Dan Gehen's Comic Reviews

Reviewer For: Infinite Comix Reviews: 73
8.0Avg. Review Rating

7.0
All-Star Western #28

Mar 1, 2014

At the end of the day, there are a lot of changes in the pages of All-Star Western #28. This is largely thanks to the return of a certain character from an extended absence. Based solely on the issue's final pages, the changes brought about will continue to twist and evolve the legend of Jonah Hex.

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8.0
All-Star Western #29

Mar 27, 2014

In that regard, All Star Western #29 is a throwback to the type of stories told in the Jonah Hex title before the New 52 launch. The issue is largely continuity free and, as mentioned previously, is a joy to look at. Readers looking to add a new title to their pull list should definitely consider this as it is in a great position for new readers to jump on. Given the sales numbers, it could use a few new readers. Those looking for a break from the regular grind of present day DC continuity should take pleasure in snarky adventures of Jonah Hex.

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8.0
All-Star Western #30

Apr 24, 2014

The Madame .44 feature, titled "The Other Side," opens with the striking image of a masked woman with two revolvers drawn. Palmiotti and Gray then take readers back in time and introduce Henry, Mr. Walker, and his daughter Jeanne. Jeanne's attire immediately ends the mystery of whom Madame .44 is, but that is not important. What's presented is a tale of betrayal and revenge that will ultimately drive Jeanne's path in the coming issues. It's a truly enjoyable read which more than makes up for the shortened Jonah Hex story.

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8.0
All-Star Western #31

May 29, 2014

The Madame .44 segment is definitely another strong outing that takes a sharp turn into gunslinging wakiness. Madame .44 may eventually become a tough, vengeance-seeking outlaw after last issue, but for now she goes swimming into another dimension to battle demons and corruption. The setting may look like the old west, but the multiple moons are a dead giveaway, as are the demon creatures. Major credit to Garcia-Lopez for creating a unique and imaginative world that, despite its grotesque features, fits right into a western anthology series. It's a crazy-pants story that is, if nothing else, simple fun. Though the story closes with an "End?" it is hopefully not the last we see of this character, especially during the final few issues of All-Star Western.

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8.0
All-Star Western #32

Jun 26, 2014

The issue's opening sequence features the couple's acquisition of their targeted bounty. Rather than taking a direct approach (i.e. with guns ablazing), Hex sits down at a table and engages his target in conversation. Palmiotti and Gray make the reader believe that a gunfight is imminent before pulling the rug out from under them. It's an effective use of comedy that sets the tone for the remainder of the issue, be it when Hex and Black are drunk at an in, or when the latter recounts the story about her "lucky shotgun." That alone makes All Star Western #32 worth the price of admission.

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9.0
All-Star Western #33

Jul 23, 2014

Credit is due to the art team of Staz Johnson, Fabrizio Fiorentino, and Guy Major. Their art is the reason readers are able to identify and pick up on these emotional cues. Furthermore, their rendering of characters and scenery makes for a differentiated and more mature-looking title than the rest of the New 52. With the book is dealing with more mature themes including (but not limited to) love and morality, the art is as pitch perfect as the writing. With one final issue left, All Star Western looks to go out in a blaze of glory.

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10
All-Star Western #34

Aug 27, 2014

All Star Western #34 is a testament to the strength of both its creative team and its characters. Though the series has now concluded, readers can dive into back issues and collections to revisit the adventures of DC's famous bounty hunter. Knowing that this final issue is the endgame, reading through nine years worth of Jonah Hex material is a task that anyone will happily take on.

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10
Batman '66 Meets The Green Hornet #1

May 28, 2014

Anyone that has listened to Kevin Smith and Ralph Garman talk about Batman knows that they hold a special place in their hearts forBatman '66.Garman himself might be the biggest fan of the 1960s series, with a collection of memorabilia that is the envy of all Bat-fans. This love and passion for the subject matter is evident with each line of dialogue, each voice-over narration, and each character gesture. An early exchange between Bruce and Dick strikes the right chord of heartfelt cheesiness which could only work in the world ofBatman '66. Kato is clearly the standout character of the issue, as his subtle interjections to a conversation between Bruce and Britt will elicit more than a few chuckles from readers.Batman '66 Meets the Green Hornet #1is a near-perfect beginning to what should be a raucous camp-fest.

