain Marvel (2016) #5

May 26, 2016

Starting point or not, the team of Fazekas and Butters, along with artists Kris Anka and Felipe Smith, are clearly a good fit for this title, and the series' upcoming Civil War II focus presents a great opportunity to further prove it.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
Captain Marvel (2016) #6

Jun 30, 2016

Considering Carol's role in the Civil War II title proper, it comes as somewhat of a surprise just how little her core title dips into the conflict.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Captain Marvel (2016) #8

Aug 25, 2016

As perhaps the single most important character in Civil War II, the spotlight on Carol Danvers has never been brighter. At this point the character's pro-Ulysses beliefs are nothing new, but Ruth Fletcher Gage and Christos Gage really do an excellent job here of highlighting the tenuous position Carol's challenging stance presents.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.6
Captain Marvel (2016) #9

Sep 29, 2016

Given the pre-set parameters set by Civil War II, Ruth Fletcher Gage and Christos Gage have done an admirable job of creating a Carol both steadfast and sympathetic. That said, for as much as the character seems aware of the slippery slope she's currently sliding down, she still more or less ignores any sense of uncertainty in lieu of unwavering conviction.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Captain Marvel And The Carol Corps #1

Jun 11, 2015

The fun and energy of DeConnick's initial run carries over into the Carol Corp, each wisecracking member at once appealing and familiar.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Captain Marvel And The Carol Corps #2

Jul 16, 2015

It's nice to see a book actually focusing on the world left behind in the wake of Secret Wars, with characters questioning Doom and the supposed realities he's set forth. That being said, it's tough to say where this book is really looking to go, issue #2 hardly moving save for a sudden swerve you see coming from miles away.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.6
Captain Marvel And The Carol Corps #3

Aug 27, 2015

Compared to most Secret Wars tie-ins, Captain Marvel and the Carol Corps reads like a book very much beholden to its event mothership. Even when things are happening, such as here in issue #3, the book never really feels like its gaining any sort of momentum.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Captain Marvel And The Carol Corps #4

Sep 24, 2015

It's the kind of read that gets you fired up, inspired, so intent are DeConnick, Thompson and Braga to leave everything on the final page.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Carnage (2015) #1

Nov 11, 2015

It takes a while for Carnage #1 to get going, but once it does both the book's quality and its engagement takes a jump. Writer Conway has smartly tucked his villain away in the shadows, allowing artist Perkins to work with the unease of the unknown. A strong premise doesn't always translate to a great series, but there's enough moody pull here to make it appear worth the descent.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Cartoon Network Super Secret Crisis War #1

Jun 25, 2014

The real surprise is the art generated by Derek Charm -- not only does he bring each respective character to vividly accurate life, but he does so solo, lending a strange sense of continuity to the proceedings. Each scene and set piece is rendered with loving accuracy, something sure to be appreciated by those long enamored with the characters involved. With a hodgepodge of famed characters still to enter the fold, Super Crisis Secret War is go!

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
Cartoon Network Super Secret Crisis War #3

Aug 28, 2014

There's fun to be had here, no doubt, but when all is said and done Super Secret Crisis War could stand to be a bit more super.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Chrononauts #2

Apr 16, 2015

What is easy to enjoy is Murphy's gorgeous art. There's detail, and then there's Murphy detail"each page and panel offers a ridiculous amount of eye candy, from distinct large scale battles to hilariously inappropriate dude-bro jokes. So much of the read depends on Murphy's uniquely timed characterization and expansive world building, and it's by and large the main component that will keep readers coming back.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Circuit-Breaker #1

Mar 24, 2016

It's not without its entertainment value; it's just not yet clear whom this book is for.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.6
Civil War (2015) #4

Sep 10, 2015

Civil War reaches its penultimate issue and, much like the previous chapters, the results are mixed.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
Clean Room #1

Oct 22, 2015

Gail Simone is no stranger to the wild and weird, so its saying something that Clean Room #1 may be her strangest yet.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Clean Room #2

Nov 19, 2015

What a difference an issue makes. Following a rushed debut, Gail Simone turns in an excellent, meticulously paced follow-up that's high on frights and even higher on intrigue.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Clean Room #3

Dec 17, 2015

All told, issue #3 is Simone and Davis-Hunt at their unhinged best.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
Clean Room #4

Jan 21, 2016

The book's end pages do well in setting up a real, and potentially present, conflict, but until the narrative catches up to it's obvious spectacle, this book will fall just short.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
Clean Room #5

Feb 18, 2016

Clean Room is at once maddening and enticing. The series is plagued with inconsistent pacing, strange narrative interjections and a plot that appears to get muddier with each new installment. It's also insanely gripping, completely terrifying and awesomely illustrated, making for a truly divisive read.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Clean Room #7

Apr 21, 2016

The frights here range from borderline creepy to downright terrifying, making each turn of the page a risk in and of itself.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Clean Room #10

Jul 21, 2016

Jon Davis-Hunt is a star. Such has been the case from the beginning, but issue #10 is a prime example of the kind of versatility the artist brings to the read.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Clean Room #13

Nov 10, 2016

An excellent blend of deviance, humor and horror, Clean Room continues to thrill.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Clean Room #16

Feb 23, 2017

Clean Room is the kind of book you can't look away from for even a second. It's not just the horrifying imagery - something issue #16 churns out with extra relish - but also its pinpoint use of language, both subtle and otherwise.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Clean Room #17

Mar 30, 2017

Clean Room is a scary book, that much we know. What makes this book so consistently unsettling is in how the book scares you, as Gail Simone's horrors never come from the same place twice. Issue #17 is an excellent example of that uncertainty.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Clean Room #18

Apr 27, 2017

The book's finale delivers on most, if not quite all, of the book's presumed promises. The resolution, while quick, is nevertheless effective, Simone bringing her expansive cast together in ways that fit well within the preexisting confines set by the story.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.4
Cloaks #1

Sep 4, 2014

Magic or not, four issues is a short time to tell a story, yet Monroe and Navarro appear fully equipped to pull a winner out of the hat.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Cognetic #1

Oct 22, 2015

The latest from Memetic creators James Tynion IV and Eryk Donovan, Cognetic #1 shares more than a few similarities with their prior apocalyptic tale. The unexplained phenomenon, the rampant violence, the talk-through-text aesthetic; at first glance, Cognetic is a few wrong turns away from a rehash. As the story progresses, however, the real intricacy of what Tynion and Donovan have created comes to play.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Conan / Red Sonja #1

Jan 14, 2015

Conan/Red Sonja #1 holds a lot of setup, driving through the final pages in order to prep the rest. That said, it's a down and dirty good time, bolstered by a stellar creative team that appears eager to show us more.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.6
Convergence: Aquaman #1

Apr 15, 2015

Richards also does a fine job elevating the read, his line work clean, if not a bit simple. There's not a lot of movement to the issue beyond the last few pages, the panels mostly similar in style and direction, but there's enough moxie to Deathblow's explosive appearance to expect greater things from their eventual showdown. Here's hoping this team delivers.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.9
Convergence: Catwoman #1

Apr 15, 2015

Catwoman's Convergence tale is kind of a weird read. On the one hand, it definitely appeals to those who grew up reading comics in the 90's, the familiar purple jumpsuit and ridiculous bullwhip at once familiar and fun. On the other, it's tough to make out what kind of Catwoman Justin Gray wants us to see.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Cry Havoc #2

Feb 25, 2016

Having already done a great job in introducing the book's cast last issue, Spurrier is able to further flesh out the eclectic band, with solid attention given to lead, Lou. There's some great character work at play here, particularly so given the leaps in time, and Spurrier's consistently strong dialogue goes a long way in crafting a distinct, immediate tone.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Cry Havoc #3

Mar 24, 2016

Cry Havoc may not always be the easiest read to follow, but it's certainly one of the prettiest.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Cry Havoc #6

Jun 23, 2016

f you were looking for answers pertaining to Cry Havoc's many threads, consider the floodgates opened. Issue #6 is a deluge of wrap-up and advancement, Simon Spurrier providing seeming ends to darn near every plot point in motion.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Curse Words #1

Jan 18, 2017

In Curse Words #1, Charles Soule and Ryan Browne have conjured up one heck of a fun yarn. It's not always a pretty tale, with some rushed pacing and an overstuffed structure, but what it does hit it hits hard and with plenty of energy. Soule's Wizord, a Merlin for the hipster generation, is an enjoyably murky lead, and with Browne on hand to deliver his many misadventures with kinetic glee, we don't expect the magic of this first issue to dim any time soon.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.4
Curse Words #2

Feb 23, 2017

Soule takes his script to some pretty out there places, and Browne brings an excellent sense of energy to each dangerous situation and humorous set piece.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Curse Words #3

Mar 23, 2017

The setup and humor here hits the mark, just not on quite the same level as issues past.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.6
Curse Words #5

May 18, 2017

The finale to Curse Words' first arc ends much like it began, with plenty of magical mischief and gonzo spectacle.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Cyclops (2014) #2

Jun 5, 2014

Cyclops may get the title billing, but Corsair is the real draw here. Each scene featuring the rakish rogue is a delight, his effortless swagger bewitching both Scott and readers alike.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Daredevil (2015) Annual #1

Aug 4, 2016

All told, while it's nice to see these characters back in the pages, this annual doesn't make for required reading.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.6
Daredevil (2015) #5

Mar 31, 2016

Issue #5 isn't the most memorable of finales, with the arc's primary villain falling as little more than an eviscerated afterthought, but the issue does do well in further solidifying the promise of this new direction.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.2
Daredevil (2015) #6

Apr 28, 2016

Elektra makes for a fine guest star and looks to be a solid focal point to this new arc, but her usage here is more perplexing than engaging.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Daredevil (2015) #9

Jul 14, 2016

Charles Soule does his best to get the most out of this particular team-up, adding Peter Parker to the mix as Matt Murdock continues to put his unseen plan into play. The resulting issue has its fair share of web-slinging and baton tossing, but it's the strong character elements that prove the most investing

View Issue       View Full Review
7.6
Daredevil (2015) #10

Aug 11, 2016

With some welcome personality and an eerie and engaging hook, this might be the most promising issue of this still young series.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Daredevil (2015) #12

Oct 13, 2016

With an unnerving and mysterious villain in Muse and a political backdrop complicated in both morality and scope, this latest arc gives us our best look yet at what this creative team has to offer.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Daredevil (2015) #13

Nov 10, 2016

Charles Soule has really rounded into form. That's not to say his earlier Daredevil work was poor, but rather that his new arc is just that much better.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Daredevil (2015) #14

Dec 15, 2016

Capping off the series' strongest arc to date, Charles Soule delivers a gripping finale with issue #14.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Daredevil (2015) #15

Jan 12, 2017

With an assured tone and a great ending hook, this arc is off to an excellent start.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Daredevil (2015) #17

Feb 16, 2017

Soule clearly has more designs for this particular tale, having spent 17 odd issues planting its seeds. But he does provide a strong sense of direction buoyed by an even stronger emotional core.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Daredevil (2015) #19

Apr 20, 2017

While the book's ending does seem to tip its hand as to where things are potentially going, this is nonetheless a fun romp that utilizes the character's long and complicated history to creative effect.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Daredevil / Punisher #2

Jun 30, 2016

There's still not much new to chew on, but it has its moments.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
DC Comics: Bombshells #1

Aug 12, 2015

Though crafted as a digital read, Bombshell's print transference proves an enjoyable one. Marguerite's Bennett and Sauvage show a keen understanding for the stories they're out to tell, their characters both familiar and decidedly fresh. In a marketplace crowded with male dominated reads, book's like Bombshells stand out.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Dead Body Road #6

May 29, 2014

Issue #6 brings the series to its adrenaline soaked conclusion, as the ever-brooding Gage inches closer to the vengeance he so desperately seeks. Artist Matteo Scalera saves his best work for last, delivering a finale so explosive that even Michael Bay can't help but nod in approval.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Dead Letters #2

May 8, 2014

As Sam goes through God Squad orientation, we're treated to a series of flashbacks that explain not only how things are, but how they came to be. It's a bit of an info dump, yet Christopher Sebela's plotting is so well articulated that you're never left scratching your head.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Deadly Class #5

May 29, 2014

Remender and Craig appear determined to command your pull list, and at this point you'd be silly to resist them.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Deadly Class #6

Jun 25, 2014

Deadly Class #6 is comic booking at its finest, a true marriage between writer and artist that fully stakes its claim as one of the best books on the rack. The wait till September will be a brutal one.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Deadly Class #7

Sep 18, 2014

Deadly Class at long last returns from it's agonizing vacation, creators Rick Remender and Wes Craig making it well worth the wait. Their narrative is chock full of the same shockingly pointed dialogue and in-your-face occurrences we've come to expect, somehow finding time to explore complex relationships amidst the copious violence, heavy drug use and deposit filled swirlies.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Deadly Class #8

Oct 16, 2014

While not entirely conducive to the book's forward motion, Remender nevertheless crafts yet another riveting read filled with achingly damaged characters.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Deadly Class #9

Nov 20, 2014

Rick Remender again finds just the right blend of back-story, character development and forward progression, his plotting somehow both sporadic and meticulous.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
Deadly Class #10

Jan 7, 2015

Now ten issues in, it's safe to say there's no book quite like Deadly Class. Rick Remender's latest is a hodge-podge of crazy situations and themes, each one messier and more destructive than the last. It's as if he's taken teenage angst, ratcheted it up to 11, and given it a machine gun.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Deadly Class #13

