Svetlana Fedotov's Comic Reviews

Reviewer For: Fangoria Reviews: 40
8.1Avg. Review Rating

8.8
'68: Jungle Jim #1

Apr 10, 2013

Writer Mark Kidwell, does an amazing job of staying faithful to both. He treats the world seriously, keeping true to the lingo and factual events of the time, while perfectly melding in the supernatural angle. Jeff Zornow's illustrations don't skimp on the violence either, creating every panel a splash page of violence, emotion, and grotesque detail. This series is a solid addition to any collection, be they a fan of shock, history, or something a little in between.

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8.8
American Vampire Anthology #1

Sep 18, 2013

The list of contributors to the anthology, which include some of the biggest names in DC's repertoire, is as exciting as the work itself.Writers such as Jason Aaron, Jeff Lemire, and Greg Rucka add their own unique stamp to the series, building on Snyder's already engrossing story. Each short is a stand-out on its own, but looked at cohesively creates a must-read sampling of talent that entices further exploring into the individual authors. Not to be outdone, the art also displays the diverse artistic pool available to DC Comics disposal. The soft toned watercolors of Ivo Milazzo and Ray Fawkes play wonderfully with some of the pioneer-based stories, while the smooth and expressive movement of Becky Cloonan and Tula Lotay are perfect for tales of Hollywood debauchery. Whether you're a new reader or an old fan of AMERICAN VAMPIRE, this anthology is a perfect addition to any horror hound's ghoulish collection.

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10
American Vampire: Second Cycle #1

Mar 24, 2014

Both creators, despite busy schedules and ballooning careers, merge and revisit AMERICAN VAMPIRE seamlessly. Available on shelves now, "Second Cycle" is not to be missed.

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10
Annihilator #1

Sep 9, 2014

Accompanying Morrison's words is psychedelic art from Frazer Irving. Having done everything from covers to interior work to board game design, Irving pours years of experience into ANNIHILATOR, creating something beautiful and atmospheric. Not only has he perfected cinematic movement and action, but his unique style is perfect for this '70s-inspired title. Though the comic may not intentionally harken to the old HEAVY METAL vibe, it definitely screams it with the thick lines and vibrant, French style coloring. Irving's encompassing digital paint work is a familiar sight to fans of vintage sci-fi, spaghetti westerns and oversized magazines. It pops into your head upon the very first look.

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7.5
Army of Darkness/Re-Animator #1

Oct 30, 2013

But on top of the layered references, the work is also dolloped with nods to classic horror films and Bruce Campbell works for the particularly sharp-eyed. So, if you're not a fan of either franchise, it's easy to miss the minute jokes and get a bit lost, making this possibly a poor starting point for a new reader.

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8.8
Baltimore: The Infernal Train #1

Sep 4, 2013

BALTIMORE is also written by Christopher Golden, Mignola's long time writing companion on the series. Golden adds his unique macabre touch to the tale and is generally credited by Mignola as the head creator of the series. With their combined efforts, the story reads smooth and naturally, with nods to old occult lore and timeless, wandering heroes. Artist Ben Stenbeck is no stranger when it comes to illustrating horror and is credited with several appearances in other Mignola works such as BPRD and WITCHFINDER. His style capitalizes on Mignola's own artwork, with dark shadows and perpetual twilight settings, but also stands on its own with thinner ink work and less artistic license on human anatomy. With this unbeatable team, BALTIMORE: THE INFERNAL TRAIN continues on steadily through the underbelly of Dark Horse Comics, but is certainly not to be missed.

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7.5
Baltimore: The Witch of Harju #1

Jul 30, 2014

Together, Mignola and Golden create a beautiful landscape of dark lore, ancient blood and unquenchable vengeance that's managed to make the long-running series comparable with Mignola's big-fisted counterpart. "Witch of Harju" rolls smoothly along with the previous story arc and blends seamlessly into the over-all world, as Peter Bergting's inks help realize the vision with fantastic horror-tinged artwork. The creeping scenery is covered with dark shadows and lurking terrors, and the entire artistic lineup renders this series a step up from the current trend of smash-and-dash virus horror. It's more satisfied to scare you in the alleyways than destroy the world, and is all the better for it.

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10
Big Trouble In Little China #1

Jun 4, 2014

The art by Brian Churilla maintains the story-appropriate balance of cartoonish and life-like, matching the strange atmosphere of the source material. The action is fantastically smooth and promises full immersion that comes to an end way too fast. If you're sick of false nostalgia, Carpenter and Powell have authentically revived BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA, and will have you kung-fu to synth rock until the next issue.