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7.0
Batman '66 Meets The Green Hornet #2

Jun 5, 2014

There is a lot to like about this issue, but the brevity is not one of them. Readers may have opened up their digital issues noticing the issue is 100 pages in length, but most of those pages are animations courtesy of the DC2 digital format. Though it has typically added value to the reading experience, the DC2 animations are lazily applied here, save for one exploding door in the early parts of the issue which is very effective. Many of the animations are so subtle that readers will find themselves spending more time looking for the changes than reading the issue. It's a shame something avoidable such as this impedes the reading experience, because otherwise Batman '66 Meets The Green Hornet #2 is another finely crafted issue by Smith, Garman and Templeton.

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8.0
Batman '66 Meets The Green Hornet #3

Jun 19, 2014

Ty Templeton's art continues to be strong and, for the most part, clean. Further, he brings the proper amount of energy, humor and gravitas that a Batman '66 story demands. Robin's depiction best encapsulates this, as the character is scared, confused, and awestruck over the course of a few panels. The quality of his linework slips compared to previous issues, but this is hardly a distraction. Readers will instead be drawn to the details he adds to build out the world. Batman's costume is rendered to appear cheap and poorly constructed, which it most certainly was on the television series. Finding Easter Eggs such as this adds another layer of enjoyment to an already fun ride.

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9.0
Batman '66 Meets The Green Hornet #4

Jul 3, 2014

Batman '66 Meets The Green Hornet continues to be a shining beacon in the market. The fantastic writing and exemplary art have made this series a must-buy. Furthermore, combine this with Jeff Parker's outstanding digital-first series Batman '66, and the world of the much beloved television show is stronger than ever before.

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9.0
Batman '66 Meets The Green Hornet #5

Jul 17, 2014

Batman '66 Meets The Green Hornet continues its campy quest through the digital medium. Though the overall plot is progressing slowly courtesy of the digital medium, brilliant banter and astonishing art more than make this worth a $1.99 purchase. Garman and Smith have even managed to include narration panels, which one can't help but read in the voice of the late, great William Dozier. Surely, the former showrunner is looking at this comic from the beyond with a smile that would put the Joker to shame.

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8.0
Batman '66 Meets The Green Hornet #6

Jul 31, 2014

If there is a criticism to be made, it's that the digital-first format hampers the plot's progression. Though the script has been clearly designed to work within the confines of the digital medium, story's pacing is clearly better suited for print publication. With the print edition being a dollar cheaper than its corresponding digital chapters ($2.99 compared to two digital issues at $1.99 each), print is clearly the better deal. But regardless of that, the digital formatremainsan enjoyable endeavor that is among the best of DC's current offerings.

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7.0
Batman '66 Meets The Green Hornet #7

Aug 14, 2014

Batman '66 Meets The Green Hornet #7 continues the miniseries' celebration of 1960s camp. Despite being a transitional issue, it packs plenty of entertainment. Those looking for a dose of fun should check it out.

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9.0
Batman (2011) #35

Oct 8, 2014

Batman #35 kicks off the next big Snyder and Capullo production in bombastic and unexpected fashion. The back-up story by James Tynion IV and Kelley Jones is a creepy and dark follow-up to a satisfying reveal. It's Scott Snyder week in the world of comics, and the superhero component more than satisfies. This looks to have the makings of yet another memorable story.

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10
Batman (2011) #36

Nov 13, 2014

The back-up story by James Tynion IV, joined this time by artist Graham Nolan, is another vignette demonstrating the Joker's ability to prey on the weak and, more specifically, the mentally unstable. Nolan's marriage of classic comic book art with cartoonish elements is a perfect match for Tynion's disturbing script. The eerie tale makes for an excellent complement to Snyder's main narrative, further fleshing out the world of "Endgame."

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9.0
Batman (2011) #37

Dec 17, 2014

Batman #37 is a fantastic issue. The marriage of Snyder's dark script, the detailed work of Capullo and Miki, and vibrant colors of Plascencia create an unnerving experience for the reader. “Endgame” was billed asthe creative team going big to close out the character's 75th anniversary, and they are delivering in spades. Terrifying, grinning spades.

