Adam Volk's Comic Reviews

Reviewer For: Comics Bulletin Reviews: 50
8.5Avg. Review Rating

9.0
Bomb Queen #3

May 15, 2006

So while reviewers and casual readers may dismiss Bomb Queen as nothing more than a blood soaked orgy of sex and violence, wipe away the blood stains and splattered brains and youll find a comic that is as insightful as it is entertaining.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Bomb Queen II: Queen of Hearts #3

Jan 4, 2007

Yes, Jimmie Robinson has nailed down another hit with the concluding issue of his second Bomb Queen series, and I for one am looking forward to seeing more. With plenty of action, nudity, violence, super-villainy AND dementedly hilarious satire thrown in for good measure, Bomb Queen is comic book insanity at its best. Long live the Queen!

View Issue       View Full Review
10
District X #2

Jul 5, 2004

Really, there arent enough good things to say about District X. This is a brilliant comic book, one of the few new series that has incredible characters, wonderful dialogue, and above all a story that has something to say. In a mere two issues, this comic has displayed more substance and originality than 40 issues of Ultimate X-Men. District X is a must read for comic fans looking for more than just mindless superhero slug fests, proving in the end, that theres more to the X-universe than simply blowing up Sentinels.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
District X #3

Jul 23, 2004

Ultimately, District X #3 is yet another entertaining and thoughtful chapter in one of the most original comics to hit the shelves in months, proving that just because a comic has an X in the title, doesnt mean it has to suck.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
District X #4

Aug 23, 2004

District X continues to prove itself as one of Marvels most inspired and well written titles. The only real weakness with issue #4 is the occasionally sloppy artwork. Lan Medina has done some amazing work in previous issues of District X, yet in issue 4 there are several pages that look choppy or unfinished, perhaps due to a rushed coloring job. In any event, it doesnt do much to distract from the story and the majority of the artwork remains consistent with Medinas previous visually appealing and innovative style. Hines writing however, is as strong as ever, and in issue 4 he displays his usual flare for realistic dialogue, characterization, and plot. In the end, District X remains on one of Marvels most innovative and entertaining titles, proving that when it comes to comics, sometimes X really does mark the spot.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
District X #5

Oct 9, 2004

Ultimately, District X #5 is a must have both for the legions of loyal X-Men fans and for comic book aficionados alike. With its brilliant blend of action, characters, story and artwork, District X is one of Marvels most original comics to date. If you havent already, go check out the District, its filthy, run down, and full of psychotic mutants, but damned if it isnt entertaining.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
District X #6

Nov 9, 2004

Ultimately, District X #6 is a satisfying end to the first story arc of a promising new series, proving once again that when it comes to tales of mutants and mayhem, theres no place better than District X.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
District X #7

Nov 18, 2004

In the end District X continues to prove itself as one of the best comics Marvel has going. Issue #7 in particular is an ideal place for new readers to jump in, but is also sure to please the steadily growing legion of fans, proving once again that when it comes to tales with character, substance and story, X definitely marks the spot.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Doctor Strange: The Oath #2

Nov 17, 2006

That being said, while Doctor Strange: The Oath is entertaining, after reading issue #2 I haven't been "blown away." Somehow Id expected more from Vaughan (particularly when you look at his groundbreaking work on Runaways, Y: The Last Man and Ex Machina). Yet considering just how talented Vaughan is - and looking at the wonderfully retro style of Marcos Martins artwork - I'm willing to give them both the benefit of the doubt and hang on for the long haul. After all, what Vaughan has done is a task worthy of the Sorcerer Supreme himself: he's made the Doctor interesting again, proving in the end that Stephen Strange still has the magic touch.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Excalibur (2004) #1

Jun 4, 2004

Lopresti does an admirable job depicting the bleak and devastated Genoshan background, but ultimately the writing is so painfully slow and misguided that most readers will probably lose interest quite quickly. Sadly, Excalibur is a huge let down and as a premier issue misses the mark in almost every conceivable way. Its even more of a disappointment for fans of Claremonts previous work, and a poor attempt from an otherwise brilliant writer. In the end, as a new series one can only hope that the title will develop some modicum of direction. With any luck Claremont will eventually pull his head out of his ass, return to his literary roots, and rediscover what the X-Men are truly all about.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Ghost Spy #1