May 28, 2015

Rick Remender and Wes Craig, no strangers to madcap action and thrilling double crosses thus far, deliver a whole new level of jaw dropping goodness here in issue #13. It's not necessarily what they do but rather how they it, the creators crafting a whole issue of build up that pays off in rather disconcerting ways.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.7
Deadly Class #14

Jul 2, 2015

Over the course of the issue Marcus' spiral continues ever downward, Remender giving each angst-filled musing and aggressive lash a dramatic but relatable weight. Its heady stuff, especially so given the writer's full on commitment to his lead's self destructive nature.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Deadly Class #15

Aug 6, 2015

This is one class still worth attending.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Deadly Class #16

Sep 10, 2015

Ever watch a horror movie where you end up constantly screaming at the main character's increasingly poor decisions? That's Deadly Class #16 in a nutshell. At this point Rick Remender has Marcus so deep in the dumpster fire of his own creation that it's any wonder he's managed to make it this far at all.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Deadly Class #19

Mar 3, 2016

For all its frenetic mayhem and constant escalation, in many ways Deadly Class is a book balanced on restraint. Over the course of 19 issues Rick Remender and Wes Craig have done a remarkable job building up and breaking down their eclectic cast. In putting in the time, the duo all but ensures that the events of the book's latest arc land on a much deeper level, as made evident by the brutal clash between side characters Billy and Viktor.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
Deadly Class #21

Jun 2, 2016

When it comes to sheer page-by-page investment, Die For Me is arguably the strongest arc in Deadly Class' run so far. Coming to a close here in issue #21, Rick Remender and Wes Craig somehow raise their already amped up narrative, delivering a shocking installment that's widespread in its ramifications and devastating for its characters.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Deadly Class #22

Sep 29, 2016

Issue #22 is definitely tame by recent standards, but the artist's ever expressive energy and fantastic layouts do more than enough to hype events to come.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Deadly Class #24

Dec 1, 2016

With so many interlocking threads, Deadly Class is a book primed for the big payoff. At first glance issue #24 is limited in that area, but the sheer amount of new information gifted here goes a long way in plotting the series' new course.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Deadly Class #26

Feb 2, 2017

Nits aside, if you've been reading this series, you can't miss this one.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.7
Deadly Class #27

Mar 30, 2017

If you've been reading since page one this is a can't miss"and if not, you'd best get caught up.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Deadly Class #28

May 25, 2017

Recent issues of Deadly Class have been punctuated by one dramatic, narrative shattering beat after the next, so by comparison issue #28 reads much more measured in its approach. It's a nice change of pace, and Rick Remender uses the slower roll-out to touch base with the majority of the book's sprawling cast.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Deadpool & The Mercs For Money #1

Feb 3, 2016

No one was likely clamoring for more of Deadpool's motley crew, but Bunn and Espin put them to good use in this first installment. Espin's clean character work and expressive lines go well with Bunn's easy moving script, the two combining for an enjoyable read that has promise for greater things. It's a familiar read, but not a bad one.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Deadpool & The Mercs For Money #2

Mar 16, 2016

Deadpool and the Mercs For Money isn't out to reinvent the wheel, but rather appears intent to give it a good spin. Bunn's utilization of his full cast makes for big laughs, and the art by Salva Espin is both well constructed and full of character. Eventually the seeming lack of substance may set the series back, but as of now it has style to spare.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
Deadpool & The Mercs For Money #3

Apr 21, 2016

We mentioned last issue that the seeming lack of substance could eventually trump the book's obvious style, and that's unfortunately the case here.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Deadpool (2015) #1

Nov 5, 2015

Deadpool's latest offers a fresh look at our mouth merc. Duggan and Hawthorne show a clear direction for the character going forward, tempering his oddity in a way that's accessible to readers new and old. There are some inconsistencies, but overall this a great start for what will hopefully be an equally great series.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Deadpool vs. X-Force #1

Jul 2, 2014

Art wise, artist Pepe Larraz and colorist Nolan Woodward prove a solid team, combining for some excellent action sequences and humorous character beats. Wade's assault of the British army is a definite highlight, the character as cool as he is ridiculous -- his gun is even named Kingslayer! Deadpool vs. X-Force #1 is pretty much what you'd expect for a book featuring a time traveling 'Pool, and that's not a bad thing. Swierczynski and Co. have a fine handle on the character, making his continued historical misadventures something worth reading.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Deadpool vs. X-Force #2

Jul 24, 2014

Writer Duane Swierczynski uses the 'alternate history as result of time stream tweaking' to great effect, his version of events decidedly one-sided. Though the resulting shenanigans are fairly standard for a series such as this, they're still undoubtedly fun, the writer mining Deadpool's self awareness for a number of great bits.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Deadpool vs. X-Force #3

Aug 21, 2014

There are still some hiccups to be found, namely Cable's overly obtrusive exposition and the obvious lack of interest in the remaining X-Force members, but overall this is just a fun book that refuses to take itself too seriously.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Deadpool vs. X-Force #4

Sep 4, 2014

In the end the series hits the notes it needs to hit, and though it may not be as memorable in the long run, it's still undeniably entertaining.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
Deadpool's Art of War #1

Oct 16, 2014

Luckily, Scott Koblish proves the book's saving grace, the artist on hand to render Wade's various exploits once more. Combined with the muted colors provided by Val Staples, Koblish's art has an almost antiquated look to it, his sharp lines and detailed backdrops right at home with David's time-warped subject matter. The artist also proves adept at filling a page, many sequences requiring an impressive amount of fully realized (and colorfully dressed) characters.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Deadpool's Art of War #2

Nov 6, 2014

Whether a victim of expectation or execution, Deadpool's Art of War remains more miss than hit.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Deadpool's Secret Secret Wars #1

May 21, 2015

Deadpool's stab at changing history mostly proves a success, Bunn and Lolli delivering a tale both entertaining and amusing. While Deadpool himself can at times overrun the narrative, the issue's overall enjoyment hinges on the book's chuckle worthy script and great art.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Deadpool's Secret Secret Wars #2

Jun 18, 2015

Whereas issue #1 effectively balanced familiarity with accessibility in a way that worked for everyone, issue #2 is much more of a direct Secret Wars parody. As such, the uninitiated will likely be left scratching their heads through much of the narrative as it ducks, dips and dodges from one time to the next.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.4
Deadpool: The Duck #1

Jan 4, 2017

Deadpool the Duck #1 won't be for everyone, but it's not just for Deadpool fans either. Stuart Moore and Jacopo Camagni take the best parts of both characters and find a way to use them in unison, culminating in a surprisingly strong and easily enjoyable debut. Some pacing issues prevent it from being and out and out hit, but with a strong premise and great, character driven art, it's certainly a fun one.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Deadpool: The Duck #3

Feb 9, 2017

Deadpool the Duck is a book that defies expectation. Whether or not you find that to be a good thing will depend on that same expectation, but Stuart Moore is definitely delivering something different.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Deadpool: Too Soon? #1

Oct 20, 2016

It's too early to say if it's too soon for another Deadpool title, but credit the creative team for going full-tilt out of the gate.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.7
Deathstroke (2014) #1

Oct 23, 2014

Initial opinion of Deathstroke #1 will vary based on what you're seeking. If you're looking for great action and detailed art, then Tony Daniel has you covered. If you're looking for an in depth exploration and recreation of a fan favorite, issue #1 will leave you wanting more.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Deathstroke (2016) #6

Nov 10, 2016

We're still left with more questions than answers, but thus far the ride proves worth the hurdles.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Deathstroke: Rebirth #1

Aug 11, 2016

For all his seeming popularity, Deathstroke is a tough character to get right. And to his credit, Christopher Priest seems to acknowledge that fact in his initial take. Rather than focus his story on Deathstroke the assassin, the bulk of this Rebirth issue looks at Slade the man, and how his actions affect those around him.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.6
Dept. H #1

Apr 21, 2016

Aside from having a great name, Dept. H #1 is just a great debut, Matt Kindt rolling out the narrative in a coolly measured, ever escalating manner.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Descender #1

Feb 4, 2015

Descender #1 marks an excellent debut from two equally excellent creators, their world at once dangerous and enthralling. Lemire's strong script makes TIM-21 someone to root for, with Nguyen's art giving the book a visual presence that's beautiful in execution and scope. More, please.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Descender #2

Apr 9, 2015

Dustin Nguyen's painterly visuals are again a draw, the artist using a fine blend of washes and colors to generate mood and tone. His alien designs and robotic creations continue to impress, though it's the subtle humanity in his robot lead that give Descender that something more.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Descender #4

Jun 11, 2015

With a true conflict at last in play, Descender remains a book on the rise.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Descender #6

Aug 13, 2015

Jeff Lemire builds off of the limb lending events of last issue, using a flashback structure as a way of fleshing out the less than fleshy origins of his robotic world. While the overall impact of these reveals is yet to be known, with hinted allusions to events past and possibly coming, the issue does a solid job in furthering Quon's layered history with robots in general.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Descender #7

Nov 12, 2015

Descender's first arc wasn't without its pacing wrinkles, but issue #7 offers a darn near perfect example on how to get a new story off and running.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Descender #9

Jan 14, 2016

With such constant calamity of late, Tim-21 and company were due for an issue off. Issue #9 offers one such reprieve, Jeff Lemire dialing down the book's recent action heavy leanings and instead focusing on further exploring his unique characters and the world they inhabit. There's plenty of advancement to be found here, but the real treat of the issue ends up being the very human focus on the book's non-human leads

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Descender #10

Feb 11, 2016

Keeping in line with the more tempered approach to last issue, Descender #10 offers a nice mix of character development and narrative maneuvering.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Descender #11

Mar 10, 2016

As a chapter in a trade, issue #11 will likely tie in well. As an establishing issue set to draw us back, it's not quite there.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Descender #12

Jun 16, 2016

This issue doesn't get us anywhere new, but the emphasis on character proves the difference.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Descender #13

Jul 14, 2016

We've trust enough in Nguyen and Jeff Lemire to right the ship, but for any new readers looking to hop aboard, this arc does not represent Descender at its best.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.3
Descender #14

Aug 18, 2016

Descender #14 may just be the most maddening issue of the series' run. It's an absolutely beautiful chapter, detailing the end days of Tim-21's mining camp as seen through the eyes of rover-dog, Bandit. It's also a largely empty read, serving as little more than extended setup for a reveal that still fails to elicit any sense of forward momentum.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Descender #17

Dec 15, 2016

Rather than focus on one particular tale, Lemire instead opts to jump-start three at once, using a triple-screen structure to update a slew of stalled plotlines. And yet, even with the wider focus there's still the sense that very little actually happens, the end page lacking in impact when considering the drawn out path it took to get there.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Descender #18

Jan 19, 2017

For a series that's largely lived and died on Dustin Nguyen's lush paints, it's refreshing to have the story back up to par.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Descender #19

Feb 23, 2017

It's one step forward, two steps back for this series. Following last issue's seeming return to form, the latest from Jeff Lemire and Dustin Nguyen again finds itself marred by strange plotting choices and uneven character work.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Descender #20

Mar 23, 2017

It's not always the most consistent read, but issues like this remind us why we stick around.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Doctor Strange (2015) #2

Nov 5, 2015

If you've never read a Doctor Strange story before, this is a heck of a place to start.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Doctor Strange (2015) #7

Apr 28, 2016

Jason Aaron and Chris Bachalo continue their excellent "Last Days of Magic" arc, diving further into the intense emotional stakes introduced last issue. The most fascinating aspect of this story is just how helpless Strange and his magical cohorts are.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Doctor Strange (2015) #8

May 26, 2016

If you weren't a Strange fan before, good luck resisting this spell.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Doctor Strange (2015) #9

Jun 23, 2016

Issue #9 mostly works as setup for the looming showdown between the last purveyors of magic and the Empirikul hunting them, but its setup that comes with its own investment.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Doctor Strange (2015) #13

Oct 20, 2016

There's never been a better time to be a Strange fan, and this book is a great indicator as to why.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Doctor Strange (2015) #14

Nov 17, 2016

Featuring a motley assortment of demonic miscreants, a great use of astral projection/streaking and a Charlie and the Chocolate Factory-esque ride through the intestines, the issue's lack of substance is more than made up for by its consistently entertaining vibe.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Doctor Strange (2015) #15

Dec 22, 2016

If the writers of Doctor Strange's next cinematic venture are looking for inspiration, they need look no further than Jason Aaron's current run.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Doctor Strange (2015) #16

Jan 26, 2017

With this issue, Jason Aaron's grinding gauntlet reaches its action packed conclusion, and it's just as bitingly witty and visually imaginative as we've come to expect.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Doctor Strange (2015) #17

Feb 16, 2017

As uncomfortably creepy as it is downright gorgeous, Frazer's lines pair wonderfully with Aaron's ever shifting tone, making for an engrossing lead in to Strange's next misadventure.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Doctor Strange (2015) #19

Apr 20, 2017

Aaron's Strange again strikes the perfect balance between cocksure braggart and fiercely protective friend, and the somewhat predictable ending does nothing to diminish the layered emotions the writer is able to draw out of his cast. Bachalo brings a similar depth to his pencils.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Drax (2015) #3

Jan 21, 2016

Now three issues in, we're still waiting to see what separates this version of Drax from the angry, literal, Thanos-murdery copies that have come before. It's a frustrating wait at this point, as from a visual perspective this series is quite entertaining, Scott Hepburn again showing a great flair for kinetic storytelling and physical comedy.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
Drax (2015) #4

Feb 25, 2016

It's not a bad book, but it's also not a particularly memorable one.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
E Is For Extinction #1