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7.0
Batman (2011): Futures End #1

Sep 11, 2014

Minor issues aside, Batman: Futures End #1 is an enjoyable issue. Those that have been reading Futures End are encouraged to pick this up, as it further builds the world with something some of the other tie-ins have lacked: competence. Those that haven't and just want a solid Batman story could do much worse than picking this up.

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7.0
Batman: Eternal #3

Apr 25, 2014

SCORE: 7/10Related Articles:Secret Origins #1 Review: the Man of Steel, the Boy Wonder, and the Last Daughter of KryptonThe Flash #30 ReviewAll Star Western #30 ReviewRed Lanterns #30 Review: Judgment Day Part 1Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

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6.0
Batman: Eternal #6

May 19, 2014

Batwing's inclusion is welcome, if only to remind everyone but that he's still around (with a very good solo book on the stands) and is an active member of the Batman Family. Fawkes' incorporation of supernatural elements into the world of Batman is executed much better here than it was over the course of the dearly departed Batman: The Dark Knight. Had this story been a part its own arc in a separate title, such as the aforementioned series, it would have fared much better. Unfortunately, its inclusion in the fabric of Batman Eternal sees it slip into averageness.

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8.0
Batman: Eternal #9

Jun 5, 2014

Guillem March does an admirable job providing the art for this issue. Specifically, he does a great job in shifting his style to match the needs of a given sequence. For example, as the setting shifts to fight in Hong Kong, the artwork becomes more fluid and kinetic. When Batman and Jiro are reviewing intel on a computerized screen, he uses a scratchier style to better portray shadows to great effect. Again, it's this attention to detail that makes this issue of Batman Eternal one of the stronger issues of the series.

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7.0
Booster Gold: Futures End #1

Sep 25, 2014

Booster Gold: Futures End #1 contains big concepts that may shake the foundation of the current DC Universe. This issue is clearly intended play a pivotal role in DC's grand plans, but the script causes it to feel dated in a manner that many readers may have difficulty looking past. Those that can look past it are rewarded with a book that explores concepts and worlds long thought to be lost in the wake of Flashpoint. The continuity of the DC Universe just became a much muddier… and a lot more interesting.

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8.0
Captain Marvel (2014) #7

Sep 11, 2014

Captain Marvel continues to lead the charge for Marvel, pushing the publisher towards both greater gender equality and high-quality, fun fare. Issue #7 is business as usual for the series, which is to say that it's an easy recommendation.

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8.0
Captain Marvel (2014) #8

Oct 12, 2014

Consistent with the issues that have come before it, Captain Marvel #8 is an enjoyable, cosmic adventure in the Marvel Universe. DeConnick's work in developing Carol Danvers has made this into a must-read title.

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8.0
Captain Marvel (2014) #9

Nov 15, 2014

Month after month, Captain Marvel proves to be one of the most consistent, enjoyable titles being published. This isn't an epic, universe changing title but a 20-page party – and that's exactly the way it should stay.

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8.0
Captain Marvel (2014) #10

Dec 19, 2014

Captain Marvel #10does not push the overall story forward, but that's not its intention.The common through-line is that Carol Danvers' presence in these character's lives has made them better and stronger individuals.She has risen to become an inspirationalfigure in the Marvel Universe – one whose ideals both supporting cast members and readers alike can aspire towards. To that end, this collaboration between DeConnick, Lopez, Takara, and Braga is a rousing success.

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9.0
Daredevil (2014) #7

Aug 22, 2014

Though many of the tie-ins to Original Sin have been somewhat of a mixed bag, Waid is manages to wrap his up with a strong, emotional punch. In becoming the longest-running creator on a Daredevil series (dating back to the previous volume), Waid has demonstrated many times his intricate knowledge of Matt Murdock's psyche. Given the personal tragedies he has suffered and quippy dialogue, it is easy for casual readers or those unfamiliar to think of Daredevil as a second-rate Spider-man. However, Waid's pen delivers moments, such as in the issue's closing pages, filled with intense, emotional weight that allow Murdock's character to fully shine through. The setup of the previous issue pays huge dividends in a manner that will force many readers to hold back tears.Daredevil may be one of the most fun superhero titles on shelves today, but strong finishes such as this arewhat raisesit into a class unto itself.