Jun 8, 2004

In the end, Ghost Spy manages to carry itself reasonably well, if only terms of being a well-drawn and mindlessly entertaining action title. Theres enough beautifully illustrated disembowelings, decapitations and explosions to satisfy even the most gore-starved readers, but hopefully future issues will start to develop some sense of characterization, along with a coherent plot and setting. After all theres more to a good comic book than a psychotic cyborgs head explodingeven as entertaining as it may be.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Ghost Spy #2

Sep 2, 2004

Ultimately, its clear that Ghost Spy is a labor of love for creators Jacob Elijah and Steve Albertson (the duo are also the founders of up and coming comics studio, Shadow Tactics). Its refreshing to see that Image is continuing to take chances on young talent and with issue 3 set for release in early September, Ghost Spy continues to prove itself as an entertaining new title. After all, theres nothing like a little gratuitous cyborg violence to help get us through those last pesky days of summer.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Ghost Spy #3

Oct 7, 2004

Throughout the issue, Jacob Elijah once again proves that he is a major new talent in the industry, with his jaw-dropping art that appears as a kind of surrealistic blend of Japanese anime and street graffiti. The comic is worth picking up for Elijahs art work alone and is complimented beautifully by Steve Albertsons solid script work. Ghost Spy #3 is a must have for anyone looking for a change from the usual superhero fare. With its brilliant blend of hyper-violence and well-crafted characters, comic geeks can rest easy, because with brilliant new titles like Ghost Spy on the shelves, the industry is in good hands.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Green Lantern (2005) #2

Jul 8, 2005

In the end regardless of fans feeling towards the return of Hal Jordan, Green Lantern #2 stands on its own as a brilliant story. Geoff Johns run on Green Lantern will undoubtedly be marked by future fans as a pivotal era in comic book story-telling, a brilliant, innovative series that quite literally brings to life one of DCs most beloved superheroes.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Green Lantern (2005) #3

Aug 23, 2005

In the end Green Lantern is quickly proving itself as one of the best new titles to hit the shelves. Hal Jordan is back, and for a dead guy, he kicks some pretty serious ass.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Green Lantern (2005) #5

Dec 2, 2005

Between van Scivers art and Johns pitch-perfect script, Green Lantern is literally the best it has ever been. So maybe Geoff Johns has cloned himself, or sold his soul to the Prince of Darkness, but when hes writing comics that are this freaking goodwho really cares?

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Green Lantern (2005) #7

Jan 30, 2006

It is this ingenious balance between old and new that makes the series work so well and marks Green Lantern #7 as another entertaining issue from the team of Johns and Pacheco. So while the DC spotlight may be on Johns remarkable work on Infinite Crisis, theres no doubt that when the Crisis is over, Green Lantern will continue to shine.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
House Of M #2

Jun 23, 2005

No, in the end House of M is an entertaining if not particularly inspiring read. Die hard Avengers or X-Men fans will likely snatch it up in droves, but it remains to be seen if the series will live up to the hype. After all it doesnt take a mutant telepath to see that Marvel is more concerned with dollar signs than drama.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Incredible Hulk (1999) #92

Feb 5, 2006

Incredible Hulk #92 isnt the most innovative or intelligent comic youre likely to read this year. What it is, however, is a good old fashioned Science Fiction yarn, with plenty of action and over the top adventure. Pak isnt trying to create a brooding, misunderstood character here, hes simply taking a massive, angry, green-skinned monster and turning him loose. So while the story may be somewhat flat in terms of story and character development, theres no denying that Pak and Pagulayan have created an issue thats just plain fun. Because in the end, hearing Hulk Smash! is just plain cool, no matter what alien dialect its translated into.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Invincible Iron Man #4

Aug 30, 2005

In the end, The Invincible Iron Man #4 is a fairly average read. Its not terrible by any stretch of the imagination and despite its shortcoming, Im still interested enough to continue to pick up issues and see how the arc pans out. Heres hoping Ellis will find his footing and give old shell-head the treatment he deserves.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Invincible Iron Man #14

