Orphan Age #1
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Orphan Age #1

Writer: Ted Anderson Artist: Nuno Plati Publisher: Aftershock Comics Release Date: April 10, 2019 Cover Price: $3.99 Critic Reviews: 9 User Reviews: 2
7.9Critic Rating
7.0User Rating

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One day all the adults died, all over the world, at the same time.
Now it's twenty years later, and the children - all grown up - are still rebuilding the world. Horses and caravans are the only thin lines connecting tiny, scattered settlements - little sparks in the great dark night. Gasoline is gone, phones long-dead, television a memory. The only power in America is the New Church, the religion of the angry children, that blames the destruction of the old world on the dead adults.
In the settlement of Dallastown, a stranger comes riding in one day, telling a story of escape from the New Church's unstoppable Firemen. The Church is more

  • 9.0
    SciFiPulse - Patrick Hayes Apr 15, 2019

    The children have grown up, but they're making their parents' mistakes in this opening issue. The premise is a familiar one, but I'm intrigued enough to see where Anderson is going to take this. I really enjoyed the visuals by Plati and Lemos. This is a series I'll be following. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    AiPT! - Sean Nickerson Apr 11, 2019

    This is an amazing first issue that does everything the way it should to establish a world and characters that the reader is excited to learn about, and will keep them coming back for more. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Newsarama - C.K. Stewart Apr 11, 2019

    This is a world of folks trying to do better without anyone left to really tell them what better is (or isn't), and Anderson and Plati knock the debut out of the park. Read Full Review

  • 8.5
    Multiversity Comics - Rowan Grover Apr 11, 2019

    "Orphan Age" handles a childish twist on an overused trope fantastically, with subtle post-apocalyptic themes, great characterization, and cleverly constructed art. Read Full Review

  • 8.4
    The Fandom Post - Chris Beveridge Apr 10, 2019

    I really enjoyed Moth & Whisper and Ted Anderson essentially takes us down a different path here that's just as exciting. I like that we get a post-event world where it's down the line enough that there are a lot of issues to explore and no real answers still to be had about it. Most people are just living and surviving but also struggling with real guilt that colors things. And, as always, there are groups looking to dominate and cement their control over others in this brave new world. Anderson brings in a lot of solid characters in slim form here that leaves me wanting more while Nuno Plati brings it to life beautifully. I love the earthy tones of it all and especially the character designs. He gives us a convincing world to inhabit with the cast while also delivering some great action material alongside the up close and personal aspects of it. Definitely a series to watch. Read Full Review

  • 7.5
    Batman's Bookcase - Zack Quaintance Apr 10, 2019

    Orphan Age is an easy to read debut comic that leaves much to be explored moving forward. I have some questions about the books many thematic interests, but Ill definitely keep reading to see how it all sorts out. Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    Big Comic Page - Adam Brown Apr 11, 2019

    Being a fan of apocalypt-arama, I appreciate that I have a biased eye but I like what I see here. Ultimately this could go anywhere so its hard to judge or gauge the long-term appeal. However, with that said, theres no better time to saddle up than at the beginning and Im all for keeping an eye on this one. Read Full Review

  • 6.5
    Doom Rocket - Clyde Hall Apr 15, 2019

    Orphan Age may realize such opportunities before all is said and done, but it's off to a measured, delayed start. Read Full Review

  • 6.2
    Monkeys Fighting Robots - Darryll Robson Apr 8, 2019

    Orphan Age contains a mediocre future world with a collection of interesting characters. An interesting premise does not bare fruit but the art work makes this comic worth a look. Read Full Review

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