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8.8
Black Science #1

Dec 12, 2013

Remender takes us on a hell of a trip through the first issue, introducing a work with limitless possibilities for each new release, new dimension, new interaction and split-second decision. With the second issue only a week away, it's going to be a hard one to keep on shelves.

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7.5
Blood Brothers #1

Jul 24, 2013

The writers, Mike Gagerman and Andrew Waller, are newcomers to the world of comics. Despite that, the writing still comes off crisp and clean without any unnecessary waste and, as stated earlier, the dialogue is very natural to read; a sure sign of potential. Fans shouldn't be surprised to see Gagerman's and Waller's pens dipped into future creations. The art by Evan Shaner is as smooth as the writing and with a dab of indie style, is the perfect addition to the story. Though he himself is also relatively new, he has been keeping busy doing work for both Dark Horse and Dynamite Entertainment. With these three at the hem of this buddy vampire tale, the rest of the series should prove to be very entertaining.

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7.5
Colder: The Bad Seed #1

Oct 23, 2014

Despite the lack of originality for the happy couple, COLDER and COLDER: THE BAD SEED shouldn't be ingored for what it really is: an unparalleled vision of horror that spans multiple realities of life. With the introduction of the terrifying Swivel, there is no doubt that we will find ourselves deeper into the maddening world of Tobin and Ferreyra than we ever wanted to be.

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5
Cutter #1

Oct 20, 2014

The art by Christian DiBari does have a bit more originality that its written counterpart, with genuine attempts at bringing the script to life. While there's still a bit of a "learning" vibe with his art, especially when it comes to hard angles, he has clearly found his style with his sharp ink work and beautiful scratch-style shadows. Honestly, his gore and guts tidbits are where he really shines, creating horrid pieces perfect forlate night creeps and is the definitely the standout of the entire work.

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7.5
Cyrus Perkins and the Haunted Taxi Cab #1

Aug 6, 2015

CYRUS PERKINS feels more like the start of a graphic novel than a standalone issue, but it carries itself enough to be worth buying on its own. The writer (and Action Labs co-founder) Dave Dwonch is a huge contributor to Action Lab's relatively new library and he brings his experience to the newest dark contribution. The writing style makes this a relatively fast read but it's not done at the expense of Perkins personality. Unfortunately, the other characters do fall a bit flat such as the over-supportive girlfriend and the tough-but-fair boss, but odds are, they'll even out in the follow-up issues.

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8.8
Drumhellar #1

Nov 26, 2013

Of course, Rossmo's art adds another layer to DRUMHELLAR, with beautifully placed bursts of color and a very obvious dot-style printing that was common with older comics. It's not a traditional style in any sense and instead takes a bit from everywhere. The characters harken to a more small-press vibe with faint pencil markings with a touch of cartoon fun, while the sidekick animal (though it's not clear what sort of animal) makes nods to Japanese manga. Even the placement of the panels is intentionally a bit off, creating open spaces that don't entirely seem out of place, perhaps commenting on modern graphic design. Together, it creates something that is fantastically visually appealing without crowding the viewer's vision.

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7.5
Ehmm Theory #1

Mar 27, 2013

EHMM THEORY has all the makings of a heavy hitter in an already blood-and-guts saturated market, while carving its own niche one issue at a time.

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10
Frankenstein Underground #1

Feb 18, 2015

Mignola, as usual, does a fantastic job of perfectly pacing the story. He creates well-timed reveals while moving the plot along and doesn't get hung up on over-explaining every detail. Though he doesn't illustrate the work, having illustrated his own comics for years has allowed him to appreciate the visual medium and he frequently lets the artwork speak for itself. Speaking of art, the work of Baltimore collaborator Ben Stenbeck adds beautifully to the story, creating sweeping visions of night time monsters and day time humans (frequently one and the same). The colors by Dave Stewart pops the whole work out, illuminating the comic in dark toned hues with flashes of light. With these three at the helm, FRANKENSTEIN UNDERGROUNDis bound to be the horror mini-series to watch.

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7.5
Garbage Pail Kids Puke-tacular! #1

Dec 23, 2014

Among the authors and artists to help pen this disgusting den of disorder is the indy sweetheart Peter Bagge, cartoonist Bill Wray, and artist Fred Wheaton (who helped bring the card back during their 2011 run)among many others. The diversity of the creators brings together a fantastic, magazine press feel that harkens back to the days of Saturday morning cartoons and really captures that very particular time and place where all it took was a solid fart joke to brighten your day. For fans of bad humor and kitschy art, PUKETACULAR will surely delight the wicked kid inside of you.

