Benjamin Bailey's Comic Reviews

Reviewer For: IGN, Nerdist, Comic Book Resources Reviews: 627
7.9Avg. Review Rating

9.4
100 Bullets: Brother Lono #1

Jun 19, 2013

Of course, the star of the issue is Risso. His artwork is a sight to see, a true thing of beauty, even when it's depicting scenes of mutilation and violence. His trademark use of shadows and blacks is on full display here. Few artists can drop out detail and manage to ramp up suspense and intrigue at the same time. The aforementioned blindfold scene starts tense, goes from bad to worse, and ends in a brutal panel that's little more than an outline sprayed with a red hue. 100 Bullets: Brother Lono #1 is a showcase for two masters of the medium and it's a comic you need to read.

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8.8
100 Bullets: Brother Lono #3

Aug 21, 2013

Eduardo Risso kills it in this issue. There's a whole lot of death in these pages, including a rather brutal fate for a small, yapping dog. His dark, fluid style is one that is instantly recognizable and comforting, even when it's showcasing death and mayhem. Few creative teams sync like Azzarello and Risso. 100 Bullets: Brother Lono is a testament to that; this is brutal comic book magic happening right before our very eyes.

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7.5
47 Ronin #1

Nov 7, 2012

The book looks amazing, which is no surprise since it is drawn by Stan Sakai. His careful cartoons tell this story perfectly. Obviously, there are no anthropomorphic animals here, but Sakai is a guy who can draw samurais. He knows the time period and it shows. There is a subtle level of detail in each panel that directs your eye and helps tell the story. 47 Ronin is a book to watch, without a doubt, even if you plan on just trade-waiting the thing.

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10
A.D.: After Death #1

Oct 29, 2016

Reading AD: After Death is a haunting and beautiful experience. Lemire's art often has a dream-like quality, floating like smoke through the page. During the books' extended flashback, Snyder and Lemire create an ethereal structure, a world that always seems a moment away from collapse. There's truly something personal about AD: After Death #1, and we can only hope that continues on through the other books in the series. There is simply nothing else like this on the shelf and that's a good thing.

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7.2
Action Comics (2011) #20

May 1, 2013

The art in this issue is also plagued with a few missteps. Again, none of it is bad, but the inking duties are split between Daniel and Batt. These two have pretty different styles and it's obvious when one guy steps in and the other steps out. That's a minor problem when compared to the pacing and action, however. Many moments are unclear, like when Lex knees a guy in the nuts. It's just not put together as well as issue #19. Hopes were high for this new run, but it's looking like it might have peaked a month ago.

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9.6
Afterlife With Archie #1

Oct 10, 2013

This issue is drawn by Francesco Francavilla, in case you need that extra push towards purchasing it. Francavilla is, without a doubt, one of the best artists working in comics today. He is also the perfect guy to drawn an Archie comic filled with homages to classic horror stories. Afterlife with Archie looks downright terrifying. It oozes darkness from every panel. Some scenes are actually unsettling; they'll make you uncomfortable. I for one never thought I'd get that sort of experience out of an Archie comic, but this one delivers, no doubt. It looks amazing, channels genuine horror and is the perfect comic to read before Halloween.

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9.2
Afterlife With Archie #2

Nov 21, 2013

Francesco Francavilla does superb work in this issue. Page after page, you'll be stunned by his beautiful work. One page, in particular, features a half-eaten apple and a pool of blood in stunning juxtaposition. The dark mood and tone of this series is works largely in part because of Francavilla, a and the classic horror sensibilities he brings to page. Afterlife with Archie is crazy good, no doubt, but it also looks absolutely amazing. The art alone is worth the cover price.

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9.6
Afterlife With Archie #4

Mar 5, 2014

At this point, what else can we say about Francesco Francavilla? This is the book he was born to draw, which feels weird but it's true. The opening page, with the words "Please don't.. Don't make me do this..." is enough to send a chill down your spine. Francavilla's unique style is what sells this comic. Even the flashbacks to happier times have a sinister glow to them. Afterlife with Archie looks better than nearly every other comic on the stands. It's genuinely scary and that is no small feat.

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8.0
Age of Apocalypse Vol.2 #2

Apr 4, 2012

Where the book is lacking is a strong central character. Our narrator is not the most interesting writer to ever grace the page; far from it in fact. The rest of the resistance is filled with fun heroes, but nobody stands out as the one this series is all about. It's hard to really care if somebody lives or dies. Issue #2, like issue #1, is a story of a place and a time. It'd be nice to have a few people to care about, too. Hopefully by the time issue #3 rolls around we'll get someone we can grasp on to.

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8.5
Age of Apocalypse Vol.2 #3

May 3, 2012

As usual, Roberto De La Torre is a superstar. His gritty style controls every page, letting the harshness of the world infect every panel. Plus, this issue comes with the added bonus of extreme violence. It's the at the level of a MAX issue, but for a book that is rated 12+, things sure do get bloody. Knives through throats, bullets through brains, Del La Torre draws all it splendidly. It's fantastic to look at, even though you might need to go fly a kite and eat a lollipop afterwards so that you remember life is worth living.

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7.0
Age of Apocalypse Vol.2 #4

Jun 6, 2012

The problem this issue has is in its art. Roberto De La Torre is joined by Renato Arlem this time around, and the whole package suffers. There are panels that are so confusing, so oddly composed, that I still am not entirely sure what I was looking at. This becomes very problematic during the fight scene. Is that Weapon Omega or Beast? Is that Prophet or Horror Show? What the hell is going on? It's a major bummer, because De La Torre's art has been the high point of this series so far. To see it become such a mess is borderline heartbreaking.

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7.5
Age of Apocalypse Vol.2 #5

Jul 5, 2012

The biggest change this issue is Davide Gianfelice taking over for Roberto De La Torre on art. Gianfelice is a certainly a capable artist and his pages look good, but he doesn't quite fit this series the way De La Torre did. The art is clearer, simpler as opposed the dark, gritty look the book had in the past four issues. Horror Show looks less horrifying, for instance. The world lacks that destroyed, futile feeling that used to haunt the pages. It's not that Gianfelice is doing a bad job, but his art just doesn't mesh with the mood and setting of this series the way previous artists have.

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7.5
Age of Apocalypse Vol.2 #6

Aug 1, 2012

Renato Arlem returns to art duites in this issue and the series is better for it. His dark, detailed style is exactly what was missing from the previous issue. The world has that decayed, war-ravaged look again. The characters look beaten and battle weary. It's exactly the way the Age of Apocalypse universe should look. This issue also has a large focus on Deadeye and Arlem gives her a complexity and intensity that is truly beautiful.

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7.5
Age of Apocalypse Vol.2 #7

Sep 5, 2012

Renato Arlem is really coming into his own on this series. You can see his work grow and improve with each issue. The good here far out ways the bad. Some scenes don't look quite as good as you might hope, like when Prophet throws down with a tyrannosaurus rex. Still, it's a solid looking issue and another fun chapter in a crazy, brutal version of the Marvel Universe.

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8.5
Age of Apocalypse Vol.2 #9

Nov 7, 2012

Artist Roberto De La Torre makes a return here and it is a triumphant one. His dirty, scratchy style fits the world like a glove. Everything has a broken, desolate look. If anything, it's almost too bleak. It makes the scenes where characters do normal things, like go out to dinner, look strangely horrifying. Still, his beautifully rendered darkness has been sorely missed. Age of Apocalypse is a book worth reading, and one that doesn't require you to follow six other titles.

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6.5
All-New Invaders #2

Feb 5, 2014

Pugh's art is solid, if slightly confusing at times. Some of the characters' poses look off, especially in the opening scene with Bucky. The fights are chaotic, as they should be, but there's just too many energy beams and too much fire flying around to accurately follow what is happening all the time. That said, Pugh draws an awesome looking Captain America and any page that features Steve Rogers looks fantastic. All-New Invaders has a way to go before it becomes a must-buy comic, but it's fun enough with some great looking Captain America pages, so it could be worse.

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8.0
All-New X-Men #2

Nov 28, 2012

The only problem this book has is the use of darkness. Whether this is a result of Wade von Grawbadger's inks or Marte Gracia's colors isn't clear, but there is far too much black in this issue. Characters are shrouded in shadows, even when they are outside in broad daylight. This wasn't a problem in the first issue, which might mean it's a conscious decision. If that's the case, it's an odd one, because it certainly doesn't make the book look better.

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8.0
All-New X-Men #3

Dec 5, 2012

Stuart Immonen's art is good, for the most part. There a few scenes where the action becomes a bit muddled, but the characters look great throughout the issue. It is a little weird when Emma Frost shows up in the middle of a field carrying an iPad, but maybe that's what Bendis wrote in the script? Either way, it's a somewhat odd moment. Still, Cyclops looks awesome, his powers look insane, and I swear Immonen draws the coolest-looking Magneto ever. He's like an evil, magnet wizard who's always drenched in shadow.

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7.7
All-New X-Men #4

Dec 19, 2012

Stuart Immonen does his usual awesome stuff with these pages. His layouts are fantastic. Few artists handle the Bendis double-page spread as well as Immonen. You never get lost or confused. The characters look superb and the action looks even better. Immonen is a welcome addition to the X-Men universe, and hopefully the insane shipping schedule doesn't force him to duck out early.

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8.6
All-New X-Men #8

Mar 6, 2013

Since this is a character driven book, it greatly helps that one of best character artists in the biz is drawing it. David Marquez draws people talking better than almost anybody. There's so much expression and emotion in every panel it brings a tear to my eye (figuratively). It's truly superb. I'd love to see him draw an Adventures of Young Iceman and Kitty Pride book (literally), because that scene absolutely steals the show. That said, his work isn't without a few missteps. Some of the action is a little confusing and we lose the background a bit too often. Still, you'd be hard pressed to find a better looking book than All-New X-Men #8 this week. It's slick, no doubt.

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8.5
All-New X-Men #10

Apr 3, 2013

As usual, the biggest strength of the issue is the dialogue. Brian Bendis gives each character a distinct voice. Kitty Pride, Bobby, Jean Grey and Wolverine run this book and make it work. Cyclops, past and present, is less compelling, but he does serve the purpose of being the mutant you can love to hate. All-New X-Men #10 is a great reminder that the X portion of the Marvel Universe is firing on all cylinders right now.

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8.3
All-New X-Men #12

Jun 5, 2013

Stuart Immonen dazzles here, even though the bulk of the time he is just drawing people yelling at each other in a field. Bendis does give him one particularly awesome page to draw, and even though it's just an illusion, it looks pretty freaking amazing. Credit must be given to colorist Rain Beredo, who really brings the confrontation in the field to life. It's a scene that takes place in the black of night, and the way he captures the lights of nearby aircrafts is a true thing of beauty. Even if you hate those talky Bendis comics, you'll have a hard time not giving this one a shot because it just looks so damn pretty.

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9.0
All-New X-Men #13

Jun 26, 2013

Stuart Immonen does his best work of the series here. The very first page is breathtaking, a true "holy crap!" moment that'll make you power through the rest of the book to find out exactly what is going on. Some of the female face work is a bit off at times, but the action looks so very, very sweet that you'll hardly notice that you can't quite tell what emotion you are supposed to be reading on Madame Hydra's face. The best bits come in Immonen's layouts. Those Bendis double-page spreads have rarely looked so good. This is the best issue yet in an already stellar series.

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6.5
All-New X-Men #15

Aug 7, 2013

The art this issue suffers a little, too. Lafuente has a drastically different style when compared to the artists that came before. He's good, but there is a severe lack of detail in this issue. For every great looking panel, there are eight that have no background whatsoever. It's hard to get a feel for where people are standing and how scenes are flowing. His characters, however, look fantastic. They are expressive and bold, showcasing great humor and emotion. They just seem to be expressing these emotions on an empty sound stage.

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8.0
All-Star Western #9

May 23, 2012

In the main feature, Moritat's art is solid, if varied. His work has been said to vary from month to month, but in this issue it seems to vary from page to page. Some of it is incredible and some of it feels half-finished. Sometimes, this happens on the same page. It can be a bit jarring, but none of it is even close to what I would call bad. It's all good, but you kind of wish it was all great. In the back-up story, Patrick Scherberger does an awesome job with the few pages he is given. His style is very detailed and controlled, with plenty of character. He's just another part of the awesome package that is All-Star Western.

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8.5
America's Got Powers #1

Apr 11, 2012

The series co-creator, Bryan Hitch, is probably the perfect artist for this book. Hitch practically invented widescreen comics -- first on The Authority, later with The Ultimates -- so who better to give America's Got Power the big, exciting feel it needs? The action is epic; the panels feel like shots from a movie. Of course, as with all of Hitch's work, if photo referenced characters bother you, you're going to have a bone to pick with this book. I have always found Hitch to be one of the few artists that is able to make characters look like celebrities without making them feel stiff and unnatural. Some people can't get passed that sort of thing, but it's worth your time to try, because there is a great book waiting for you if you do.

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8.0
America's Got Powers #2

May 30, 2012

Right?!

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8.0
America's Got Powers #3

Aug 22, 2012

Bryan Hitch delivers his usual dynamic, detailed artwork. America's Got Powers might take a while to come out, but it looks quite nice once it arrives. His work has always had a realistic quality to it; a fine sense of space and perspective. There are a few moments in this issue where the characters look a bit stiff, with almost a mannequin like quality. For the most part though, everything looks good. Hitch draws superhero books as good, if not better, than any artist out there.

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8.6
American Vampire Anthology #1

Aug 28, 2013

Where American Vampire Anthology #1 truly succeeds is in its art. We get work from Francesco Francavilla, Becky Cloonan, Gabriel Ba, Fabio Moon, and the always amazing Rafael Albuquerque in one freaking comic book. Obviously, this is one gorgeous looking comic. Every artist brings something different to the table while still managing to capture the look and feel of this world. Ba and Moon do this best, delivering a story that captures the soulful spirit of American Vampire while still finding something unique and exciting. Anthologies often get a bum rap these days, but this comic proves that when it's done right you can create something truly special. Plus, more American Vampire is never, ever a bad thing.

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8.5
American Vampire: Second Cycle #1

Mar 19, 2014

Rafael Albuquerque's stunning artwork is always a treat. He brings his usual flair for dark, gritty violence and scary-as-hell looking vampires to this issue. The opening is a little cold " both in setting and art " and doesn't quite pack the punch you get in the rest of the issue. The best scene involves Pearl standing, gun in hand, ready to defend her home from some would-be vampire hunters. It's beautiful stuff and great reminder as to why American Vampire is so highly regarded. We're glad you are back, boys.

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8.7
American Vampire: The Long Road to Hell #1

Jun 12, 2013

Story aside, this thing is freaking gorgeous. Rafael Albuquerque does some beautiful work in these pages. His visual storytelling is is second to none. There are a few moments when the characters' faces don't look quite as good as we are used to, but it's a minor offense in a sea of beauty. Dave McCaig's colors are on another level, as well. There's a dynamic shift in tone that happens through the coloring as scenes change and the story grows darker. You aren't staying long, American Vampire, but it was great to have you back. You are always welcome here.

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8.6
Archer & Armstrong #0.2014

Feb 6, 2014

Pere Perez is so freaking good. His clean, smooth style is always a treat. This issue is one of his best looking in recent memory. The characters are expressive and dynamic. There's no real action to speak of, but Perez still manages to inject a sense of fluid grace into the entire issue. There's nota single wasted line here, not one out of place shadow. Any time you see Pere Perez's name on a comic, you know it's at least worth a look. The dude can draw, without a doubt.

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9.0
Archer & Armstrong #1

Aug 8, 2012

If you are looking for some great superhero books outside of the usual tights and fights, then check out what Valiant is doing. Every book they have launched has been a great read. Archer & Armstrong is no different. It's fun, action-packed, and interesting, which is more than can be said about most superhero comics on the stand these days.

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9.0
Archer & Armstrong #2

Sep 5, 2012

Of course, a huge part of the book's charm and humor comes from Clayton Henry's artwork. He handles the action well enough, but he really nails the smaller moments; the looks that Archer and Armstrong give to each other. This is a great looking comic book that deserves your attention. Plus, in this issue he draws some ninja nuns. If the idea of Archer and Armstrong throwing down with ninja nuns doesn't get you excited, then you are truly lost.

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9.4
Archer & Armstrong #4

Nov 14, 2012

Since the first issue, Archer & Armstrong has looked amazing, too, and that is thanks to Clayton Henry. This time around he is assisted by Pere Perez, but fear not, the art doesn't miss a step. It's just as stunning as always. Henry's action looks awesome, but he truly knocks it out of the park when it comes to the humor. The looks on characters' faces; the expressions and the reactions. That's where this book really shines. If you aren't buying Archer & Armstrong, then use that extra money you save each month to buy a hammer and hit yourself in the head.

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8.5
Archer & Armstrong #6

Jan 16, 2013

Emanuela Lupacchino does some killer pencil work in this issue, drawing everything from pirates to epic gun fights to a tea party with a monkey. Guillermo Ortego's inks and Matt Milla's colors add to the solid art package. Archer & Armstrong is a great looking comic book all around. The characters look fantastic, the action moves wonderfully, and the humor always hits home. Valiant knows what they are doing, folks. This is just good comic booking.

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8.4
Archer & Armstrong #7

Feb 14, 2013

Emanuela Lupacchino does some great work here. Her style is vibrant and brings an energy to the page. When the action is front and center, the issue looks brilliant. She struggles a little in the quieter moments with the staging and perspective, but once people are driving cars through office buildings and spraying machine gun fire into villainous cults all is forgiven. The colors, by Matt Milla, feel little bizarre at times. There are florescent green tree lines and few too many neon backgrounds, but they don't drag the book down too much. Archer and Armstrong is just too good to let a little thing like overly bright coloring stop it.

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8.8
Archer & Armstrong #8

Mar 13, 2013

Emanuela Lupacchino handles pencils this issue, with inks by Guillermo Ortego and colors courtesy of Matt Milla. Things look slick and everyone really seems to click. The art has a smooth, finished look that makes this an easy read. If there is one standout point, it's Milla's colors, which are simply stunning. Scene transitions work perfectly thanks to shifts in color and tone. Archer & Armstrong #8 is just a good comic book. Valiant knows how to do it and do it well.

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8.9
Archer & Armstrong #9

Apr 11, 2013

This issue apparently had two artists, but I never noticed when one started and another stopped. Emanuela Lupacchino and Alvero Martinez divide up the issue seamlessly. Valiant is employing this whole multiple-artist-in-each-issue thing and the results can be varied. Here, it works just fine. Sometimes, it's a little hard to tell where the characters are positioned in a battle, but all in all things look great. Archer & Armstrong is, without a doubt, Valiant's best series. And that's sayin' something.

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9.0
Archer & Armstrong #10

Jun 5, 2013

Artist Pere Perez steps in this issue and knocks it out of the park. He's the sole artist on the book and definitely nails the tone and feel right from the get-go. The characters look great, the action is frantic and fun, and the humor is spot on. Hopefully, Perez sticks around for a while because his style fits this series like a glove. Archer and Armstrong is the comic book we deserve, people. Give it all your monies.