Jun 25, 2015

Grant Morrison's New X-Men run was as different an X-book as you'd x-pect when it first debuted, and in many ways the Secret Wars offshoot it inspires feels much the same. Chris Burnham and Dennis Culver pair a familiar feel with a fresh spin, utilizing their introduced old school/new school divide to great effect.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.7
Edge of Spider-Verse #5

Oct 16, 2014

In the end Gerard Way's turn in mainstream comics is a successful one, he and Jake Wyatt combining for some uniquely cool and original stuff. While there's the definite need for more fleshing out of the premise, we're hopeful that Peni and her SP//dr companion will show up again in the not-so-distant future.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
Effigy #1

Jan 29, 2015

The book's final pages are more strange than intriguing, but there's enough mystery to the debut to merit a return look.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.6
Effigy #2

Feb 26, 2015

Much of the book's investing quality comes from his fantastic characterization, his use of facial expression, coupled with subtle mannerisms, making for an immediately relatable tone. If the creators can maintain that investment while also ratcheting up the mystery, Effigy may just surprise.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Elektra (2014) #3

Jun 19, 2014

Much like last issue, issue #3 is more visual than cerebral, highlighting grand set pieces and action over plot progression.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Elektra (2014) #4

Jul 17, 2014

Given the series' more action oriented elements, the opening pages of Elektra #4 offer a refreshing change of pace, delving not only into the mind of our scarlet assassin but her gluttonous assailant as well.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Elektra (2014) #5

Aug 21, 2014

Elektra's struggle of self continues here, and while that struggle is again voiced and acknowledged, it's resolution lacks any real dramatic impact or resonance as Blackman continues to straddle the character with one foot safely behind the line.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Empress #3

Jun 9, 2016

Mark Millar's ability to write entertaining fare is largely unquestioned, but the latest issue of Empress does make one wonder just how far the book can go on sheer entertainment alone.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
Eternal Empire #1

May 4, 2017

Opting more for show than tell, this debut issue from Sarah Vaughn and Jonathan Luna is a slow burn. While this initial issue sets the conceit well enough " a mysterious woman in the present toils under the regime of a cruel Empress shaped by the past " there are more perplexing questions than enticing teases.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Eternal Warrior: Days of Steel #1

Nov 6, 2014

More effective is the art by Nord. What his panels lack in clarity he makes up for in design, his layouts unique and appealing. The Eternal Warrior is known for smashing heads and cleaving bodies, and Nord renders the book's violence well, his Gilad appropriately fierce and convincing in his prowess. Brian Reber adds to the book's tone, mixing muted, hazy colors with more intense and vibrant hues to create the sense of days long past.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Eternal Warrior: Days of Steel #3

Jan 7, 2015

Gilad Anni-Padda's adventures come to a close here in issue #3, the fate of his moon-marked charges seemingly all but certain. It comes as a pleasant surprise then that writer Milligan manages to circumvent said expectation, crafting a finale that hits the mark in unexpected ways.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.4
Extraordinary X-Men #1

Nov 5, 2015

Extraordinary X-Men #1 is a perfectly passable first issue, but given the talent within its pages we're ultimately left wanting. Jeff Lemire gives us some solid character play and a nifty new roster, but there's little in the way of initial investment. That leaves Humberto Ramos to carry the load, which he mostly does with his excellent art. Hopefully with the team now in play we can expect something a bit more extraordinary going forward.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Extremity #1

Mar 1, 2017

Extremity #1 is a strong debut, driven by Daniel Warren Johnson's excellent characterization and electric art. Johnson takes a pretty straight forward concept and imbues it with new and exciting layers, making for a character first ensemble that packs plenty of visual punch. The attention to character does leave certain aspects of the narrative feeling a bit undefined as of yet, but overall this book is a bloody ball.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Extremity #2

Apr 6, 2017

It's still an absurdly pretty book, with the aforementioned Shiloh making one heck of a memorable entrance; it just doesn't register on quite the same emotional level.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Faith #3

Sep 15, 2016

There are plenty of fun books out there, but few can match Faith when it comes to easy endearment. There's just something eminently likable and relatable to the character, a trait Jody Houser puts on full display with her latest.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.4
Faith #5

Nov 3, 2016

It's tough to scoff at 48 pages for cover price, but this chapter nonetheless feels like a strong idea not quite executed to its full potential.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Faith #6

Dec 8, 2016

While it's always refreshing to see our heroes take the path less traveled, this one comes off as forced.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.1
Faith #7

Jan 5, 2017

What really works is Houser's characterization here. Much like Faith we're not entirely sure what's real at this point, and while certain moments are definitely played up past the point that is necessary, Faith's uncertainty and lack of, yes, faith, rings clear and true.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Faith #8

Feb 2, 2017

On a purely narrative level, issue #8 is a bit flat. The cliffhanger from last month ultimately proves unimportant, and the move to a familiar foil doesn't initially offer much. Where issue #8 succeeds is in its examination of character, both with Faith herself and in the importance she places on the expectations of others.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Faith #9

Mar 2, 2017

The issue itself is a bit of a throwaway, with its only real conflict coming from an unexpected and easily dispatched adversary, but the sentiment is so strong and Kate Niemczyk's art so sharp that it works on quality of substance alone.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Faith #10

Apr 6, 2017

The issue is billed as a jumping-on point, and in that spirit writer Jody Houser does a solid job of reestablishing many of the characters, namely villains, we've previously seen over the course of the series.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Faith #11

May 4, 2017

A nice blend of character and spectacle, this arc continues its strong run

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Faith (Mini-Series) #1

Jan 27, 2016

Faith is the latest Valiant mini to get off to a good start, Houser and Co. making great initial use of the fan favorite character. The plot is a bit threadbare as of yet, but the strong characterization and referential air, paired with the enjoyable art of Portela and Sauvage, go a long way in earning return readership.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Faith (Mini-Series) #2

Feb 25, 2016

As a character study Faith #2 is a welcome read, though its impact on the series as a whole is limited.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Faith (Mini-Series) #3

Mar 31, 2016

It's tough to carry a book on likability alone, but three issues in it's a trick that Faith continues to pull off. It's not that the story isn't good " it just seems like it's still trying to get going, despite the various stop-starts and last second reveals. And considering the book's mini-series nature, that puts a sizable amount of pressure on the finale to pull things together.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Faith (Mini-Series) #4

Apr 28, 2016

The speed and convenience in which the book's threat is introduced and summarily dispatched is again noticeable, but the character put forth by Jody Houser, Francis Portella and Marguerite Sauvage is so strong that it's easy to overlook.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Flash (2016) #3

Jul 28, 2016

While there's the sense that it's yet to fully hit its stride, this remains one of Rebirth's more promising titles.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Frankenstein Underground #4

Jun 25, 2015

Just when you think a book revolving around a reanimated corpse of patchwork parts can't get any weirder, Mike Mignola finds a way. His latest issue is steeped with creature feature mythology, the writer deftly entwining the Monster's dark past with his own broader universe.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Frankenstein Underground #5

Jul 23, 2015

The series' finale brings many of the book's overarching themes " life, death, and that area in between " to a tumultuous head, Mike Mignola and Ben Stenbeck putting a fine capper on their sprawling mini.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Frostbite #1

Sep 28, 2016

Frostbite #1 is a familiar tale, but it's not a bad one, and ultimately it's the quality of work that will keep readers coming back. Joshua Williamson has a clear handle on his characters and his world, his many twists offsetting the equally numerous tropes. Jason Shawn Alexander and Luis NCT combine for a one-two punch of atmosphere and mood, their bleak setting and strong character work immediately engrossing. It's not a runaway hit, but it's a pretty cool read.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Frostbite #2

Oct 27, 2016

There's an undoubtedly interesting dynamic in play, what with Keaton needing Victoria to help cure her of her illness, while also harboring the secret of Victoria's murdered father. And yet, Williamson's dialogue is so on-the-nose in presenting those connections that it almost ruins seeing them play out.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
Frostbite #5

Jan 26, 2017

Any book that sees a woman uppercut a bear deserves a strong look, and it's ultimately Alexander's strong visuals that make us most excited for the final act.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
Frostbite #6

Feb 23, 2017

For a finale, Frosbite #6 is perfectly serviceable. It wraps up the book's signature focus well, brings its character arcs full circle, and even squeezes in a tantalizing promise of future issues down the pike. That said, Joshua Williamson's capper can't help but feel a bit bland when all is said and done.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Ghost Rider (2016) #1

Nov 30, 2016

Focusing more on splashy guest stars than establishing its title lead, this first issue remains stuck in neutral. Felipe Smith's script has its moments, but the odd plotting and lack of personality hinder any initial investment. Danilo Beyruth gets a few moments to play, but by and large the art never really takes hold. Given what we've seen from the character before this book still holds promise, but this initial chapter does little to prove it.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Giant-Size Little Marvel AVX #1

Jun 4, 2015

Of course, that's not to say he slouches in the art department. Not only is his expressively cartoony style as enjoyable as ever, but he also utilizes physical comedy quite well. These moments, such as Rogue always being on her cell phone (even in battle) or Daredevil's hilarious directional challenges, are great, Young's youthful spirit adding giant size fun to this giant size read.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Giant-Size Little Marvel AVX #3

Aug 6, 2015

When the book's script and art come together like this, Giant Size Little Marvel is nothing short of a delight.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Glitterbomb #1

Sep 8, 2016

It only takes two pages for Glitterbomb #1 to sell itself as something wholly investing. Writer Jim Zub, working on a seedier side of the tracks than what we're accustomed to, pulls no punches in his initial debut, which paints the life of an aging actress in Hollywood in bleak, depressingly honest detail.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Gotham Academy #1

Oct 2, 2014

Overall, Gotham Academy stands apart from previous Bat books both in tone and execution. Becky Cloonan and Brenden Fletcher are off to a fine start, though not all of their characters yet feel fully formed. Karl Kerschl proves a great fit for the book's exuberant tone, his stylized visuals sure to garner many return readers.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Gotham Academy #3

Dec 4, 2014

Though only three issues in, Gotham Academy has already solidified itself as one of the more uniquely investing books on the rack. Its mix of Scooby Doo hijinks and teen-soap drama continues to prove engaging, writers Becky Cloonan and Brenden Fletcher combining for a number of great character moments.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Grass Kings #1

Mar 9, 2017

This is the kind of slow burn book that requires a bit of faith on the part of the reader, but with creators like these, we're betting they'll deliver.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.7
Grayson Annual #2

Sep 30, 2015

Grayson's latest annual is a solid affair, Seeley and Martinez gifting some fun moments of humor and super action. At times the characters don't quite seem themselves, but the team does a nice job creating a story in which Dick and Clark would feasibly share time. While it would have been nice to see a few themes further explored (such as Dick's grappling with the newly-amnesiac Batman), there's enough strong art to carry you through.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Grayson #11

Aug 27, 2015

Writer King shows a great mind for pacing here, the book's tone subtly shifting from light hearted romp to mind bending thriller in a way that leaves you just as disoriented as the book's eponymous lead.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Grayson #12

Sep 24, 2015

With so much emotional kindling we expected Grayson's return to be good, but by hitting the heartstrings and advancing the plot, King and Seeley have delivered something special. With new wheels in motion and the Bat family at long last repaired (sort of), Grayson continues to be just as surprising and entertaining as its eponymous lead.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Grayson #13

Oct 29, 2015

It was going to be tough to top last month's wonderful, reunion centric issue, and thus it comes as no surprise that Grayson's latest entrant feels a bit lacking by comparison. That said, Tim Seeley does a solid job of getting the book's primary narrative back on track, turning Dick's focus towards the recently revealed Agent Zero.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Grayson #15

Dec 10, 2015

It's always a crapshoot whenever an existing series is forced to bend its narrative to fit a larger event book, but Grayson's Robin War tie-in is a surprisingly seamless affair.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Grayson #18

Mar 24, 2016

It's not a total loss " there's some solid action to be had and a well placed, if slightly confusing cliffhanger " it's just not quite of the quality we've come to expect.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.3
Grayson #19

Apr 28, 2016

The narrative acrobatics may eventually culminate in a stuck landing, but as of now this book is swinging without a net.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Grayson #20

May 26, 2016

. Ultimately, it's not the plot that makes issue #20 a winner, but rather the clear sense of character that's consistent throughout.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
Green Arrow (2011) #38

Jan 7, 2015

Visually, Daniel Sampere uses the team-up premise to nice effect, ably mixing the more fantastical power set of Green Lantern with Green Arrow's more real-world abilities. The "Lantern" arrow is a definite highlight, though it is interesting that the same shot achieves an entirely different result on the second try. Comic physics maybe? Despite some weird angles, Sampere's facial work is noticeably improved this go round, the artist effectively capturing the character's various emotions. His King is still more a figurehead than anything else, but his look is still evil enough to know he means business. The new Green Arrow remains a work in progress, but with Ollie seemingly having FAILED HIS CITY, the book's stakes appear prepped to raise even higher.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
Green Arrow (2011) #39

Feb 5, 2015

Green Arrow continues its everything-but-the-kitchen-sink approach, Andrew Kreisberg and Ben Sokolowski building towards the finale of their first arc. The various escalating events do well in creating interest for what's to come, but it also leaves issue #39 feeling a bit forced as a result.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Green Lantern (2011) Annual #4

Oct 1, 2015

While the annual is far from required reading, it does serve to fill in some notable blanks.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
Green Lantern: The Lost Army #3

Aug 20, 2015

For a book supposedly outside of the main Lantern universe, The Lost Army sure has a lot of connection to it. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but after a bright start the series is veering dangerously close to rehash territory.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Green Lanterns #11