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7.5
Ghost (2013) #1

Dec 19, 2013

The current series is being penned by a writer duo of Kelly Sue DeConnick and Chris Sebela. With their powers combined, they've managed to create a smooth, sharp read while staying true to the pre-established characters. The story plays as a mix of crime drama and superhero turmoil, flowering a well-rounded comic with plenty of action along the way. Ryan Sook's art is an excellent complement to the script and, having previously worked on other macabre titles such as THE SPECTRE and ARKHAM ASYLUM, his style is well versed in everything spooky. The character designs are beautiful, illustrated with sharp detail. The creative team on GHOST just seems to work in tandem and it's apparent in the preciseness and deliberation of the issue. With these three at the helm, this could be an amazing series.

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10
Goners #3

Dec 8, 2014

With its fast-paced action and split second decisions, GONERS #3 brings the old saying, "The family that slays together, stays together," a whole new meaning.

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6.2
Hack/Slash: Son of Samhain #1

Aug 21, 2014

Despite such, HACK/SLASH: SON OF SAMHAIN is still a worthy addition to the series. If and when Tim Seeley returns, he will have a solid launch pad to start from.

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7.5
Harrow County #1

May 8, 2015

Though HARROW COUNTY#1 is still in its infancy, it has plenty of time to come in to its own. Until then, take comfort knowing that there is at least still a place where old magic can scare up new monsters, and that place is on the comic shelf.

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7.5
Hoax Hunters: Case Files #1

Jul 7, 2013

As mentioned, each story in the comic is drawn and written by a different creative team. Among the writers, one of the most notable is Tim Seeley (HACK/SLASH) who does a take on the HOAX HUNTERS as a classic superhero team complete with guns, tights and bad attitudes. Another is Nick Pitarra (MANHATTAN PROJECT), who – along with Tim Daniel – wrote and illustrated a strange tale involving multiple Bill Murrays and his (their?) unyielding pranks. Art ranges from newcomer Keith Burns' deeply-brushed swamp landscape about a really ugly unicorn to that of quirky artist Gabo in a one-page fishing story. A well done book with a fantastic array of creators, HOAX HUNTERS: CASE FILES is the perfect stepping-stone into a world of the macabre.

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5
Holy F*ck #1

Jan 20, 2015

The art, on the other hand, falls painfully short of any style or substance. While there is a definite "look" that the comic was going for (a pop art/graffiti style), the poor layout and awful character movement is very garish to look at. Also, the backgrounds lack detail and give the characters a very blank world to inhabit, almost as if in a half finished painting. Honestly, I wouldn't get this one for the art. But all in all, HOLY F*CKis exactly what it is: a jab at Christians with plenty of explosions.

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8.8
Itty Bitty Hellboy #1

Mar 18, 2014

ITTY BITTY HELLBOY is the brainchild of power team Art Baltazar and Franco, a pair of pals with a love for all things cartoony. Both Baltazar and Franco are credited for adapting and writing Mike Mignola's characters, creating an easily accessible work with plenty of laughs and winks to its base series. The writing is goofy and fun, mixing well with Baltazar's big-headed art handle. Using a chalk-like style, each character is simplified with round hands and cartoonish bodies, perfect for silly expressions and corny jokes. Baltazar, who is also responsible for TINY TITANS and SUPERMAN FAMILY ADVENTURES has had plenty of experience shrinking down popular icons and really brings his all to the latest outing. Here's to seeing more from this talented duo.

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8.8
Judge Dredd: Year One #2

Apr 29, 2013

A mix of post-apocalyptic sci-fi and modern action thriller sprinkled generously a with heaping amount of gore, Judge Dredd has appealed to readers for at least two generations and with IDW's recent contribution, just may continue for another two. The writer behind YEAR ONE, Matt Smith, joins serious ranks previously occupied by the likes of Garth Ennis, Grant Morrison, and Mark Millar. His eye for detail is greatly appreciated, he's added an interesting precursor to the mythos of the hard-headed flatfoot. Artist Simon Coleby does a beautiful job of bringing the place to life, keeping the tones subdued to reflect the decaying city while not skimping on blood and guts when the need arises. This is one series that needs to be picked up alongside reprints of some of the original Dredd stories.