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7.6
Archer & Armstrong #13

Sep 11, 2013

Pere Perez's art looks as slick as ever. He's a fantastic storyteller that knows how to compose a kick ass page. Archer and Armstrong really gives him a chance to draw just about everything and he draws it all very, very well. The only hangup in this particular issue is the coloring. David Baron goes for an extremely bright palette that starts wear on the eyes. It does inject a sense of wonder and splendor into Faraway, but holy geez is that a bright green. It almost glows, which might not be the desired effect.

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8.5
Archer & Armstrong #14

Oct 9, 2013

Khari Evans' art looks great. Some scenes feel a little crowded and some of the action a bit muddled, but overall the issue is awesome. Archer's dark, amusement park battle is a highlight, for sure. He gets to really cut loose here, drawing different factions of the sect that range from the cool (Sisters of Perpetual Darkness) to the incredibly bizarre (Black Bloc). There's a lot going on, but Evans is the right guy to draw it all. As usual, Archer and Armstrong is a must read.

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8.7
Archer & Armstrong #15

Nov 14, 2013

Khari Evans is on art for this issue, with a little help from ChrisCross, and book looks good. Evans isn't a perfect fit for this series, but it doesn't drag the issue down at all. The characters look a little puffier than usual, but since they're drunk the whole time, it's forgivable, I suppose. Evans nails the comedic tone, and that's what is really important in a comic like this. The look on a henchman's face when he realizes a plan calls for his own death is priceless. There are tons of great moment like that throughout this issue, which makes for one great comic book.

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7.8
Archer & Armstrong #16

Dec 12, 2013

Khari Evans and ChrisCross are on art, once again, and this issue looks pretty good. Evans does a fine job, although he's still not a great match for this series. As previously stated, this issue has tons of action, and both arts deliver on those scenes big time. Every other page features explosions, stabbings and other violent acts. There are times when the character look a little too puffy in the face, like everyone has had a too much to drink (maybe they have?) and many of the characters look incredibly similar. It's not bad, but you'll not all the Egyptians look like the same dude. Kinda weird.

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7.5
Ash and the Army of Darkness #1

Oct 30, 2013

Dennis Calero provides the art for this issue, and while his stuff is usually great, it feels like there's a bit of a disconnect here. His layouts are bold and frantic, but they page often feel empty. The characters look great, if somewhat stiff at times, but the setting and world are barren. There's a lack of backgrounds and texture, which only adds to the sparse feeling. Fortunately, he does provide a great sense of atmosphere and mood, which goes a long way. Ash and The Army of Darkness is still a fun ride, and a must read for fans of the films.

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6.1
Avengers (2010) #31

Oct 10, 2012

The art in this issue is a little off putting. Brandon Peterson and Mike Mayhem are both credited as artists here, although it doesn't say who draws what. The artist who drew the first scene kills it. Looks great. The bulk of the book, however, looks awkward and far too photo referenced. Is Wonder Man (hate you so much) pissed off or taking a dump? It just looks weird and staged. This is not a terribly exciting issue to begin with and then you add in strangely posed characters taking dumps while floating in in New York City? There are better Avengers books out there, people.

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5.5
Avengers (2012) #4

Jan 30, 2013

The art in this issue doesn't do much to help the situation. Adam Kubert is a legend in the comic industry and rightfully so, but this is not his best work. For every finely detailed panel there are several that look rushed and half finished. The characters' faces rarely display any kind of emotion, which renders the scenes stiff and boring. It just doesn't flow, and it doesn't grab you. Avengers was a book we were incredibly excited for and one that is slowly becoming a major letdown. Here's hoping it gets back on track and brings the pie.

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7.0
Avengers (2012) #7

Mar 6, 2013

Dustin Weaver steps in to the art shoes on this issue, and he does some really solid work. His storytelling is clear and nicely structured, serving Hickman's widescreen, epic script very well. There are times when his characters look a bit too stiff and posed, however; especially in the scenes featuring everyday folks. His superheroes, on the other hand, look fantastic. Hopefully we'll get some more Cap and Iron Man suiting up for action in coming issues, because they look ready badass and ready to rumble.

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4.9
Avengers Assemble Annual #1

Feb 6, 2013

When it comes to the art, this issue is an utter mess. Tomm Coker is credited on the cover, but inside we have five artists listed. That's right, five! It's hard to say who is doing what, but in general the book looks very, very flat. It's stiff and lacks any movement. When the characters are just standing around talking, it looks fine, but once the action starts it becomes a disaster. The scenes are clunky and awkwardly staged. The colors are blocky and overdone. There are even a few moments where I swear the art is just copied and pasted from a previous panel. Avengers Assemble Annual #1 is an odd book and one that Avengers fans could, and should, probably skip.

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8.5
Avengers Assemble #9

Nov 14, 2012

Stefano Caselli absolutely rocks this book. It's incredible looking. The double spread that features Hulk and Iron Man could be a poster. In fact, it should be a poster. Get on that, Marvel. Of course, since the bulk of this issue is heroes talking, Caselli gets lots of opportunity to do some amazing character work. It all looks great. Unfortunately, he doesn't get to cut loose on too much action here, but that seems to be coming in the next issue, which means you should buy the next issue.

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6.5
Avengers Assemble #12

Feb 14, 2013

The art doesn't help things much, as Pete Woods' pencils devolve throughout the course of the issue. The book starts off looking pretty great and slowly becomes stiff and bland. The character anatomy doesn't look quite right (Spider-Woman's arm looks like it is stretching off the page at one point) and the emotion lacks any real punch. Woods does draw some awesome lizard monsters, but that's not enough to keep the story afloat. In general, there is a very underwhelming feeling that fills every page of this issue, which is a bummer when you remember how great the last arc was.

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6.3
Avengers Assemble #13

Mar 13, 2013

Where things really fall apart though is the art. This issue lists three artist, Pete Woods, Mark Bagley, and Scott Hanna. The first two pages look fantastic and then things quickly decline. Characters' heads look odd and misshapen, the action is muddled, and the backgrounds disappear every other panel. This issue just looks rushed, like it was hastily thrown together to meet a deadline. It's a real bummer, because the world needs a good, fun Avengers book.

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7.8
Avengers Assemble #14AU

Apr 11, 2013

Fortunately, Black Widow looks amazing thanks to the skillful line work of Butch Guice. He nails all the character moments, especially the opening scene. However, things get a bit choppy when the action hits and it's not always clear what's happening and who's getting hit. There was moment where I could have sworn Black Widow had her head blown off by an Ultron laser, which of course turned out not to be the case. Frank D'Armata provides some killer colors in this issue, really giving the aforementioned opening scene a sense of life and fun. Obviously, things don't stay fun for very long.

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7.0
Avengers Assemble #16

Jun 12, 2013

The art provided by Matteo Buffagni is not your typical superhero fare. His character work is exaggerated and fantastic. The Hulk is especially great since it appears his stance and movements were based off of a gorilla. There's a really sense of energy in these pages. Unfortunately, it's not all good. Some of the action is structured strangely and as a result is hard to follow. It took me multiple reads to figure out exactly how the Avengers beat the Brood and I'm still not 100% sure that I'm even right. It's confusing, to say the least.

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10
Avengers: Rage Of Ultron OGN #1

Mar 31, 2015

Avengers: Rage of Ultron is worth your time and money. It's slick and alluring graphic novel that reads like the epic ending to a hard-fought trilogy. There's a lot to enjoy in these pages, and if you are fan of Remender's Marvel work, there's a lot to love. For our money, this how the Avengers should look and feel. Gigantic in scope, but overflowing with heart and unity, this is superhero action done right. Earth's Mightiest Heroes indeed.

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8.1
Avengers: The Enemy Within #1

May 15, 2013

Scott Hepburn handles art for this issue, and he gives us some really strong and detailed pages. Every page feels fully loaded, packed to the edges with gorgeous artwork. The action looks awesome and the dinosaurs (yes, there are dinosaurs) are a thing of beauty. There are a few hiccups, mostly in the character's faces, where things look a little off, but it's never bad enough to slow you down. This is a fun comic to read and a snazzy one to gaze upon. It might be unnecessary, but it's clear that DeConnick and Hepburn are giving it their all.

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9.0
Axe Cop: President Of The World #1

Jul 25, 2012

I'm just glad we live in a world where Axe Cop: President of the World exists.

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9.0
Axe Cop: President Of The World #2

Aug 29, 2012

Ethan Nicolle really goes big in this issue. The opening double-page spread looks massive and wonderful. He pulls things back in this issue, packing less panels into each page and letting the action really take the front seat (and there is a lot of action). He manages to draw everything that his little younger partner throws at him, including things like a scene where Junior Cobb punches things in space in order to propel himself back to Earth. It's insane and brilliant all at the same time. It's Axe Cop.

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9.8
Batman '66 #1

Jul 3, 2013

DC makes great use of the digital medium too, giving Case's artwork time to shine before a "POW!" pops across the screen, a la the old show. It's glorious stuff. The popup speech balloons aren't exactly needed, and there a few times where the colors and the artwork don't line up giving the book a "3D without glasses look" which is weird. Still, this is the best dollar you'll spend all week, it's amazeballs of the highest order.

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9.5
Batman '66 #2

Jul 10, 2013

Jeff Parker delivers again as well. Like the first issue, he ramps up the action and set pieces, giving us a story with big action, big laughs, and a really awkward moment between Batman and Dracula. What really makes the issue work is that Parker plays it straight. He embraces the camp and ridiculous nature of the series without poking fun at it. Without a doubt, Batman '66 is quickly giving the other Bat titles a run for their money. This just might be the best book DC is doing right now, in my opinion.

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9.7
Batman (2011) #13

Oct 10, 2012

DC has been touting this issue a lot. Joker coming back certainly is a big deal, but when it comes down to it, this is just another fantastic issue in one of the best Batman runs in the history of the character. The fact that two of the biggest names in the industry are handling the return of the Joker is just icing on the cake. Welcome back, Mister J. Batman probably didn't miss you, but we sure did.

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8.9
Batman and Robin (2011) #23.2

Sep 11, 2013

Artist Jorge Lucas deserves some mega praise; he brings so much to these pages. The aforementioned sense of horror and dread is brought to life thanks to his dark, visceral artwork. His superb style grounds the issue and makes it feel more like a sinister crime story and less like an over the top supervillain tale. His Talons look brutal and violent, his Gotham is seedy and broken. This is a seriously killer issue and worth picking up even if Villains Month isn't your thing.

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6.5
Batman and Robin (2011) #23.3

Sep 18, 2013

Jeremy Haun is a superb artist who tends to produce some exciting and dynamic panels. This isn't his best work, but it still looks pretty damn good. Unfortunately, John Rausch's colors don't click with Haun's art and the end result is a little off. Rausch's coloring is bright, slightly cartoony, and heavy on the shading. A lot of the time, it looks like it's sitting on top of the art instead of becoming a part of it. It's not all bad, there are a few panels that look great, but the overall package is not what you would hope.

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7.5
Batman Incorporated #0

Sep 26, 2012

Frazer Irving handles art for this issue, and it looks pretty great. The layouts and colors really shine, even when his characters feel a bit stiff. It's a pretty damn good looking book. The pages just pop. The only thing that seems to be missing are backgrounds. Irving drops a traditional background out in place of a wall of color and he does it a lot. At least once a page, sometimes more. This sort of maneuver can have a great effect, but not when it's do as frequently as it is in this issue. Backgrounds aside, this is one very handsome issue of Batman, Inc.

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9.0
Batman Incorporated #2

Jun 27, 2012

Chris Burnham's artwork is topnotch, as usual. In the last issue, he delivered panel after panel of action. Here, the action happens between the panels. We get the moments before and the scene after. It works brilliantly, and fits the narrative structure of this issue like a glove. Of course, Burnham's biggest strength has always been his character work, and that is in full display within these pages. When Talia give's a raised eyebrow and sly smirk to a would be kidnapper, he asks if she is trying to hypnotize him. Looking at Burnham's beautifully rendered panel, it's a pretty fair question.

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8.5
Batman Incorporated #3

Aug 22, 2012

Even if you hate Morrison's story and, at times, stiff dialogue, you can enjoy the flawless work of Chris Burnham. This issue, like the two before, looks freaking great. Every page is finely detailed, every character wonderfully expressive, and every horror is truly ghastly. The overall zany quality of this book is perfectly captured by Burnham's art. There's teeth being kicked out of heads, deformed monsters of men, slick new costumes and plenty of other inspired insanities. It all looks good. If nothing else, this is a beautiful book. Seriously, no matter what the story or who the character, if Burnham is drawing, it's worth your hard earned pennies.

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8.8
Batman Incorporated #4

Oct 24, 2012

Chris Burnham delivers the goods, as usual, here. His work seems little sketchier than usual, a bit more frantic and loose, which is not a bad thing given the issues level of action and movement. His panel layout in the first few pages is awesome stuff, adding to the desperate, chaotic feel of the scene. This is another entertaining and expertly drawn issue of Batman Incorporated.

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8.5
Batman Incorporated #5

Nov 28, 2012

As cool as the glimpse into a possible dark future is, the real hook of this book is the cliff hanger. The ending of this book is devastating. Say it ain't so, Morrison. Say it's all a clever ruse, that you are merely pulling our collective chain. So far, Batman Incorporated has pulled the rug out from under us more than once, so let's just hope that this one is another misdirect. Either way, Morrison is at least bring his Batman yarn to a close in epic fashion.

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8.3
Batman Incorporated #6

Jan 2, 2013

The art in this issue is good, if a bit inconsistent. The credits list Andres Guinaldo as providing additional art pages. It's not entirely clear what this means, but it's very obvious something changes during those pages. Chris Burnham's heavily detailed, scratchy art style suddenly becomes smooth. Maybe it's because Burnham didn't draw these pages at all or perhaps Guinaldo merely provided inks? Whatever the case, it's a bit odd that the look of the book suddenly shifts for about three pages and then returns to normal. It's not bad looking, but it's noticeable.

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6.6
Batman Incorporated #7

Jan 30, 2013

Where things have started to suffer the most in Batman Incorporated is in the art. This issue has the weakest work Burnham has delivered thus far. The perspective never seems quite right; the characters anatomy is awkward. Moments like when Hood suddenly switches sides look stiff and staged. Backgrounds all but disappear far too often. Burnham is a fantastic artist who has given us issue after issue of fantastic art, but Batman Incorporated #7 is a misstep and a lackluster time all around.

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6.8
Batman Incorporated #10

Apr 24, 2013

Once again, artist Chris Burnham is assisted by two other artists. Jason Masters and Andrei Bressan each take a few pages, presumably to ensure that Batman Incorporated comes out on a regular, monthly schedule. While that may be a noble cause, it's a bummer that Burnham couldn't be given the time he needed to complete a full issue. Masters and Bressan blend nicely with his style, but there is a noticeable shift when they jump in for a page or two. This close to the end, DC should really just let Burnham finish out the series himself.

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6.0
Batman Incorporated #11

May 22, 2013

Jorge Lucas steps in on art and much like the script, it's a mix of good and bad. Some pages -- like when the Batman of Japan makes his first costumed appearance -- look finely detailed and dynamic. Other pages are awkwardly staged and missing backgrounds. The whole package is a mixed bag. If, this close to the end, you are going to do a one-off story, it really needs give us a bit more than this issue does. Batman Inc. #11 just feels like filler and now is not the time for filler.

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7.2
Batman Incorporated #12

Jul 3, 2013

Chris Burnham gets to pencil the whole book this time around, which is an awesome change of pace from the divided artist duties we have had the past few issues. His action scenes are glorious, especially the aforementioned battle between Batman and a genetically-enhanced super Damian. There is, however, a sparse feeling to some of the pages. Too many missing backgrounds, too many empty looking panels. It gives the book a rushed look that hurts the overall package.

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7.7
Batman Incorporated #13

Jul 31, 2013

So that's it. Morrison's run is over and the story of Batman Incorporated is most likely finished, as well. There's little fanfare and not nearly enough excitement. The cowl has been passed to others and it's hard to see the new crop of writers and artists picking up these story threads. Maybe that's a good thing. Maybe it was time for this to end, but it's hard to not be a little bit sad. There were some good times, Grant. We'll miss ya, buddy.

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7.2
Batman/Superman (2013) #3

Aug 28, 2013

There is one area in this series that is starting to wear thin and that's the art. Jae Lee is a superstar, no doubt, but the lack of backgrounds is really starting to become a problem. On nearly every page he draws, the characters just stand in front of clouds or smoke. It's hard to tell where they are and what they are doing. The emptiness of these pages becomes even more apparent when Yildiray Cinar steps in for an extended flashback. The pages Cinar handles are rich and finely detailed, a fully realized world. The beauty of that sequence only showcases how sparse the main storyline is, which is really a bummer when you consider how good this comic should be.

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7.1
Batman/Superman (2013) #3.1

Sep 25, 2013

Brett Booth does some of his best work in years here. This issue looks great. There's an energy to the pages; a sense of destruction and violence when Doomsday slams to the ground. The best bit comes during the previously mentioned fairytale section. Booth switches up his style and shows us something dynamic and exciting, a new side of his work that we haven't seen. Honestly, I thought for sure that section had been drawn by a different artist, it's that unique. This isn't a great Villains Month title, but it's a pretty fun read that looks fantastic. You could do worse.

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9.0
Batman: Black and White #1

Sep 4, 2013

Of course, every story, even the preachy "Batman Zombie," features beyond stellar artwork. Sean Murphy, Neal Adams, Michael Cho, Joe Quinones, and Chris Samnee all bring their A game, and A game from these folks is freaking unreal. Seriously, Batman: Black and White #1 is a visual masterpiece, you'd be lucky to hang any of these pages on your wall. My personal favorites were the Murphy and Samnee tales. Both of these guys would fit nicely into the world of Gotham and they prove it in a matter of a few pages. Wrap the whole package in a fantastic Marc Silvestri cover and you have one damn beautiful comic book.

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6.5
Batman: Black and White #2

Oct 2, 2013

The rest of the stories are fairly forgettable. Some have a nice story but confusing, poorly structured art and others have solid visuals but a lackluster story. The clunkiest of them is the story by Dan DiDio and J. G. Jones. Jones artwork is great, although slightly stiff at times, but DiDio's writing misses the mark and misses hard. It's heavy handed and completely out of character for Batman. It's certainly not a great way to start an issue, as it somewhat sours everything that comes after it.

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6.8
Batman: Black and White #3

Nov 7, 2013

The winners in Batman: Black and White #3 are Paul Dini, Stephanne Roux and Rina Hughes. Dini and Roux deliver a great, relatively straight forward Bat tale that will leave a smile on your face. Hughes, on the other hand, manages to produce one of the weirdest comic books I have ever read. Seriously, it's freaking bananas, which is what I love about it. I can't even describe it, but just know it has a line of dialogue that reads, "Retro really is the only way to defeat postmodernism."

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4.8
Batman: Black and White #4

Dec 12, 2013

Other than Nguyen's piece, everything else falls flat. Michael Allred's story needs color in a big, big way. Also, it features Batman letting a group of brain washed dudes die in an explosion. Nathan Edmondson's story ends in a cliffhanger. Sean Galloway and Derek Laufman's piece is really close to being good, but the art is hard to follow and the story is kinda generic. The point is, you might want to skip this issue of Batman: Black and White. It's a mess.