Jan 2, 2007

In the end, The Invincible Iron #14 is a must read issue. While it may go unnoticed amid the myriad of Civil War tie-ins, fans of both Iron Man and comic books in general, owe it to themselves to read this issue and get a first hand glimpse into what may very well be one of the most prolific and creative superhero runs in years.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Iron Ghost #1

May 10, 2005

Ultimately, The Iron Ghost #1 is a great read and well worth picking as an almost text book case for how to construct a well-paced and intriguing opening issue. Its clever mix of action and mystery along with the realism of war works brilliantly, thanks to Dixons steady narrative. But its most appealing feature is undoubtedly its homage to the old Golden Age pulp heroes. Which begs the question: does the Iron Ghost know what evil lurks in the hearts of men? Hmmmmmaybe not, but hes still fun as hell to read about.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Iron Man (2004) #1

Nov 26, 2004

Ultimately, with the Invincible Iron Man #1, Ellis has constructed a memorable, if not particularly spectacular, opening issue. The story is sure to please the loyal throngs of Iron Man fans as well as offer an ideal place for new readers to jump on. For a first issue it manages to accomplish a great deal indeed, giving insight into Stark and the origins of Iron Man as well as offering an intriguing sub plot. In this sense The Invincible Iron Man #1 is definitely worth the read, but with hundreds of thousands of dollars invested in the series, a featured film in the works, and exclusive contracts signed, one cant help but wonder what Spider Jerusalem would think.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Iron Man (2004) #2

Jan 6, 2005

In the end, the success of The Invincible Iron Man remains entirely uncertain. There is no doubt that Ellis has the potential to innovate Iron Man and offer a brilliant new take on the character and the themes put forth by the original. And yet, Ellis has yet to strike a balance between developing a multi faceted character, creating a superhero that will appeal to fans of the genre, and presenting a work that is socially relevant. If Ellis can someone find a way to balance all three in future issues then The Invincible Iron Man has the potential to be some of Ellis strongest work yet. In the meantime readers will have to wait until issue #3 hits the shelves next month to decide whether Iron Man will once again take flight or drop like a lead weight.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Iron Man (2004) #3

Apr 21, 2005

In the end The Invincible Iron Man #3 is worth picking up, if for no other reason than to indulge in Adi Granovs larger than life visuals. In terms of Ellis writing it is not nearly on par with much of his previous work, but the script is still entertaining and relatively satisfying. Ultimately, The Invincible Iron Man #3 finally gets around to doing what it should have done from the very beginning: having a super hero who actually acts like a super hero.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
JSA: Classified #3

Sep 23, 2005

JSA: Classified #3 is literally as good as a comic can get. Its also a great place for new readers to jump on, with no real prior knowledge of the JSA or Power Girl required to enjoy the story. With a great plot, memorable character development, plenty of action and humor, and incredible artwork its clear that with JSA: Classified Johns and Conner are a real force to be reckoned with, and I for one cant wait to see what else theyll do with this series. Power Girl is back, because even a blonde superhero with a bad attitude and giant jugs deserves a second chance.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Last Train to Deadsville: A Cal McDonald Mystery #2

Jun 23, 2004

In the end, Last Train to Deadsville is successful only because it doesnt take itself too seriously. The series isnt claiming to be anything more than an entertaining romp through a world overrun by the forces of evil, and in this sense reads more like a loving tribute to the pulp-era horror serials of the past. By the same token however, new readers and those unfamiliar with Cal McDonald, will feel left in the dark. Steve Niles, has done some incredible work, and is largely responsible for the recent resurgence in horror comics today (30 Days of Night is nothing short of brilliant, Aleister Arcane is one of the most innovative new series to emerge in decades, and Remains, Niles latest foray into the world of zombies, is absolutely phenomenal (see my review for Remains issue #1). Ultimately, Niles continues this tradition with Last Train to Deadsville. While the series can read a little choppy at times, it has potential, and there is something inherently likable about Cal McDonald.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Mutant 2099 #1

Dec 3, 2004

But its difficult to blame Robert Kirkman for the utter failure of Mutant 2099. After all, the very concept of a one shot Marvel Knights 2099 series was doomed from the very beginning, a classic case of comic book marketing gone awry. Hopefully, in the near future Marvel will focus more on producing comics with quality writing and art, and less time rehashing lame concepts. After all, some things are better off left buried. Heres hoping that 2099 will once again rest in peace.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
New Avengers #2

Jan 18, 2005

Ultimately, The New Avengers #2 is a highly entertaining read, and even in its early stages has all the makings of developing into a promising new series. Despite its seemingly formulaic plot, Bendis has something powerful on his hands, and hopefully Marvel will support the series and allow it to develop into what could potentially be an intriguing new concept. After all, The New Avengers may be on to something: superheroes that die and stay dead. Whod have thunk it?

