Swords of Sorrow #6

Swords of Sorrow #6

Event\Storyline: Swords of Sorrow Writer: Gail Simone Artist: Sergio Fernandez Davila Publisher: Dynamite Entertainment Release Date: October 14, 2015 Cover Price: $3.99 Critic Reviews: 9
7.3Critic Rating
N/AUser Rating

IT ALL ENDS NOW. The planet-crushing finale to this epic crossover ends here! With a key player down for the count, can the remaining warriors (and their Swords of Sorrow) hold the tide against Purgatori and the other CHAOS women, AND the Prince of All Dimensions as the universe collapses around them? Featuring the greatest pulp heroines of all time in the adventure no one ever imagined could happen!

  • 8.5
    The Rainbow Hub - Logan Dalton Oct 15, 2015

    Swords of Sorrow #6 has a couple predictable moments (Snow White is actually a shapeshifter.), but this is drowned out by the sheer volume of action, comedy, and female camaraderie that has been this series' hallmark from Gail Simone, Sergio Davila, and Jorge Sutil. I am still in awe of the fact that even less used characters like Pantha, Jane Porter, and Masquerade had pivotal roles to play in this finale as they drive the twisted embodiment of the patriarchy back to the chasm from whence he came. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    GWW - Agasicles Stamas Oct 17, 2015

    ‘Swords of Sorrow' may be over, but it was an event that needed to happen. These great characters earned their place among any at the Big Two and some predate even those. Does the event always succeed? No, but there's more goodness to derive from it than not. Simone's great ambitions pay off by bringing together so many talented women and creating a platform for overlooked characters that prove themselves to be as compelling as any in comics. As for issue six, Simone smoothly ramps up the tension and action to conclude the epic battle between good and evil that satisfies while defining what it means to be a female warrior. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Spartantown - Enrique Rea Oct 15, 2015

    'Swords of Sorrow' may be over, but it was an event that needed to happen. These great characters earned their place among any at the Big Two and some predate even those. Does the event always succeed? No, but there's more goodness to derive from it than not. Simone's great ambitions pay off by bringing together so many talented women and creating a platform for overlooked characters that prove themselves to be as compelling as any in comics. As for issue six, Simone smoothly ramps up the tension and action to conclude the epic battle between good and evil that satisfies while defining what it means to be a female warrior. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    GWW - Enrique Rea Oct 17, 2015

    ‘Swords of Sorrow' may be over, but it was an event that needed to happen. These great characters earned their place among any at the Big Two and some predate even those. Does the event always succeed? No, but there's more goodness to derive from it than not. Simone's great ambitions pay off by bringing together so many talented women and creating a platform for overlooked characters that prove themselves to be as compelling as any in comics. As for issue six, Simone smoothly ramps up the tension and action to conclude the epic battle between good and evil that satisfies while defining what it means to be a female warrior. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    The Fandom Post - Chris Beveridge Oct 14, 2015

    While I thoroughly enjoy Gail Simone's work in general, I didn't go into Swords of Sorrow with high expectations in terms of story simply because I could see what it was. It's a series that takes the opportunity of bringing together a range of female characters from across a number of books and time periods and throwing them together in different combinations. It's all working towards the end goal of defeating one person and it does it well. The core series has a good smoothness and polish to it that kept it flowing and engaging so that you felt like you were on top of things even if you didn't read the supporting books. It's a solidly done work, but it's also one that doesn't really bring something new to the table for the characters as they all return to their books and stories, most likely without a mention of this event for the most part. But what this series did succeed more so in is in that it had a whole lot of fun. Read Full Review

  • 7.5
    SnapPow.com - John McCubbin Oct 15, 2015

    Swords of Sorrow #6 was a fabulous ending to a sensational crossover, as although the ending itself was rather sudden, the build up and character depth was magnificent to say the least. We also once again got brutal action, with the series as a whole coming highly recommended. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    Comic Crusaders - Johnny Hughes Oct 14, 2015

    As an issue of itself, the book isn't that impressive in content or conclusion and in retrospect that pretty much covers the whole series. The idea of female characters written by female writers may be a great idea but for the industry to take their work, and their characters, seriously, there has to be a quality product, otherwise its all just sounds like a gimmick, which is an insult to all the hard work that writers like Nancy Collins, Gail Simone and Leah Moore have put in. The benefits of the series has been to get some of the lesser known characters some exposure (no pun intended) but Dynamite knows where their success lies, hence the the revamp of Red Sonja, Dejah Thoris and Vampirella announced at NYCC, including designs by Nicola Scott, slated for 2016. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    Big Glasgow Comic Page - Liam Pollock Oct 14, 2015

    Finally brining an end to the saga of Swords of Sorrow it is a bit of a lacklustre ending to a series that really should have been greater than it was. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    First Comics News - Richard Vasseur Oct 9, 2015

    The story as it ends is a let down. It ends with almost no action, no big fight scene. The ending to put it mildly is boring. Read Full Review

Be the first to rate this issue!



Click the 'Rate/Write A Review' link above to get started.

Reviews for
the Week of...

December

November

More