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9.0
Daredevil (2014) #8

Sep 19, 2014

Daredevil #8 continues the series' gold standard of excellence. Despite its lack of superheroics, Waid and Samnee have begun their latest arc is stellar fashion. There may come a day when Daredevil is not worth checking out, but today is not that day. This remains a must-read title.

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9.0
Daredevil (2014) #9

Oct 16, 2014

As great as Waid's script is, Samnee's ability to translate it into art is truly special. This is no less evident than when revisiting the issue's cover after reading through it. The imagery has a simple, if somewhat abstract aesthetic. However, it is a microcosm of the issue's narrative in which Matt, seeming cheery, is forced off the deep end by the issue's antagonists, with the Purple Man at the root of it all. In one image, Samnee masterfully conveys base elements of a single issue. Anyone looking to see what he can do with a whole issue's worth of pages should check out Daredevil #9.

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9.0
Daredevil (2014) #10

Nov 21, 2014

Daredevil #10 nicely wraps the Purple Man arc, but also directly addresses one of the more prevalent mental disorders – one that affects millions of people around the world. Waid and Samnee are effectively making Matt Murdock a greater symbol than he already is. Not only is he someone that can bringhopethe physically handicapped, he now can also be look to as a beacon of light for those suffering from various mental issues. He is a truly inspirational figure, which is the mark of a hero.

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9.0
Daredevil (2014) #11

Dec 29, 2014

Waid's run onDaredevil has been a masterful exercise in storytelling. He and collaborator Chris Samnee have managed to tell fascinating tales every month, and this issue is no different. Even though there is little action, Samnee's art alone will keep readers glued to the page. Furthermore, Waid's tightly written scriptcontains several, well executed twists that will keep readers guessing with every turn of the page. Aspiring comic writers should look no further that this series for inspiration. This is superhero comics at its finest.

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8.0
Earth 2 #21

Mar 11, 2014

Reading this issue can be maddening, with each turn of the page thinking "these aren't the characters I know." Yet as the final page reaches it's conclusion, there is a desire for more. There is genius behind the insanity and mayhem Taylor and the Scotts have packed into this issue.

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8.0
Earth 2 #22

Apr 3, 2014

In between the aforementioned sequences is a moment in which Superman discovers that this group of rebellious wonders is lead by a Batman. Superman's reaction is both surprising and disappointing, as he immediately refers to the cape and cowled figure as their "greatest threat" without once questioning how he is still alive, or if it is even the same Batman he was once friends with. In an issue that otherwise hit all the right notes, it stands out as the one missed opportunity.

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6.0
Earth 2 #23

May 9, 2014

The pacing of the story is an unfortunate casualty of Taylor's slow-burn storytelling and Scott's bold illustrations. Earth 2 #23 is a transitional issue that seems intent on slowing down the title after several issues of big developments. However, Scott's large panel structure causes the issue to be an extremely quick read. Also, Taylor may have decompressed the story a little too much, as there are few developments beyond the aforementioned events.

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7.0
Flash (2011) #28

Feb 27, 2014

Buccellato's story adds some rather dark elements to to the history of the Gem Cities. This should come as no surprise to readers of Dynamite's The Black Bat, as the grim origin of Flash's hometown is fascinating while servicing the ongoing narrative in the present. Buccellato's character work continues to be strong, be it focused on the supporting cast in the Central City crime lab, or the main protagonists. The interactions between Flash and Deadman are, for the most part, entertaining. It may lack the fireworks of a confrontational pairing — such as Batman and Superman or Marvel's Wolverine and Cyclops — but Buccellato proves that putting a couple of "nice guy" characters together can work too.

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7.0
Flash (2011) #29

Mar 27, 2014

As mentioned before, the main theme presented by Buccellato is closure. This story's biggest mystery — the truth behind the relationship between Captain Frye and Barry Allen — is resolved leaving much of the previously established status quo intact. That said, new wrinkles are added to this character dynamic which the upcoming creative team should be able to play with. This includes a tantalizing nugget in the issue's closing pages, which should drive Barry Allen's story well into the foreseeable future.

