The Exterminated: X-Men #1 View Preview
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The Exterminated: X-Men #1

Writer: Zac Thompson, Lonnie Nadler, Chris Claremont Artist: Neil Edwards, Ramon Rosanas Publisher: Marvel Comics Release Date: December 5, 2018 Cover Price: $4.99 Critic Reviews: 4 User Reviews: 10
6.8Critic Rating
6.2User Rating

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EXTERMINATION AFTERMATH!
A Death in the Family!
In the aftermath of Extermination, the X-Men mourn for their fallen brother, Cable. But no one is taking it harder than his adopted daughter, Hope Summers. Will Hope be able to cope with the loss, or will she be led down a dark path that she won't be able to return from? Only Jean Grey can save Hope from herself! Plus, celebrate the life of Nathan Summers with a story from his past by Chris Claremont!
Rated T+

  • 8.0
    AiPT! - Chris Hassan Dec 5, 2018

    Fans of Cable, Hope and the Summers family, in general, will especially enjoy this one-shot that celebrates the life of Marvel's Askani'Son. Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    Comic Book Revolution - Kevin Lainez Dec 9, 2018

    X-Men: The Exterminated #1 was much better than I expected it to be. Having Hope Summers be the driving force of the main story was a smart decision. Zac Thompson and Lonnie Nadler did a good job with the execution of how Cable's death affected Hope's interaction with Jean Grey, Bishop and Deadpool. Unfortunately there was a lot of lost potential in what this issue was intended to do, partly due to the timing of X-Men: The Exterminated #1's release. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    ComicBook.com - Jamie Lovett Dec 5, 2018

    X-Men: The Extermined features two separate stories. The first is a direct follow-up to the death of Cable in Extermination. Written by Lonnie Nadler and Zac Thompson, the story focuses on Hope Summers and Jean Grey and feels like both an epilogue to Extermination and a coda to the writers' recent run on the Cable ongoing series. Read Full Review

  • 6.0
    Graphic Policy - Brett Dec 5, 2018

    The comic as a whole is ok. It never feels like it really honors Cable and by the end you're left with muttering "that's it?". Nothing is vital and again this feels more like a checking of the box than anything else. There isn't some deep thought about who Cable is or his impact on X history, instead it's a very surface level experience that lacks any real emotion or depth. Read Full Review

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