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5.0
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #0

Sep 26, 2012

For reasons unknown, DC also decided to split this issue between two very different artists. It kills the flow of the issue. Mico Suayan and Juan Jose Ryp are both great artists, but their styles look absolutely nothing alike and do not mesh. When Juan Jose Ryp suddenly takes over, it feels like you are reading a different comic book. Sure, it's another nicely written and good looking comic book, but it still feels different. One of these guys should have done the whole issue. Splitting the issue up between to two of them makes about as much sense as retelling the story of Crime Alley. So, in a weird way, I guess it makes perfect sense that DC did this.

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3.5
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #8

Apr 25, 2012

With so many other Batman books on the stand, it's hard to justify picking up this book. It's not good… at all. Can't Finch just draw variant covers for other series? That'd be a better use of ink and paper.

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8.0
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #9

May 23, 2012

David Finch is a perfect Batman artist. He draws the character wonderfully and sets the mood in a way that few other artists can. It's refreshing that he is drawing a worthwhile story this time, because, let's be honest, this series has not been known for its writing. There are a few pages where the characters that aren't in a costume of some sort look a little awkward, but it's not much more than a small hiccup. Aside from that, the book looks fantastic. It's exactly what I hoped for when I heard David Finch was going to be drawing Batman. It just took a lot of issues to get to this point.

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7.0
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #10

Jun 27, 2012

David Finch's art takes a slight dip in quality this month, too. There is a rushed, unfinished feel to the artwork. If you are a fan of Finch and have followed his career, you'll definitely notice that certain scenes seem to get more attention than others. Batman swinging through a car window to kick a punk in the face looks amazing. Damian and Bruce talking in the Batcave looks boring and awkward. It's a bummer, since you'd hope that Finch would bring his A game to Gregg Hurwitz's much-hyped debut. The issue doesn't look bad, but as a David Finch fan, I know it could have looked a lot better.

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6.5
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #11

Jul 25, 2012

Finch has some great moments in this issue. His Scarecrow looks spectacular. He really takes the character to a whole new level of creepiness. Batman: The Dark Knight has always had a bit of a horror feel to it, and this issue really achieves that look. The darkness of this storyline is really playing to Finch's strengths. That said, let's just get this out in the open, David Finch cannot draw children. They look like creepy little people with adult faces. Hopefully, Hurwitz and Finch can find a groove together, because they are two creators that are capable of making a really good Batman book, not just an okay one.

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6.5
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #12

Aug 22, 2012

The high point of this issue is the art. David Finch absolutely knocks it out of the park. The book looks dark and brutal, like there is horror and death dripping off of every page. He does some great tricks, too. Scarecrow casts a shadow that looks an awful lot like Bruce Wayne's murdered parents. A young Bruce looks in a mirror a sees a much darker, violent world. It's neat stuff. I'm a Finich fan, and I say with confidence that he is on top of his game here. Batman: The Dark Knight #12 might be a bit boring to read, but it is one awesome looking comic book.

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7.5
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #13

Oct 24, 2012

The art matches the sinister writing very well. Finch draws horror splendidly, and there is plenty of horror in these pages. As usual, his pages featuring people in superhero costumes look much better than his pages featuring normal, everyday people. When he is not drawing ugly monsters and/or a drug induced Batman, Finch's art can look a little stiff. However, the good outweighs the bad in this issue, which is not something anybody usually says about Batman: The Dark Knight.

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6.0
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #14

Nov 28, 2012

David Finch produces some of his best work here. The dark violence of this issue looks fantastic. The are a few stiff moments, like when Damian is nursing Bruce back to health, but anytime Scarecrow is on the page things are awesome. He's a bloody mess, like something out of a nightmare. Finch draws horror as well as anybody, so let's hope that's where this book keeps its focus.

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5.5
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #15

Jan 2, 2013

The only good thing about the length of this story arc is that it gave David Finch lots of opportunities to draw the Scarecrow. Finch brings a sinister and dark feeling to the book. His art can be somewhat inconsistent, but he's firing on all cylinders here. The book looks good. There are a few moments when key story elements seem to happen off panel, but's hard to tell if that's a problem with Finch's story telling or Hurwitz's. Either way, let's hope the next arc improves and gives us something new and exciting.

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6.0
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #16

Jan 30, 2013

The books looks pretty damn nice, at least. Van Sciver draws a mighty fine Batman and a super creepy Mad Hatter. The action looks great, even if it is slightly hard to follow at times. The only place the book doesn't look so hot is during a series of pages where the panels are modeled after piano keys. It's a neat idea that simply doesn't work very well. It feels like a minor scene is stretched for too many panels, like the structure is forcing Van Sciver to draw unnecessary stuff. If you are looking for a great Batman story, you might want to look somewhere else. Hey, you have plenty of other options.

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6.5
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #17

Feb 27, 2013

As has been the case since day one, the main attraction to Batman: The Dark Knight is the art. Ethan Van Sciver does some killer work. His Mad Hatter looks almost too insane, which would be fine if this series embraced its sillier tone. There's a still a dark intensity in these pages, a sinister overtone that is ever so slowly disappearing from the scripts and story. Van Sciver draws a spectacular looking Batman, but if Hurwitz keeps making with the funny, a different artistic tone might be required.

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5.4
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #18

Mar 27, 2013

Ethan Van Sciver does some nice work on the art in this issue. He struggles a bit with non-costumed characters, but when Batman or Mad Hatter get panel time, it looks great. Unfortunately, this issue also has a guest appearance from an incredibly strange looking Catwoman. Her poses, movement, and ability to mash her breasts into Batman without touching any other part of him are downright bizarre. Like the story itself, Catwoman's appearance is out of place and largely pointless.

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3.8
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #19

Apr 24, 2013

Szymon Kudranzki steps into art duties on this issue and he has drastically different style than this series has carried in previous issues. Kudranzki has a penchant for character close-ups, tight shots on faces, and expressions. Backgrounds appear to be an afterthought if they are there at all. What this means is that Batman: The Dark Knight #19 does read or look like a Batman book at all. In fact, you could take the Caped Crusader out of this issue entirely and it wouldn't really change much. That's not a good thing.

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2.3
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #20

May 22, 2013

Szymon Kudranski's art takes a major nosedive here, too. The layouts are funky and awkwardly staged. The characters stand in strange, inhuman-like poses. At times it is nearly impossible to tell what exactly is happening from panel to panel. Did she just scratch his face? I guess that's what happened? Maybe? The strangest moment comes towards the end when a character is just laid on top of the existing panels. It looks like an afterthought, which is quickly becoming par for the course in this series.

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2.5
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #21

Jun 26, 2013

Ethan Van Sciver returns to art on this issue, and delivers some good Batman pages. Unfortunately, those good pages are also mixed with confusing action, direction, and scenery. It makes for a bizarre read, a jumbled tale that could have been " and should have been " better. Even those really good pages are wasted on a story that carries no weight, heft, or emotion. At least it's over and we can all move on.

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7.8
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #23

Aug 28, 2013

Of course, what really makes Batman: The Dark Knight #23 worth your hard-earned dollars is Alex Maleev. His gritty, detailed style has always been a perfect fit for the underworld of Gotham, and it's nice to see him back in the saddle. You'd be fine just skipping the word balloons and narration captions, instead just marveling at the glorious work of a true master of the medium. The only hiccup, and it's a small one, is that the color work of Dave McCaig doesn't always gel with Maleev's art. There are times when it adds lines or shading to the art when it doesn't really need any. It's not bad, not at all, but it's noticeable.

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7.0
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #23.2

Sep 11, 2013

Jason Masters art is pretty good. There are some anatomy and perspective issues in a few places, but nothing too jarring. The real disconnect is the look and feel of the art " and colors by Dave McCaig " in relation to the story. The book looks bright and almost fun, which is so off base from the dark, violent tone. Nobody is doing bad work, but it just doesn't line up. This is a comic that needed to feel cold and instead it just feels sorta blue.

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6.9
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #23.3

Sep 18, 2013

Cliff Richards' art is mostly good, as well. In fact, the one thing that doesn't look good is Clayface. Richards' rendering of the character is supremely uninteresting. Everything else looks awesome. He never skimps on a panel, drawing full, detailed backgrounds and expressive characters. The action looks the best when Clayface gets pissed and starts messing everyone up. It's just the stuff in between that drags. This is a pretty good looking comic, Richards just isn't a good fit for Clayface.

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2.0
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #23.4

Sep 25, 2013

The art by Georges Jeanty, Dexter Vines, and Michelle Madsen misses the mark, too. Maybe it's the less than inspiring setting, but there's just nothing to grab on to here. There's a major disconnect between the story and visuals; things just don't add up. Joker's Daughter is armed with a crescent tipped staff that she somehow uses to burn smiles onto people's faces. The angles don't line up and the action is confusing. The characters' anatomy looks bizarre at best. There are a few good visual moments in this issue when we glimpse life before madness, but those are few and far between.

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7.3
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #24

Oct 23, 2013

Like the previous arc, the best stuff in this issue is courtesy of Alex Maleev. His style is perfect for Batman, which is way it's so damn pain that Batman isn't in this comic. The Clayface stuff looks great, and the flashbacks to the character's youth look even better. Maleev is seriously a master. Dave McCaig's colors are soft, and at times look odd when compared to Maleev's jagged line work. Again, the flashback scenes are the best, truly the moments where the creative team is really in sync. The story may not be very interesting, but Batman: The Dark Knight #24 is a damn fine looking comic book.

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6.0
Batwing #9

May 3, 2012

Unfortunately, Marcus To's art only contributes to the lack of excitement. The fight looks awkward and lacks any real punch. His artwork is certainly not bad, he does great work with characters and seems to excel in the quieter moments. Problem is, this is an issue about a deadly assassin attack, and that's where things don't look so hot. At one point, Batwing flies the Talon straight into a parked van, crushing the assassin against the side of the vehicle. Sounds cool? It's not, because the panel is so small and distanced, you can barely tell what is happening. It's a bummer, really.

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7.7
Batwoman #23

Aug 21, 2013

The story does its job as well. J.H Williams III and W. Haden Blackman keep things moving at a brisk pace, which is a good thing. You get drawn in quickly, but there are times when scenes cut too fast or switch too often. The end result is that not much happens, just a fast paced series of conversations. There are certainly pivotal moments here, but they happen and then are quickly tossed aside as the scene jumps to another character and then back again. Of course, when a book looks this good, it's hard to be mad about much at all.

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8.5
Bedlam #1

Oct 31, 2012

Where Bedlam truly excels is in its visuals. Riley Rossmo and colorist Jean-Paul Csuka just nail it. Madder Red looks amazing; the use of the color red through out the opening sequence is a true marvel. This is one attractive comic book. The artwork alone makes it a must buy. Even if you hate the story, or find it over-written or too familiar, you'll fall in love with the art. It's that good.

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4.0
Bedlam #2

Nov 28, 2012

Riley Rossmo's art falls flat here to. Perhaps it's the lack of anything interesting to draw. Perhaps it's the uninspired color work. Or maybe it was just an off day. Whatever the case, the book looks bland. There are one or two pages that feature some cool imagery, but that's it. Most of the pages, like this book in general, just feel like a waste of time.

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5.2
Before Watchmen: Dollar Bill #1

Jan 30, 2013

The good news is, Steve Rude draws the hell out of this issue. The life and times of Dollar Bill may not matter much, but at least they look fantastic. I couldn't care less about most of the events of this issue, but Rude manages to give every page some weight. His work is dynamic and classic, and way better than this tale deserves. Awesome coloring work by Glen Whitmore helps to make Before Watchmen: Dollar Bill one of the best looking comics that you should probably never read.

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8.7
Black Dynamite #1

Jan 16, 2014

Ron Wimberly, Sal Buscema and JM Ringuet deliver the goods. Black Dynamite is beautiful and perfectly captures a long gone genre. Wimberly's pencils are fun and, at times, goofy. It's exaggerated stuff, dynamic and bold. The angles are insane and constantly shifting; this comic is never boring to look at. That said, the best thing about this issue by far is Ringuet's colors. It's his color work that makes comic feel so dated (in a good way). It's gorgeous stuff and a real showcase for the importance of a great colorists. Black Dynamite #1 works on every level and is definitely worth a read.

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10
Black Science #1

Nov 27, 2013

Not only is Black Science #1 a masterclass in storytelling, it's probably one of the best looking comics to grace the stands in a very long time. Artist Matteo Scalera and colorist Dean White are so perfectly in step it's incredible. This is a haunting book, a visual onslaught that matches the fast-paced story beat for beat, panel for panel. Every page is gorgeously detailed; the panels filled to the brim with the ugliness of an alien world we can't hope to understand. Without a doubt, this thing is a work of art, the kind of comic you just marvel at. Do yourself a favor and buy Black Science #1. Buy it and get lost in a world of anarchy, science and fantasy.

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9.4
Black Science #2

Dec 19, 2013

If you read the first issue, you know the real stars of this comic are Matteo Scalera and Dean White. These guys have crafted one of the most unique and beautiful looking comics on the market. Black Science may read like an extreme, pulpy throwback, but its art is in a league all its own. Scalera's scratchy, frantic line work should clash with White's smooth, painted colors, but it doesn't. The two styles gel and mix, creating stunning look that will leave you slack-jawed. This is a series to watch, folks. Two issues in and Black Science has already become required reading.

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9.5
Black Science #3

Jan 29, 2014

Matteo Scalera and Dean White area visual dream team. For three issues now, we have been singing their praise and for good reason. This is a stunning comic, visually unlike any other book out there and it's all because of the combination of these two dudes. Alone they are mighty, together they are unstoppable. I just want to taste each page of this comic; I want to cook it in a quesadilla and absorb its essence. It's that good.

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5.9
Blackacre #1

Dec 5, 2012

The art provided by Wendell Cavalcanti is okay, but doesn't ever really grab you. He's a competent storyteller, and there is a nice flow to the book, but he doesn't get to tell enough story in this issue. Again, his strengths are not utilized in those first six pages which just feature images of people standing there. There is also not enough background detail in most panels, and that is incredibly noticeable in a book that is all about background and setting.

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7.3
Blackout #1

Mar 26, 2014

If nothing else, this issue looks fantastic. Lorimer brings a cinematic sense of scale to the comics he works on. He wonderfully lays out scenes, drawing you close to a character at just the right moment, pulling out for that wide shot in all the right places. Blackout #1 moves wonderfully. The best bits are during the lead character's haunting nightmares. Lorimer delivers truly horrific visions of broken characters and spilled guts. As long as he's drawing this series, I'll be reading it.

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8.7
Bloodshot #0

Aug 21, 2013

Chrisscross provides art in this issue and does a fantastic job. The characters and settings look great, but it's storytelling and layouts that really shine. The way the panels flow and shrink as a character is torn to pieces on the streets of a hostile foreign country. The way the eyes cut through any given scene, showing us just how dead inside these men are. The fabulous Moose Baumann does some slick color work in this issue, as well. Basically, Bloodshot has finally kicked into high gear.

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8.5
Bloodshot #1

Jul 9, 2012

Valiant is quickly becoming the publisher to beat and as long they keep putting out quality book like Bloodshot, it's likely to stay that way. Waiting thirty days for the next issue is going to be grueling. I'm ready for more ultra-violence and more Bloodshot.

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7.5
Bloodshot #3

Sep 5, 2012

Manuel Garcia and Arturo Lozzi handle pencil duties, and, for the most part, they do it well. While some pages look better than others, none of it looks bad. Bloodshot's expressions can be hard to read at times, but given the fact that he is confused as hell most of the book that's probably an intentional detail. This book looks best when it's firing on all cylinders and Bloodshot is tearing dudes to pieces, so I look forward to the next issue when we hopefully get to see more of that.

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7.5
Bloodshot #5

Nov 14, 2012

On art, Manuel Garcia and Arturo Lozzi do a mostly solid job. They excel when it comes to the darker stuff; the violence and the blood. Knives in heads and bullets tearing through bodies look awesome. The only place they lack is in some of the character work. The two female leads can be hard to tell apart. At times, it's hard to tell who is who and which one of them has super powers. But hey, it looks like Bloodshot is going to get really stabby and shooty next issue, so that should play right to their strengths. Unless Swierczynski is teasing us again. Stuff better hit the fan, dudes.

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7.0
Bloodshot #8

Feb 14, 2013

It's pretty clear that Duane Swierczynski is building towards a bigger story here. He's developing the character of Bloodshot, and that is definitely a good thing. However, we are eight issues in at this point and our title character is still roaming around with very little direction or purpose. The forthcoming Harbinger Wars looks to put our pale hero on a bit more of a path, but it'd be nice if he'd take a bit more charge in his own series. We are ready for Bloodshot to become the badass hero we know he can be.

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6.5
Bloodshot #9

Mar 13, 2013

Manuel Garcia does a fine job with the art in this issue. His action scenes " of which there are simply not enough of " have a nice dynamic energy to them. You can just feel the brutality as legs snap and heads crunch. Where things get loose is in the character work. Other than fat grandma and Bloodshot, a lot of the characters look pretty interchangeable, especially the females. It makes the quieter moments awkward, since there's an emotional punch missing. Hopefully the upcoming Harbinger Wars will return Bloodshot to its former, action-packed glory.

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8.5
Bloodshot #10

Apr 17, 2013

Adding Barry Kitson to this issue makes a huge difference, as well. Bloodshot has never looked bad, but it has never looked this good either. It's lacking in the background department, but that's about the only complaint that can be leveled at this beauty. Kitson draws the action and violence with a style and grace, it's truly a sight to see. The smaller scenes towards the end look good too, but it's hard to beat Bloodshot pulling out a machete that has just been cleaved into his body and then turning to face the guy who did it.

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7.0
Bloodshot #11

May 15, 2013

If nothing else, this issue at least looks a little different. Barry Kitson is a great storyteller, and the action here is a bit clearer than it was in Harbinger Wars. The gore and violence looks awesome, too. Month after month, Bloodshot continues to be the most brutal superhero book on the stands. Faces melt off, limbs break and Bloodshot gets run over by a tank. Business as usual here, and that's not a bad thing.

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7.0
Bloodshot #12

Jun 19, 2013

Barry Kitson delivers a stellar set of pages again. The book looks great, especially those aforementioned chainsaw and machete scenes. Kitson inks some of his pages himself and others are inked by Stefano Gaudiano does the others, which is a slight problem because the styles are wildly different. Some pages are heavy on lines and shadows, others are smooth and lighter. It's not that one looks better than the other so much as they just look stylistically different.

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9.2
Bloodshot & H.A.R.D. Corps #14

Sep 18, 2013

As great as the story and characters are, the absolute best thing about this comic is the pencil work of Emanuela Lupacchino. Her artwork is beautiful and absolutely engrossing. This is a character driven issue that's light on action and Lupacchino brings it to life with gorgeous detail and movement. Bloodshot looks better than ever, so let's hope that Valiant keeps Lupacchino around. If you dropped off this series a while back, now is the time to give it another shot. You won't be disappointed.

