The Family Trade #1

Writer: Justin Jordan, Nikki Ryan Artist: Morgan Beem Publisher: Image Comics Release Date: October 11, 2017 Cover Price: $3.99 Critic Reviews: 13 User Reviews: 1
7.2Critic Rating
7.5User Rating

+ Pull List

"THE FAMILY," Part One
Introducing an all-new ongoing series from the creator of LUTHER STRODE, SPREAD, and DEAD BODY ROAD!
Steampunk, alchemy, and adventure meet the ocean. On an island city in a world where history didn't quite turn out like ours, a hidden family of spies, thieves, and assassins makes sure that the world keeps going. Or they did, until Jessa Wynn, their youngest member, manages to start a civil war.

  • 8.5
    Weird Science - Andrew McAvoy Oct 14, 2017

    A stunning bit of storytelling and high class artwork lend get this Oceanic Steampunk title off to a great start. It immerses readers completely within its world within the first quarter of the book, and we are hooked straight away. The sense of mystery is preserved though and this issue gives us plenty, while still leaving us hungry for more tales of intrigue and skullduggery in The Free Republic of Thessala. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    AiPT! - David Brooke Oct 10, 2017

    A strong first issue, though it does lack in some areas. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Doom Rocket - Brandy Dykhuizen Oct 16, 2017

    If there's anything to complain about in The Family Trade, it's the antagonist's Trumpian demeanor. He's an easy bad guy to hate, of course. But I, for one, am so tired of the real deal that it felt a little deflating to have to look at him here. But that's just one woman's opinion. And it almost seems possible we'll learn that the future is feline by the end of the series, so I'll keep tuning in for that. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    CourtOfNerds - Benjamin Raven Oct 12, 2017

    Any debut issue with an interesting setting and a witty, self-aware, badass female lead character is going to reel me in. The Trumpian main character will justifiably push some away, but Jordan and Ryan have built the foundation for a solid, solid series in The Family Trade. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    Black Nerd Problems - Jordan Calhoun Oct 12, 2017

    Overall, The Family Trade is a solid start with a foundation to build on: a likable protagonist, an interesting world, and an inner conflict to grow. What it needs next is character depth, both on the parts of Jessa and the family around her, and we might have an enchanting new book on our hands. Worth sticking around for issue #2 to find out. Read Full Review

  • 7.7
    Multiversity Comics - Kate Kosturski Oct 12, 2017

    There's some rather large narrative gaps for a debut issue that shouldn't have been mentioned in the solicit if they weren't going to be at least alluded to in the actual book. That aside, high praise is due to this team for writing a heroine worthy of admiration by all ages, and giving her glorious art to match. Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    Outright Geekery - Frank Gogol Oct 13, 2017

    Jordan, Ryan, and Beem's The Family Trade #1 offers a solid first issue. It won't blow reader's minds, but it's a well-designed, good-looking book with an interesting premise and some promising story aspects. It's enough to warrant coming back for another issue. The story needs to work harder in successive issues, though, to invest readers in Jessa and The Float. Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    All-Comic - Milo Milton Jefferies Oct 15, 2017

    It's a high concept story that takes plenty of risks in an original approach both in terms of story and art, and although it's early stages, there's enough potential for things to only get better from here. Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    Comics: The Gathering - Olivier Roth Oct 11, 2017

    The art is also a pretty big attraction to this series. Beem is another in a series of artists that paint everything which adds enough uniqueness to the comic that you don’t always see on the shelves. Hopefully Beem will be given enough time between issues to complete them since their style is not always great for a monthly schedule. Time will tell. Read Full Review

  • 6.5
    Comicsverse - Kat Vendetti Oct 13, 2017

    THE FAMILY TRADE #1 promises a steampunk adventure, but doesn't connect us with its characters or setting just yet. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    Newsarama - David Pepose Oct 10, 2017

    There's plenty of potential for Jordan and Ryan's high concept, but right now they seem to be resisting the endearing hooks, diving instead into the murky waters of spectacle rather than substance. There's probably a very engaging character underneath all the history of the Float, and hopefully this creative team can tap into what makes Jessa tick before readers decide to trade up elsewhere. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    Comic Bastards - Ben Snyder Oct 11, 2017

    The Family Trade #1 offers a lot of potential in its political commentary and interesting world, however the lack of exposition towards the Jessa and the out of place art ultimately sink this issue from true greatness. Read Full Review

  • 5.5
    Capeless Crusader - Jeremy Radick Oct 11, 2017

    I wish I liked The Family Trade #1 a lot more. It's hard to read a book with as much originality on display as this issue does and still have so many problems evident. At the end of the day, I wish the creative team had given me more to latch onto in terms of meat and potatoes character and structural work so that I could look forward to the next issue. It's tricky for any creators, even very good ones, to keep their excitement for their ideas from overwhelming the rather boring job of story construction. In the case of The Family Trade #1, written by Justin Jordan and Nikki Ryan with art by Morgan Beem, it definitely feels as if the team has committed this creative error. Read Full Review

  • 7.5
    Bill Blaze Oct 11, 2017

    Not to sure about this one. The art is ok I suppose, if you're into this style. It seems something more suited to a children's book. The story seems decent enough but feels like its narrated by a child. Nice concept though

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