Nov 17, 2016

At this point, the rainbow corps are a familiar trip to the well, which makes the initial introduction of the Phantom Lantern feel somewhat ho-hum. What ultimately proves the difference here is Sam Humphries' layered characterization, the writer imbuing glory-hound Frank with just enough earnest passion to keep him relatable.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Green Lanterns #12

Dec 8, 2016

While issue #12 reads as a bit of a rehash in regards to the Phantom Lantern's psyche, there's enough new insight gained to make up for any perceived stalling.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Green Lanterns #14

Jan 5, 2017

Despite the many conflicting natures shown, the villain ultimately falls into one-note territory, never feeling particularly important to the story at hand. However, Humphries again manages to get great mileage out of how Earth's greenest Lanterns are affected by the ongoing conflict, with Simon and especially Jessica seeing some much needed and well constructed growth.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.6
Green Lanterns #22

May 4, 2017

Humphries' pacing is a little off here"the appearance of Kyle Rayner is so quick and random that it takes a few pages for it to really sink in"but overall he does a great job of capturing the awe and spectacle that would likely overwhelm any shiny-eyed recruit.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Green Lanterns: Rebirth #1

Jun 1, 2016

Green Lanterns: Rebirth #1 is a strong start to an engaging premise. While setup heavy, it also contains a strong sense of character, something reflected in the easy, if reluctant, chemistry between its leads. The early lack of a true series artist makes expectations tough to come by, but the overall tone presented here offers plenty of promise going forward.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.9
Guardians 3000 #1

Oct 2, 2014

Guardians 3000 brims with potential, but as of now it's weighted down by a heady script and some overly confusing dialogue. A second read through provides insight that should aid in the book's overall appeal, though the property's overall popularity may not be enough to save it in the long run.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #17

Jul 30, 2014

Guardians of the Galaxy #17 is a brisk read that ultimately does nothing save for reuniting the titular team, a necessary yet no less plodding outing. With teases of a Spartax revolt and an unknown role for Venom, things are sure to turn around, but for now the Guardians story most worth investing in is likely on the silver screen.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #19

Sep 24, 2014

There is substance here, particularly in the scenes between Quill and Gamora, but it's buried under so much flash and silly humor that Quill's grave recounting falls flat. We've still got an issue to go till we find out what really went down -- hopefully it'll prove worth the wait.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.8
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #20

Oct 29, 2014

It's a disappointing end, and one that isn't easily remedied by the book's artistic team. Ed McGuinness and Valerio Schiti turn in some solid pages, but their styles are so vastly different that the switch between them is quite noticeable. It also doesn't help that the book has three different inkers, resulting in three distinctly different degrees of hatching and shadow. Honestly, issue #20 feels like a book the creators were forced to make, a cobbled together attempt to tie-up a long unsolved end. It's serviceable enough as a whole, but Richard Rider, and his fans, deserved better.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #21

Nov 20, 2014

With Venom as the focus Bendis is able to take things a bit darker, exploring the suddenly weakened connection between Thompson and his increasingly surly symbiote. While the writer does little beyond presenting the initial conflict, he does a solid job implicating things to come, using secondary characters to tease the symbiote's soon to be expanding mythos.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.7
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #22

Dec 17, 2014

Of course, if all you're looking for is pure symbiote-in-space action, issue #22 has you covered. Valerio Schiti again tackles the bulk of the art duties here, he and David Lopez combining for some awesome shape-shifting shootouts. Schiti shows a fine eye for choreography this go round, the book's constantly changing circumstances allowing for a number of arresting visuals, both in character and design. His design can veer a bit cartoony at times, especially with Rocket, but overall it's his great action pieces (and fun movie Easter eggs) that make this an issue worth reading.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.8
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #23

Jan 21, 2015

With so much of the writing feeling disjointed, artist Valerio Schiti is left to carry the rest of the book. He does his best, crafting some unique and eye catching spreads, but as a whole his depiction of the Klyntar and their world comes off as somewhat lackluster. Much of this has to do with the issue's overly rushed presentation, but when you have one chance to add to canonical history, you gotta swing for the fences. That doesn't happen, and with the next chapter of the Guardians' tale already set in motion, Planet of the Symbiotes feels like a distant memory.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.4
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #24

Feb 11, 2015

That particular moment is a highlight in a read full of them, artist Schiti turning in one of his best issues yet. Freed of the confining quarters of the ship, the artist shows some excellent vision, crafting a number of visuals impressive in scope and design. He also deserves some major kudos for his character work this time around. There are a lot of bodies to this installment, and all of them look great, Schiti showing nice use of body language and expression. We'll need more than good art to keep this event investing, but with Schiti involved it's almost enough.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.4
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #25

Mar 26, 2015

Inconsistency aside, issue #25 sure is pretty. Valerio Schiti has been turning in some consistently great work with this event and this issue is no different, his pages dynamic and captivating. The attack and subsequent destruction of Hala proves an immediate highlight, as exemplified by an impressive four-page stretch showcasing the means and the aftermath. The artist's character work also continues to impress, his group scenes and focused interactions making great use of mannerism and expression. Issue #25 has its faults, but Schiti makes it better.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Hadrian's Wall #1

Sep 14, 2016

Hadrian's Wall #1 is a strong debut from an equally strong creative team. Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel get the premise laid out quickly and efficiently, with lead Simon sticking out as an immediate character worth following. The sense of suspense is only furthered by Rod Reis' atmospheric art, his excellent facial work and tonal use of color generating easy investment. A whodunnit set in space? We're in.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Hadrian's Wall #3

Nov 17, 2016

More character development is never a bad thing, but in the case of issue #3, the laser focus on lead Simon does leave other parts of the narrative wanting.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Harbinger: Renegade #1

Nov 17, 2016

With a direction that looks to appease fans old and new, Harbinger's return is one worth watching.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
Hawkeye (2016) #1

Dec 14, 2016

Hawkeye #1 hits the ground running and never looks back, the creative team of Kelly Thompson, Leonardo Romero and Jordie Bellaire on target early and often. Their Kate is one immediately believable and root-worthy, her sharp wit and numerous talents put to great use from the start. With fantastic art and some strong early setup, it's easy to get excited by the potential shown here.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Hawkeye (2016) #3

Feb 2, 2017

Kate Bishop deserves a strong creative team, and thus far Thompson, Romero and Bellaire are delivering.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Hawkeye (2016) #4

Mar 2, 2017

Though only four issues in, this is a series that very much knows what it is and what makes it work, something we can't wait to see pay further dividends down the line.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Hawkeye (2016) #5

Apr 6, 2017

With any guest spot, there's always the worry that the guest star may overshadow or unnecessarily undermine the lead character. And thankfully, it's a concern that's unfounded here, as Kelly Thompson is able to construct the perfect vehicle for both Kate Bishop and Jessica Jones to coexist.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Hawkeye (2016) #6

May 4, 2017

With every passing issue it gets more and more apparent that Kelly Thompson is the perfect writer for this series

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #20

Sep 10, 2014

Really, the script as a whole benefits from Wu's gift for subtle nuance. Her facial contortions and physical quirks are fantastic -- you can tell the mood and general demeanor of Kate just by looking at her, no small feat when that mood changes every three panels.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #21

Feb 4, 2015

As always, Fraction's timed beats and engaging quirks live and die with artist David Aja. He hasn't disappointed yet and he sure as heck doesn't now, his pages at once brilliant and immersive. The artist has such a keen understanding of what is happening and what needs to happen, his panels numerous but never wasted. He combines with colorist Matt Hollingsworth for some incredible imagery, mixing detailed lines with beautifully simplistic design. The initial arrival of the Tracksuit Draculas is punctuated by the vanishing of a bike and the growing dots of headlights, Aja using little to convey much. And that final page...good luck making it out of that one unscathed.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #22

Jul 16, 2015

It's a day we hoped would never come, but Hawkeye's exit proves worthy of everything that's come before. The team of Matt Fraction and David Aja deliver a masterful finale, they, along with Matt Hollingsworth and letterer Chris Eliopoulos, turning in yet another thrilling chapter of character and heart. They don't push too hard or go too big, instead delivering the same understated, excellently plotted storytelling that's helped elevate Hawkeye from afterthought to fan favorite. It's an end to soon, but what a great end indeed. Thanks for the memories, bro.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Hawkeye Vs. Deadpool #0

Sep 3, 2014

Speaking of character work -- Matteo Lolli proves an excellent fit for the mashup, utilizing layouts and themes from both books to great effect. The artist shows a great eye for storytelling, highlighting the various quirks and idiosyncrasies in ways that are continually amusing. While the two heroes don't come to blows this issue (at least not really) it's clear that their continued interactions will lead to some further shenanigans down the road. Can. Not. Wait.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Hawkeye Vs. Deadpool #1

Oct 8, 2014

With a great creative team and an even greater cast, Hawkeye vs. Deadpool continues to exceed nearly every expectation faced thus far. Duggan advances his narrative just enough to remind us that it's there, but in the end it's the book's ever present wit and awesome art that will keep us coming back for more.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Hawkeye Vs. Deadpool #2

Nov 13, 2014

Whether it's discussing the merits of owning a sky cycle, debating the membership process of the Avengers or agreeing on who may or may not have seen a naked wizard, Hawkeye vs. Deadpool remains an absurdly fun time. Writer Gerry Duggan already has the book's balance down, mixing high octane action with rampant situational humor.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Hawkeye Vs. Deadpool #4

Jan 7, 2015

Also a bit confusing is the dual art duties shared by Matteo Lolli and Jacopo Camagni. Characters look almost completely different at times, particularly Black Cat, and the red herring at issues' end is made all the more confusing by an errant color swap. That said, the artists definitely nail the book's wild energy, combining for a number of pages both ridiculous and chuckle worthy. Hawkeye vs. Deadpool may not have been the versus book some may have expected, but as a pure team-up mini it hits pretty darn close to a bull's-eye.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Heartthrob #1

Apr 14, 2016

Getting a complicated premise off and running is no simple feat, but man do Christopher Sebela and Robert Wilson IV make it look easy. Heartthrob #1 is assured from its opening page, each subsequent flip only furthering the book's clear cut sense of identity.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
House of Penance #1

Apr 14, 2016

House of Penance #1, from the creative team of Peter J. Tomasi, Ian Bertram and Dave Stewart, is a debut of immediate and riveting intrigue. Drawing influence from Sarah Winchester's famed Mystery House, Penance #1 offers a dark look at the physical and psychological effects of loss and guilt, as told through the unblinking eyes of the titular structure's warden.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Howard The Duck #1

Mar 12, 2015

Chip Zdarsky and Joe Quinones make a great team. Not only have they successfully revived a walking punch line but they've done so in hilarious style, their debut as entertaining as it is self assured. Time will tell how well the book's rampant absurdity will hold up, but as far as new debuts go, it's tough to find one more fun than this.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Howard The Duck (2015) #5

Mar 10, 2016

Howard the Duck #5 offers everything but the kitchen sink, and given the involvement of Chip Zdarsky and Joe Quinones, it likely won't be long before the sink comes into play.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Howard The Duck (2015) #10

Sep 1, 2016

With only one issue left to go, Howard's swan (duck?) song shows no signs of slowing down. If anything, it's ramping up, as self-aware alien manipulators Chip and Joe - sorry, Chipp and Jho - continue to throw everything they can at their unflappable hero.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Howard the Human #1

Aug 20, 2015

It's a fun twist to a familiar structure, and one writer Skottie Young plays up well with a series of in-gags and visual cues.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Huck #3

Jan 14, 2016

Huck may be the least flashy title in Mark Millar's eclectic stable, and in many ways that's both its biggest draw and largest knock. It's an entirely character driven read, and considering that the main character is one of little words and even littler complications, that makes the book's enduring narrative one tough to fully get behind.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Huck #4

Feb 18, 2016

Huck has been nothing if not an entertaining read, yet despite its enjoyable story there's yet to be any sense of real momentum. Well, check your ticket stubs and secure your brain luggage because the momentum train has left the station.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
Hulk (2016) #2

Jan 26, 2017

We'll need more from the narrative overall to fully buy in to this series, but the character is in good hands.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.7
Hulk (2016) #4

Mar 23, 2017

There's plenty of humor and heart in these pages, but the narrative's coaster climb needs to get around the next bend.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Immortal Brothers: The Tale of the Green Knight #1

Apr 13, 2017

The Princess Bride by way of a table-top game master, this standalone is a hoot.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Imperial #1

Aug 7, 2014

Imperial is a fun time from start to finish, Seagle and Dos Santos combining for a number of entertaining moments. What's best, the creators appear to know exactly the kind of book they're trying to create, nicely balancing the irreverent with the heartfelt.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Imperium #1

Feb 5, 2015

Imperium is off to a solid, if murky, start, but we want to know more.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
Inhuman #3

Aug 14, 2014

While the script by Charles Soule has it's moments, it also feels awfully hurried, Soule quickly breezing through some solid character work in order to set up the book's knuckle-swinging climax.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Inhuman #4

Aug 28, 2014

Though technically still in its first arc, the latest issue of Inhuman feels almost like a different book. Obviously the artistic switch from Joe Madureira to Ryan Stegman plays a large role, but even Charles Soule seems to have shifted gears, focusing on entirely new events and characters.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
Inhuman #7

Oct 30, 2014

Inhuman's latest arc starts with a literal bang, so here's hoping the creators involved can keep that forward momentum humming.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Inhuman #8

Nov 20, 2014

Charles Soule has spent a fair amount of time building his characters and their world, and in issue #8 said characterization begins to pay dividends. We're finally starting to see the book's many pieces come into play, and while the larger narrative is still a bit too loose for its own good, Soule's engaging script and solid character work prove enough to continue vested interest.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.7
Inhuman #9