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7.4
Bloodshot & H.A.R.D. Corps #17

Dec 19, 2013

Emanuela Lupacchino does awesome work in this issue. She's a superstar in the making, for sure. Joseph Cooper joins her on pencils and his stuff looks slick, too. The only problem is that many of the characters are wearing costumes that look incredibly similar, making for some confusing pages. You'll have to take a moment and sort out who is who before you can really dig in, and that's not exactly a good thing. Still, the movement and energy on these pages is hard to dismiss; this is good stuff all the way through.

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5.8
Bloodshot & H.A.R.D. Corps #21

Apr 10, 2014

This issue is rough and it's main due to the art. Four artists jam into these pages and the results are muddled. Characters grow and shrink within the same page.

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6.2
Bounce #1

May 22, 2013

The biggest problem this issue has is its art. David Messina has clearly studied some Spider-Man books because the main character moves and leaps like everyone's favorite web spinner. That the good. Everything else around that character is not so good. It's never bad, far from it, but it's lacking anything dynamic. There's a lot of talking head pages that just look like, well, talking heads. The Bounce could be going somewhere interesting, but it'll need to get on track quickly if it wants anyone around to see it.

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9.5
Breath of Bones: A Tale of the Golem #1

Jun 12, 2013

What the seals the deal though -- what really makes this a such a stunning debut -- is Dave Wachter's art. The washed out gray tone of the pages gives life to the world in way that you wouldn't think possible. It's dark, dirty, and vibrant, a look it achieves without a hint of color. The pages where a grandfather shares the secret of the Golem with his grandson are bathed in darkness, the characters barely breaking through the deep black of the shadows. Breath of Bones is set to be another stunning miniseries from the folks who do books like this better than anybody, Dark Horse Comics.

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9.5
Breath of Bones: A Tale of the Golem #2

Jul 10, 2013

Dave Wachter is the main attraction in this series. His dark washed and moody artwork brings this story to brilliant life. From the characters to the landscape to the shadows of a barn that holds the town's last hope against the machine of war. It's stunning; every page, every panel. This is how comics should read. This is a thing of beauty in every sense of the word. The third issue of Breath of Bones can't get here fast enough.

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6.9
Buddy Cops One-Shot #1

Mar 13, 2013

Evan Shaner handles the art and the issue looks pretty enough most of the time. The majority of the humor revolves around dialogue, but the few scenes that are more physical in nature are some of the best bits. Buddy Cops is ridiculous, both in concept and execution, and Shaner delivers on that. There's a slight lack of detail on many pages, but given the breezy nature of this comic, that's no big offense.

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6.5
Captain America (2004) #633

Jun 27, 2012

While it may move a bit slow, Captain America and Iron Man is a great looking book. Barry Kitson puts together some truly inspired pages. His fight scene looks spectacular. The only place that the art trips up is with the character expressions. Everyone seems so emotionless for most of the issue. They just kind of stare with their mouths closed. But, since more than half of the issue features Cap and Iron Man chatting on the phone while walking through a convention, maybe they were just as bored as the rest of us.

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7.5
Captain America (2011) #10

Apr 25, 2012

Another issue of Captain America, another notch in Brubaker's epic. It's good, although it could do a bit more to justify its price point. Still, to some of us, Captain America drawn by Alan Davis is worth the price of admission alone.

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7.5
Captain America (2011) #11

May 9, 2012

Following Alan Davis is no small task, but Patrick Zircher manages to do a fine job. His style is dark and moody; it fits this new arc perfectly. If anything, he probably uses a bit too much black. The shadows and darkness are a bit overwhelming in the book, and while it might suit the mood of the issue, it feels heavy at times, like it is covering the artwork. Still, the issue looks great, the action moves well and The Scourge looks pretty menacing. It's a solid book, or piece of a book anyway. Like most of Brubaker's Cap run, we'll just have to wait and see how everything comes together.

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8.5
Captain America (2011) #12

May 23, 2012

That said, if there is a standout star of this book, it is Patrick Zircher. He was good last issue, but he absolutely kills it this issue. As good as the action looks, the best moments are when you see the look on Cap's face. You see how angry and driven he is. Last issue felt a bit too dark, but the darkness fits now. The tone is perfect. Zircher makes you believe that this is a man that will charge head first into a Hydra base and destroy everyone inside. It's fantastic.

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8.0
Captain America (2011) #13

Jun 13, 2012

Complimenting Zircher's art are the great colors courtesy of Paul Mounts. He keeps the palette dark and it looks wonderful. It feels like this entire story arc stakes place at nighttime, which is not a bad thing. It was jarring at first, coming off of the bright Alan Davis arc, but now that we are in the swing of things, it is pretty clear that Zircher and Mounts fit this story like a glove.

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4.5
Captain America (2011) #16

Aug 8, 2012

The only thing this issue has going for it is Scot Eaton's art. Some pages look better than others, but when they look good they look really good. His style is fun and vibrant. There action scenes look good, which only adds to the disappointment that Cap is fighting guys like Missile Magician. It'd be nice if Eaton got to draw something more compelling, with a bit more story and character. As it is, it feels like he's polishing a turd.

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9.0
Captain America (2011) #19

Oct 24, 2012

All that's left to say is "thank you." Thank you, Ed. Thanks for the Winter Solider. Thanks for Captain America Reborn. Thanks for all the good times. Thanks for making Captain America so freaking awesome for eight years. Thanks for giving your story a proper end with this issue. We salute you.

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8.7
Captain America (2012) #2

Dec 19, 2012

Captain America is a solid adventure book. Remender and Romita Jr. have stripped away all the calling cards of the previous run and left us with a science fiction story that feels like it was ripped straight out of the 70s. Plus, major bonus points to Remender for a well-placed Ernest Hemingway reference. You know the way to this reviewer's heart, good sir.

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7.0
Captain America (2012) #3

Jan 16, 2013

The art also has highs and lows. Like the script, the crazy science fiction stuff is fantastic and the streets of NYC stuff is less so. John Romita Jr. draws awesome monsters and mutants. Captain America looks badass. However, when he draws young kids fighting in an alley, it looks awkward and weak. Dean White and Lee Loughridge make great use of colors, which helps to give the two different worlds very different feels and tones, but Romita's pencils don't rise to the occasion. Hopefully, future issues will be spending more time with mutants and barbarians and less time with bullies in alleyways.

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8.8
Captain America (2012) #4

Feb 20, 2013

Rick Remender's bigger story clicks into place here, too. The old New York scenes finally seem like they have a natural place in the series and give weight to Cap's struggles in Dimension Z, as opposed to the tacked-on feeling that they had previously. There is a ton to love in this issue; the dialogue is great, the world is captivating, and Ian is finally an interesting character. Captain America is an awesome series and it doesn't come out on a weekly basis like most of the other Marvel books seem to, so we all should support the hell out of this thing, guys.

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7.3
Captain America (2012) #5

Mar 20, 2013

The art suffers slightly here, most likely to the missing Klaus Janson. Romita is inked by Tom Palmer & Scott Hanna this time around, and it feels like some of the heart has gone out of the issue. There's still plenty of awesome pages " Marvel needs to print the last page as a mini poster " but when the action really gets going everything becomes a jumbled mess. The character's anatomy is screwy at times, too. Overall, the issue still looks good, but there is a noticeable dip. Dean White's colors still look amazing though, so that's something.

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9.2
Captain America (2012) #6

Apr 17, 2013

The absolute best part of this issue is the coloring art by Dean White. Right from page one, it's clear he's bringing more than his fair share to this book.The muted darkness of Zola's Dimension Z is punctuated by the red, white, and blue of Cap's tattered costume and the bright green splatter of mutant blood. It's hard to imagine this comic looking as good as it does without White's masterful touch. Captain America #6 is a comic where the creative team just nails it.

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8.0
Captain America (2012) #8

Jun 26, 2013

Romita's art is severely hit and miss in this issue. The opening looks great, but things quickly fall apart. There are too many lines on some pages, not enough on others. For my money, Romita is one of the best in the industry, but this simply isn't his best stuff. There's a rushed quality to many of the pages. That said, when things are on, they are really, really on. The last three pages are damn near perfect in their composition and structure. The scene made me gasp and mutter "no way, no way" with each passing panel. And then, that last page, guys. What the heck are Remender and Romita trying to do to us?

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8.0
Captain America (2012) #10

Aug 28, 2013

John Romita does some great work in this issue, although credit has to be given to Klaus Janson, Tom Palmer, and Scott Hanna for providing the finishes. The end result is a little all over the place, with some pages filled with fine detail and others more loose and smooth. Fortunately, Dean White and Rachelle Rosenberg color Captain America #10 to perfection. Their masterful color art holds the whole thing together and helps bring the horrors of Dimension Z to a stunning close. Great issue in what looks to be a Cap run to remember.

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8.5
Captain America (2012) #11

Sep 11, 2013

Carlos Pacheco joins the stellar art team in this issue and he fits right in. His style is a little cleaner than Romita Jr's, but with Klaus Janson and Dean White still around, the series doesn't lose a step. What we get here fits perfectly with what came before and helps give the series a cohesive look and feel. Captain America #11 looks great on every page and in every panel. It'll be great to see these guys handle some action scenes, which are clearly on the horizon. If you have been waiting to read this series, wait no more. Jump on in.

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7.0
Captain America (2012) #12

Oct 9, 2013

Story problems aside, Captain America #12 looks really damn good. Carlos Pacheco and Klaus Janson just click and provide page after page of glorious artwork. The only part of this book that doesn't look great is the aforementioned Cap and Falcon scene. The emotional expressions on the characters' faces is way overdone. It makes an already silly scene even sillier. That said, the rest of the issue is amazing. Nuke's reign of violence is a beautiful dance of destruction. I can't wait to see him with clash with Captain America; you just know it's gonna be great.

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8.8
Captain America (2012) #13

Nov 7, 2013

Nic Klein comes onboard this issue and delivers some truly stunning pages. What we get here is more focused and clean than some of Klein's previous work. It's beautiful stuff, especially once Cap starts throwing down with Nuke. The fight, which stretches for several pages, looks glorious. There's sense of movement and grace, it never feels posed or stiff. The last panel of the issue is so menacing and dark, it's almost worth the cover price alone. Klein is on the road to superstardom, no doubt. Keep your eyes on this guy, or at least keep your eyes on his amazing artwork.

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7.0
Captain America (2012) #15

Jan 22, 2014

Carlos Pacheco's work is solid. The issue looks smooth and the storytelling is great. There are a few moments of strange anatomy -- like Nick Fury Jr's pose in the helicopter -- but for the most part this thing looks good. Pacheco's strength has always been his characters, and that shows here, especially on the last page. It's a ridiculous reveal, but one that looks all kinds of awesome. Captain America remains a very enjoyable comic book, even when it needs hurry up and tell its story.

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7.1
Captain America (2012) #16.NOW

Feb 5, 2014

Pascal Alxie steps in on art in this issue and it's a mixed bag. The world looks great as Alxie renders it in stunning detail. The evil characters look superb, as well. This issue has one of the best looking Red Skulls ever. There's so much menace and horror in the details, the evil practically oozes off the page. The problem is, the regular characters look just as menacing. Jet has too many lines on her face; she's often covered in scratchy shading. It also appears that Alxie drew Jet mostly nude and that Marvel decided to just color her in as if she were wearing tights. It's distracting, to say the least.

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8.5
Captain America (2012) #17

Feb 19, 2014

Artist Nic Klein is amazing. The man is gonna be superstar. His style is highly detailed and gritty, but with a cartoony edge. It looks beautiful, page after page. The man manages to make a guy armed with a candy cane look intimidating and confident. A candy cane! It's awesome stuff, for sure. Hopefully he sticks around for a while, because we haven't really seen Cap in action yet, and if Klein is drawing it, you know it's going to look awesome. A nice long run from Klein and Remender would be a real treat. Keep Dean White around, too, because that man is a coloring warlock. Good stuff all around.

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7.6
Captain America (2012) #18

Mar 6, 2014

Nic Klein does the same awesome stuff here that we have been praising for months now. He's a superstar in the making, a man who knows how to draw a superhero comic. This issue does look slightly more rushed than the others, but given Marvel's insane shipping schedule, it's pretty understandable. Dean White holds down the fort with his color magic, too. The art in this series is top notch, even when the story drags. Klein and White make a hell of a team.

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7.2
Captain America (2012) #19

Apr 2, 2014

Nic Klein does some awesome work here. He excels at action scenes and Remender gives him plenty. The end fight between Cap and the Iron Nail is by fair the best bit of the issue. For the rest of the book, chaos is the name of the game, and it has varying levels of success. We never really get a sense of the size and scariness of this new helicarrier. It never seems all that menacing, which sucks the intensity out of the opening pages. That said, it looks real awesome when everything starts blowing up, so that helps pad out those confusing moments.

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9.0
Captain Marvel (2012) #1

Jul 18, 2012

It's also worth mentioning that the newly designed costume looks incredible. Ms. Marvel's old look was fine, I'm not ripping on that costume, but this one looks better. I can tell you this: I have a young daughter that has been carrying around a postcard that features the new Captain Marvel on it. She brings it to dinner and takes it to bed at night. If you ask her what is on the postcard, she'll tell you, "It's a superhero." She doesn't know anything about the who the character is, but she looks at that costume and sees the same thing she sees in Superman or Spider-Man. That's something Marvel should be proud of.

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9.0
Captain Marvel (2012) #2

Aug 15, 2012

If Captain Marvel continues on this path, DeConnick and Soy will have created one awesome new title for Marvel. It's engaging, fun, beautiful and different. This is not your typical superhero book, and that's exactly what makes it so great. It's nice to see a different kind of monthly title from Marvel. I have never been a Carol Danvers fan, but as long as Kelly Sue DeConnick and Dexter Soy are handling her adventures, I'll be picking up every issue. Marvel needs to take more chances like this, because -- in the case of Captain Marvel, at least -- it has totally paid off.

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9.0
Captain Marvel (2012) #3

Aug 29, 2012

Captain Marvel is one hell of an awesome series. Each issue solidifies it as one of Marvel's best new books. It's got more heart packed into it's pages than any superhero book has the right to, and that is a good thing. Hopefully it'll be around for a very long time, because if these first three issues are any indication, we are in for quite the treat.

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8.0
Captain Marvel (2012) #4

Sep 26, 2012

This issue also uses two very different artist to great effect. Dexter Soy is up to his usual awesomeness in the the book's first half, and then, when time skips and the story shifts, Al Barrionuevo steps in on art duties. The story's structure makes the switch feel natural and smooth. The only problem is that Barrionuevo's art simply doesn't pack the same punch that Soy's does. The first half of Captain Marvel #4 feels fresh and original, the back half feels like business as usual. The writing is as sharp as ever but the art just can't keep up, which is a damn shame.

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9.6
Captain Marvel (2012) #5

Oct 17, 2012

That said, the most amazing thing about this issue is the artwork. Emma Rios just kills it on every page. This thing thing is stunning, guys. Witness the glory of Helen Cobb, armed with brass knuckles, punching out a dude. Revel in the glory of that sly smile as she says "got 'em on the ropes now, kitten." Seriously, Captain Marvel #5 is a true work of art. Absolutely beautiful in every single way. If ever there was comic book that could make a person swoon, this is it.

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9.5
Captain Marvel (2012) #6

Oct 31, 2012

Adding to the brilliance of this issue is Emma Rios. Holy crap, she is incredible here. Beautiful, in every sense of the word. Unlike the previous issue, there is lots of action here, and Rios just kills it. There is a fluid, graceful quality to every page, to every panel. Whether it's two characters talking in a hospital or two super powered females duking it out in the sky, it all looks stunning. This is one freaking fantastic looking comic book.

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8.0
Captain Marvel (2012) #8

Dec 19, 2012

This is, without a doubt, the best looking issue that Dexter Soy has delivered. This dude needs to draw a Transformer book, stat. The giant robot looks absolutely stunning. Plus, the his layouts are second to none. The pages flow, at times without panel borders. Instead, the characters and the action divide panels and movement. This is Soy's last issue of Captain Marvel, so hopefully Marvel has plans to stick him on a book that features lots of giant robots. The guy seriously has a gift.

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9.5
Captain Marvel (2012) #9

Jan 16, 2013

In addition to the fantastic writing, this series has featured a rotating team of unique and superb artists. That continues in this issue which sees Filipe Andrade hopping into art duties. It might take you a few pages to warm up to his kinetic style, but once you get into the meat of the book it really starts to soar. This thing just looks amazing. There is so much energy and life to every scene and every panel. Trust me, just flip to Captain Marvel's fight with two giant dinosaurs on the streets of New York. It's hypnotic and damn beautiful. This is the kind of comic that all superhero books should aspire to be.

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9.0
Captain Marvel (2012) #10

Feb 20, 2013

Kelly Sue DeConnick is joined by Christopher Sebela on scripting duties this time around but the story doesn't suffer one bit. The dialogue is snappy and fun, as usual. Carol Danvers' little corner of the Marvel Universe is a fun one, filled with crazy characters and hilarious interactions. This is just a great issue from start to finish. I love this world, I love these characters. Hell, I'd read a book starring Wendy and Chewie the cat in a heartbeat.

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8.8
Captain Marvel (2012) #11

Mar 20, 2013

Once again, the stupendous artwork of Filipe Andrade gives a kind of kinetic energy to the book. The scenes that feature Carol in hospital look nice and have just the right amount of emotion. But, the scenes were Carol is punching dudes in the face and jump from roof to roof in New York City? Frickin' amazing. Jordie Bellaire, who I believe currently colors 83% of the comic books on the market, does some gorgeous work in this issue, too. Captain Marvel's costume just pops and glows. Everything about this comic book looks great.

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7.3
Captain Marvel (2012) #12

Apr 17, 2013

The story itself starts bringing things full circle, connecting people and places we saw back in the first arc to the current madness. It's good stuff, and a pretty clear indication that Kelly Sue DeConnick and Christopher Sebela make an excellent team. The dialogue is snappy and smart, too, which should be a given since it's basically become a staple of this series. Without a doubt, Captain Marvel is a killer series, even in its more lackluster issues, that Marvel fans should be reading and supporting.

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6.8
Captain Midnight #0

Jun 19, 2013

At the very least, the issue looks good thanks to Victor Ibanez and Pere Perez. The story flows smoothly and is easy to read. There's no "wow" moment but that might be more of a scripting issue than an art problem. Too many action scenes are skimmed over and not given enough room for these guys to showcase what they can do. Captain Midnight is off to shaky start, but it's good enough that I'll be back for issue one when it launches.

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7.8
Captain Midnight #1

Jul 31, 2013

Fernando Dagnino nails the action. His art is kinetic and exciting. The slower scenes look okay, but it's when the characters are flying across the page, jump kicking, snapping necks, or sliding in from helicopters that the book really soars. Captain Midnight isn't the best-looking character, as far as his design is concerned, but Dagnino makes him look great. I'm ready for more Captain Midnight. Ready for more Nazi punching action and more polar bears. Well, I don't need the polar bears... but it'd be nice.

