Alisha Weinberger's Comic Reviews

Reviewer For: The Pop Break Reviews: 16
8.7Avg. Review Rating

10
All-Star Batman #1

Aug 11, 2016

All-Star Batman is a definite pickup. Stepping away from the superhero soap opera that is the larger DC universe, Snyder brings the character back to its roots. He weaves a morally ambiguous and sincerely tragic Dent/Two-Face. With all the attention given to the Joker lately, it is a welcomed, refreshing reminder that Gotham City is brimming with villains not just one, some infamously known and others that may surprise you.

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9.5
All-Star Batman #2

Sep 15, 2016

All-Star Batman #2 is a definitive pickup for the action and art alone. Even if you didn't pick up the previous issue. More so for the fact that issue two doesn't directly start where issue one left us, that is a closing panel featuring The Gentleman Ghost. This is the only complaint I have so far. As I mentioned with a plot like this, a quick pace is necessary, but it would have been nice to see a fight between Batman and The Gentleman Ghost. But maybe readers are just being spoiled by the numerous villain appearances so far.

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10
Beowulf #1

Jan 19, 2017

Readers who want to delve more into iconic, classical literature but are detoured by the scale of print, should turn to Garcas and Rubns Beowulf. Avoid awkwardly CGI early-2000s film adaptations. Beowulf is not just an exploration of English literature but of comic books too, and will beckon revisiting over the years.

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7.0
Captain Marvel (2016) #1

Feb 6, 2016

Its satisfying to see Deconnicks fun light-hearted Captain Marvel live on, rather than an entirely serious revamp of the character. However, with a $3.99 price tag, Anka and Wilsons artwork felt rushed and lackluster, not nearly as striking as its cover, leaving plenty room for improvement.

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7.5
Cave Carson Has A Cybernetic Eye #1

Oct 19, 2016

Cave Carson has a Cybernetic Eye isn't the most action packed or enthralling. Starting slow and packing all the action and plot in towards the very end. But conceptually alone, a hero turned widower makes for an interesting idea, it's just Cave Carson might be too obscure of a hero to capture the hearts of new readers. There is, however, a brutal fight between the spelunker and a Cronenberg monster that may be worth the read through. The art, although worth it for its vibrant array of colors and page layout, is distractingly inconsistent. Readers shouldn't necessarily rush to this premier issue right away, unless they're already fans of the character. Although heavy with content, it still may be worth the wait to pick this issue up with issue #2, as the plot doesn't gain steam until the end. Way and his Young Animal gives us another weird gem to keep an eye, but not enough to purchase right away.

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9.0
Curse Words #1

Jan 19, 2017

You shall not pass"on Charles Soule and Ryan Brownes Curse Words. Fans of Deadpool will appreciate the metatext and millennial satire, Rick and Morty lovers or any Adult Swim viewers will love the tongue-in-cheek combination of the fantastical and mundane.

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8.0
Devolution #1

Jan 22, 2016

The quirks are forgivable, considering the length of the series. It's refreshing to see an original title try to take a stab at a new approach, especially from a publisher known for its many titles adapted from movies. Devolution is a bloody fun and fresh take on an all too frequented genre.

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8.0
Doom Patrol (2016) #1

Sep 14, 2016

The "mature" element of Young Animal isn't found in gritty storytelling but in trippy, psychedelic sci-fi concepts and in Way's ambiguous style, that would otherwise fly over younger readers' heads. If one isn't already accustomed to Way's work, Doom Patrol #1 may require a second read through. There are at least 1-2 pages where dialogue does drag-on and feels like filler, but the sharp colors, sudden switch between cartoonish line work and painterly panels are visually inviting. What it lacks it in discernible plot, it makes up for in humorously macabre moments and dialogue (like having a your roommate disintegrate via a blast of party confetti). If you're a fan of Way's previous work, or enjoy bizarre sci fi like Dr. Who or Rick and Morty then you may want to pick this up, otherwise it may be confusing to DC traditionalists.

