Doom Patrol #8

Writer: Gerard Way Artist: Nick Derington Publisher: Vertigo Release Date: September 6, 2017 Cover Price: $3.99 Critic Reviews: 8 User Reviews: 4
9.0Critic Rating
8.9User Rating

+ Pull List

What is S**t, and why is everyone eating it? Cliff doesn't like it, but Casey can't get enough. Sure, Cliff doesn't like a lot of stuff, but that doesn't mean he's wrong to be suspicious this time around. Meanwhile, we find out where Lotion the cat got off to, and how his journey has changed him. Life on the streets has made him an entirely different animal!

  • 9.8
    Comicsverse - Brandon Bloxdorf Sep 6, 2017

    DOOM PATROL #8 unleashes the creative minds of Gerard Way and Nick Derington. A spectacular new arc of oddities and character building! Read Full Review

  • 9.5
    Comic Book Bin - Deejay Dayton Sep 8, 2017

    Im really not sure where Way is going to be taking this plot. All I know is that bad $#!+ is on the way. Read Full Review

  • 9.5
    IGN - Tara Giovannini Sep 7, 2017

    Look, all I'm saying is that if you thought the original Doom Patrol runs were weird, well get a load of this. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    DC Comics News - Matthew Lloyd Sep 6, 2017

    Doom Patrol continues to be a unique, interesting and challenging title. It often isn't so much about good vs. bad, but, instead how one copes with the challenges in life. This issue is a perfect example of that- the imperfect adjusting to the imperfect world that the imperfect wish were in fact, perfect. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Comics: The Gathering - Olivier Roth Sep 6, 2017

    One thing that has always been great about former Doom Patrol stories has been the sense of forced family that the characters had to endure. Here, Way and Derington do a good job portraying exactly that: Casey isn’t happy about her new position with Danny, stating that she loves her apartment, but is willing to move into Dannyland anyways. We also have Sam trying to reconcile with his wife who’s been in Crazy Jane’s cult for the past four years and their son Lucius experimenting with forces he probably shouldn’t be touching. And finally, we have Cliff beginning to worry about Trainor’s frequent trips to the dream world, leaving the real world behind. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Multiversity Comics - Nicholas Palmieri Sep 7, 2017

    This is true, unrestrained comic book joy. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Comicosity - Matt Santori Sep 6, 2017

    Theres a lot to not understand about what Gerard Way is constructing in Doom Patrol, and the deviation from even the most wacky super-hero fare is pronounced. Like Twin Peaks, we seem to be witnessing the return of the avant garde in comics that never was nearly this out there, except in our memory. The familiarity is a comfort. The originality is invigorating. And the possibility is beyond the scope of our vision. Just the way great art should be. Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    Weird Science - Reggie Hemingway Sep 6, 2017

    This issue picks up from the storylines left in issue #6, back in May. As a result, there's a lot of exposition to remind the reader of all the goings-on. There's some implied interspecies sex, and a new status for the Negative Entity, but it feels a little like we're in the tutorial stage of this Doom Patrol: The Second Arc video game. I hope the first level proper is coming next issue. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    Haand Sep 6, 2017

    A little easier to follow than how the first arc started off - but still the best kind of weird. Way's dialogue and Derington's art continue to make this one of my first reads on NCBD.

  • 9.0
    SloboSOY Sep 7, 2017

    A Bwahahaha title. This's a very strange title, have some very strange moment, a little too weird sometime, but that make me laugh & I find it good nevertheless. Casey have some good time and I find nice to see the Alien in Larry bounding with Kay. Even if he did hurt the woman without realising it. The art is perfect for this title, but the cliffhanger is very weird.

  • 9.5
    T.K. Sep 7, 2017

  • 8.0
    HOSHWE Sep 13, 2017

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