Batgirl #7

Batgirl #7

Writer: Hope Larson Artist: Chris Wildgoose Publisher: DC Comics Release Date: January 25, 2017 Cover Price: $2.99 Critic Reviews: 13 User Reviews: 9
7.9Critic Rating
7.9User Rating

+ Pull List

"Son of Penguin" part one! Babs is back in Burnside! But everything's...different-friends, school, even Burnside itself. Batgirl must determine her next steps when she realizes that the shady new tech mogul moving into her neighborhood is none other than the estranged son of the Penguin!
RATED T

  • 10
    Kabooooom - Matt Morrison Jan 26, 2017

    If you haven't been reading Batgirl, now is the time to start. If you haven't read it in a while, it's time – like Barbara Gordon herself – to come home. Things may be different but unlike Burnside, the changes on this title are definitely for the better and the future for Batgirl is promising indeed. Read Full Review

  • 9.8
    Comic Crusaders - Tracy Sayers Jan 30, 2017

    And we are then left with a to be continued. Personally, I can't wait it's a 5 out of 5 from me . Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    AiPT! - David Brooke Jan 25, 2017

    Barbara feels more real than ever as the series takes a deeper look into her day to day life and all the plates she has to spin now that she's back from China. If Batgirl continues with this look and feel it might go down as the strongest character work she's had in ages. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Bleeding Cool - Joe Glass Jan 26, 2017

    Overall, Batgirl #7 is a return to form for the title, not that it had fallen into bad form in the interim. But with a refocus, and a recenter, this return to Burnside feels as interesting and fresh as it did the first time. Read Full Review

  • 8.5
    Comicosity - Matt Santori Jan 25, 2017

    Overall, however, Batgirl #7 is a great jumping-on point for fans, especially YOUNG fans, who want to enjoy the world of a young college student who just happens to swing around at night in a bat-costume. Glad to see Larson has maintained her groove and Wildgoose seems so immediately at home with the title. Its going to be a great ride from here. Read Full Review

  • 8.5
    Batman-News - Elena Carrillo Jan 25, 2017

    This isn't exactly elegant, but it's getting the job done without apologies. I love that Larson has gone in with a surgical knife and is cutting away anything that won't contribute to a healthy Batgirl title going forward. She's also making her own mark by introducing Ethan Cobblepot to the world (can't wait to see what he's all about), and she's brought Dick back into Babs' life in a way that better than just peripheral "ex" nonsense. Wildgoose keeps the energy high in the art and this book has a solid combination of action and character building with a real emphasis on pushing the story forward. This is a very exciting time for Batgirl and I'm very optimistic about this new team! Read Full Review

  • 8.5
    Black Nerd Problems - Jordan Calhoun Jan 25, 2017

    Overall, Batgirl #7 sets up for an interesting arc that allows readers to see Burnside from a slightly different lens as our heroine returns after having grown a wider perspective as a person. If the series really hopes to address a sensitive theme, the rest of the series' success will lay in its supporting cast and how much Batgirl appreciates the perspective of others as she fights for the less fortunate around her. If that's the goal, Batgirl has set itself up with a diverse range of characters to utilize. If that's not the goal, expect a thinner plot of Batgirl facing a representative of a conspicuously greedy capitalist, or an elongation of the question whether to trust Penguin's estranged son. I'd rather the moral conflict between the two addressing opposing views on how to improve their city, but either way, we should find out soon. Read Full Review

  • 8.1
    Comicsverse - Sam Sobel Jan 25, 2017

    All in all, BATGIRL #7 was an intriguing start to a new story arc, but not my favorite issue in the series. There are some strong themes present, and it would be great to see them explored. I have full confidence that Wildgoose will eventually hit his stride. I'm excited for what the next issues will hold! Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    DC Comics News - Sean Blumenshine Jan 25, 2017

    This is a strong start to the new story. I really like all of the stuff with Barbara having to face major changes in her town and personal life after being gone for a while. Life moves on whether one is there to see it or not. The art is pretty good as well. I recommend checking this issue out. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Dark Knight News - Nat Brehmer Jan 27, 2017

    The Penguin's son is a very strange romantic interest for Batgirl, but the issue is strong regardless. It's also a surprisingly effective starting point if you're debating giving this series a try. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    The Batman Universe - Ian Miller Jan 26, 2017

    Larson starts off her new arc of Batgirl with a bang, weaving a complicated web of intrigue and action with brilliant new artist Wildgoose. Read Full Review

  • 4.0
    IGN - Blair Marnell Jan 26, 2017

    Batgirl # 7 is a very strange beast. Barbara Gordon finally arrives back in Burnside, and even she's calling it a "parallel Burnside" where the tech industry has started to force out the local shops and drive up the rents at a ridiculous rate. While that is a very modern problem, it's introduced in a very jarring way as Larson appears to write out the majority of Babs' supporting cast. Read Full Review

  • 3.5
    Weird Science - Reggie Hemingway Jan 24, 2017

    Well, that was a bunch of bunk. Penguin's son being in the mix is intriguing, but if the issues going forward are of this caliber, I doubt I'll care. This was almost antagonistic in its poor storytelling. Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    Supes' soups Jan 29, 2017

    If I'm honest, with the direction Larson is taking this book, they should retitle it Barabara Gordon Rebirth rather than Batgirl. The point is, the costume is now meaningless to the current iteration of Babs. Back in the New 52 during Simone's run, we learn in the #0 issue that Babs takes on the mantle of Batgirl because she was inspired by Batman, fighting violent criminals and needing to protect her identity and her ties with her father, James Gordon. The problem now is that she can solve the social injustices without the costume just as effectively. She didn't need the Batgirl costume to help her stop that homeless man from being abducted and sold (weird anyways when you think about it, if you're going to do experiments on human subjects, why pick on the homeless crowd from any other random human). She could've filmed the incident with her smartphone notified the police and be on site when the cops showed up. Simple and effective without the need to "lug her boots around". The costume is now more of a hindrance than a help. Also now that Babs has gone full organic-coffee-drinking, fundraiser at a aquarium themed nightclub-going hipster, I can't see her back in the nitty gritty of Gotham's underworld. She seems so far removed from the girl who was shot by the Joker. So three things: 1) There is enough interest in Babs that I think she can have her own comic, 2) but it shouldn't be Batgirl, you have Cassandra Cain as the Orphan and Stephanie Brown as the Spoiler who are actually in the trenches of Gotham fighting alongside Batman and Batwoman, pass your mantle and costume as Batgirl on!! I mean that's the whole point behind Rebirth isn't it? Why would you put Grayson back in a blue Nightwing costume and then still keep hipster Babs? Either keep hipster Babs and pass on Batgirl to two women who have already been Batgirl or give us back the detective Babs and not SJW Babs. 3) SJW Babs is interesting on her own, separate it from Batgirl and make her stories more narra

  • 10
    Robert Garcia Mar 9, 2017

  • 9.5
    Rose Navarro Mar 9, 2017

  • 8.5
    sebastianorellana95 Jan 27, 2017

  • 8.5
    JVV Jul 27, 2017

  • 8.0
    Pauly V Mar 29, 2017

  • 7.5
    EDiakota Jan 25, 2017

  • 7.5
    Nuckster77 Jan 28, 2017

  • 4.5
    Superior fan Mar 23, 2017

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