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7.0
Flash (2011) #30

Apr 24, 2014

The issue's cliffhanger reveals the identity of the Future Flash, which should pose an interesting challenge for Barry in the following months. Unfortunately, the timeline that this issue establishes does seem to clash with the upcoming Futures End, which may become a source of contention. That said, readers should reserve judgment on this matter until the whole story unfolds. The Flash #30 is a somewhat flawed but promising start for what should be a fun ride.

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8.0
Flash (2011) #31

May 29, 2014

The Future Flash shows up once again, working his way back in time. His travels bring him four years into his past, which is 16 years from the present. This leads to a showdown between Future Flash and Mirror Master, which is the issue's highlight. The writing is comic-booky in the best way possible, with Future Flash finding a clever, but morally questionable foil to Scudder's scheme. Seeing Future Flash continue to compromise his morals throughout the arc has some fantastic potential for the creative team to explore, especially given his choices here. From start to finish, The Flash #31 is a dose of classic superhero fun.

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7.0
Flash (2011) #32

Jun 26, 2014

Though Francis Manapul has taken his talents to Gotham City, the art continues to be a strength of this series. Merge's unique powerset allows Brett Booth and his collaborators to create some fascinating visuals by twisting perceptions of reality. Andrew Dalhouse's colors are particularly striking, especially on the Future Flash. The different shades of blue on "other Barry" pop off the page. The art, however, is not as strong as in previous issues. There are some minor inconsistencies with character proportions – specifically the Flash's hands when running. Also, Barry is rendered with wide-swinging arms while in full sprint, which not only looks but is impractical for any runner. But despite its flaws, The Flash #32 is another entertaining chapter in the Future Flash saga.

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8.0
Flash (2011) #33

Jul 24, 2014

The Flash #33 is another rock-solid installment in the adventures of the Scarlett Speedster. The writing continues to be sharp to accompany eye-catching art. Though the story is now fiveissues in, Venditti and Jensen have crafted a single issue that is welcoming to new readers. It truly is impressive that, as the opening arc reaches its apex, the creative team continues to find new ways to pull readers in.

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6.0
Flash (2011) #34

Aug 29, 2014

Despite fleeting moments of greatness and dynamic artwork, The Flash #34 ultimately disappoints. Though by no means a terrible comic, the story fails to live up to the standard of prior issues. If there is a glimmer of hope, it's the promise of Flash vs. Flash when the series resumes in October following September's Futures End tie-in.

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5.0
Flash (2011) #35

Oct 22, 2014

Superhero comics – particularly those produced within the last several years – are inherently derivative. That is not a criticism, but a fact. Writers and artists draw from and are influenced by past story arcs as they develop the latest chapters in the serialized medium, especially at DC and Marvel. When successful, these creative teams are able to put a fresh (or at least seemingly fresh) spin on an old concept. Unfortunately, this is not the case for The Flash #35. Most of the story elements come across as tired recyclings of previously seen concepts and contradictory character portrayals.

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7.0
Flash (2011) #36

Nov 28, 2014

With a cast of characters that are currently abrasive to readers, Venditti and Jensen are making it difficult for readers to want to keep reading long-term.

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6.0
Flash (2011) #37

Dec 29, 2014

It still remains unclear where the creative team is taking this story. Though the writers are trying to make the case that the hardships he hasfaced over hiscrime-fighting career has hardened his personality,the Future Flash they have created is Barry Allen in name only. Barry is mild-mannered, hopeful in the face of tragedy, and always looking forward. These characteristics whichmake Barry Allen endearing to readers are nowhere to be found in the Future Flash. Granted, the heroic incarnation that is trapped in the Speed Force is wholly recognizable,the script gives greater attention to the alienating version from the future. This story arc has the potential to be very good, but it continues to be held back byan unfocused narrative.

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8.0
Flash (2011) Annual #3

May 1, 2014

Though bleak on the page, the future of The Flash is promising for fans of the Scarlett (and Electric Blue) Speedster. This oversized annual is equal parts world building and superhero action. Fans of both should definitely check this out.

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9.0
Flash (2011): Futures End #1

Sep 25, 2014

Though it has little to do with the main Futures End story, The Flash: Futures End #1 is a must-read for those keeping up Barry Allen's current adventures. Furthermore, it serves as an excellent jumping on point for lapsed readers, as the story should smoothly transition into The Flash #35 without the baggage of previous issues.