Dec 4, 2014

Inhuman's Axis tie-in comes at the worst possible time, as the book's increasingly promising direction is forced to take a sudden and unwelcome swerve.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
Inhuman #11

Jan 29, 2015

Charles Soule essentially sweeps Inhuman's AXIS offshoot under the rug, with only Medusa's arc maintaining any real sense of continuity. What's there is solid enough in terms of development, but it feels so forced comparatively that many of her story beats fall short.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Inhuman #12

Feb 26, 2015

Inhuman isn't quite at must buy levels, but it remains a solid dose of superhero action and familial drama.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
Inhuman #13

Mar 26, 2015

Following weeks and weeks of non-stop pummeling, Charles Soule at last allows his characters a brief respite. At first glance this decision appears strong, opening the door for some much needed development amongst his young cast. Unfortunately, said development never really takes off, as aside from a few quick panels of introspective analysis we don't really get anything new.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.4
Inhumans: Attilan Rising #1

May 28, 2015

Writer Charles Soule gives his squad the Battleworld treatment, offering a mostly simple tale made better by a slew of entertaining cameos.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Inhumans: Attilan Rising #5

Sep 24, 2015

As far as tie-end endings go this one is certainly passable, with some great art and a killer whoopsie moment, but as an Inhuman book that looks to say and be something new, Soule and Timms seem to take their cue from the Inhuman's newly minted and muted leader.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Invisible Republic #1

Mar 19, 2015

Whereas most future sci-fi tales begin with the world, Invisible Republic builds from its characters. Such structure makes the new debut from Gabriel Hardman and Corinna Bechko quickly engaging, the book's plot piloted by very human drama.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.1
Invisible Republic #3

May 28, 2015

Gabriel Hardman and Corinna Bechko don't do a whole lot to advance here, instead using plot lines both past and present to up the book's already considerable intrigue. It mostly works, but for different reasons.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Invisible Republic #4

Jun 25, 2015

While the prevailing mystery surrounding Invisible Republic remains interesting, the book is at its best when it focuses on the world and how it shapes its characters. Issue #4 gives us ample doses of both as Gabriel Hardman and Corinna Bechko open their narrative substantially following last issue's more contained structure.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Iron Fist: The Living Weapon #2

May 8, 2014

There's some intense stuff here (particularly that last page) and though the script can be a mite confusing at times if you don't know the players, Andrews' strong writing and remarkably detailed art drives this one home.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Iron Fist: The Living Weapon #3

Jun 5, 2014

There's a lot going on here, both in terms of plot and character, and though some of the symbolism is a bit too on the nose at times, it succeeds in garnering an emotional response.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Iron Fist: The Living Weapon #5

Aug 7, 2014

Andrews is juggling a ridiculous amount of moving parts here, and while he's proved adept thus far at managing them, there's a definite "style over substance" vibe that negates some of the emotional beats he's striving to hit.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Iron Fist: The Living Weapon #6

Sep 4, 2014

Iron Fist continues to be one of the most maddeningly inconsistent books in Marvel's stable. On the one hand, there's so much to like, Kaare Kyle Andrews again delivering a great blend of high stakes action and intricately constructed visuals. Conversely, he also tends to try to stuff every page and panel with additional gravity and meaning, leading to a revolving carousel of characters and plot points.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Jean Grey #2

May 25, 2017

A standout spread featuring floors of rampaging Reavers offers a glimpse of this series' vast potential, making the wait for next month an impatient one.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Jem and the Holograms #1

Mar 26, 2015

Jem and The Holograms' first issue gets a lot of things right. The tone and characterization are strong and inviting, as are Ross Campbell's well realized visuals. The setup is a bit long overall, but does serve the story well in setting up further adventures yet to come. It may not be for everyone, but its open and accessible enough to merit a shot.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
John Flood #1

Aug 6, 2015

We've barely scratched the surface of what Flood, and his creative team, can do, but what's here is certainly promising.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Josie and the Pussycats #1

Sep 29, 2016

It's not quite a showstopper yet, but in time we can see it moving up the charts.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.1
Josie and the Pussycats #2

Nov 3, 2016

Josie and The Pussycats' debut was a somewhat sporadic affair, the pinball narrative making it tough to settle on the book's overall tone. It's only clear after reading issue #2 that the always-forward ebullience of the debut actually IS the tone, and it's that knowledge that makes this read so entertaining.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Josie and the Pussycats #4

Feb 2, 2017

As wise as it is witty, Bennett, Deordio and Mok continue to hit the right notes.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Josie and the Pussycats #5

Mar 9, 2017

Marguerite Bennett and Cameron Deordio have no problem balancing pop culture overload with fourth-wall-breaking winks, but it's the book's consistently strong focus on building real and relatable characters that makes it work.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Judge Dredd (2015) Annual #2017

Mar 2, 2017

While the cover price is fairly steep, this issue packs in a pretty sizable helping of Judge Dredd goodness.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Jughead (2015) #1

Oct 8, 2015

As the first of the non-Archie specific offshoots, Jughead #1 delivers. It's clever, funny, and brimming with energy, Zdarsky's sly humor a perfect complement to Henderson's quirky stylings. While some of the character choices and design work feels just off, the book's premise and creative team allow for a debut just as entertaining as the Archie title it spun from.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Jughead (2015) #4

Feb 11, 2016

It's never anything less than fun"Erica Henderson's increasingly boisterous visuals and solid character play makes sure of that"but it is becoming a tad formulaic, the many stop-starts again limiting the book's overarching plot.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Jughead (2015) #5

Mar 31, 2016

While the overall plot continues to plod, the setup itself is nonetheless amusing, as Chip Zdarsky's mines the teenage information hub that is the mall for pertinent information.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Jughead (2015) #8

Aug 4, 2016

Issue #8 reads very much as a book spinning its wheels, serving as neither an ending to Zdarsky's run nor a precursor for things to come.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Jughead (2015) #10

Oct 27, 2016

Don't let the change in creative teams deter you; this book is still a treat.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Jughead (2015) #11

Dec 1, 2016

It's in the back half of the issue that North really pulls things together, the heartfelt exchange between Jughead and Sabrina doing wonders for both characters. Not only does he turn in perhaps the most fully formed and self aware version of Jughead yet, but his Sabrina too reads as layered and well realized - their pairing is surprisingly organic and one easy to enjoy.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Jughead: The Hunger (One Shot) #1

Mar 30, 2017

As creepy as it is fun, this is one one-shot that will leave you hungry for more.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
Jupiter's Circle #1

Apr 8, 2015

As of now this direction appears to be a calculated risk, as really very little of Circle echoes that of its predecessor. Whereas the former focused on the challenges of generation and, well, legacy, Jupiter's Circle offers a simpler time, where heroic lives in the public eye are potentially undercut by that which they partake behind it. In lesser hands said premise would appear all too familiar, but in the hands of artist Torres it becomes a true tight-rope walk of intrigue and deception. His clean, crisp style evokes a strong Silver Age feel, his pages never flashy but always engrossing. This is a read in which the capes feel secondary, the book's more grounded tone amplifying its more personal nature. There's improvement to be had in terms of crafting real and lasting investment, but with Torres involved we're willing to play it out.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
Justice League #31

Jun 25, 2014

The debut of the new Power Ring has been a long time coming, especially considering the glimpse we got waaaay back in Green Lantern #20 (look it up!). The ring's newest victim, Jessica Cruz, is interesting enough, the brief backstory we get appropriately depressing. Even the meeting at issues end has been seemingly on the books, effectively promising our first real look at what the new Power Ring can do. Johns' Lex holds all the cards at this point, and it'll be interesting to see how Justice League unfolds going forward.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.6
Justice League #38

Jan 21, 2015

Though mostly set-up to the book's creepy new turn, issue #38 is never anything less than engaging, Johns and Fabok delivering a number of exciting moments and surprising twists. Justice League has shown a real return to form of late, and with the bad getting worse, here's hoping the trend continues.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Justice League (2016) #7

Oct 19, 2016

Hitch ends the issue on an uncertain note making it unclear if the story arc is over or continuing next issue. A bigger question perhaps is whether it's worth looking forward to the next issue either way.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Justice League / Power Rangers #1

Jan 11, 2017

Justice League/Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #1 isn't perfect, but it's a solid start to a promising crossover. Tom Taylor and Stephen Byrne show a clear appreciation for the properties and their fans, delivering an entertaining romp with plenty of standout moments. The extended setup and lack of strong character work makes for a quick read, but one that has plenty of room to get even better. This meeting has already happened in your head countless times over - time to see it on the page.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.3
Justice League / Power Rangers #2

Feb 8, 2017

A step back from its debut, this installment fails to fully take advantage of the opportunities the book's pairing presents. Tom Taylor's characters are mostly true to form, but their shared interactions offer little sense of momentum beyond that expected. Stephen Byrne's art fares a little better, but at times his clean style and minute detail comes up lacking. It's still an overall pretty read, but one yet to fully deliver on its promise.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Justice League / Power Rangers #3

Mar 8, 2017

Another issue, another set of unmet expectations for this series. Tom Taylor has done a solid job of building a tale that fits tonally with both properties, but the drawn out plotting and overabundance of DC characters ultimately pushes the Power Rangers out of the picture here. There's fun to be had"including an abundance of teenagers-on-dinosaurs zingers"but it doesn't fully translate to a strong installment. Stephen Byrne's art gives the issue an appealing sheen, but we're still waiting for that breakout issue that ties it all together.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.6
Justice League / Power Rangers #4

May 18, 2017

While a perfectly serviceable tale, it's still hard to pinpoint just who Tom Taylor is trying to reach with this series. In writing something that appears geared to all-ages, Taylor's overly general script fails to hit any real resonant notes with either property, despite the many overly convenient plot devices he uses to instigate them.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.7
Justice League: Futures End #1

Sep 17, 2014

In the end, Justice League: Futures End #1 isn't bad, but it's not particularly great either. Lemire and Dougherty deliver a solid tale that hits all the right beats, but their version of the future isn't one quite worth investing in.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Kamandi Challenge #1

Jan 25, 2017

Good natured competition is always fun, and in the Kamandi Challenge DC has a concept that's both inventive and entertaining. The early creative teams do a great job of putting down pieces for the following teams to pick up, with the end page revelations offering equally interesting insight. With 14 creators set to take their turns at the shirtless wheel, this is one challenge you should certainly accept.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Kamandi Challenge #2

Feb 23, 2017

Fast, fun, and brimming with creative competition, this series is a true treat.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Kamandi Challenge #3

Mar 30, 2017

The book's "wait, there's more!" structure may eventually peter out in the long run, but for at least one more issue the Kamandi Challenge remains a fast and loose good time.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Kamandi Challenge #4

Apr 27, 2017

The ever forward nature of this story doesn't allow for many breathers, but as far as pure entertainment goes, this book is an easy sell.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Kaptara #3

Jun 25, 2015

It's that rare book that you like but can't always tell why, so jumbled are its themes and overall sense of direction. In many ways the script reads as a "best hits" sort of ode to the space adventure genre, with Chip Zdarsky doing his best to cram in as many unique set pieces as possible.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Kill Or Be Killed #1

Aug 4, 2016

When Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips and Elizabeth Breitweiser get together, good things happen. Their latest collaboration looks to continue that winning streak, the debut propelled by its unique premise and solid early characterization.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.7
Kill Or Be Killed #5

Jan 19, 2017

This isn't a book you read quickly, but rather one you pore over and read again. If you doubted this premise had legs, issue #5 will set you right.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Kill Or Be Killed #6

Feb 16, 2017

While wordy, Brubaker's narration does an excellent job of breaking down the stakes of each player involved, even as he moves others around the periphery of our leads. It's a focused approach that absolutely thrives due to Sean Phillips' rich character work.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
King #1

Aug 13, 2015

King #1 is undoubtedly fun, filled to the brim with wild set pieces and anthropomorphic action. It also feels a bit out of control, the overarching narrative unfolding in fits and spurts. Joshua Hale Fialkov and Bernard Chang make for a promising pair, but as of now the book's big means better philosophy hasn't quite fulfilled on its promise.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Lake of Fire #1

Aug 25, 2016

Making full use of its oversized format, Lake of Fire #1 is at once sprawling, immersive debut.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Lazarus #9

Jul 3, 2014

If you're a fan of high concept drama and expansive world building, Lazarus remains a top pick.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Lazarus #11

Sep 11, 2014

Rucka, already proven as a master of scheming, delivers yet again, his pacing deliberate and plotted to the smallest detail. All the world building he's done, both subtle and unsubtle, begins to pay dividends here, the rivalry between the factions reaching a level of intrigue we've yet to see.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Lazarus #12

Oct 22, 2014

Trading bulletproof vests for ball gowns, Michael Lark yet again delivers the good stuff. One has to wonder just how he reacted upon seeing a script filled with pages of dancing and lavish backdrops, but he comes through in every regard, creating a truly immersive experience. His ability to generate mood has proved hugely important to the book's overall proceedings, and with the sudden surprise at issue's end, chances are he'll need those talents now more than ever.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.6
Lazarus #14

Jan 15, 2015

Rucka's writing is as magnetic and terse as ever, yet much of the book's tension comes courtesy of artist Michael Lark. His physical pacing is phenomenal this issue, panels flowing with a cinematic zest befitting the best spy thrillers film has to offer.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
Lazarus #15

Feb 19, 2015

While slower story wise save for one sudden swerve, Lark's excellent art drives another excellent issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Lazarus #17

Jun 18, 2015

Greg Rucka and Michael Lark have spent a good deal of time building and cultivating their Families and the world they inhabit, and at long last they're ready to set them against each other. Building off the duplicitous events of his Conclave arc, Rucka's latest script brings war, and lots of it.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Lazarus #18