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10
Doom Patrol (2016) #5

Mar 22, 2017

The first story arc of Ways Doom Patrol is a strong start to a series, finding a balanced pace but still leaving readers with many questions. DCs Young Animal imprint has been solid but is still very much in its infancy. Doom Patrol has truly established Way as a writer and is the best title the imprint has to offer so far. Always having come from the strangest corners of the DCU, this is the kind of narrative style and imagery the Doom Patrol deserves. By abandoning linear storytelling, Gerard Way and his team have truly brought the team back to its roots.

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8.0
Justice League of America: The Atom Rebirth #1

Jan 4, 2017

This is not to suggest the issue is skippable as it does explain who Ryan Choi is, but readers shouldnt rush to buy it. The art is fun, cartoonish and the story is a quick read, albeit with some dialogue that tries to be serious but falls flat due to the quick pacing of the book. Readers should probably wait for the next issue to buy this one to build up steam. As of right now, the story arc is starting at a very subatomic pace.

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8.0
Justice League of America: The Ray Rebirth #1

Jan 19, 2017

Stephen Byrne and Clayton Clowes give readers some great artwork, and Orlando tackles issues surrounding the LGBTQ community, such as gentrification, community, and the push back from a stubborn old guard. It would have been an interesting read and exploration had The Ray received his own series. Instead the one-shot comes off rushed and its allegory heavy handed towards the end. The Ray Rebirth isn't necessarily skippable as it is a enjoyable short story tackling heavy themes in the greater DCU, readers should opt for a digital copy and avoid driving to the shop for just this single issue.

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8.5
Motro #1

Nov 2, 2016

Motro #1 is a short but sweet issue, and a tight start to a series. The story doesn't progress muchpast the introduction of the hero. Farias gives us a small gem, a landscape better suited forhardened men but traversed by a boy who just wants to live up to his father's promise. It's a postapocalyptic coming of age story, and although violent, it doesn't revel in the bloodshed. Ifunfamiliar with Farias stylings, fans of Andrew MacLean or Brandon Graham should certainlycheck out Motro. However, Farias' work is comparatively reeled in for this issue, either due toits brevity or the barren landscape, which is usually accustomed to sprawling mega cities. All themore reason to anticipate the next issue.

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10
Old Guard #1

Feb 23, 2017

The Old Guard hooks readers in with a solid cast of characters and solid artwork. As always, Rucka establishes a strong female lead, and finds a perfect balance between ambiguity and plot.

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9.0
Silver Surfer (2016) #1

Feb 6, 2016

There is however only one complaint. Slapping a #1 on the cover for the sake of relaunching may confuse new readers as Silver Surfer #1 picks up almost immediately where Slott and Allreds fantastical run left off. Yet in a company wide frenzy for relaunches and creating continuity between Marvels cinematic and comic universe, readers should take comfort in knowing there are still titles focused on creating innovative interpretations of beloved characters. With the announcement of some new movie or Netflix adaptation seemingly every month, not all titles are focused on capitalizing off a cinematic fan base by maturing and dramatizing in-print characters to match their live-action counterparts.

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9.0
The Belfry (One Shot) #1

Feb 23, 2017

Hardmans artwork, with its scratchy pencil work and dark inks with the occasional contrast of bright red, shrouds the world of Belfry in a mysterious deep darkness, beckoning readers to question if Bills bat winged abductors are the worst on the island. The only shame is the length of the one-shot, for its brevity it is a frightening read but would have been more suitable in a collected anthology than a stand alone. This is not a complaint due to its $3.99 pricing but more so for the missed opportunity to compare and contrast Hardman's unique take on the iconic monsters against other talented Image creators.

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8.0
Wonder Woman: Rebirth #1

Jun 8, 2016

Wonder Woman Rebirth #1 establishes an existential crisis for Wonder Woman, both real and metaphorical. At some point, there is beautifully illustrated and symbolic fight between Diana and mythic automatons. Given the events of the nearly 80-page packed DC Universe Rebirth #1, this start to a new Rucka run may be a welcome rest stop for long-time readers to get their bearings straight. However, this specific issue may be somewhat on the boring side for new readers, but also a setup for those who really want to learn an extensive lesson into her character and origins.

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