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10
Kaijumax #1

Apr 13, 2015

Being serious while also being a bit goofy go hand-in-hand in both the movies and in KAIJUMAX, making this comic one of the truer "and much more interesting- of the kaiju comic adaptations. A unique inclusion to the growing mythos of Japanese monsters, this is definitely a work we will be seeing more of.

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7.5
Lady Killer #1

Jan 2, 2015

The art by the co-writer Jones is definitely the stand out of the entire work. Sharp, precise work and smooth angles make LADY KILLER easily one of the more well-drawn works in the current comic market. While it may sound like an exaggeration, one quick look reveals an art style that not only doesn't slack on the details, but in fact, adds hidden Easter eggs though out the work, such as the SHINING-inspired wallpaper in Romanov's house. There are no smudged over facial expressions or unsightly, spotty inking, but well-developed comic art that combines that 50's charm with the high powered action of modern works. Jones also plays well with unique viewpoints, creating a comic that moves like a TV show. And though there's not much to go on with the first issue, LADY KILLERdoes the best with what it's got, and for this writer, its best is looking pretty good.

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7.5
Lumberjanes #3

Jun 12, 2014

The writers of this adventurous tale are the power team of Grace Ellis and Noel Stevenson. While both are brand new to the printed comic medium, Ellis is fairly well known on the internet for her Tumblr, Gingerhaze, which features mini-comics and quirky artwork. Together, they've made a solid entrance into the world of the graphic word, crafting a smooth story with larger-than-life creatures and Scooby-Doo-esque mysteries. Eliis and Stevenson have managed to balance the strong personalities of each character, giving each star its time in the sky, while the art by Brooke Allen plays perfectly with the buoyant atmosphere and over-the-top nature of the writing. It's a perfect blend of spooky, dark fantasy horror, cartoon madness, and fun, relatable characters for fans of all ages.

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8.8
Rasputin #1

Nov 4, 2014

Of course, such a monumental idea could have easily fallen apart with the wrong artist, but Rossmo's talents help RASPUTIN move stunningly from page to page. He masterfully blots and scratches the pages with his heavy inks, while still maintaining the proper atmospheres between the present and the past. Even his large splash pages play well; a place where form and atmosphere overrides immediate action as he chooses to use the available pages more for meditative reflection than a panorama of violence… though there is a wicked man vs. bear fight.

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7.5
Roche Limit #1

Sep 24, 2014

It's not just the visuals that really help this story move, but the entire collaborative vision, which includes fan-favorite Michael Moreci. He takes on the idea of a space noir with the ingenuity needed. All too often, attempts at mixing two very deliberate genres crash and burn when either outshines the story. Not so with ROCHE LIMIT. Moreci balances the two styles while expertly mixing in what bit of horror he can. He scatters emotional tidbits throughout"quick flashes of thoughts and animalistic fear that give the feel of flash-mob violence boiling right under the surface"while the characters of Skaarsgard and Hudson have a natural grace to them. Appropriately for a deft blend of genre, both leads complement each other's personalities as they make their way across the pages.

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8.8
Star Wars: Darth Vader and the Cry of Shadows #1

Jun 23, 2013

Scott Snyder, the quill behind the madness, has applied his incredible story-spinning abilities to this unique tale, creating a truly strange story of men and monsters. To be fair, he has had a lot of practice as the voice behind SWAMP THING and AMERICAN VAMPIRE, and he has carried over that experience to this original work. His writing is sharp and on-point and he has smoothly established a depth of character for each individual even at this early stage of the story. If the first issue is any indication of the rest of the series, it's going to be a hell of a ride.

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10
Ten Grand #1

May 9, 2013

TEN GRAND leaves you immersed in not only the written story, but the untold words of the accompanying art as well. Fan favorite Ben Templesmith provides his iconic designs, mixing heavy inks with delicate pen work and making each image literally drip off the page. Writer J. Michael Straczynski is an old hand on this circuit as well, and though he is better known as the creator of BABYLON 5, he's also lauded for work on RISING STARS, THOR and a six year run on THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN. This combo has created an astounding new comic that touches on a bit of everything, from love to death to monsters of both man and creation. While it harks back to the old detectives stories, it also manages to stay relevant, deftly mixing strippers and mohawks with fine whiskey and cigars.