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6.0
Forever Evil Aftermath: Batman vs. Bane #1

May 1, 2014

These two elements make Forever Evil Aftermath: Batman vs. Bane #1 a better comic that it should be, even though it remains void of an emotional anchor (save for the happiness of Gothamites upon Batman's return). Unfortunately, readers knew Batman would survive Forever Evil, even without reading the final chapter. Forever Evil Aftermath: Batman vs. Bane #1 is nothing more than an action comic " entertaining, but offering little outside the imagery.

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8.0
Forever Evil: Rogues Rebellion #5

Feb 16, 2014

Scott Hepburn's artwork is gleefully cartoonish, which is a tonal fit for the unpredictable and wacky Rogues. His expressive work with faces is outstanding in terms of conveying the big personalities found within the pages. There is a panel where Weather Wizard discusses leaving, and Hepburn's pencils show just how heavy his thoughts are and the toll bottling them up has taken on him. This is not to say that everyone looks good under Hepburn's pen. He has drawn Mirror Master like a member of a certain team of martial artist turtles throughout the series, a trend that continues here. Despite some art hiccups, Forever Evil: Rogues Rebellion #5 relies on its strengths of slapstick humor, banter, and action to remain one of, if not the best part of DC's event.

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8.0
Forever Evil: Rogues Rebellion #6

Mar 27, 2014

If there is one major gripe about the issue, it's final splash page. The heroic poses struck by the Rogues is not the problem, it's the inclusion of the ghostly forms of Heatwave and Captain Cold. There is no real point of including them. Heatwave's status is currently up in the air, and Cold is alive and well with the Lex Luthor's Injustice Gang. Perhaps it is meant to symbolize the bond between all members of the Rogues, whether or not they are present. Or maybe Hepburn just wanted to take advantage of an opportunity and draw all of the Rogues together. In the end, it raises unnecessary questions and draws the reader out of what is an otherwise satisfying conclusion.

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6.0
Green Arrow (2011) #35

Oct 2, 2014

Green Arrow #35 is a competently constructed relaunch for one of DC's more popular characters. The characterization of Oliver Queen is endearing to both longtime and new readers, a trend which will hopefully continue as the character's classic elements are reintroduced. Should the artwork improve in consistency, Green Arrow could become one of the better "traditional" superhero comics on stands.

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6.0
Green Arrow (2011) #36

Nov 6, 2014

Green Arrow may not reach the heights of Mike Grell's, Kevin Smith's, or even Jeff Lemire's run, but what it does offer is a solid, meat and potatoes superhero story. The book does not try to reach beyond its capabilities, but instead continues to build a foundation with much room to grow. Hopefully, the series can continue to build upon itself in terms of artistic and narrative quality, but as it stands now it is just merely okay.

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7.0
Green Arrow (2011) #37

Dec 6, 2014

For readers that jumped on this series with the new creative team, Green Arrow #37is the “pull or drop” issue. While Sokolowski's script marks a step up from the previous two issues, the writing and art are just too ordinary to stand out among the myriad of great titles released each month. Fans of the character may wish to stick around, but those looking for something more than standard superhero fare should look elsewhere.

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9.0
Infinity Man And The Forever People #1

Jun 11, 2014

Infinity Man and the Forever People #1 is a fantastic jumping on point that is accessible to long-time and new readers alike. The fantastic art and character-driven writing embraces the many enduring elements of Jack Kirby's Fourth World saga and brings them into the modern DC Universe with the reverence they deserve. With this in mind, the creative team still manages to update these characters and concepts for today's readers to great success. Issue #2 can't come soon enough.

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8.0
Infinity Man And The Forever People #2

Jul 10, 2014

Infinity Man and the Forever People #2 is another issue worth picking up. Didio and Giffen continue to offer engaging character interactions between the junior New Gods. Combined with bright and fun art by Grummett, Hanna, and Atiyeh, Infinity Man and the Forever Peoplefeels far from a standard DC title, which may be enough for new readers to pick it up.

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6.0
New Suicide Squad #1

Jul 10, 2014

Despite a rocky start, Suicide Squad fans shouldgive this a try. Though it pales in comparison to the legendary series by John Ostrander, it is not trying to be that and should not be judged as so. This is a perfect title for readers looking for popcorn entertainment. However, anyone looking for something with a little more character depth and stronger storytelling should give this a pass.