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8.4
Captain Midnight #4

Oct 30, 2013

Eduardo Francisco does some stellar work here, as well. The bulk of this issue doesn't feature any costumed, super heroics, and it looks fantastic. His character work is expressive and dynamic. He never skimps on a panel, always finely detailing the world and shifting the view to keep things fresh and interesting. Captain Midnight #4 is great looking, from start to finish. As a pleasant bonus, this issue also happens to be a perfect jumping on point, so get on board, it's worth it.

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7.6
Change #2

Jan 9, 2013

Jeske handles the art and it's as crazy as the story. Some scenes look amazing and surreal, others look a little muddled and confusing. The best bits come when things get really crazy and monsters creep onto the page. Casual conversations look okay, but when there's death and mutilation, the book soars. The good outweighs the bad, but it's a shame not every page rises to the occasion. As long as Change keeps the craziness and horrors ramped up, I'll buy every issue they put out.

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8.8
Colder #1

Nov 7, 2012

The writing is solid, but it's the art that will grab most people. Ferreyra gives an unholy energy to the page. Nimble Jack seems to just float; he's captivating. Whatever sort of horrors he has in store, you'll want to see, because Ferreyra makes everything look so damn good. And seriously, guys, did you see his cover? The dude can draw and this book is a testament to that fact. Colder is a book worth reading and the kind of book that Dark Horse should be doing a lot more of.

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9.5
Colder #2

Dec 5, 2012

The easiest selling point on Colder is the art. This book looks incredible. Juan Ferreyra does some of the most expressive, convincing character work I have ever seen in a comic book. Horror and darkness has never looked so damn pretty. Flip to the double-page spread of the theater filled with giant eyeball people. Stare at that and let its beauty sink into your skull. It'll haunt your dreams. And Nimble Jack? He's due for cult status any day now. Such a sinister character, both in design and execution. Read Colder. Do it. Stop what you are doing and read it.

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9.5
Colder #3

Jan 2, 2013

The absolute best thing about Colder is the incredible art of Juan Ferreyra. It's amazing. At one point, Nimble Jack climbs out of a dude's mouth, splitting him in half in the process. It's so horrifically rendered by Ferreyra that you'll squeal in disgust and delight. Everything from the panel layout to the character design is spectacular. Colder looks as good as it reads. If you aren't buying Colder, then you must hate yourself. Stop hating yourself. You deserve to enjoy this comic.

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8.9
Colder #4

Feb 6, 2013

As stated in previous reviews, Juan Ferreyra is a god amongst men who draws our darkest fears and uses his sorcery to haunt the dreams of the sane. It's crazy (get it) how good Colder looks. This issue starts a little slow, with Declan in a grocery store, but once you get to the realm of madness you'll drool and moan with admiration. The creatures, the buildings, Nimble Jack; all of it. It's truly horrifying. Ferreyra's art makes Colder a book you simply have to buy. You'd be crazy not to, because once Colder grabs you, it does not let go.

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9.8
Colder #5

Mar 6, 2013

All this aforementioned horror and violence is rendered in terrible detail by Juan Ferreyra. It's absolutely insane how good this issue looks. There are stakes jamming through eyes, dogs tearing dudes apart and so much blood you feel like you are swimming in it. Ferreyra has superstar written all over him and the words are written in blood. Visually, this book is leaps and bounds above 99% of the other books on the stands. Whatever Ferreyra does next, buy it. Keep this man creating, he's too good to ever stop.

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8.5
Comeback #2

Dec 19, 2012

This issue looks good, too, thanks to Michael Walsh and Jordie Bellaire. Walsh is great storyteller, and it shows in his character work. Expressions and reactions mean a lot in this comic, and Walsh makes sure they carry the proper weight. At times, it can be a bit difficult to tell the characters apart, which is a bit of a problem, especially when we are talking about multiple versions of characters. The colors look amazing, because Bellaire is a wizard of some sort, traveled from time and space to come here and bestow glorious color work on our comic books.

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8.8
Comeback #3

Jan 16, 2013

The book looks fantastic, too. Michael Walsh sets the mood perfectly, giving us the nuances of the characters on the page. It doesn't feel staged and stiff; it flows and moves like an expertly shot film. Jordie Bellaire lays down some beautiful color work, as well. She doesn't over do it, using a simple palette that gives the book a dark feeling. Comeback #3 looks great and reads even better. Set your watches, folks.

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7.8
Conan And The People of The Black Circle #1

Oct 23, 2013

Ariel Olivetti's artwork doesn't always gel with the superhero books he is working on, but Conan fits like a glove. His detailed, painted style looks fantastic and gives the world a hyper-fantasy look. As with some of his previous work, there is some overall stiffness to the characters, which drags down some of the faster paced scenes. Overall, the issue looks really good and unique. none of the Conan comics on the stands look anything alike, which is kinda cool. I'm onboard with this series and can't wait to read more.

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6.0
Conan And The People of The Black Circle #2

Nov 27, 2013

Where this comic really suffers is in the art department. For whatever reason, Ariel Olivetti decides to draw nearly every character identically. The thieves, raiders, barbarians and kingdom folk all look exactly the same. Like, they are all the same dude who's facial changes slightly from panel to panel. The painting effect that Olivetti is known for also has a rushed quality to it. It's as if he simply didn't have as much time this issue to give the backgrounds and character details the time they required. Walls are just smudges of brown and grey. Character's hair becomes a mess of smeared color effects. It looks rough, especially when you consider how great that first issue looked.

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7.0
Conan the Barbarian #8

Sep 12, 2012

Wood, however, continues to make this the Conan book to read. I've been a huge Conan fan for years and Wood is the first writer in a long time that has made the character feel fresh and exciting. As long as he is at the helm, this series is a must buy. Hopefully, the art will get back on track and this book will stop being good and start being great again.

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6.4
Constantine #2

Apr 11, 2013

The art doesn't help the situation much. Like the story, it's close to being good, but there are more than a few panels that just feel off. When scenes shift into different perspectives " downward angles and the such " it looks very, very strange. Artist Renato Guedes does nail a lot of the straight on character work, though. Constantine looks good, even if he seems to lack any sort of expressional range. Unfortunately, Marcelo Maiolo's colors miss the mark, too. There's nothing horribly offensive in this issue, but it really needs to kick things up a notch if it wants to stay on the ol' pull list.

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5.7
Constantine #4

Jun 12, 2013

Fabiano Neves' art doesn't help matters. At times, he gives some great emotion to the characters. However, when it comes to body language, things get screwy. Characters often have awkward and stiff poses. Also, there are far too many lines on Constantine's shirt, which gives him a puffy, stuffed look as opposed to a wrinkled, unkempt one. That said, Neves does deliver a high level of detail in nearly every panel. He never skimps on a background or a stitch of clothing. There are some truly great looking pages, we just aren't really given a reason to care about them.

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8.0
Creator Owned Heroes #1

Jun 6, 2012

As far as extras go, you get a crap load of them. There is an interview with Neil Gaiman. There is a feature on a cosplayer. There are some Best Of lists, a small essay/rant from each of the creators and lots more. It's not all good, but you would be hard pressed to not find at least one thing that you wanted to read in this issue. This is a magazine that earns its price tag; the Big Two could learn a thing or two from Creator-Owned Heroes. I sincerely hope these guys can keep this up, because we could really use more comic books like this.

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8.0
Creator Owned Heroes #2

Jul 5, 2012

The extras this time around are incredibly diverse. You'll find something worth reading within the pages of Creator-Owned Heroes, even if you don't enjoy all of it. Personally, I couldn't care less about an interview with a personal trainer, but I really enjoyed Palmiotti's tips to running a successful Kickstarter campaign. But, that's the real strength of Creator-Owned Heroes, they cover all the bases. No matter what you looking for, you'll probably find it in an issue of Creator-Owned Heroes. How many other comic books can say that?

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8.8
Curse #1

Jan 16, 2014

Riley Rossmo and Colin Lorimer are two artists whose names you should know. Lorimer takes the lead here, drawing the bulk of the comic and doing a hell of a job with it. The man handles characters and expressions as well as any of the big guns in the industry, and that shows. The first few pages will sell you on the series, no doubt. Those first few pages have enough darkness and horror to carry the whole issue. It's brutal stuff. Rossmo handles a brief flashback, and it looks really good. As a huge Rossmo fan, it is not lightly that I say that his pages are the weakest of the comic. Not bad, but Lorimer is good, any time he steps out, it's just a damn shame.

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9.0
Curse Words #1

Nov 14, 2016

After reading the first issue of Curse Words, we're hooked. Charles Soule and Ryan Browne have a winner on their hands, no doubt. Though some of the humor is a little dated already, as jokes about popular music poke fun at the early 2000s, these are minor complaints. We're onboard for the adventures of Wizord, his Koala Bear familiar, and his sweet, sweet beard. Harry Potter can suck it, Wizord is the magic user we need.

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6.5
Cyber Force #1

Oct 17, 2012

The biggest problem the book has is the art, which is surprising given Top Cow pedigree. Khoi Pham is an artist that can be really hit and miss, and he manages to do just that throughout this entire issue. Some panels look great, some look unfinished. For whatever reason, it seems like any time technology is drawn, which is often in a book titled Cyberforce, Pham just gives everything a scratchy quality. The overall effect is somewhat underwhelming. Still, there are more than a few great pages sprinkled through and hey, it was free. Hard to complain about free.

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6.5
Daredevil (2011) Annual #1

Aug 8, 2012

In this issue, Daredevil crosses paths with the ClanDestine. It's less than compelling and not the kind of story that deserves to be stretched out with an extra long annual issue. Again, it's not bad and certainly does entertain, but once it's over you'll close the book and forget all about it. There is nothing lasting within this issue. It's a bummer, because Daredevil is a character that has been on my mind ever since Waid's relaunch.

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9.0
Daredevil (2011) #12

May 3, 2012

Chris Samnee's art goes with the story perfectly. He's the kind of artist that really delivers when it comes to characters and expressions, and since this is a book about a date and a law school flashback, he's perfect here. You only have to look at the first page to get a sense of how wonderfully he nails this story. Waid and Samnee just gel here, and they deliver one hell of an awesome funny book.

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8.5
Daredevil (2011) #13

May 16, 2012

If you happen to be a long time Daredevil reader, you'll definitely notice how bright this issue is, too, especially in comparison to previous volumes of this series. The colors pop off the page and there is hardly a shadow to be found. It feels like some of the pages are practically glowing. This is not a bad thing; there are plenty of dark and gritty superhero books on the shelf. It's nice to have a fun comic book that reminds us what makes superheroes so great in the first place.

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9.0
Daredevil (2011) #15

Jul 18, 2012

Chris Samnee once again dominates on art. His simple style fits Waid's back-to-basics storytelling perfectly. Samnee plays with light, dark and color here to great effect. As Daredevil struggles to "see" his surroundings, Samnee drops out the detail, letting only outlines come through. Of course, the really standout moment of the book is a fight on the rain-soaked rooftop of Dr. Doom's castle. It's beautiful, filled with the kind of comic book pages that you just stare at. Add in a surprise appearance from a popular Avenger and you one very good looking, fun to read comic book. Gorgeous stuff.

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9.0
Daredevil (2011) #16

Aug 1, 2012

Chris Samnee has got to be the hardest working man in the comic industry. The rate at which he cranks out stunning artwork is mind boggling. This issue looks fantastic. The opening spread, which is a mixture of Ant-Man's origin and Daredevil's origin, is a true work of art. It has a classic feel, like something out of the golden age. It's hard to imagine a better superhero book out right now; that's probably because there isn't one.

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9.5
Daredevil (2011) #18

Sep 19, 2012

I'm running out of adjectives to describe Chris Samnee's art work. Fantastic? Brilliant? Beautiful? It's all those things and more. He gives every issue he touches a classic feel, like something from Marvel's golden era long ago. He even draws in his own sound effects. And his books are never late. The man is a gift to the comic book medium. I don't say this lightly; I really, truly believe he is closest thing we have to a modern Jack Kirby. If we could figure out how to clone Chris Samnee, we just might be able to save the entire industry.

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9.2
Daredevil (2011) #19

Oct 17, 2012

Chris Samnee is as amazing as ever. His art adds to the old-school feel, with hand-drawn sound effects and an emphasis on just the right points. For example, Hank Pym wearing a lab coat over his costume. Or Daredevil clipping a giant clothes pin on his nose to block out nasty smells. It's those kind of things that add to the fun tone of this book. If you aren't reading Daredevil, you are failing so hard.

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9.0
Daredevil (2011) #21

Dec 19, 2012

Naturally, the issue looks a-freaking-mazing. Chris Samnee is a machine, delivering incredibly and gorgeous artwork at an inhuman pace. His classic line work and layout style suit Waid's storytelling like a glove. Plus, somehow, against all logic, he manages to make The Spot look terrifying. Coyote was creepy enough, but The Spot takes it to a whole new level. Samnee defines amazing and sets the standard to which all comic book artist should be judge. He's that good.

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8.2
Daredevil (2011) #22

Jan 16, 2013

Chris Samnee is a robot. He has to be. There's no way a human could pump out fantastic art this quickly. He even does his own sound effects. It's not possible. Daredevil, issue after issue, looks amazing. Samnee nails the action scenes and delivers big time on the character moments. His awesome art is enhanced thanks to the killer coloring by Javier Rodriguez. This issue is a smooth ride that is easy on the eyes and fun to read. I'm not saying a new issue of Daredevil makes the world a better place, but I'm not saying it doesn't either.

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9.2
Daredevil (2011) #23

Feb 20, 2013

Of course, I am required to do my customary gushing about the artwork of Chris Samnee. Sure, all the crazy super heroics look awesome. And yes, I want to wallpaper my house with that image of Daredevil standing atop a building and that amazing cover. But, where Samnee really nails it is in the last four pages. It's a quiet scene, filled with emotion and heart. The look on Matt Murdock's face was enough to bring a tear to my eye. No joke, guys, this one hits home. It's incredible.

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9.3
Daredevil (2011) #24

Mar 20, 2013

So, back to Chris Samnee. Dude's incredible. His knack for storytelling is unparalleled in modern comics. The transitions are damn near flawless and each page is laid out with a crisp and clear precision. The use of shadows, of light and dark, gives a rich depth to setting and characters. And, man, the hand-drawn sound effects are just the best. Few comics have even half the heart of a typical Samnee drawn issue of Daredevil.

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9.8
Daredevil (2011) #25

Apr 17, 2013

Topping off the sundae with whipped cream and a cherry of awesomeness is Chris Samnee. His stuff is always great; always top notch. Here? It's another level. It's in a new dimension where only amazing art lives and rules the land with an iron fist. The action just flows; it swims across the page. It really is a thing of beauty. Plus, killer coloring, slick lettering, and hand-freaking-drawn sound effects. Daredevil #25 is one for the books, you guys. Read this comic or die miserable and alone.

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10
Daredevil (2011) #26

May 22, 2013

The craft of this issue is beyond stunning. Joe Caramagna's lettering is superb (that neat trick with the elevator door), Javier Rodriguez's vibrant color work, all of it. Every piece of this issue fits into place. There's even a backup that rivals the main feature. We get to see Foggy Nelson learn the importance of believing in something from a group of cancer-stricken children. It's moving, inspiring, and heartbreaking all at once. From cover to cover, Daredevil #26 delivers. This is what happens when everything clicks. This is why we love comics. This is what it is all about.

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9.6
Daredevil (2011) #27

Jun 26, 2013

Of course, Waid's master stroke wouldn't have played out so perfectly if it wasn't for the superb work of Chris Samnee. In an issue that features brutal fights, chemical blindings, and tons of shadows, the one thing that you'll remember is the smiles. Subtle little smiles that shine through the darkness. This is a comic that uses shadows better than almost anything in recent memory and it's those sly little grins that break through. It plays with you and muddles your expectations in all the best ways. Here's hoping Waid and Samnee hang around the Man Without Fear for a very, very long time.

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9.6
Daredevil (2011) #28

Jul 10, 2013

Waid continues with the threads he has established (Foggy's cancer, Matt's new advice-giving law practice) while still managing to make this feel like a new beginning. If you were waiting for time to jump into Daredevil, now is the time. You get everything you need here to enjoy one of the best comics in recent years. Seriously, you are out of excuses. Buy this book and dream such dreams as you never thought imaginable. Maybe that's over selling it? Probably not, it's pretty amazing.

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8.5
Daredevil (2011) #29

Jul 31, 2013

Javier Rodriguez is on pencils and colors again, and things look awesome. His characters are expressive and dynamic. The action is superb. Solid inking from Alvardo Lopez completes the package and makes Daredevil #29 a damn fine looking comic book. There a few pages that have a noticeable lack of backgrounds, but Rodriguez makes it work by keeping the colors bright and having them switch with tone and movement. Daredevil continues to impress, but you already knew that.

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9.8
Daredevil (2011) #30

Aug 21, 2013

Through all of this superhero madness, there's a heart. Foggy's cancer is at the back of your mind. Matt is struggling to rebuild his firm and his life. The moment that'll really get you though, the one that'll make your heart hurt, comes towards the end. It's a simple line told by a sentient lie (really) that cuts our hero to his core. The mostly-wordless final page is one of the best comic pages I have ever seen. This is the stuff of legends.

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9.6
Daredevil (2011) #31

Sep 18, 2013

Of course, Waid and Samnee don't do Daredevil all by themselves and I'd be remiss if I didn't mention the awesome work of some of the other creators. Javier Rodriguez gives us a masterclass in coloring. His sold style fits in wonderfully with Samnee's art; it becomes a part of the story instead of sitting on top of it. Letterer Joe Caramagna does some magic here, as well. This is a dialogue heavy issue, but it never feels overdone or intrusive. Caramagna blends the balloons and words into the comic, giving it a fluid, smooth look. Daredevil #31 is how comic books should be done, in just about every aspect.

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9.5
Daredevil (2011) #32

Oct 23, 2013

As usual, Chris Samnee delivers page after page of stunning artwork. Without a doubt, Samnee is a legend in the making, a guy that future comic artists will study. I've said it before, but he is the closest thing we have to a modern day Jack Kirby, and that's about as big of a compliment as I can pay someone. Javier Rodriguez's colors are as vibrate and beautiful as ever while Joe Caramagna reminds us that great lettering can make or break a comic (it makes Daredevil, for sure). Let's all cross our fingers that this team sticks around, because Daredevil is as good as it gets.

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8.6
Daredevil (2011) #33

Nov 21, 2013

Jason Copland fills in on art in this issue, and he does a fine job. His style matches well with what came before, although his storytelling isn't quite as strong as some of the previous artists. He does deliver so really great, big moments that look freaking fantastic and help to carry the book overall. As usual, Javier Rodriguez does brilliant color work. His palette has really become the heart and soul of this book, tying together the many different artist who have stepped in over the years.

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9.0
Daredevil (2011) #34

Dec 19, 2013

Javier Rodriguez is on pencils and colors this issue, and he nails them both. The page where Matt Murdock stands on top of a building and just looks over the city is worth the cover price alone. There's a fluid grace to the panels, a softer touch than we normally get in this series. Rodriguez gives this issue his own spin, but still manages to make Daredevil #34 feel completely inline with the stuff that came before. Listen, this series is just awesome. Every inch of it is amazing and you should be buying it every time a new issue hits the stands.