Jul 30, 2015

Michael Lark gets some excellent action sequences to work with, his cinematic eye detailing everything from covert stealth strikes to impressive displays of lethal efficiency. His ability to generate tension sans words continues to be a huge part of Lazarus' visual appeal, as exemplified by the issue's left field ending that'll leave you blinking in disbelief.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Lazarus #24

Sep 1, 2016

Greg Rucka's Lazarus workstation must be a maze of photos and yarn, so complex are the various connections and relationships that inhabit his world. And yet, despite each new layer, each uncovered past or secret motivation, the story never gets so loaded with extraneous detail that comprehension is lost.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Lazarus #25

Oct 13, 2016

In 22 some-odd pages the duo explores a long running reveal, presents a major power shift and introduces a terrifying and brutally effective new foe. And not once does the story feel bloated or unnaturally forced, each new revelation and obstacle feeling organic and earned.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
Lazarus #26

Mar 30, 2017

Delays aside, Lazarus continues to be one Image's most consistently top notch titles.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Legendary Star-Lord #1

Jul 2, 2014

Legendary Star-Lord #1 does just enough to set it apart from the main series, driven by the book's amazing art. Humphries appears well at ease in his new surroundings, and with a new, personal entrant of Quill's now in play, the misadventures of Star-Lord aim to be mighty legendary indeed.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
Legendary Star-Lord #3

Sep 4, 2014

Now THAT'S some Legendary Star-Lord. After two fun but average issues, Sam Humphries and Paco Medina get it right with issue #3, delivering a riotous and involving read.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.2
Legendary Star-Lord #6

Dec 4, 2014

Kitty Pryde has proven to be a welcome addition despite her relatively brief appearances, but unfortunately Humphries' attempt to intermix her involvement with the current narrative doesn't quite pay off.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
Legendary Star-Lord #7

Feb 18, 2015

This feeling of been there, done that unfortunately spills over into the art department as well. Paco Medina is a fantastic penciler, but so many of his beats feel like rehashes from the first two chapters that it's tough to get all that invested. The book's most exciting moment turns out to be nothing more than a projected apparition, so while the art is very good, it's not entirely memorable. We've more ground yet to cover and more Vortex yet to submit -- hopefully there's some story worth sticking around for.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
Lobo #1

Oct 2, 2014

As mentioned, artist Brown does a solid job executing the book's numerous action beats, yet while his Lobo is certainly capable, he doesn't quite possess the same machismo swagger we've come to expect from the character. Perhaps it's unfair to hold the creators to the standard of what came before, but it's nevertheless difficult to fully buy in to the book's events, especially considering the book's romantic, oddly accent-less flashback to Lobo's life on Czarnia. Time will tell what kind of book Lobo wants to be, but as of now his ongoing lacks bite.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Loki: Agent of Asgard #4

May 8, 2014

Though Old Loki is conspicuously absent, the book brims with great content, featuring everything from the appearance of a Marvel heavy, an intriguing meeting and a tasty recipe for salmon. A godly union, indeed.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Loki: Ragnarok and Roll #4

Jun 19, 2014

Ragnarok and Roll ends much like it began, large in spirit yet short in resonance.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Loose Ends (2017) #1

Jan 26, 2017

With a cadre of lived-in characters and a host of neon visuals crackling with personality, this is the kind of book that grabs your attention.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Low #4

Oct 30, 2014

Some may grumble over the issue's defining twist being introduced so early overall, yet Rick Remender deserves credit for circumventing the expectation that comes with such a move. He again leads us to some murky places, some more obvious than others, with each bit of world building serving to sink we readers further into its depths.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Low #5

Dec 4, 2014

Each issue of Low has seemingly featured some sort of time shift or grand reveal, and while issue #5 follows said pattern to an extent, it also manages to be the most consistently grounded issue yet.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Low #6

Feb 26, 2015

Low's first arc reaches its explosive conclusion, Rick Remender taking the world he's so carefully cultivated and turning it upside down like a snow globe. The resulting finale leads to a slew of new and enticing questions, but it also fails to fully tie up (or even address) those that came before.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Low #7

Jun 18, 2015

Greg Tocchini turns in one of his best issues to date, his unique eye carrying the beginning of this new arc. Each page is awash with gorgeous visuals, Tocchini melding fluid design work with color both brilliant and subtle.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Low #9

Aug 27, 2015

Low is the kind of book little baby sci-fi tales hope to grow up to be. It's grand in scope and focused in character, its layered family drama and lavish backdrops peppered with copious bouts of evisceration.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Low #12

Mar 17, 2016

He opens the chapter in contemplative, albeit hopeful fashion, painting a seemingly idyllic picture wherein all one has to worry about is the occasional fire spider. By issue's end that good feeling is all but gone, the book's new menace leaving an instant and lingering mark.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Low #13

Apr 28, 2016

At this point Rick Remender has us pretty much conditioned to expect the worst in Low, but that doesn't make the events of the issue any less disheartening.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Low #16

Mar 9, 2017

In the afterward of Low #16, Rick Remender promises that events in this issue will have an impact on further events down the line. While that certainly bodes well for the future, the present finds itself a bit more muddled.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
Lumberjanes #2

May 15, 2014

While its too early to declare the book a runaway hit, it's hard to argue with any troupe that gives out badges for bad puns.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Lumberjanes #16

Jul 16, 2015

If you still need convincing that Lumberjanes is the bees knees, an Eisner win oughta do it. Fresh off their recent Best New Series victory, writers Noelle Stevenson and Shannon Watters continue their exploration of the history of the Lumberjanes, complete with domineering counselors, shape shifting bear-women and a not-so-little thing called a Grootslang

View Issue       View Full Review
8.7
Lumberjanes #17

Aug 27, 2015

"All ages" will always have its detractors in comic circles, but Lumberjanes remains the rare read that really offers something to pretty much anyone.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Lumberjanes #18

Sep 17, 2015

Lumberjanes showed some impressive scale throughout its last arc, and as a result issue #18 reads as noticeably more contained. The issue still possesses the same bubbly spirit and infectious charm of past installment, but its focus " a rift between mermaids, er, merwomyn " lacks the rampant sense of whimsy we've come to expect.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Lumberjanes #19

Oct 22, 2015

Is there any comic quite so effortlessly enjoyable as Lumberjanes? Filled with raging sea serpents, ill-advised antics and a healthy splash of heart, the latest from Shannon Watters and Kat Leyh again proves that above ground or below water, Lumberjanes is the best all ages book on the shelf today.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Lumberjanes #20

Nov 19, 2015

It may seem commonplace to heap praise on Lumberjanes at this point, so heartwarming are its stories, but it's the book's continued ability to surprise that proves the difference here in issue #20.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Lumberjanes #21

Dec 17, 2015

Maritime merit badges, saucy seal people, one-eyed werewolves - it's just an average day for the Lumberjanes. Following the book's largely April-centric arc, Shannon Watters and Kat Leyh bring the band back together for another tale of zany weirdness and enduring friendship.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Lumberjanes #22

Jan 21, 2016

As a series, Lumberjanes' ability to highlight real issues - friendship, compassion, teamwork - against a fantastical setting has consistently made it a favorite to fans and critics alike. And it's that lack of something more that ultimately holds issue #22 back.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
Lumberjanes #23

Feb 18, 2016

Its still a solid issue, just one short of the series' usual heights.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Lumberjanes #24

Mar 17, 2016

From the touching exchange between Molly and Mal to the hilarious back-and-forth between Ripley and her selkie mirror image, issue #24 wears its heart-shaped badge on its sleeve, and the series is better for it.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Lumberjanes #25

Apr 21, 2016

Lumberjanes #25 sees a welcome return to form for the eclectic series, the oversized anniversary issue stuffed to the gills with hijinks weird and whimsical.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Lumberjanes #27

Jun 16, 2016

Lumberjanes latest arc feels more in tune with the book's earlier run, which is a good thing. Issue #27 is a great blend of magic cats, clever mischief, and good 'ol fashioned teamwork, Shannon Watters and Kat Leyh making good use of both the book's principal cast and its eccentric newcomers.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Lumberjanes #28

Jul 21, 2016

Of the many, many things to enjoy about Lumberjanes, it's ability to mine genuine growth out of the most ridiculous of situations remains at the top of the list. Case in point - in an arc heavy on supernatural mischief, with rainbow-courting birds and super-powered cats, it's non-Jane Barney who stands out.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Lumberjanes #29

Aug 18, 2016

Whereas last arc focused on newly minted 'Jane, Barney, issue #29 returns the spotlight to the campers of bunk Roanoke, pairing solid character insight with the usual mythical maladies. While the book's more fantastical elements give it its sense of whimsy and adventure, it's in the more human moments that Shannon Watters and Kat Leyh really shine.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.2
Lumberjanes #30

Sep 29, 2016

From its rich, layered characters to its warm and welcoming art, this series impresses yet again.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
Lumberjanes #35

Feb 16, 2017

While Carolyn Nowack's bright characters and strong physical comedy manages to inject a sense of energy to the proceedings, there is the sense that the numerous overly specific details are a tad unnecessary and could have been better served elsewhere.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Lumberjanes #36

Mar 23, 2017

It's still a good time, just not quite to the Lumberjanes standard.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Lumberjanes #37

Apr 27, 2017

It's a solid start to what looks to be a fun arc, and artist Ayme Sotuyo's style fits well with the new direction.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Lumberjanes #38

May 25, 2017

Wacky and weird is Lumberjanes' bread and butter, and it's the lack thereof that gives Shannon Watters and Kat Leyh's latest arc its humor.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
Lumberjanes / Gotham Academy #1

Jun 9, 2016

Lumberjanes/Gotham Academy #1 works because it offers the best of both worlds. Chynna Clugston Flores shows a clear understanding of her characters and their relationships, something too reflected in Rosemary Valero-O'Connell's picture perfect art. This was a crossover that made too much sense not to happen, but now that it has, it couldn't have gotten off to a better start.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Lumberjanes / Gotham Academy #2

Jul 14, 2016

The resulting read isn't as laugh-out-loud-funny as we'd expect from the pairing, but it is quite clever, Clugston-Flores playing the various cast against one another in inventive ways.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Lumberjanes / Gotham Academy #3

Aug 11, 2016

Much like its principle cast, Lumberjanes/Gotham Academy has read very much like a book working to come together. With issue #3 is appears the series may have finally done so, Chynna Clugston-Flores and Rosemary Valero-O'Connell at last pulling back the veil on their eclectic tale.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Magneto (2014) #4

May 22, 2014

One thing Cullen Bunn has done well in this series is to reestablish Magneto as a dangerous and credible threat.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Magneto (2014) #7

Jul 17, 2014

Now seven issues in, Cullen Bunn continues to prove that Magneto doesn't need powers (or hair) to command respect. The writer has really settled into the character, his inner voice strong and assertive, no matter the circumstances.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.4
Magneto (2014) #9

Sep 11, 2014

Artist Gabriel Hernandez Walta does a solid job rendering the proceedings, but ultimately issue #9 represents a minor step back

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Magneto (2014) #11

Oct 16, 2014

On premise alone, Magneto #11 is pretty cool. The Master of Magnetism compiling a super team of Marvel's most illustrious villains in order to take down the newly resurrected Red Onslaught for the sake of humanity?! It sounds like a fan-fiction fever dream come to life and it reads much the same, writer Cullen Bunn delivering a rousing Axis entrant that'll leave you pumped for the bad guys.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.6
Magneto (2014) #12

Nov 20, 2014

The book's copious flashbacks and asides do well in showcasing Magneto's hero/villain dichotomy, but they also bog the book down some, especially with secondary characters popping in and out at random. That said, Bunn smartly focuses on furthering his own story over that of Axis in general, using an intriguing mental meeting to gain some much needed narrative momentum.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
Mayday (2016) #1

Nov 3, 2016

So long as the creative team irons out the pace, this book has potential.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Mega Princess #1

Nov 10, 2016

. As far as all-ages goes this one skews inevitably young, but even those old in body will feel young at heart with this title.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Men of Wrath #1

Oct 2, 2014

Aiding in the book's cold, subdued tone is Ron Garney, the popular artist turning in his first creator owned pages. Much like Aaron, his work is remarkably understated throughout. There are no flashy panels or overly kinetic details, the artist focusing on realism above all else. Even his violence, terrible as it is, shows a level of restraint befitting the book's more subtle edge. Garney's meticulous pencils provide a grounded quality that meshes perfectly with Aaron's sharply written narrative, each page and panel sinking you deeper into the story's ever darkening beats. In the end, Men of Wrath is the kind of book that stares you square in the eye, almost daring you to look away.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Midnighter (2015) #5

Oct 8, 2015

Midnighter's Grayson team-up continues here in issue #5, the two furthering their investigation into a pay-for-play monster murder ring. It's a testament to the creative team of Steve Orlando and Stephen Mooney that such setup is the least interesting part of the issue, as the budding bromance between M and Dick continues to take center stage.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Midnighter (2015) #6

Nov 5, 2015

Through some excellent pacing, the writer is able to dim the sense of narrative danger, despite the sprinkling of warning signs that appear throughout. At first appearing to be little more than an expansive look at M's protective relationship with Matt, the end game manages to change, well, everything.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Midnighter (2015) #7

Dec 3, 2015

It feels strange to call an issue rife with physical and emotional beatdowns a letdown, but such is the case here in Midnighter #7. It's not that the issue is bad " Steve Orlando's script lands a number of punches to the feels and midsection " but given the amount of careful time and plotting spent on getting us to this faceoff, the end result feels almost rushed in its resolution.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Midnighter (2015) #9