View Issue       View Full Review
10
New Avengers #4

Mar 26, 2005

Ultimately (no pun intended) The New Avengers is easily one of the finest titles being produced by Marvel, in addition to being some of the most engaging writing to come out of the already impressive head-space of Brian Michael Bendis. Avengers fans may still be reeling from the disbanding of their beloved team, but this is clearly a new chapter in Marvel history, and a time that comic book fans will inevitably look back on with great fondness. The New Avengers truly is history in the making.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
New Avengers #6

Jun 28, 2005

Ultimately, character development is a tricky thing, particularly in comics. After all, readers really WANT to see the same characters, no one wants to see Batman turn in his tights and go settle in the suburbs of Gotham or Thor turn in his Hammer to become a successful door to door vacuum-cleaner salesman (though come to think of it those MIGHT make for some pretty entertaining stories). No, just because a character remains relatively the same, that doesnt mean the writers cant challenge us. The trick is to show us MORE of the characters we already know and love, not to change them entirely (a lesson that damn J. Michael Straczynski might take to heart now that hes good and screwed up Spider-Man). Take Ed Brubakers recent run on Captain America, or even Peter Davids latest rendition of the Hulk. These are iconic, classic characters, and yet both Brubaker and David have been able to bring some substance to them beyond the icon status they already possess (Cap as a tortured and poss

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
New X-Men Academy X #1

Jun 4, 2004

The art itself however, is quite well done. Randy Greens fluid and kinetic style, with its slight cartoonish overtones, suits the tone of the book nicely and the ink work of Rick Ketcham complements Greens style admirably. Ultimately, New X-Men seems to show some potential as a series. While admittedly much of the material is somewhat redundant and is nothing long time X-fans have not already encountered, it does offer an excellent place for new readers to jump in. With the proper direction, some tighter writing, and further character development New X-Men, could very well become a welcome addition to Marvels mutant lineup.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Punisher War Journal (2006) #1

Nov 26, 2006

Heres hoping Fraction is able to spin the series in another direction and put Frank Castle back where he should bebehind the barrel of a big-ass gun.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Remains #1

Jun 20, 2004

In the end, Remains #1 is well-worth picking up. Steven Niles has done some incredible work in the past, and should be commended in this series for his efforts to build a well written story rather than simply thrust the reader into a hurried and poorly paced narrative. Hopefully Niles will continue to develop what seems to be a promising story, and provide his own unique twist to the now familiar zombie genre. After all, even the undead deserve a change of pace now and again.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Remains #3

Aug 4, 2004

Ultimately, Remains continues to prove itself as one of the best horror books on the marketno easy feat when you consider the slew of other zombie related comic books saturating the market (including Robert Kirkmans own brilliantly scripted zombie opus The Walking Dead). In the end Remains is really Steven Niles doing what he does best, taking a formulaic concept and twisting into something innovative and new. After all, just because a comic has a bunch of stinking, rotting corpses in it, doesnt mean it cant still be fresh.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Remains #4

Sep 3, 2004

In the end, Remains #4 is a must have for horror aficionados and comic book fans alike. With only one more issue left in the series and with a possible trade format re-release from IDW, the popularity of Remains will undoubtedlyerremain long after the series finale.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Runaways (2005) #3

May 5, 2005

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Runaways (2005) #6

Jul 29, 2005

For those of you who havent read Runaways, the next issue offers a prime jumping on spot, as it is kicking off a new story-arc. Runaways really has it all, action, character, and incredible plots, proving in the end, that sometimes its really not that bad getting addicted. At least, assuming Marvel doesnt release any crystal-meth variant covers in the near future. Thats just no good for anyone.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Runaways (2005) #7

Sep 19, 2005

In the end Runaways #7 is well worth picking up. Its a great jumping on point for new readers and a pay-off for long time readers interested in seeing the characters continue to evolve. With incredible action, intriguing characters, great art, and spot-on dialogue, comic books dont get any better than this. All hail Vaughan!