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8.8
Daredevil (2011) #35

Jan 16, 2014

As you probably expected, this issue looks amazing, too. Samnee is in top form, delivering page after page of gorgeously detailed artwork. His Elektra is one of the best I have ever laid eyes on, and considering my love for Frank Miller, that is saying something. The colors are fabulous, as usual, thanks to color wizard Javier Rodriguez. If nothing else (and there is a lot of else) Daredevil is still the best looking superhero comic around. Thankfully, this team looks like they'll be on the title for a while, so we'll have beautiful Daredevil comics to look forward to for the conceivable future.

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9.8
Daredevil (2011) #36

Feb 19, 2014

Samnee's art is top notch, as usual. One page in particular sells this whole comic. When Matt utters a certain phrase to a courtroom full of reporters and cameras, it become the climax of this whole run. The words become the book, literally shaping the panels and taking over. It's truly stunning and a perfect example as to why Daredevil is one of the most visually compelling comics in recent memory. Colorist Javier Rodriguez and letterer Joe Caramagna do great work, as well. This issue, like this series, is a cut above the rest. All superhero books should dream of being this good.

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6.8
Daredevil (2014) #1.50

Apr 10, 2014

Even hardcore hornhead fans are better off just waiting for the next regular issue as opposed to paying the inflated cover price of this book.

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8.5
Daredevil: Dark Nights #1

Jun 5, 2013

When you take DD's other books into account, it's hard to think of a character that is being drawn better right now. Weeks just kills it. I'm not sure what he has been doing lately, but it's great to see him on a prominent Marvel book again.

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7.9
Daredevil: Dark Nights #2

Jul 3, 2013

What it may lack in the writing department, Weeks more than makes up for with his art. Daredevil: Dark Nights #2 looks superb. The storytelling is great, especially in the first few pages, in which he plays with expectations. Seriously, there is not a single bad looking panel in this book, every one of them knocks it out of the park. If nothing else, Daredevil: Dark Nights is worth your attention because it's so damn gorgeous.

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7.5
Daredevil: Dark Nights #3

Aug 7, 2013

The story is a good one too, although it gets a bit convoluted in this issue. The simplicity of the race to find a little girl's heart is buried in a snowfall of characters and motivation. The first issue focused heavily on Matt Murdock's head injury and this one seems to all but discard that event. Of course, over-plotting aside, that last page is absolutely magical. Daredevil: Dark Nights #3 most definitely ends on one hell of a high note.

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8.0
Daredevil: Dark Nights #4

Sep 4, 2013

The art for this issue really caught me off guard. I've been a big fan of Lapham's art since I first read Stray Bullets, but I never realized just how well this would fit in with the current look of Daredevil. Hell, if the main DD book needs a fill-in, Lapham would be the guy to call. He does some killer work here, delivering a range of stuff, everything from giant monsters to character drama to that pesky little gnome dude. The best parts are the smaller moments though and now I think I'd like to read a Daredevil romance book written and drawn by Lapham. Make that happen, Marvel.

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9.1
Daredevil: End of Days #2

Nov 7, 2012

Klaus Janson is a true legend in the world of comic book art. Add in finishes and paintings from Bill Sienkiewicz and Daredevil: End of Days quickly becomes a master class in comic storytelling. This issue is a true feast for the eyes. From the opening double-page spread to the final, tense confrontation, every single page nails it. Every page is a thing of beauty; each of them deserves to be hung in your dining room and the subject of awkward dinner conversations between friends and family. Daredevil: End of Days is so dark and bleak and heartbreakingly gorgeous that it'll make you want to throw up and cry with joy.

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9.0
Daredevil: End of Days #3

Dec 5, 2012

Adding to the rundown, broken feeling of the book is the art work of Klaus Janson and Bill Sienkiewicz. It's killer stuff. This doesn't look like the Marvel Universe we know, but rather a future version of it where things haven't advanced. We also get some painted spreads by David Mack that are unbelievable. This is kind of stuff you want to hang on your wall. The thought and care that have gone into this book is staggering. Sure, it could wear thin pretty quick, but so far it's pure gold.

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9.2
Daredevil: End of Days #4

Jan 2, 2013

Once again, Klaus Janson and Bill Sienkiewicz kill it on art duties. This thing just so freaking beautiful. From the opening double page spread to the brilliant final scene, this issue just delivers. Of the best moments comes when Urich pays a visit to everyone's favorite skull-clad vigilante. The tension is thick, and Janson and Sienkiewicz's art pulls you into the heart of it. It feels like slow zoom in a film, slowly bringing us into the character's eyes; slowly ramping up the intensity. As someone who has been a Daredevil fan for over 20 years, I can safely say this is one of the best books the character has ever had, even though he's dead in it.

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9.5
Daredevil: End of Days #5

Feb 6, 2013

Look, I'm running out of ways to praise the art in this thing. Klaus Janson and Bill Sienkiewicz are giving us a master class in comic book art with each and every issue. The storytelling is brilliant. There are less trademark Bendis double-page paneled spreads and the book is stronger for it. And folks, you can die happy once you see the two painted pages that Sienkiewicz delivers here. This comic book is truly a work of art; a thing of beauty. I never thought Marvel could kill off one of my favorite characters and I'd love it so very, very much. More Daredevil: End of Days, please.

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9.7
Daredevil: End of Days #6

Mar 6, 2013

When it comes to the art, well, it's still top notch. Klaus Janson and Bill Sienkiewicz kill it. They destroy it. This issue features an amazing page that is a tribute to the first appearance of another classic Marvel hero. It's stunning. The only hiccup, and it's a small one, is Alex Maleev's page. It's a little stiff and awkwardly staged. Not bad, but it doesn't reach the heights of the other brilliant pages in this issue. The thing that is truly bad about Daredevil: End of Days is know that it'll end, and end soon. That hurts, because I adore this series.

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9.6
Daredevil: End of Days #7

Apr 17, 2013

The story beats are magical, too, thanks to the glimmer twins known as Brian "Magic Foot" Bendis and David "Big Mac" Mack. The layered tale these guys have woven is a true work of brilliance. It's hard to accept that there is only one more issue of this series, but hot damn I can't wait to see how things turn out. We still don't even know what "Mapone" means! You double ship all your other books, Marvel! Give All-New X-Men a week off and get us the last issue of Daredevil: End of Days pronto!

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8.8
Daredevil: End of Days #8

Jun 5, 2013

Story aside, this thing shines when it comes to the art. Since the first issue, Klaus Janson and Bill Sienkiewicz have been delivering one of the best looking comics in recent memory. If nothing else, I'm sad to see this mini-series end because this unbelievable art bream won't be working together anymore. I'm extremely bummed to leave this world behind and that's largely because of the work of these two legends. David Mack also provides some gloriously painted flashback pages, which help reveal the beginnings of this story. All in all, Daredevil: End of Days #8 is great, if not the flawless ending we all hoped for.

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8.0
DC Universe Presents #9

May 16, 2012

When it comes down to it though, the best thing about this book is Bernard Chang's artwork. He draws and colors the issue, and it looks beyond amazing. His character's eyes say more than some artist's entire panels. His colors jump off the page " or screen, in my case " and add a layer of depth to the book. Chang is drawing two people sitting chairs and talking for the bulk of the issue and it still looks better than the majority of the comics out there. It's stunning, really.

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8.0
Dead Body Road #1

Dec 12, 2013

Matteo Scalera has really become a superstar this year. This guy can deliver, that's for sure. Every page he draws has such intensity to it. The whole issue looks great, but the brief car chase in particular looks amazing. It feels like the cars are gonna drive off the page and roll you over (you probably deserve it). Scalera can draw action s well, if not better, than any other artist currently working, which should make you very excited for Dead Body Road. If the first issue is any indication, this series promises lots of action and that is something to be very pumped up for.

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8.9
Dead Letters #1

Apr 2, 2014

Chris Visions art is scratchy and all over the place, which is kinda the point. Some of the action is a little confusing and hard to follow, but overall this book looks supreme. The grit and darkness fills every panel, like the best mystery movie you've never seen. The violence is fast and brutal, even when it doesn't stick. Ruth Redmond provides some great colors, too. Visually, Dead Letters can be a little choppy, but that won't stop you from tearing through it. It's a great comic book, through and through.

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9.4
Deadly Class #1

Jan 22, 2014

Deadly Class is one kick ass comic book. Amazing art, lettering, coloring and story. This is the whole package, folks.

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9.0
Deadly Class #3

Mar 26, 2014

Wes Craig is unbelievably good. Deadly Class is laid out damn near perfectly. Within the first couple pages you see just how incredible this man is. Pages literally fall apart as a character nearly falls to his death. The panel cascade and crash down, enveloping the reader in the same sense of panic and chaos that the characters are experiencing. It's truly stunning work. Lee Loughridge's colors are brilliant, as well. Visually, Deadly Class #3 is as good, if not better, than anything else on the stands.

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7.5
Deadpool (2012) #4

Jan 23, 2013

The highlight of this issue, as with previous issues, is Tony Moore's art. He gives every character an exaggerated, expressive nature. The humor of the book is elevated by Moore's handling of every scene. Of course, what Moore does best is draw people being torn to pieces, and there is tons of that in this issue. The violence looks over the top and ridiculous, which fits the tone of this series perfectly. Lincoln vs. Deadpool during a UFC match looks great. It's fun stuff, even if it doesn't have much weight to it.

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8.2
Deadpool (2012) #25.NOW

Mar 12, 2014

Mike Hawthrone draws some great characters. His Crossbones looks fantastic and his Deadpool is even better. However, the world itself feels slightly empty. At times, the characters feel like they are on a sound stage, people and objects only appear when Deadpool or Crossbones are going to interact with them. Of course, you can forgive an empty looking page when the characters that populate it look so damn good. Deadpool is a pretty comic book, which seems like a really weird thing to say.

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8.6
Deadpool (2012) #26

Mar 26, 2014

Scott Koblish and Val Staples commit to the throwback look of this book completely. The idea is that this is a lost issue of "Nick Fury and His Howling Commandos" and the art embraces that. The pages look worn and faded. The color bleeds at times and the whole comic has a tinge of yellow decay. It's gorgeous stuff. There are moments when the storytelling is a little choppy and it's hard to tell how one set of characters moved across the scene, but it's nothing that'll stop you from enjoying the issue. This comic is great, and I say that as someone who typically has no interest in the merc with a mouth.

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9.0
Debris #1

Jul 25, 2012

Bringing all this awesomeness to life is Riley Rossmo. His art is a thing of beauty. The opening battle is so stunning, it's haunting. It's up there with the best animated action movies, like it roars and crashes to earth. He does magic with the scale, making the giant monsters feel truly gigantic. By the time it comes crashing into town you'll be ready to stand up and cheer. This is grand comic book making, kids. Drop one of those superhero books that you just buy out of habit and buy Debris. It's deserves a spot on your pull list.

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9.0
Debris #2

Aug 29, 2012

Just like the first though, the real star of Debris is the artwork of Riley Rossmo. This book looks incredible. I could read a series that contained nothing but Maya fighting Debris monsters. You can feel the movement; the intensity. When Maya slides across the ground to grab her gun, it feels so cinematic, so perfect. He drops out the backgrounds at the perfect moments, so you can focus on the punch, stab, kick or shock. If nothing else, Debris is a visually stunning book that proves that Riley Rossmo is the real deal. This is what comic books are all about, guys.

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8.0
Debris #3

Sep 26, 2012

The main reason this world works so well, that it feels so bleak and real, is the artwork of Riley Rossmo. His techniques as a storyteller are superb. The monsters he brings to life in this and every other issue of Debris are truly unique and awesome. The art is enhanced by Owen Gieni's coloring. The aforementioned flashback sequence is the only place that things fall a little flat. All in all, Debris #3 is a gorgeous comic book.

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6.4
Debris #4

Oct 24, 2012

Sadly, I can't say the same for the art. It's not even second class. It's coach. Riley Rossmo's stunning visuals have been one of the books highlights. For reasons that I can't fathom, Rossmo merely provides breakdowns in this issue and has colorist Owen Gieni produce the finished art. The end result is a muddled, unfinished look that sucks the heart right out of the issue. The book really falls apart towards the end, when it should be at its strongest. The epic battle looks like a mess. It's a damn shame, because before this issue hit stands I had Debris pegged as one of the best series of the year.

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7.0
Demon Knights #0

Sep 12, 2012

If nothing else, the book looks damn good. Bernard Chang doesn't get to draw anything terribly exciting, but he makes the most of it. There is a brief rebellion in Hell, and it looks pretty great, but it doesn't last long.His character work is spectacular, and considering this book features a lot of people standing around talking, he is the perfect guy for the job. Ultimately, Chang is a fantastic artist that is sadly wasted on a somewhat pointless issue.

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9.0
Demon Knights #8

Apr 11, 2012

With the great setup given in issue #8, you are out of excuses for not buying this phenomenal series. It's time to jump on board and enjoy one the best offerings in DC's new title lineup.

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9.0
Demon Knights #9

May 9, 2012

The book looks good and ends with an awesome cliffhanger. Sea monsters and deals made in Hell? Come one, folks, buy this book. It's worth your time and money.

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8.0
Demon Knights #10

Jun 13, 2012

What can be said about Diogenes Neves that has not been already said? The guy's amazing. You only have to glance at the first 5 pages of this book to realize what a superstar Neves is. By the time you see Vandal Savage uppercut a sea serpent you'll be in full swoon, I promise. He also gets to draw giant monster animals and a zombie King Arthur in this issue, so it is safe to say this one is a win.

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8.0
Demon Knights #12

Aug 8, 2012

Diogenes Neves goes it alone on art this issue. He'sstill backed by some great inkers and colorists, but he's the sole penciller listed this time. His stuff looks great, as usual. There is a lot of magic in this issue, lots of energy and explosions that at times looks a bit confusing. Don't get me wrong, it still looks awesome, it's just frantic. At times it's hard to see where all the characters are and exactly what they are doing. Of course, that's to be expected when wizards, demons, immortals, and monsters do battle in a magic tower filled with an entire kingdom.

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9.0
Demon Knights #14

Nov 14, 2012

Bernard Chang is again on art duties and his fluid and graceful style is truly a complement to the series. The characters look fantastic and sinister. There's tons of emotion on every page and even a scene that's filled with dinosaurs and samurais. There's a battle brewing and with Chang drawing it you just know it'll be so freaking slick and beautiful. If nothing else, Cornell and Change are at least making sure this story arc goes out on one hell of a high note.

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6.0
Dominique Laveau: Voodoo Child #2

Apr 18, 2012

On art duties, Denys Cowan does a fine job. The art style is sketchy and a bit frantic. There are times when the character's anatomy feels a bit off and the perspective feels a little compressed. There are some issues with movement too; it's hard to tell if we're looking at one werewolf moving along the outside of a house or three werewolves all just perched in different spots. All in all, the look fits the series very well, it'd just be nice if the script was a bit more cohesive and would give the art some breathing room, because it feels like the book could really shine if it did.

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7.5
Dominique Laveau: Voodoo Child #3

May 23, 2012

Denys Cowan is still great on art duties. His sketchy, detailed style might take some getting used to for certain readers, but it fits the series. He really shines in the close up moments, in his details. When things are pulled back a bit, his character work starts to lose focus. But, man, when he draws a character's face nice and close up, it is freaking glorious. Seriously beautiful stuff, in a horrify, voodoo, and werewolves kind of way.

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9.1
Eternal Warrior #1

Sep 11, 2013

Trevor Hairsine has done some incredible stuff for Valiant already, but this is his best work to date. He renders all the bloody violence with such fluid detail, it really is a sight to see. The gore barely takes a break as the issue barrels along. The action steals the show, but it's the smaller moments that he really nails. The subtle smile on the Eternal Warrior's face as the war rages around him. The look of pain on his face as loved ones die around him. It's beautiful stuff and the kind of thing that'll keep you coming back month after month.

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9.0
Eternal Warrior #2

Oct 9, 2013

Trevor Hairsine is joined by Clayton Crain this time around, but the division of art duties works. Typically, dividing a single issue between two such drastically different artists is a recipe for disaster. This issue avoids that pitfall by having each artist handle a different period in time. The flashbacks are Crain territory, and they look spectacular. The main story is all Hairsine, who is doing the best work of his career in this book. The colors, provided by Brian Reber, are as solid as ever. Eternal Warrior is complete package, a full course of awesomeness.

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9.0
Eternal Warrior #5

Jan 22, 2014

Artist Robert Gill does spectacular work in this issue, as well. He brings a stunning level of detail to this bleak future, drawing crazy robots, bloody sword fights and lush landscapes all with a superb level of skill. By the second page, you'll be in awe of this guy's art. I don't know where this comic is going and what this crazy future has in store for our lead character, but I know I want to read it and I want Gill to draw it. It's a thing of beauty and further proof that Valiant is publishing some of the best comics around.

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8.5
Eternal Warrior #6

Feb 12, 2014

Robert Gill does some amazing stuff in this issue. He draws excellent looking characters and you get a sense of the world through them. The boss of the newly discovered city instantly clues you into the kind of the place our heroes are walking into. Sometimes the background are a little sparse, and the action is a bit jumbled this time around, but this issue is on target a majority of the time. Eternal Warrior looks awesome and has a gut-punch of a story that'll leave you begging for more.

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6.5
Exiled #1

May 3, 2012

The best thing about Exiled #1 is the art. Carmine Di Giandomenico draws an insane amount of detail into every panel. I don't know if one of those three writers told him to draw a bridge made of eyeballs, but it looks awesome when he does. For a book that wasn't too fun to read, it sure was great to look at. Unfortunately, his art is buried by the story at times. Towards the end of the issue, as Asgardians, demons and mutants all face off, he is given a chance to spread out a bit and it looks great when he does.

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8.6
Fantastic Four (2012) #4

Feb 14, 2013

For the most part, Mark Bagley's art is pretty solid. There are a few panels that look slightly rushed, leaving characters looking a little off. That said, it's hard to deny that Bagley is an expert storyteller. He gives the book a clean, classic look that fit this all-ages series like a glove. The aliens look great and the heroes look awesome (Reed Richards has one finely sculpted butt). The art and the story create a package that is big and daring, without being convoluted and inaccessible. Bagley and Fraction have taken the Fantastic Four back to their roots in all the best ways.

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8.1
Fantastic Four (2012) #5

Mar 13, 2013

The art, on the other hand, is good, but doesn't quite excel like the writing. Mark Bagley, inked by Mark Farmer, does a serviceable job, and definitely nails a lot of the small moments, but the book still feels like it lacks a strong visual character. The storytelling is fine and the panel structure does its job, which is all fine and dandy. There's just no panel or page where you go "Wow! Look at that!" It'd be nice if the art matched the excitement and fun of the story, but it simply doesn't.

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7.7
Fantastic Four (2012) #5AU

Mar 27, 2013

If nothing else, the issue looks pretty damn good. Andre Araujo does some killer work. He has a sketchy, European style that reads fantastically. The highlight is his Thing, who he injects with superb levels of detail and character. That said, there are a few moments where some of the other characters look a little odd, mainly in their facial expressions. Pupils are different sizes, heads seem misshapen. The colors also feel drab and flat, which doesn't help the slower scenes.