Feb 4, 2016

Steve Orlando and ACO spin their guest star wheel yet again, this time pitting Midnighter against the controlled crazies of the Suicide Squad. And again, Orlando makes this unique marriage work, combining fantastic action, great character play and narrative altering drama.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Midnighter (2015) #11

Apr 7, 2016

Midnighter is a book that will be gone too soon, but at least it appears prepped to go out on top.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Midnighter (2015) #12

May 5, 2016

To say that Midnighter goes out with a bang is quite the understatement. Steve Orlando stuffs his final issue with action aplenty, delivering an electric battle of computer brains versus buffed-up brawn.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #0

Jan 14, 2016

The Mighty Morphin Power Rangers appear in good hands with Higgins and Prasetya on board. Their #0 issue finds a good balance between old school nostalgia and a more modernized take, with a solid new mystery developing alongside a familiar story. The issue's limited page count doesn't allow for a full exportation of what's to come, but it definitely does its job in eliciting excitement for the series' upcoming debut.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #1

Mar 3, 2016

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #1 does what it sets out to do, Higgins and Presatya striking a tone that's both appropriately nostalgic and distinctly modern. Higgin's script contains a lot of elements worth exploring, and Pretsaya's detailed visuals, particularly in the Ranger scenes, shine. There aren't quite enough pieces to form a Megazord-worthy read just yet, but it's not a matter of if, but when.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #2

Apr 6, 2016

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #2 continues the series' hot start, combining layered character play with engaging Ranger action. The lulls of the book's main narrative are offset by its great fan service, Kyle Higgins and Hendry Prasetya again doing a fine job in creating a Ranger tale for generations new and old. With a budding character dynamic and some great art, Boom! Studios continues to do the Rangers justice.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #3

May 11, 2016

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers continues its progression from nostalgia-laden throwback to standalone flagship, Higgins and Prasetya combining Ranger action with strong characterization to great effect. They haven't quite found the successful balance between themes as of yet, with some undercooked characters and a rapidly advanced plot point, but what works, works well, and stands to get even better.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #4

Jun 22, 2016

Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers gets a welcome injection of full scale action, Hendry Presetya at last making good on the full potential he's often teased. Kyle Higgins' script still tends to create its own drama at times, but his handle on characters not named Tommy continues to impress. In many ways, issue #4 comes the closest to creating a true Power Rangers experience, and with some solid character dynamics in play and an intriguing hook set, the future of this young title remains bright.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #5

Jul 20, 2016

Zach gets the much deserved spotlight in this one-off installment. The character work here doesn't change the character in any monumental way, but it does give him an added depth that's been lacking in past issues. The issue also adds an interesting wrinkle to the Green Ranger mythos, one that may come back to taunt Tommy in some fashion. Art wise, Thony Silas proves a worthy complement to the books artistic style, imbuing the standalone with an energy and character all its own.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #6

Aug 31, 2016

While issue #6 is more action oriented than anything else, it does succeed in lending a sense of stakes to a property long devoid of them. In the Black Dragon, Kyle Higgins appears to have a worthy foil, one who knows how to attack both physically and emotionally. His first appearance is made all the imposing thanks to Hendry Presetya's kinetic art, the resulting chapter standing as a visual highlight for the series thus far.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #7

Sep 22, 2016

The further Mighty Morphin Power Rangers gets from its source material, the better the book continues to get. It's not that Kyle Higgins is braving entirely new territory - one has only to look to the MMPR feature film to see the Rangers de-powered and Zordon de-tubed - but rather, it's the changing tone that proves the draw.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.6
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #8

Oct 27, 2016

The dip in pace makes for a quieter issue " as quiet as an issue can be with a 30-foot shark man battling a robot dragon, in space " but ultimately the respite allows for some much needed character focus.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #9

Nov 30, 2016

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #9 is a strong installment, though one can't help but think it could have been stronger. Kyle Higgins dials up the drama to a fever pitch before ultimately taking things in a different direction, resulting in a bit of setup that's as frustrating as it is intriguing. Hendry Presetya makes the most of his pages, but his contribution too falls just short of greatness. With a strong ending hook and even stronger art, this uneven issue is still a worthy read.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #11

Jan 18, 2017

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers is quickly becoming the book many hoped it could be, buoyed by a strong creative vision from its team. Kyle Higgins' script combines relatable drama with series-specific action, resulting in a chapter that will land with fans new and old. Hendry Prasetya shows his might with equal force, turning in a tonally strong and visually impressive installment. The needle continues to point up on this title.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #12

Feb 15, 2017

Kyle Higgins and Hendry Prasetya open up the toy chest, making great initial use of their alternate reality setup. Higgins uses the extended flashback sequence to shine a different light on the Tommy character, as well as to highlight the many different eras of Ranger lore. Prasetya's epic action and strong sense of tone make for an especially exciting chapter that calls to mind the best aspects of the original source material.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #14

Apr 20, 2017

From a tense standoff with a squad of Imperial-esque Ranger-troopers to the proper way of growing a Goldar, this issue has far more hits than misses.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #15

May 17, 2017

While more of a recap issue than anything else, this chapter succeeds thanks in large part to the vision of its creators. Kyle Higgins manages to catch readers up to speed in a way that also shapes the story going forward, giving further layers to a character long deserving of them. Daniel Bayliss does the rest, his strong imagery lending a welcome sense of weight to the various emotional proceedings. Filler this is not.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers Annual #1

Aug 24, 2016

As far as annuals go this one offers up a little bit of everything for everyone. From canon building backstory to amusing what-ifs, the great collection of talent here results in some quality entertainment. Now if only it didn't cost so much.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #0

Jan 14, 2016

The Mighty Morphin Power Rangers appear in good hands with Higgins and Prasetya on board. Their #0 issue finds a good balance between old school nostalgia and a more modernized take, with a solid new mystery developing alongside a familiar story. The issue's limited page count doesn't allow for a full exportation of what's to come, but it definitely does its job in eliciting excitement for the series' upcoming debut.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #1

Mar 3, 2016

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #1 does what it sets out to do, Higgins and Presatya striking a tone that's both appropriately nostalgic and distinctly modern. Higgin's script contains a lot of elements worth exploring, and Pretsaya's detailed visuals, particularly in the Ranger scenes, shine. There aren't quite enough pieces to form a Megazord-worthy read just yet, but it's not a matter of if, but when.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #2

Apr 6, 2016

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #2 continues the series' hot start, combining layered character play with engaging Ranger action. The lulls of the book's main narrative are offset by its great fan service, Kyle Higgins and Hendry Prasetya again doing a fine job in creating a Ranger tale for generations new and old. With a budding character dynamic and some great art, Boom! Studios continues to do the Rangers justice.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #3

May 11, 2016

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers continues its progression from nostalgia-laden throwback to standalone flagship, Higgins and Prasetya combining Ranger action with strong characterization to great effect. They haven't quite found the successful balance between themes as of yet, with some undercooked characters and a rapidly advanced plot point, but what works, works well, and stands to get even better.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #4

Jun 22, 2016

Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers gets a welcome injection of full scale action, Hendry Presetya at last making good on the full potential he's often teased. Kyle Higgins' script still tends to create its own drama at times, but his handle on characters not named Tommy continues to impress. In many ways, issue #4 comes the closest to creating a true Power Rangers experience, and with some solid character dynamics in play and an intriguing hook set, the future of this young title remains bright.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #5

Jul 20, 2016

Zach gets the much deserved spotlight in this one-off installment. The character work here doesn't change the character in any monumental way, but it does give him an added depth that's been lacking in past issues. The issue also adds an interesting wrinkle to the Green Ranger mythos, one that may come back to taunt Tommy in some fashion. Art wise, Thony Silas proves a worthy complement to the books artistic style, imbuing the standalone with an energy and character all its own.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #6

Aug 31, 2016

While issue #6 is more action oriented than anything else, it does succeed in lending a sense of stakes to a property long devoid of them. In the Black Dragon, Kyle Higgins appears to have a worthy foil, one who knows how to attack both physically and emotionally. His first appearance is made all the imposing thanks to Hendry Presetya's kinetic art, the resulting chapter standing as a visual highlight for the series thus far.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #7

Sep 22, 2016

The further Mighty Morphin Power Rangers gets from its source material, the better the book continues to get. It's not that Kyle Higgins is braving entirely new territory - one has only to look to the MMPR feature film to see the Rangers de-powered and Zordon de-tubed - but rather, it's the changing tone that proves the draw.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.6
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #8

Oct 27, 2016

The dip in pace makes for a quieter issue " as quiet as an issue can be with a 30-foot shark man battling a robot dragon, in space " but ultimately the respite allows for some much needed character focus.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #9

Nov 30, 2016

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #9 is a strong installment, though one can't help but think it could have been stronger. Kyle Higgins dials up the drama to a fever pitch before ultimately taking things in a different direction, resulting in a bit of setup that's as frustrating as it is intriguing. Hendry Presetya makes the most of his pages, but his contribution too falls just short of greatness. With a strong ending hook and even stronger art, this uneven issue is still a worthy read.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #11

Jan 18, 2017

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers is quickly becoming the book many hoped it could be, buoyed by a strong creative vision from its team. Kyle Higgins' script combines relatable drama with series-specific action, resulting in a chapter that will land with fans new and old. Hendry Prasetya shows his might with equal force, turning in a tonally strong and visually impressive installment. The needle continues to point up on this title.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #12

Feb 15, 2017

Kyle Higgins and Hendry Prasetya open up the toy chest, making great initial use of their alternate reality setup. Higgins uses the extended flashback sequence to shine a different light on the Tommy character, as well as to highlight the many different eras of Ranger lore. Prasetya's epic action and strong sense of tone make for an especially exciting chapter that calls to mind the best aspects of the original source material.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #14

Apr 20, 2017

From a tense standoff with a squad of Imperial-esque Ranger-troopers to the proper way of growing a Goldar, this issue has far more hits than misses.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers #15

May 17, 2017

While more of a recap issue than anything else, this chapter succeeds thanks in large part to the vision of its creators. Kyle Higgins manages to catch readers up to speed in a way that also shapes the story going forward, giving further layers to a character long deserving of them. Daniel Bayliss does the rest, his strong imagery lending a welcome sense of weight to the various emotional proceedings. Filler this is not.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers: Pink #1

Jun 1, 2016

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: Pink #1 does a solid job of setting the stage for further solo-centric titles down the line, Brenden Fletcher and Kelly Thompson introducing a Kimberly that's true to form but still unique. The book's uncertain timeline and heavy reliance on knowledge of the source material bog it down at times, but a clear voice and great art ultimately proves the difference.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers: Pink #2

Jul 28, 2016

The art by Daniele Di Nicuolo and Sarah Stern thankfully remains a bright spot, the book's dynamic characters and brilliant colors often proving the difference. Still, when you're thinking about why a character wearing a helmet would also need a hood, you're focusing on the wrong things.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers: Pink #3

Sep 15, 2016

All told, while not the strongest installment, it's still a darn good-looking one.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers: Pink #4

Oct 20, 2016

With two issues left there's still time to prove us wrong, but as it stands now this book just isn't as vibrant, or mighty, as its name suggests.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers: Pink #5

Dec 15, 2016

Since rocketing out of the gate with a fun and engaging debut, Power Rangers: Pink! has stumbled down the stretch, its drawn out story and tough-to-define tone a consistent thorn. And unfortunately, that feeling doesn't change much as the book enters its final leg, the script by Brendan Fletcher, Kelly Thompson and Tini Howard reaching its seeming conclusion with little fanfare.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.5
Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers: Pink #6

Jan 26, 2017

Power Rangers: Pink! has been a wildly inconsistent ride, and that trend doesn't change with the book's finale. Brenden Fletcher, Kelly Thompson and Tini Howard seem to have quite a bit to say in regards to Kimberly Hart, but their final installment is somehow both drawn out and overstuffed, making it tough to single in on any one redeeming trait.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.4
Monstress #7

Oct 13, 2016

After a long, long, long break, Monstress is back. And the good news is, it's as beautiful and bewitching as ever.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Monstress #8

Dec 1, 2016

With a more focused lens and a strong sense of momentum, Monstress' latest charts an intriguing course.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Monstress #10

Feb 23, 2017

With the plot ratcheting up and the visuals again superb, Liu and Takeda continue to be a sure bet.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.8
Monstress #11

Apr 20, 2017

While the actual content - Monstrum betrayal! Blood foxes! Nekomancy! - is fun enough, it's how Liu integrates the various reveals that's most impressive. This is a big world getting ever bigger, yet Liu never allows the widening lens to take away from the more immediate story at hand.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Mortal Kombat X #1

Jan 14, 2015

Mortal Kombat X has its moments, but those moments are few and far between. Kittlesen shows some decent range, but at this point he doesn't really have an audience beyond those who bleed all things Kombat. A few cool sequences aside, this is a book that needs some polish before the next issue rolls around.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Mortal Kombat X #4

Apr 9, 2015

Shawn Kittelsen and Dexter Soy get their second arc off to a fun start, showing a clear focus to go with some explosive art. Some structural issues interfere at times, but the book's highlights, such as the Scorpion/Sub Zero standoff, prove enticing.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
MPH #1

May 22, 2014

MPH is definitely a book to keep an eye on, assuming it doesn't sprint off the shelves.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
MPH #2

