Red Mother #6

Writer: Jeremy Haun Artist: Danny Luckert Publisher: Boom! Studios Release Date: July 15, 2020 Cover Price: $3.99 Critic Reviews: 5 User Reviews: 5
8.7Critic Rating
7.8User Rating

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Daisy's employment under the mysterious Leland Black has taken her to London -- and away from the life she knows. Will leaving New York help Daisy leave her past traumas behind, or will the Red Mother follow her no matter where she goes?

  • 10
    Outright Geekery - Angel Young Jul 14, 2020

    With a cliffhanger ending that truly surprised me, even giving me a bit of a chill, Red Mother #6 is definitely another great installment of one of the most haunting comics out there. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    But Why Tho? - Max Funkey Jul 10, 2020

    The Red Mother #6 is a strong continuation of the series, though it does feel a little scant on the action. Thankfully the creative team has done such a fine job of making everything feel off that even slower issues like this one remain eerie. The narrative seems to be shifting toward a distinct Rosemary's Baby-style narrative, and I can't wait to see what happens next. While it may seem like this issue would be a solid jumping-on point for new readers, too much is lost without having read the first five. That said, if you're a fan of this series, there is a lot to enjoy here. Read Full Review

  • 8.9
    The Super Powered Fancast - Deron Generally Jul 8, 2020

    Danny Luckert does an amazing job of giving the art a sleek, engaging look while also adding in disturbing visual elements that make you look at every corner of the panel as you read. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    ComicBook.com - Nicole Drum Jul 8, 2020

    If you're looking for action, Red Mother #6 isn't it. The issue has a slow, rather mundane pace, but it serves to bridge Daisy's story from her major step forward last issue to her settling into her new life in London. Read Full Review

  • 7.5
    Multiversity Comics - Christa Harader Jul 13, 2020

    "The Red Mother" #6 maintains a bit too much obscurity, but the book still takes its time in an organic way. Read Full Review

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