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6.2
The Halloween Legion: The Great Goblin Invasion #1

Sep 11, 2013

Boatwright's art is perfect for THE HALLOWEEN LEGION graphic novel. It has an energetic, cartoony vibe reflecting the subdued "scary" artwork of kids' movies like PARANORMAN and CORALINE"beautiful small town backgrounds with an eternal twilight theme and dotting the work with a signature scratchy ink style and a soft color mix. Unfortunately, the shorter, accompanying tale at the end of the comic "Once upon a Halloween," while still written by Martin Powell, is illustrated by a different artist and suffers for it. An attempt at children's illustration with no regard to traditional form or structure, it does not transfer well into sequential art.

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3.8
The Memory Collectors #1

Oct 21, 2013

If you're already a fan of Menton3 or love fetish art, this is up your alley, but it might not appeal to longtime comic lovers. Perhaps it would have received a better reception as an illustrated book versus a comic book, but as it is, it's hard one to enjoy.

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8.8
The New Ghostbusters #1

Jan 4, 2013

This series is an interesting addition to the GHOSTBUSTERSuniverse. It's one of the first comics to really take the story away from the classicfour guys and give some of the side characters (most that were made for the IDWseries) a spot to shine. It's advised to start with THE GHOSTBUSTERS beforedelving into the NEW GHOSTBUSTERS, but the latest series does a decent job of providingbackgrounds for its characters. Writer Erik Burnham carries over to THE NEWGHOSTBUSTERS, where the pacing is perfect, maintaining all the bitter humor ofthe movies coated in a fine sheen of ghost ooze. The same goes for artist DanSchoening, who also worked on both series, and continues his solid, albeit abit cartoony style.

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6.2
The Other Dead #1

Sep 27, 2013

That could be because the characters are very much caricatures of real people, with the Satanists sporting mohawks and bad attitudes while the single mothers are over-worked and under-paid. It reads very much as "by the book," but perhaps issue two will bring all that around. The art as well falls just a tad short of being really good. Digger T. Mesch has a unique style which focuses on heavy detail and raunchy imagery, but the anatomy balance is painfully skewed. Angles bow off in odd directions and facial expressions are stiff and unimaginative. Despite this, THE OTHER DEAD is attempting something a lot of comics do not: re-think the zombie mythos. That alone is worth a mention.

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10
The Sandman Overture #1

Nov 6, 2013

Gaiman paints a vivid portrait of his characters without stomping over old ground, creating a brand new adventure for the classic hero. J.H. Williams' artwork is the perfect companion to the words, playing with the intricacies of the author's design. He jumps styles with every leap of the story, from fine pencil work to full colored pieces, without ever coming off as unnecessary. The two just work so, so well together. A testament to what comics could be, have been, and hopefully, will be again, THE SANDMAN: OVERTURE is quickly on its way to becoming as essential as its predecessor.

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7.5
The Squidder #1

Jul 16, 2014

it's also worth noting that there is a good possibility 44 Flood can only work because of the current comic boom and the growing interest in all things four-paneled that, ironically enough, are spearheaded by the very companies that 44 Flood is providing an alternative to. Let's not forget, Squidder is being distributed by IDW, perhaps not one of the top three, but still one of the better-established businesses out there. It seems that despite the effort toward alternative comic representation, it's the nuts and bolts of the comic world, mainly publishing and distribution, that could really hold back the development of the small press industry. 44 Flood has still a long way to go before it can truly walk on its own (and even then, will owe its success partly to its early partner distributors), but with such reputable work and talented contributors, perhaps the world of creator-owned/fan-funded comics isn't as far as it seems.

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10
To Hell You Ride #2

Jan 3, 2013

TO HELL YOU RIDE, is well, a hell of a ride. With the firstissue dropped on the end of the Mayan calendar, the comic had fans up-in-armsbefore anyone even picked it up. Henriksen, co-writer Joseph Maddrey(NIGHTMARES IN RED, WHITE AND BLUE) and illustrated by Tom Mandrake, the triopowerhouse has made a comic that is both deep and terrifying. It has theamazing ability to question the world around you, to show you how beautiful andpowerful nature really is. If TO HELL YOU RIDE ever does get optioned to be themovie that it was intended to be, it will have a very strong source to drawfrom.

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7.5
Twilight Zone #1

Jan 8, 2015

Overall, the new TWILIGHT ZONEseries starts strong and finishes with a heck of a cliffhanger; teasing at a strange and chaotic universe just out of our reach.This is indeed a perfect companion piece for the TWILIGHT ZONEfandom.

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