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9.0
Nightwing (2011) #28

Feb 16, 2014

Benefiting from kinetic artwork and a tight script, Nightwing #28 is a return to form after the average Marionette arc. Higgins gives his all in the penultimate chapter to his run, igniting anticipation for the final issue next month. With spectacular action and quality dramatic sequences, Nightwing #28 is a title that will bring smiles, and then frowns over its impending end.

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10
Nightwing (2011) #29

Mar 15, 2014

As the issue draws to a close, the optimism of Dick Grayson is felt within every panel and ultimately reaches its apex on the final page. Though the future of the character has yet to be written, this chapter of his saga has come to a conclusion. There will be more adventures of Dick Grayson in due time. However, there were no more, Nightwing #29 serves as a fantastic finale.

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5.0
Nightwing (2011) #30

May 28, 2014

The final sequence, which should be most representative of the look and feel of Grayson, is illustrated by the team of Mikel Janin and Guillermo Ortega. The change of scenery eases the transition in art, but it's nonetheless jarring going from the grittiness of Lucas' Batcave to the warmth of Janin's Middle Eastern cityscape. Seeley and King save the best for this issue's final pages. The story and action beats are well-paced, as is the the dialogue. Gone are the clunky phrases as they are replaced by ones that are more natural. If Grayson is anything like these final pages, readers should be looking forward to the next chapter in Dick Grayson's life. However, if the series ends up being like Nightwing #30 taken as a whole, they may want to wait until he returns to the vigilante lifestyle.

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9.0
Rocket Raccoon #3

Sep 5, 2014

Despite the almost surreal world Young has crafted, he manages to keep the characters fairly grounded, which best demonstrated through their dialogue. No matter the circumstances Rocket and his supporting cast find themselves in, their reactions are genuine and true to their portrayals in the greater Marvel tapestry. New readers curious about the world of Guardians of the Galaxy will be able to pick up Rocket Raccoon #3 and find the characters recognizable when compared to their cinematic counterparts. That alone makes this series a success.

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8.0
Rocket Raccoon #4

Oct 10, 2014

Rocket Raccoon #4 may not be considered to be one of the greatest books released this week, but it earns high marks for being the most entertaining. Though the story may not have the tightly wound narrative and impact on the Marvel Universe to fully justify the $3.99 price tag, the gut-busting humor will make that an afterthought. For pure, escapist fun, readers could do a lot worse than picking up Rocket Raccoon #4.

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9.0
Rocket Raccoon #5

Nov 6, 2014

Rocket Raccoon #5 is escapist, comic book fun distilled into it's purest form. As one of the more entertaining releases this week, and being a done-in-one issue, readers should grab this along with their weekly pulls. Those that are a fan of fun won't be disappointed.

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8.0
Rocket Raccoon #6

Dec 11, 2014

The script is Skottie Young at his irreverent best. Though the series may be in danger of becoming rather one-note, it has worked so far as the majority of comics published today strive to tell mature stories. Young's Cosmo has hilarious broken-English that makes the four-legged telepath sound like a Bond villain. Reading it with the voice of Dug from the Pixar film Up can further enhance the reading experience. This issue also allows Rocket the opportunity to comment on his own adventures – specifically with the recurring gag of him stating that, just for once, he'd like to be paired up with someone with a semblance of a vocabulary.As much as he may want that, it's become clear that the character works best when he does the talking for two.

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8.0
S.H.I.E.L.D. (2014) #1

Dec 31, 2014

S.H.I.E.L.D. #1is a solid first issue that anyone can pick up. Waid and his art team invite readers to follow a cast of characters that lack marquee value, but make up for it with personality and chemistry. The issue's structure sees a complete story told in the space of 30 pages while laying the seeds for a greater, overarching narrative should be enticingfor readers looking to try something a little different.Even with the $4.99 price tag, it's not a painful price to bear during this light week.

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9.0
Storm #1

Sep 4, 2014

Futures End: Green Arrow #1 is an early contender for best issue of DC's event month. Lemire and Sorrentino's last hurrah with Oliver Queen is a return to form for the character. Fans of the classic Oliver Queen, or simply fans of entertaining stories, owe it to themselves to check it out. It is sure to have them clamoring for more. Luckily, they just might get it.