Jun 19, 2014

Mark Millar and Duncan Fegredo lose some momentum following their electric debut, so focused on moving their players that the narrative threatens to run right past them. While Millar does a nice job conveying the sense of wonder and excitement that likely accompanies such newfound abilities, there appears to be little to no learning curve, the writer bypassing any growing pains in lieu of setting up the next chapter.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.3
Nailbiter #1

May 8, 2014

Nailbiter #1 is a riveting debut that gets better with each read. Williamson and Henderson are in strong form, setting a mood and tone that sticks with you long after the final page is turned. Though the titular Nailbiter is more of a secondary character here, his presence nevertheless impacts the book and it's proceedings. This is one not to be missed.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Nailbiter #2

Jun 5, 2014

Cinematic would probably be the best way to describe Mike Henderson's striking visuals. His staging of the riveting murder scene locks you in, leaving you just as helpless to turn away as the victim himself. It's this kind of quality storytelling that makes the book so great--it's moody, atmospheric, and feels terrifyingly real. Luckily, the book is filled with such instances, Williamson and Henderson again crafting some bloody good fare. Read at your own peril.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Nailbiter #3

Jul 3, 2014

The book's razor sharp narrative doesn't feel quite so tight this go round, killers seemingly popping out of the woodwork at rather opportune times. Nailbiter is still very, very good -- we've just gotten used to it being great.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Nailbiter #4

Aug 7, 2014

There are still a great many questions to be answered (and likely more still to come), but there's a definite sense of direction to this issue, one that's sure to leave you biting your nails with anticipation.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.3
Nailbiter #5

Sep 4, 2014

Williamson does a fantastic job pacing this installment, Finch and Crane's continued investigation taking on an urgency that's been lacking as of late. While the issue's thrills rely on yet another unknown assailant, this time a Skyrim reject with a fondness for machetes, his interaction (and hinted history) with the Nailbiter is enough to maintain intrigue.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Nailbiter #6

Oct 2, 2014

With a trade freshly dropped and a new arc now in motion, Nailbiter remains a bloody good time.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
Nailbiter #9

Jan 7, 2015

The book seems so focused on hitting the requisite horror beats"grisly murders, vanishing bodies, hidden assailants"that the narrative itself at times feels largely secondary.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Nailbiter #13

Jun 4, 2015

Joshua Williamson has clearly been waiting for the chance to return to Warren's pre-killer roots, his flashbacks rich in foreshadowing and development. Interestingly, it's Shannon's role in these events that proves most intriguing, particularly in how they affect Warren's assumedly budding inclinations.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.2
Nailbiter #20

Feb 4, 2016

Nailbiter's latest arc comes to a close, Joshua Williamson and Mike Henderson delivering a finale laden with killer reveals and plenty of arterial spray. Considering the somewhat lengthy release gap between this issue and the next, in many ways issue #20 reads a bit rushed, the various payoffs and extended revelations not quite aligning with the work put in to get there.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
New Avengers (2015) #2

Oct 29, 2015

While the book carries many of the requisite beats of a good Avengers story, its execution and character dynamics still leave a lot to be desired.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
New Suicide Squad #6

Jan 15, 2015

Much like last issue, New Suicide Squad #6 reads like a book taken out of the oven before it's fully cooked.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
New Suicide Squad #7

Feb 12, 2015

What little momentum Sean Ryan had built following last issue takes a sudden and literal dive, the writer skirting forward momentum in favor of additional character development. While the book's need of some added depth in undeniable, Ryan's way of introducing it remains haphazard at best.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.9
New Suicide Squad #8

Mar 12, 2015

The numerous issues that have plagued the series reach critical mass here, resulting in a flat and needless installment that manages to accomplish next to nothing in 22 pages.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
New Suicide Squad #9

Jun 11, 2015

New Suicide Squad was in need of a huge jump in quality following a string of lackluster issues, and in many ways issue #9 hits the mark.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.4
Nightwing (2016) #4

Sep 8, 2016

Tim Seeley brings his first arc to a close, delivering on the character-first focus that's carried the book from the start. The end result is a bit rushed in its resolution, but it does succeed in both cleverly reestablishing Dick as Nightwing proper, as well as seeding events for issues to come.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Nightwing (2016) #6

Oct 5, 2016

If you've been invested in the arc so far, the payoff on the home stretch has been a lot of fun. This issue's cliffhanger is a great teaser dating back to the classic Strange/Batman rivalry.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Nightwing (2016) #9

Nov 17, 2016

Nightwing's rebirth has been anything but smooth thus far, and Seeley uses the subconscious setup to really flesh out the character's long running fears and anxieties. What really makes the issue shine, however, is how Seeley gets him past these hang-ups, using the ever optimistic Superman as a way of reminding Dick of the impact his good and hopeful nature has on the DC Universe at large.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.6
Nightwing (2016) #10

Dec 8, 2016

If you've been waiting for a time to jump back into Bldhaven, this arc looks to be it.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Nightwing (2016) #11

Dec 22, 2016

Of COURSE there's a support group for villains formerly thumped by Nightwing. It's as Nightwing a plot point as we could hope to get, and serves as another example as to how great Tim Seeley is for the character.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
Nightwing (2016) #12

Jan 5, 2017

All told, issue #11 works best as a stepping stone towards grander designs, and while the issue certainly has its entertainment, it's clear the best things are yet to come.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Nightwing (2016) #14

Feb 2, 2017

It's still a solid and unreasonably pretty book " Marcus To again delivers an excellent mix of costumed splash pages and well-realized character work " it's just lacking in the same excitement and punch we expect.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Nightwing (2016) #19

Apr 19, 2017

Seeley is weaving a creepy and really engaging story here. Nightwing Must Die is quickly starting to rival Better Than Batman for this run's best arc.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Ninjak #1

Mar 11, 2015

Ninjak's turn at solo stardom proves mostly worth the wait, Matt Kindt and Clay Mann turning in a solid and entertaining installment. Some pacing issues in setup slow the momentum some, but there's enough ninja action and teased reveals to keep us coming back. Plus, ninjas.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.6
Ninjak #3

May 21, 2015

While it's fun to see Ninjak face all manner of adversity (from razor-haired assassins to anti-smoking PSA security guards), there's never really the sense that he's in any actual danger. If his suit doesn't have the answer to his current predicament, Kindt's narration does, his Ninjak monologuing and forward thinking even as he falls out a 50th story window.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.6
Ninjak #4

Jun 25, 2015

It's unlikely that anyone was really clamoring for a Roku one-off so early in Ninjak's run, but in typical Matt Kindt fashion he gets the most out of the book's standalone format.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Ninjak #5

Jul 30, 2015

The result is a fun issue that seems in a rush to set up what comes next, the tension from Ninjak's last meet swept up by an exciting but mostly pointless fight.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
Ninjak #7

Sep 10, 2015

Just two issues in to its latest arc, Ninjak already feels formulaic. The formula itself isn't bad - introduce new adversary with wild backstory, commence punchy punchy - but the actual execution comes off as a bit convenient.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.6
Ninjak #11

Jan 14, 2016

Using a grounded character like Ninjak to jumpstart the supernatural side of the Valiant Universe may seem like an odd stretch, but if Matt Kindt has proven anything throughout these first 11 issues it's that Ninjak works pretty much anywhere.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Ninjak #12

Feb 11, 2016

Ninjak's trek through the Deadside hasn't been the series' strongest point, but credit must be given for how well Matt Kindt continues to utilize his lead so far out of his comfort zone.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.3
Ninjak #13

Mar 10, 2016

While an interesting aside that served to further open the Valiant Universe to a more supernatural focus, Ninjak's own inclusion to this Deadside arc often felt secondary to the widening scope. Despite that, issue #13 is a solid wrap up, littered with a welcome mix of metaphysical melees and spy caper action.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Ninjak #14

Apr 7, 2016

With Ninjak's lengthy detour through the Deadside in the rearview, Colin King and Matt Kindt are finally able to get back to the spy driven capering they do best.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Ninjak #15

May 12, 2016

It's always fun when a character with limited resources gets them taken away, but in the case of Ninjak #15 the end product doesn't entirely live up to the premise.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Ninjak #16

Jun 9, 2016

Ultimately, while not a bad issue, we've seen this team deliver better.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Ninjak #17

Jul 14, 2016

All in all, while issue #17 is a solid end, with arc best art by Diego Bernard, the real draw remains in things to come.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Ninjak #18

Aug 11, 2016

They may not be the ones who get the ampersand billing, but for our money the title of Valiant's premiere bromance goes to Ninjak and the Eternal Warrior. And following the systematic dissolution of all things Colin King, the rejoining of this particular odd couple makes for a nice change of pace.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.6
Ninjak #19

Sep 8, 2016

It's perhaps unfair to critique on a what-have-you-done-for-me-lately basis, but considering the quality previously seen from this book, this issue doesn't measure up.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Ninjak #20

Oct 20, 2016

While an improvement from last month, this arc is still working out some kinks.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Ninjak #24

Feb 9, 2017

There's a certain amount of convenience to Kindt's brisk pacing -- Ninjak goes from unwilling combatant to team player in mere panels -- but it's so easy to get caught up in the writer's intricate fantasy that it's forgivable.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Ninjak #25

Mar 30, 2017

Quick but fun, this arc is still one worth following.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.1
Ninjak #27

May 18, 2017

With Matt Kindt taking a breather between arcs, writer Kevin Maurer proves an excellent placeholder.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.7
Old Guard #3

Apr 27, 2017

Further bolstered by Daniela Miwa's oppressive color palette, this issue delivers the goods on both a visual and emotional level.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Old Guard #4

May 25, 2017

It took a few issues for this series to really get going, but now it's one not to miss.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.6
Old Man Logan #1

May 27, 2015

Bendis and Sorrentino faced a mountain of expectation, and issue #1 sees them almost reach the top. Their Logan is both vicious and heavy, weighted down by the things he's done and the things he's yet to do. Some pacing issues pop up early, but they're quickly corrected by some intriguing developments. Not only is this a must read for fans of the original, it's a must for anyone who likes good comics.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Old Man Logan #3

Jul 23, 2015

Though only three issues in, Old Man Logan has begun to feel a bit like a procedural, the series' "realm of the week" structure leading to all manner of set pieces but not much in the way of character.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Old Man Logan #4

Aug 27, 2015

Old Man Logan #4 doesn't have much narrative push, but it does have great art as delivered by Sorrentino and Maiolo. The script from Brian Michael Bendis has its moments, but they feel largely disconnected from everything else going on. Art alone will keep some invested till the end, but if you're looking for a worthy sequel to OML's original run, this isn't it.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Outcast By Kirkman & Azaceta #1

Jun 25, 2014

Whether you're a fan of things that go bump in the night or just someone who likes good comics, you can't do much better than Outcast. Kirkman and Azaceta prove a dynamic and disturbing pairing, crafting a riveting story that's sure to possess your very soul. Now where'd we put that holy water...

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Outcast By Kirkman & Azaceta #3

Aug 27, 2014

Visually, Paul Azaceta again brings the proceedings to somber life, his moody pencils and great panel work creating a deceptively innocent atmosphere. The colors by Elizabeth Breitweiser only enhance the mood, her subdued hues bringing the small town to eerie life. There are a lot of great character beats to this issue, most of them unspoken, and Azaceta and Breitweiser nail darn near every one of them.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.7
Outcast By Kirkman & Azaceta #4

Sep 25, 2014

Art-wise, not enough can be said about Azaceta and colorist Elizabeth Breitweiser. Azaceta's character work is simply phenomenal " there's never a single instance where you don't know who's who or what's going on, so fully realized is his seemingly idyllic world. Breitweiser again uses her warm, calming hues to make the proceedings disturbingly innocent, her colors changing to garish and disturbing greens to display the book's shifting tone. The book's final page is one teeming with dread, a simple but effective cliffhanger that almost dares the reader to guess what's coming next. Read with the lights on.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.6
Outcast By Kirkman & Azaceta #5

Nov 13, 2014

Visually, Paul Azaceta has already made a name for himself in limited work, his expressive line work and exceptional storytelling ability elevating every aspect of Kirkman's script. He uses that same ability to staggering effect here in issue #5, crafting a terse, frightening exchange that perfectly encapsulates everything that's made Outcast so great. His horror is constantly bubbling just beneath the surface, each leer and smile simple in execution but complex in its meaning. He also makes great use of shadow here, his characters often half obscured and menacing. Completing the effect is colorist Elizabeth Breitweiser, whose soft hues and gentle colors are perfectly contrasted against the book's violent streaks of red. Outcast is building towards something big, and our guess is that its something you won't want to miss.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Outcast By Kirkman & Azaceta #7

Mar 19, 2015

As an overall issue Outcast #6 is a solid tale, but as either a precursor of things to come or a new jumping on point, the book lacks teeth.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Outcast By Kirkman & Azaceta #9

May 28, 2015

Robert Kirkman and Paul Azaceta offering just enough answers to reel you back in even as they add more narrative potholes to the mix. Such slow form structure can be frustrating, but it also makes it more interesting, we readers growing right along with tormented lead Kyle.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Outcast By Kirkman & Azaceta #10

Jul 2, 2015

Issue #10 puts character before scares, and it's better for it.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Outcast By Kirkman & Azaceta #12

Sep 10, 2015

Outcast has done a great job of balancing external horror with internal strife thus far in its run, and issue #12 sees both aspects escalated to a high degree.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Outcast By Kirkman & Azaceta #17

Mar 24, 2016

It's not the smoothest of issues, the many learned tidbits again dwarfed by weighty rumination, but it does lend some welcome direction. Paul Azaceta gives the issue its final push, his sleek, dramatic layouts allowing him to get the most out of his expressive cast. It appears that something wicked this way comes - and at this point, it's not a moment too soon.

View Issue       Vi