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Scatterbrain #2

Jun 12, 2006

In the end, in a market overrun by the big summer blockbusters, fans of great comics owe it to themselves to pick up and support this book. Its stylish, dark, intriguing and genuinely deserving of recognition. Because in a summer thats just heating up we need all the cool comics we can get.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Scatterbrain #4

Oct 3, 2006

Ultimately, Scatterbrain #4 is an incredible conclusion to one of the most intriguing new series of the year. If you're a fan of well written superhero comics and haven't been reading Scatterbrain, you owe it to yourself to pick up the back issues (or hopefully Markosia will release a collected trade in the near future). Because when all is said and done, the only disappointing element in Scatterbrain is that it has to end...

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Spider-Woman: Origin #1

Dec 25, 2005

Its still too early to tell whether Spider-Woman: Origin will deliver the goods as a super hero origin story, but if the rest of the series is anything like the opening issue, then it looks like readers are in for a hell of a ride.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
X-Factor Vol. 3 #1

Dec 11, 2005

Its been a hell of a long time since X-Factor has been around, but with Peter Davids spot on characterization and plotting, and Ryan Sooks dynamic artwork, X-Factor is clearly back in business

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
X-Force: Shatterstar #1

Mar 14, 2005

In the end X-Force: Shatterstar #1 is well worth picking up. The writing is incredibly polished and original, the art well-done, and the story intriguing. Fans looking for their fix of Shatterstar rejoicethe Force is definitely strong in this one.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Young Avengers #1

Mar 3, 2005

Of course, in terms of adolescent superhero comics Young Avengers lacks the wit and creativity of Robert Kirkmans Invincible (which manages to balance drama whilst still poking fun at the superhero genre) and it is nowhere close to being in the same league as DCs Teen Titans. But in the end Young Avengers still manages to hold itself together. Is it a great comic book? Wellno, but it could be a hell of a lot worse if one wants to get optimistic about the whole thing. No, in the end Young Avengers #1 is the comic book equivalent of a New York style chili dog. Its cheesy, made of god only knows what, will probably rot your brain and give you a coronary, but hey once you get through the first few bites, its really not that bad.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Young Avengers #2

Mar 22, 2005

In the end, Young Avengers is a pleasant surprise. Heinberg (who landed the gig after working on TVs The O.C.) is a hell of a writer, his dialogue is smart, his characters (despite their inherent cheesiness) are interesting, and the plot is surprisingly complex and intriguing. The fact that Jim Cheungs art happens to be incredibly well-polished and innovative also adds a great deal to the title, and the book is worth picking up for Cheungs work alone. No, despite the fact that the odds are staked against it, Young Avengers manages to come off as a hell of a ride, with over the top action, larger than life characters, and some of the best art in the business. Like its characters, Young Avengers is a true underdog story: it should fail, it should suckbut somehow Heinberg not only manages to make it work, but more impossibly, he manages to makes it interesting too. Damnso much for my scathing review.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Young Avengers #3

Apr 22, 2005

In the end Young Avengers #3 proves that you really cant judge a book by its cover, and that if Marvel keeps producing series like Young Avengers chances are there are going to be a lot of comic book fans with their feet in their mouths.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Young Avengers #4

Jun 7, 2005

Ultimately, Heinberg and Cheung have knocked the ball out of the park with Young Avengers proving that when it comes to the Earths Mightiest Heroes, even a group of teenage wannabes can still kick some ass.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Young Avengers #6

Sep 6, 2005

To sum up, Young Avengers #6 is a brilliant end to one of the most promising new series to hit the shelves in years. Heinberg and Cheung have a hit on their hands, and I for one plan to stick it out with them for the long haul.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Young Avengers #8

Nov 10, 2005

In the end, Young Avengers #8 is yet another great read in a consistently brilliant series proving that when it comes to the Avengers, New is old and tired, and Young is where its at.

View Issue       View Full Review

Reviews for the Week of...

November

October

More