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8.0
The Life After #2

Aug 21, 2014

The layers of the afterlife are peeled back in The Life After #2. Though the budding relationship between Jude and Hemingway are the issue's primary focus, perhaps the most important sequence occurs in the closing pages.There is clearly something sinister lurking behind the scenes of The Life After assuming the form of a mundane office building security room. It is this nugget of information that is certain to bring readers back.

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9.0
Wonder Woman (2011) #28

Feb 20, 2014

Herein lies the strength of Wonder Woman #28. Azzarello and Chiang have several plates spinning throughout this issue, and not once are they in any danger of dropping one. This is a dense issue, packed not only with big action, but character moments as well. Chiang's additional nuances and personality traits"along with his bombastic action sequences"are a perfect marriage to Azzarello's script.

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9.0
Wonder Woman (2011) #29

Mar 23, 2014

Despite the handling of these characters, the focus remains on Diana and what she will do in the face of a seemingly unstoppable foe. With the First Born taking control of Olympus, Diana finally accepts her title as the God of War. Despite following our heroes retreating from battle, this moment is resoundingly triumphant and earned by the creative team, accentuated by the reveal of the surviving Amazons and a restored Hera. The changes that Azzarello and Chiang bring to our characters, along with the promise of a climatic battle in the coming issues, should make Wonder Woman #29 an easy addition to anyone's pull list.

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9.0
Wonder Woman (2011) #30

Apr 17, 2014

Wonder Woman #30 is par for the course for the series, which is spectacular. Though Cliff Chaing's art is initially missed, Goran Sudzuka absolutely owns this issue. Combined with another outstanding script from Brian Azzarello, this is a series that more people need to be reading. Great story. Great art. Buy it.

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9.0
Wonder Woman (2011) #31

May 22, 2014

Goran Sudzuka's art should not be discounted. The reason Azzarello's script works so well is because his collaborator has done a masterful job turning it into visceral imagery. Because of the issue's lack of dynamic action, much of Sudzuka's efforts can be seen in the character's facial work. The expressions he uses are dynamic and varied. Even though there is a single misstep in a panel near the issue's end, it hardly detracts from another fantastic art showcase. Par for the course, Wonder Woman #31 is a must-buy issue.

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8.0
Wonder Woman (2011) #32

Jun 19, 2014

Brian Azzarello's script is a delicate balancing act positioning pieces for the final battle and delivering an effective dose of fist-pumping moments. Diana has brought together the Sons and Daughters of Themyscira, tasking Hephaestus with providing armaments for their upcoming battle with the First Born. Azzarello deftly cuts the tension with humor courtesy of Diana's appointment of Zola and Zeke's protector. This feat is repeated once more as the issue closes, as a bleak situation is turned upside down thanks to the return of a fan-favorite character. The well-balance script combined with the art make for another satisfying chapter in a definitive run for Wonder Woman.

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9.0
Wonder Woman (2011) #33

Jul 24, 2014

From the start of this run, Brian Azzarello has weaved an intricate narrative with more twists and turns than a labyrinth. Impressively, after more than thirty issues of a continuous story, he manages to keep the twists coming without them ever being stale. Superhero comics come with the built-in expectation that the hero will make it out of a predicament no matter how dire. However, Azzarello's Wonder Woman has been anything but a typical superhero comic. The stakes are real. Death is real. By flipping the readers' expectations on its head in the final pages, Azzarello has everyone hooked for the saga's finale.

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10
Wonder Woman (2011) #35

Oct 29, 2014

Brian Azzarello and Cliff Chiang's final installment of Wonder Woman sticks the landing forthischaracter-defining run. Going forward, this will be the version of the character that people will look to when asking "Who is Wonder Woman?" She is the daughter of Zeus and Hippolyta. She is Queen of the Amazons. She is the God of War. Above all else, she is Diana. Wonder Woman #35 is not a perfect comic if only because no such thing truly exists.

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10
Wytches #1

Oct 14, 2014

Wytches #1 is a near-perfect marriage of writing and artwork. Between Scott Snyder's tightly wound script and Jock's disturbing imagery, this looks to be the best horror title on the market today. Fans of the horror genre, and fans of great storytelling in general, need to read this.

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