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7.8
Fantastic Four (2012) #6

Apr 11, 2013

It's not all lollipops and sunshine though, because Mark Bagley's art has some huge dips in quality in this issue. The first page is awesome. The fight scene that dominates the back half of the book is superb. The scenes in between are considerably less awesome. The Richards kids look downright strange, with bizarre head shapes and facial expressions. Once the fists and energy blasts start flying, everything looks great, but those small moments are almost painful.

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8.9
Fantastic Four (2012) #7

Apr 24, 2013

This issue also features the best Bagley work we have seen to date. Perhaps this has to do with new inker Andrew Hennessey or perhaps there's just more of a focus on the characters and anatomy. Either way, everything in this issue looks superb. Previously, the Richards children looked somewhat off, but that isn't the case here. Fantastic Four #7 looks fantastic and how could we hope for anything more?

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8.8
Fantastic Four (2012) #8

May 22, 2013

Matt Fraction has a gift. He crafts these lines of dialogue that you can't help but repeat. You want to wear them to dress yourself in the conversation of superheroes. If you read Hawkeye, you know plenty of them. Well, "Yancy Street Don't Bend!" It's not just because it sounds great when you yell it, it's because it has weight. When Ben Grimm says it, it means something. There's an intensity in those words that you don't always find in superhero comics.

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8.0
Fantastic Four (2012) #9

Jun 19, 2013

Matt Fraction is on fire, as usual. His structure and narrative are spot on, but it's the dialogue that really soars. He often gives each issue a signature line, something that sticks out and brands the story. "Yancy Street don't bend!' was the line we got in the previous issue. This time around, it's Doom's signature catchphrases, like "You dare?!" When you have fifteen Dooms all yelling out some variation of the same line, it's pretty hilarious. Fantastic Four is just plain ol' fun.

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9.5
Fatale #4

Apr 4, 2012

Fans of Brubaker and Phillips won't be disappointed with this issue. They have become one of those teams that are synonymous with great comic books. There is very little these guys touch that doesn't come out great. If you haven't been reading Fatale, don't start here. Go back and pick up the first three issues and then read the glory that is issue #4. You won't be disappointed.

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8.7
Fatale #9

Oct 31, 2012

The only problem this issue has, and it's a minor one, is a few art hiccups. Sean Philips is one of the best artist in the working in the medium today, but he's not one hundred percent on his game in this issue. The anatomy of some of the characters feels off, waists are too small, noses grow and shrink. It's still a great looking issue, but if you are used to Philips work, you'll no doubt notice that this isn't his best stuff.

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9.6
Fatale #10

Nov 28, 2012

Sean Phillips does his usual tricks here, and the results are awesomeness in its purest form. He brings the madness forth in every page while keeping a natural talent for storytelling front and center. Artists are as much of storytellers in the comic book medium as writers, and Sean Phillips is one of the best. The pages are smooth and graceful, even when the panels are filled with blood and chaos and death. You should be buying Fatale. It's that simple.

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8.4
Fatale #12

Feb 14, 2013

Sean Phillips delivers his normal level of quality artwork. His layouts are top notch and his skills as an artist and storyteller are in full effect. Fatale, as always, looks great. The big change this issue is the coloring by Elizabeth Breitweiser. Her style is a bit brighter and more layered than we have previously seen in this series, and it'll take some getting used to. Breitwesier is a master color artist, without a doubt, and any comic book would be lucky to have her, but she brings a different feeling to Fatale and I'm not totally sold on her style in conjunction with Phillips art. That might change if she sticks around for a few issues, but for now I can't help but miss Dave Stewart just a little.

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9.1
Fatale #16

Aug 7, 2013

Sean Phillips is amazing, as always. He draws the cracks of the world -- the rundown lowlifes of society -- better than anybody. Fatale looks lived in, like it's about to decay. There are no clean lines or dignified characters, just darkness and desolation. Elizabeth Breitweiser helps build the world with her subtle color work. There's a range of purples and pinks that give the issues a feeling of constant sunset, like darkness is always right around the corner, just a moment away. Issue #16 of Fatale is a thing of beauty.

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9.8
Fatale #18

Nov 7, 2013

Sean Phillips is a masterful storyteller. Fatale moves and reads like a dream, or a nightmare, rather. The beginning of the issue centers around an argument about what to do with the dead body of a friend. Phillips pulls you in and then suddenly, there's a hatchet in a head. The look of confusion and horror on the character's faces makes the whole scene. If you love horror, crime or just amazing comic books, you need to read Fatale. Brubaker and Phillips are doing some of their best work ever in this series.

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9.0
Fatale #20

Feb 12, 2014

Phillips and colorist Elizabeth Breitweiser deserve most of the credit for that aforementioned dread and tone. Fatale has a look all its own, from the lettering, to the washed colors to the blood spattered gore. Phillips and Breitweiser bring their A-game to every panel, never skimping on a scene. There's more detail in these pages than most comics manage in a whole year. Fatale is one of those comics that reminds you how great the medium can be. It's consistently fantastic.

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9.0
FF (2012) #3

Jan 23, 2013

Matt Fraction has really hit his stride with FF. In a lot of ways, this is an all-ages book, the kind of thing that many of us grew up reading. Fraction nails the characters and gives the series an huge, universe-spanning feel while still keeping things focused on the smaller moments (like a dessert bomb courtesy of the Yancy Street Gang). The dialogue is great and the story has finally started to separate itself from the main Fantastic Four story. Also, Doom the Annihilating Conqueror is pure gold.

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9.1
FF (2012) #4

Feb 27, 2013

Of course, what really sells the tone and heart of this book is the art. Michael Allred and Laura Allred make FF a slick treat. This is a character driven book and the Allreds solidify that each and every issue. Again, She-Hulk has so much personality and presence in these pages, and that is largely due to the art. There's times when a joke or a scene is accompanied with a mere look from a character; a sideways glance or a curled lip. These little nuances are a part of what make FF work so very, very well. You'd be hard pressed to find a more fun mainstream superhero book, and why would you want to? FF has everything we're looking for.

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8.6
FF (2012) #5

Mar 27, 2013

That said, there are a few scenes where the backgrounds disappear a bit too often and it can lead to some confusion. The store John Storm finds himself in seems strangely staged and barren. The FF building is also sparse and empty, but when your characters look this amazing, it's a forgivable offense.

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9.4
FF (2012) #6

Apr 24, 2013

As previously stated, Quinones nails the high-energy pop sensibilities that Allred imbued in this series. It helps a great deal, of course, that Laura Allred is still around to provided her gorgeous color work. FF #6, like the five issues before it, looks incredible. This is one of the comic books that you can just pop open and instantly understand. The writing and the art both convey that same sense of fun and humor. I'm going to start buying two copies of this book each month so that I can hand one out to a random person on the street and instantly make their world a little bit brighter.

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9.8
FF (2012) #7

May 15, 2013

Michael Allred kills it, as usual. Par for course, but this issue of FF is a beauty. The best bits in here are when the characters are talking things out and making big decisions; those are panels where Allred truly delivers. To be completely honest, the only thing keeping this issue from receiving a perfect 10 is a few scenes during the big fight where characters look a little stiff. Other than those small, small, flaws, this issue is stunning.

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8.5
FF (2012) #8

Jun 26, 2013

We've said this before, but wherever the line is for a Mike Allred illustrated She-Hulk series, we'd like to get in it. Allred draws strong women that stand and move with a purpose beyond sexy poses and broken backs. You can see She-Hulk's strength in the way she stands as opposed to insanely rendered muscle tone. The character work in this book, both in the art and the writing, is second to none. Of course, not everything is perfect: the action still looks a little stiff. The scene involving the kids dog piling in the halls of the Baxter Building is awkwardly staged, at best.

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7.3
FF (2012) #10

Jul 31, 2013

Weird creative choices aside, the issue at least looks fantastic. The bright pop sensibilities of Michael and Laura Allred are on full display, giving a vivid energy to a brief battle with a micro-tiger. The characters look great, as usual. FF #10 is big, bold, and beautiful. It's easy to get lost in this artwork, even when the story falls flat. Hopefully, Fraction and Allred won't be characters in upcoming issues so FF can get back to being the book we have loved so much in the past.

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8.6
FF (2012) #11

Aug 28, 2013

FF is also one of the coolest looking comics on the stands thanks to Michael and Laura Allred. Half the humor and heart of this comic wouldn't come through is it wasn't for the Allreds. The aforementioned time travel sequence will make you laugh out loud because of the characters' expressions. Then there's the casual appeal of The Impossible Man, who glances at his fingernails while asking the FF to take his son who is just entirely too possible. Yes, this book is beautiful and yes, you should be buying and worshipping it.

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9.5
Flash Gordon #1

Apr 10, 2014

If you are starting a list of best comics of 2014, make sure you leave room for Flash Gordon #1.

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8.0
Frankenstein, Agent of S.H.A.D.E. #8

Apr 11, 2012

Alberto Ponticelli has really honed his style, as it feels tighter and the panels feel more thought out. There are times when his anatomy feels a bit off, but considering this is a book where have the cast is literally sown together from spare appendages, it's a forgivable offense. His expressions are great, as is his scenery (Castle Frankenstein!) and he draws the action with just the right amount of chaos. Lemire and Ponticelli have just fit together superbly on this book. Sometimes, it's just fun to wallow in the insanity, and Frankenstein lets you do just that.

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8.5
Frankenstein, Agent of S.H.A.D.E. #9

May 9, 2012

There are some great moments within this book, and a wonderfully heartfelt ending that showcases one of the things that makes this series so great. It's crazy and zany, sure, but it also has heart.

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6.5
Frankenstein, Agent of S.H.A.D.E. #10

Jun 13, 2012

Alberto Ponticelli's art is as good, as usual. However, from issue to issue, even with that same inker on board, his line work seems to go from thick to light. Last issue had more weight, slightly heavier in the lines and shadows. This issue is lighter; sketchier. None of it looks poorly done, but I preferred his art last issue. His detail work, however, is as good as ever in this issue. The upside down city looks great, even if it is a little confusing at times.

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7.2
Furious #1

Jan 29, 2014

The star of the show is Mr. Victor Santos. His inspired cartooning fills this comic with energy and life. The action scenes are a thing of wonder. Panels slip and slide across the page, it looks as if everything is falling apart before your very eyes (and, in a way, it is). It's frantic and kinetic, inserting you into the moment and making you feel the intensity. Furious #1 is visual treat, a debut filled to the brim with awesome artwork. Hopefully the story can keep up.

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6.5
Ghost #0

Sep 19, 2012

Strangely, the most uneven part of the book is Phil Noto's art. If you loved his clean, beautiful work in Creator-Owned Heroes, you'll find yourself scratching your head here. Some pages look great. Others look choppy with downright sloppy color work. The backgrounds are minimal and the layouts are as straightforward and uninteresting as possible. This could all add up to a terrible looking issue, if his characters didn't look so freaking fantastic. You can see what they are feeling just by looking at their eyes. It's stunning and it's mixed in with a bunch of ho-hum pages which results in a slightly confusing package. I love Noto's work, but what we get here is not his best stuff.

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8.2
Ghost #1

Oct 24, 2012

The art is even better in this issue. Phil Noto does his same simple line technique here, but the characters look more expressive. Maybe it's because there are better moments in this issue; better places for him to really shine. Whatever the reason, it looks impressive and sharp. The scene where a woman is being attacked with a shard of broken glass is equal parts horrifying and mesmerizing. DeConnick and Noto are doing great stuff here and Ghost looks to be one very interesting series. Count me in.

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7.0
Ghost (2013) #1

Dec 19, 2013

The thing really saves Ghost #1 from being just okay is the art by Ryan Sook. His pages are dynamic and energized. The action scenes look fantastic and the smaller, character scenes look even better. Sook draws some of the best faces in comics, conveying emotion and motives through something as simple as sideways glance. We simply don't get enough Ryan Sook art, so if he draws something it's definitely worth checking out. If nothing else, Ghost #1 is a very, very pretty comic book.

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7.5
Ghostbusters #9

May 30, 2012

This issue also features a back-up by Tristan Jones, and it is a beauty. It has a dark and sinister feel, which is polar opposite to the story that proceeds it. The art is filled with detail and shadows, nothing at all like the cartoony look of the the main feature. It'll be interesting to see where it goes. Two Ghostbusters stories are better than one Ghostbuster story, I always say!

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10
God Country #1

Oct 30, 2016

God Country #1 will be hitting comic shops in January 2017, but you can pre-order it now. Without a doubt, this will be one of next year's big times. It'll be the book that makes everyone say, "Whoa, where dd this come from?!" It's a truly stunning debut and we can't wait to read more.

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8.6
Godzilla Awakening #1

May 8, 2014

Before you head to the theater to witness the return of the king, do yourself a favor and check out this graphic novel. It'll leave you even more pumped up than you already are for the flick. Hell, I'm more excited after reading this than I was before and I did not think that was humanly possible. It sure seems like the writers understand the source material, and because Max Borenstein also wrote the movie, it should give you confidence that Godzilla is in good hands.

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10
Godzilla: Half-Century War #1

Aug 8, 2012

Art aside, what really makes this book work is the way Stokoe tells his story. All of the IDW Godzilla books have been pretty good, but they have always focused on the bigger story; the story of several monsters tearing the world apart. Stokoe tells the story of one guy, Lieutenant Ota Murakami, and his battle to save the citizens of Tokyo from Godzilla's rampage. It's a story told from the street, from the view of a single tank commander. It's engaging, thrilling and beautiful. I can't stress this enough, folks, buy this book. It's a must read and a must own.

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9.0
Godzilla: Half-Century War #2

Sep 19, 2012

Naturally, the biggest draw of this book is Stokoe's highly detailed artwork. It's incredibly rendered stuff, almost mesmerizing. Stokoe changes the perspective in this issue, with the majority of our view coming from helicopters circling Godzilla as he plows through the countryside. It's not quite as intense as the previous issue's tank scenes, but it's beautiful none the less. The frantic attention to line work makes every page look like something you could hang on your wall. Godzilla: Half Century War is a truly wonderful comic book. You don't just read it, you experience it.

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9.8
Godzilla: Half-Century War #5

Apr 3, 2013

This issue also proves that Stokoe is one hell of a writer. It's a brilliant narrative cap, the kind of ending we rarely get in comic books. This series was less about Godzilla and more about the man who dedicated his life to stopping him. If you've been reading this from the beginning, the payoff is absolutely immense. The final encounter between these two is as good as it gets, seriously. Buy this book. Buy ten copies and hand them out to your friends and family. The world needs more comics like Godzilla: The Half-Century War.

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6.5
Great Pacific #1

Nov 14, 2012

Art duties are handled by Martin Morazzo and for the most part the book looks really good. He has nice, detailed style that suits the book and the characters. His color work really pops and gives the pages life. There are a few anatomy issues, a few scenes where the some characters look a little off, but nothing that'll stop you from enjoying the book. Great Pacific could be going someplace awesome, you'll just have to stick with it to see if it gets there.

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5.0
Green Arrow (2011) #0

Sep 5, 2012

The book really suffers in the art department. Freddie Wiliams II has a sketchy, frantic style that does not fit the tone or feel of this book. It looks weird, to be frank. Then there are the bizarre angles. Several times in the issue, Williams draws a profile shot of Queen, with another character perking halfway around his face. It's awkwardly staged and he does it more than once. Panels like this derail what little momentum this book has.

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6.9
Green Arrow (2011) #20

May 1, 2013

Andrea Sorrentino does the usual art magic here. This is a nice looking issue, especially the end fight scene that takes place in a total downpour. Seriously, rain has never looked so good in a comic book. The only place this comic is lacking in the visual department is the same place it has been since this new creative team took over: the coloring. Yes, there are heavy, stylistic risks being taken, but they just aren't working. The black and white panels just look unfinished; it looks like flats with no texture or life.

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8.5
Green Arrow (2011) #21

Jun 5, 2013

Sorrentino delivers some of his most competent storytelling in this issue, too. Maybe it's the absence of huge multi-paneled double-page spreads or frantic fight scenes, but there is a clearer sense of character and movement. There's a still a few moments when things look a bit stiff " a guy cuts an arrow in half mid-flight, for example " but overall this issue looks great. It also features the best use of their little color-dropping-out trick, drawing your attention perfectly instead of sticking out like a sore thumb.

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8.0
Green Arrow (2011) #22

Jul 3, 2013

Jeff Lemire is writing a bigger story in this issue, placing another piece on the board as Oliver tries to assemble the secrets of his father's past. Green Arrow as a character still isn't doing much to grab the audience. What really keeps things exciting is the sense of adventure, the brisk moving action scenes and the story that keeps our hero and his companions jumping from place to place. I may not exactly care where this story is going, but I'm enjoying the hell out of the ride.

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8.2
Green Arrow (2011) #23

Aug 7, 2013

Jeff Lemire deserves mega credit for doing something different, as well. He's transformed this little title into a huge mythological vision quest. It's the not tone or feeling we have come to expect in a Green Arrow title, but Lemire makes it work. There are deep family secrets, violent pasts, ancient orders, and powerful artifacts. It's big stuff, at times a bit too big, but it's interesting and engaging. Green Arrow deserves your support; DC needs to know this is the kind of book we want more of.

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8.3
Green Arrow (2011) #23.1

Sep 4, 2013

If you have been reading Green Arrow, you know what to expect from Sorrentino's art. He does the same great work in this issue, especially in the darker, more brutal moments. This issue is light on action, and the characters tend to look a little stiff and awkward when they are just talking. When people's heads start exploding and the such, it looks great, but there's not a ton of that here. Colorist Marcelo Maiolo does some fine work, as well, only briefly using the black and white panels this series has become known for.

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8.4
Green Arrow (2011) #24

Oct 2, 2013

Lemire does a great job of building this issue for new readers. As an entry point to the series, it's top notch. The only place the story falls a little flat is when Ollie finally confronts Count Vertigo. To say it's anticlimactic is probably being generous. The Count has been built into a great villain and the fact that Green Arrow essentially puts him out of commission with one punch is kind of a bummer. I can't be the only one hoping for something a little bigger, something a bit more epic.

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9.0
Green Arrow (2011) #26

Dec 5, 2013

Andrea Sorrentino can be hit and miss, but in this issue he's all hits. Maybe it's the big, sweeping set pieces or maybe he's just cramming it all in there and ditching the minimalist stuff that never really worked before. Whatever the reason, Green Arrow #26 looks stunning. The island is brilliantly detailed and the characters look better than ever. The stiffness that has haunted in this comic in the past is gone, leaving only fluid movement and superb storytelling. The flashback to Ollie's time on the island is some of the best stuff Sorrentino has ever done. So, great writing, awesome artwork, fun premise and looks of cool action? Yep, Green Arrow's got it all.

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8.8
Green Arrow (2011) #30

Apr 2, 2014

Sorrentino, as previously stated, does some amazing stuff in this issue. When it looks great, it looks unbelievable great. The storytelling it top notch and smooth as silk. Even in unrelenting chaos, Sorrentino choreographs things beautifully, letting the characters dance through the violence and mayhem. Colorist Marcelo Maiolo does some awesome stuff here, too. There are a few panels that have a strange yellowish background, but for the most part it looks great. Green Arrow is one of DC's better comics right now. Only a fool would skip this comic and you're not a fool, right?

