Kate O'neil's Comic Reviews

Reviewer For: The Fandom Post Reviews: 5
7.6Avg. Review Rating

Farlaine the Goblin finally reaches the end of his journey. Sometimes you find a home and sometimes home finds you. A touching conclusion to the story of a goblin, his tree, and their robot friend. The whole series has been a light, delightful read and it's a great all-ages story that younger readers should especially enjoy. It's clever enough that older readers can stay engaged with its snappy dialog and clean, lively artwork.

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In Summary Vox Machina returns for a tale which shall bring the group together to save one of their own. If you are new to Critical Role Campaign 1 then you should start with the first mini-series. Existing fans waiting for the debut of the other two main members of Vox Machina can jump in right here. Thisvolume is delightful and I'm confident that Houser has the chops to do this part of Vox Machina's story justice. Of course, the problem with floppies is that the story barely gets going before we have to wait for the next issue. And I do want to get to the next issue, because I really want to see this adventure play out.

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With a new friend made, Vox Machina heads out to rescue their goliath friend from evil. Yet many questions still remain as to why he was targeted in the first place. Why target a dead goliath, and what brought Grog's father to that cave to begin with? When dealing with the undead you really can't be sure. The ominous foreshadowing of not all being right with their recovered friend means that the adventure will continue.

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In SummaryGrog isn't out of the woods yet. While Vox Machina struggles to find someone to help them an offer of suspicious help arrives. This issue isn't as punchy as the previous two in this story arc, but it's fun to see familiar places and people realized for the page. (And the start of a certain running gag that I was shocked made it in.) I'm excited about the next volume though, where we should finally be introduced to the last major member of the group.

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What the Last Stop of the Red Line wants to be is a question I'm left asking. A pastiche of imagery which draws from the horrors that have called Boston home, from the stories of Lovecraft to the Boston Strangler, to the racial violence to the Marathon bombing. Yet it has no voice of its own and doesn't even draw on its inspiration particularly well. The comic format doesn't give the story room to breath, there is no tension in the horror. The artwork is serviceable and some panels truly impressive, but it feels at odds with the story at large. This is just the first issue of a four-part series, and there's still time for the story to find itself, but for now, the readers are left with questions and a vague, lingering sense to not ride a subway car alone.

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