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7.0
Grim Leaper #1

May 30, 2012

[Full Disclosure: IGN Comics Editor Joey Esposito has a back-up story in this comic.]

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9.0
Grindhouse: Doors Open at Midnight #2

Nov 7, 2013

Peterson's art, with colors by Nolan Woodard, completes the package. All that ridiculous violence and mayhem that De Campi writes is brought to bloody life in a spectacular fashion. Peterson draws the gore with just the right amount of detail, as characters a ripped to pieces and devoured. The stories heroine is so kick-ass, she leaves a trail of gorgeous destruction that will suck you into every panel. Seriously, blood bathes are rarely this much fun, so do yourself a solid and buy this comic book.

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8.2
Grindhouse: Doors Open at Midnight #3

Dec 5, 2013

Artist Simon Fraser jumps onboard this issue, and does a bang up job. Right from the second page, which features a prison shower filled with naked women, it's clear Fraser can deliver the goods. You can't take the stuff you see in Grindhouse too seriously, and Fraser embraces that. Every scene features near nudity or blood or both. The most horrifying bit comes when an inmate gets treated to a acid hose down, and Fraser draws renders the scene with goofy gore that leaps off the page. Grindhouse: Doors Open at Midnight could be called mindless entertainment, but sometimes that's exactly what the soul needs.

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8.2
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #3

Jun 12, 2013

Steve McNiven and Sara Pichelli split the penciling duties in this issue, but it manages to keep a consistent flow throughout. Anytime you see two pencilers and three inkers, there is some cause for concern, but here it proves to be unwarranted. Guardians of the Galaxy #3 looks good and avoids any jarring shifts in tone when one artist steps out and another steps in. The characters look great even when the action feels a little stiff and staged. The big shootout we get could be a bit more dynamic and exciting, but it ain't bad overall.

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7.5
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #4

Jun 26, 2013

The issue looks slick, thanks to Sara Pichelli and the color art of Justin Ponsor. Pichelli does fantastic stuff with the characters, bringing forward all sorts of emotion and expression. There is a slight problem with backgrounds disappearing, at times for entire pages, but Gamora looks so amazing it's not a huge problem when there is nothing behind her. For whatever reason, she draws Pepper Pots extremely young looking, too. Potts looks like a teenager as opposed to Tony's right hand girl who often is running one of the biggest corporations on Earth.

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8.0
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #5

Jul 31, 2013

Sara Pichelli delivers some stunning art in these pages, with her flare for characters and expressions really shining through. The awkward scene involving Tony Stark and Gamora is fantastic thanks to things like Gamora's subtle sneer of disgust. Pichelli isn't always the best when it comes to backgrounds, often leaving the areas behind characters blank, but colorist Justin Ponsor comes to the rescue by giving each page dramatic lighting and mood. All in all, Guardians of the Galaxy #5 looks great.

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7.3
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #8

Oct 30, 2013

Brain Michael Bendis has these characters dialed in. There's some great dialogue in this issue for everyone expect Rocket Raccoon. For whatever reason, he seems to only say the same stuff over and over again. Seriously, some of his lines of dialogue are copy and pasted from early issues. "Human tech sucks," "I'll murder you," etc, etc. That said, Star-Lord and Abigail Brand have some exchanges during a a rescue attempt that pretty make the entire issue.

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7.0
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #9

Dec 5, 2013

Francesco Francavilla is on art again, and this issue is slightly more successful than the past one. The colors pop a bit more the overwhelming sense of purple isn't present. The constant action looks great, although it is a bit easy to get lost at times. The stuff he handles best are the pulled back moments, the shots of space and the spaceships. The final scene, featuring the explosion of a space station, is the best looking set of pages in the whole issue. Francavilla is an amazing talent, but there are comics that showcase his work better than these issue of Guardians of Galaxy have.

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8.6
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #10

Jan 1, 2014

Brian Bendis might have just been writing to the strength of his artist, but this is a bit reserved for him. You get lots of talking heads in the first few pages, but once the crap hits the fan he reels it back and lets Maguire do his thing. The dialogue we do get is snappy and to the point, without overdone attempts at humor and banter. This just might be the best series Bendis is writing right now, and considering how good the X-Men universe is right now, that's really saying something.

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7.8
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #11.NOW

Jan 29, 2014

Sara Pichelli is kicking ass. Even if you have no investment in these characters, no interest in this story and no desire to read a Bendis book (you have a bad attitude, you know that?), then you will still find something to enjoy here thanks to Pichelli. She draws some of the most expressive looking characters in the comics biz. If you have to have a book where a bunch of people stand around and talk for most of the time, then you should probably have Sara Pichelli draw it. She's top notch, a superstar in the making.

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8.5
Happy #1

Sep 26, 2012

Happy #1 is a great looking book that teeters on the brink of typical Morrison madness. If you like your violence graphic and your donkeys blue with wings and horns, then Happy is the book for you. It's hard to tell where exactly it is going, which probably exactly what Morrison and Robertson want. Still, where ever it is headed, it looks to be one hell of a trip.

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8.0
Happy #2

Oct 31, 2012

Darick Robertson produces the same gritty, ugly world we have come to expect from him. His artwork is as detailed and smooth as ever. The violence looks graphic and bloody. Nick looks like an out-of-shape jerk. Happy looks like a flying donkey unicorn. This ugly little world Morrison has written looks amazing thanks to the work of Robertson. Who knew that the story of a friendly little imaginary friend could look so damn awful and dirty?

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8.6
Happy #3

Dec 19, 2012

The best thing about Happy is Darick Robertson. His dirty, detailed art gives the world a sick and twisted feel. Happy the horse sticks out like a sore thumb against a backdrop of blood, vomit and lust. We know Robertson can draw this kind of stuff better than anybody, but he's bringing his A game here. This series has looked fantastic and this issue is no slouch either. One of the best moments comes when you get to see a younger version of Nick through a series of flashbacks. It's amazing to watch him transform from a bright-eyed young man into a fat, miserable drunk.

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8.5
Harbinger #0

Feb 6, 2013

This issue has two artists, and the quality between the two of them varies greatly. Mico Suayan and Pere Perez split the book, with one of them drawing the present scenes and the other drawing the past. The stuff in the present looks okay; nothing spectacular. The stuff in Hiroshima, on the other hand, looks amazing. It's stunning and horrifying. I even googled images of the aftermath of Hiroshima after reading this because I had a hard time accepting the terrifying images I saw as the reality of the situation. The artist captured it perfectly. It's absolutely disgusting, as it should be.

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7.2
Harbinger #0.2014

Mar 19, 2014

This issue does suffer slightly do to the fact that four different artists tackle the pages. The jumps in time help to justify the new looks and tones, but it's hard not to notice just how different some sections look from the others. Considering how interesting the story is, it would have been nice if one artist could have handled the whole thing. Khari Evans, Mico Suayan, Stephen Segovia and Lewis LaRosa all dow fine work, but nobody sticks around long enough for you to really get into their stuff. Thankfully, Ian Hannin's colors help hold the issue together.

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7.5
Harbinger #1

Jun 6, 2012

So far, with two titles under its belt, Valiant is doing a fantastic job of relaunching their line of comics. Harbinger #1 is a well written, well drawn comic book that is worth reading. It is going to have to prove itself very quickly though, because readers are not going to stick with it if they feel like they have seen all it has to offer before. Those of us that grew up with Harbinger know it still has a few tricks up its sleeves, let's just hope they bust them out soon.

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7.5
Harbinger #4

Sep 12, 2012

Khari Evans' artwork is good stuff. He's assisted by two other artist here, and they all seem to gel. The book doesn't feel disjointed. If there is any complaint that can be leveled at the artwork, it's that all the characters seem to have a very similar facial structure. They all kind of look the same. Other than that, this is a solid looking book with an interesting story. It's worth reading.

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8.8
Harbinger #5

Oct 17, 2012

The art in this issue is better than it has been the entire series. Khari Evans (with assists from Matthew Clark and Muniz) delivers big time. By the end of the issue, Pete looks so bloodied and broken that it almost hurts to read. The book just has a raw, visceral look that jumps off the page. There are so many cool moments in this issue, so many incredible panels to gaze at. All in all, Harbinger has become one hell of a kick ass series.

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8.4
Harbinger #8

Jan 23, 2013

Lee Garbett's art looks slick in this issue. The action is smooth and the storytelling is spot on. He gives the book a more cartoony feel, but it's a welcome change that fits the energy of the story. After all, this is an issue that features a grown man with a shotgun wearing a bright yellow sundress. Moose Baumann's stellar color work gives the book a bright, fun feel, especially the pages involving Faith. All in all, Harbinger #8 is a great looking comic book with a fun, if not unique, story. Let's just leave the Jersey Shore out of it from now on, guys.

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7.9
Harbinger #9

Feb 20, 2013

Pere Perez does some killer work in this issue. Harbinger #9 looks really nice, with clear action and stellar storytelling. It's a pleasure to read and easy on the eyes. The character's expressions are pitch perfect, with every worried glance and sly smile hitting their mark. Events in this series are coming to a head, and the big showdown between Peter and his band of misfits can't come soon enough. Harbinger delivers the goods, month after month.

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8.1
Harbinger #11

Apr 11, 2013

Khari Evans and Trevor Hairsine continue the new Valiant tradition of having more than one artist draw an issue. These two provide a fairly smooth experience, though. Whoever drew the first few pages " it looks like Hairsine " does the best work in the issue, but they also have the advantage of drawing the coolest scene of the book. Harbinger #11, like the issues before it, looks great, but it would be nice if Valiant would let a full issue be drawn by a single artist. Doesn't seem like too much to ask for.

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8.2
Harbinger #13

Jun 19, 2013

Khari Evans and Trevor Hairsine split art duties in this issue. It manages to be a nice meld thanks to a series of flashbacks that allow the book to be broken up into sections. One artist handles the past, the other the present. It'd be nice if one artist could handle the entire book so there would be a more cohesive experience, but what we get works well enough.

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7.8
Harbinger #16

Sep 18, 2013

Barry Kitson is still on art for this issue, but he's joined by Mark Pennington and Brian Level this time around. Harbinger #16 looks really good, but it doesn't run as smooth as a Kitson solo issue. There's not bad a page in here, but there are some noticeable shifts when one artist takes center stage and another steps back. Still, there's some rad looking pages in here and anytime we get to see a heavy metal train it's a very good thing. Hell, I want more heavy metal trains and giant bats, there isn't nearly enough of them in this issue!

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7.7
Harbinger #17

Oct 23, 2013

Clayton Henry steps into the art duties this issue, and his work is solid, as usual. His careful linework is clean and fluid, giving a the world a slick look. That's both good and bad. The comic looks great, for sure, but we are told over and over how tired Harada is, but he never looks it. There's no sense of the world being lived in, everything just looks a bit too perfect. That said, the scenes involving the cartoon projects of a young psionic are spectacular. I'm excited to see more of that stuff in upcoming issues.

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7.0
Harbinger #19

Dec 12, 2013

Art this issue is provided by Barry Kitson, Brain Level and Riley Rossmo. The highlights are Rossmo's few bits, which are mostly dreamscape, flashback scenes. They look great, whatever they are. Kitson and Level's tuff looks great sometimes, and unfinished others. It's hard to know who did what, and nothing looks bad, per se, but it's clear that quality jumps from page to page. Backgrounds disappear often and it's hard to follow where characters are standing and what they are interacting with. Fortunately, Dave Sharpe's excellent letterering keeps the issue on track and moving at a brisk pace. Harbinger has been better, but it's still a pretty good comic book.

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8.5
Harbinger #20

Jan 16, 2014

This is a great looking issue, too, thanks to Clayton Henry. He doesn't get to draw too much in this issue, just lot of Harada talking to people and planning, but it all runs smooth and is an easy read. As a storyteller, Henry is fantastic. He keeps the action close, rarly pulling out for long distance views. SWAT officers are right in your face, Harada's eyes are staring right at you. It's all front and center. It'd be nice to see him handle a bit more action, but given the events of this issue, that is coming and coming soon. Peter is gunning for Harada, and we know when those two throw down, things get out of control.

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8.2
Harbinger #21

Feb 12, 2014

Clayton Henry is always good. He does some awesome work this issue, giving us some truly expressive characters. There's very little in the way of action this month, which is okay when you get such great character moments. You can feel the emotion on the page when Henry draws it, the looks of anger, disgust and love. It's all hits home. Even when the script falters and characters act strangely, Henry keeps the book running smoothly. His art carries this thing from start to finish.

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8.6
Harbinger Wars #1

Apr 3, 2013

There are three artists working on this issue, but it manages to never feel jarring or stitched together. Clayton Henry, Clayton Crain and the non-Clayton named Mico Suayan all have incredibly different styles, but Harbinger Wars is structured brilliantly and allows for each of these guys to do their thing without disrupting the flow or feel of the book. The trick is that the artists all handle different scenes, times, and settings. Crain does a violent flashback. Suayan renders a bizarre dream-type sequence. Henry gives us the here and now. Harbinger Wars features a lot of different threads coming together, and it accomplishes that daunting task with style and vigor. Issue #2 can't get here soon enough.

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8.6
Harbinger Wars #2

May 1, 2013

Clayton Henry kills it in this issue (literally). Bloodshot is a character known for taking a beating, but holy crap does it get insane in Harbinger Wars #2. It's almost sickening, in a good way. I don't believe we are meant to enjoy the sight of Bloodshot's face peeling off as he vomits blood and nanites at his enemies. But hey, feeling grossed out has never felt so good and looked so awesome. If Harbinger Wars can keep this momentum up, it'll be the superhero event of the year, no doubt.

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8.7
Harbinger Wars #3

Jun 12, 2013

Clayton Henry and Pere Perez work together on art and the result is a mighty fine package. Harbinger Wars #3 is slick, but there is one panel that kind of kills the momentum. It's this one panel that keeps this issue from being an "A" in the art department. The offending panel looks to feature a satellite image of Las Vegas and it sticks out horribly. It's a weird decision because everything else looks so damn great. Harbinger Wars is delivering on its promise and giving us an intense and violent intersection of the most compelling superhero universe on the stands.

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9.5
Harvest #1

Aug 1, 2012

What really makes Harvest amazing though, the thing that pushes it into "buy this freaking book now" territory, is the art. Colin Lorimer's detailed and dark style turns this comic book into a masterpiece. The cover alone should be enough to convince you that his stuff is the real deal. One scene in particular, featuring a strung out doctor operating on a car crash victim is so haunting and dreadful that it'll stick with long after you close the comic. Seriously, folks, buy Harvest. If you like crime, mystery, murder or just masterful storytelling, then this is a comic book for you.

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8.0
Harvest #2

Sep 5, 2012

Colin Lorimer kills it on art, just like he did in the first issue. This book doesn't have as many jaw-dropping pages as the last, but the ones that we do get are amazing. The first double page spread is bleak and cold. Dane's plan to get back at the people using him ends with a ghost, some gas tanks and a defibrillator. It's so cool looking that the rest of the book kinda pales in comparison. But hey, Harvest is a great looking, well written, indie book. We can always use more of those.

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9.0
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #2

Sep 5, 2012

David Aja soars in this issue. This is a stunning book, a visual masterpiece. He structure is impeccable; the book just flows. It's beautiful stuff. The colors, courtesy of Matt Hollingsworth, give the book an overwhelming sense of purple. I know there were other colors in this book, but all I can remember is purple. Lots of purple. That is not a criticism. Aja's line work is enhanced by the simple color palette. These two guys click and the results are one of the best looking comic books on the stands.

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9.8
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #3

Oct 17, 2012

David Aja and Matt Hollingsworth make sure that all that craziness look so damn fine. It's gorgeous stuff. There's something wonderful on every single page. The action moves perfectly, and the humor is so spot on it's ridiculous. The scene were Hawkeye has his nude battle has a moment that'll seriously make you laugh out loud. Hawkeye is such a good series that it makes me question what I had done with my life before I read it. Everything just seems so trivial and unimportant pre-Hawkeye.

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8.4
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #5

Dec 5, 2012

Javier Pulido is on art duties again, and it's a somewhat mixed bag. It's better than last issue, and there are some really great moments, but it still feels a little off. His style works well for the series, he just doesn't quite click the way that David Aja did. It's not bad, but it is certainly not as good either. Some panels are just missing some attention to details. There's a lack of backgrounds, a lack of scenery and placement. This issue still looks good, just not as good as you would have hoped.

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8.8
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #7

Jan 30, 2013

We get two artists this time around and they divide the issue equally. Instead of a jarring art change midway though, the story is cut in two and follows each of the characters as the deal with storm in separate areas. Steve Lieber and Jesse Hamm both bring a lot to the table, although they do so with very different styles. There's cartoony elements mixed with highly detailed action. Don't worry, the book keeps a cohesive feel throughout thanks to the always amazing Matt Hollingsworth who colors this thing to perfection. Once again, Hawkeye hits the bullseye (there's your cover quote, Marvel)!

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8.3
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #12

Jul 10, 2013

Look, what it really comes down to is this issue is drawn and colored by Francesco Francavilla. If he draws something, you buy it. That's it. Pull your money out and buy it. Hawkeye #12 is a work of art, which is no surprise. Francavilla is firing on all cylinders, from his line work to the simple color palette. I'm not saying that if everyone looked at Francavilla art there would be no more wars in the world, but it's a possibility. Lay down your arms, pick up this comic book and hug somebody.

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7.5
He-Man & The Masters of the Universe #1

Jul 5, 2012

This is a fun book, but I'm ready for more He-Man, more Skeletor, more of the setting and characters that 5-year-old me loved so very, very much.

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9.0
High Crimes #2

Feb 27, 2013

To go along with the great writing and story is some absolutely beautiful artwork. Ibrahim Moustafa gives just the right amount of life to these broken and beaten characters. The guy does everything here: pencils, inks, colors, and he's good at all of it. There are books coming out from major publishers that don't look or read half as good as High Crimes. This is a title to watch coming from the publisher that everyone should be watching. Seriously, this is what comic books are all about, folks.

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7.0
Higher Earth #1

May 9, 2012

The art isn't exactly awe inspiring either. Francesco Biagini does a fine job, but his attention to detail is somewhat lacking and leaves the book feeling a bit empty at times. At one point, a character kicks a would-be assassin off a cliff that I didn't even realize was there. I had no idea there was a steep drop off inches away from the characters. While hiccups like this are apparent throughout the issue, Biagini does draw one hell of a bear-skin mech suit. Hopefully, we'll get to see some more unique stuff like that from this series. This issue is only a buck, so it's an easy sell; we'll just have to see if the series as a whole will be worth picking up month to month once the price goes up.

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6.5
Hoax Hunters #1

Jul 5, 2012

Axel Medellin's art is pretty good. Most of the issue is just talking heads, but when he finally gets to draw a giant Sasquatch, it looks pretty freaking amazing. Hopefully, since this book is supposedly about monsters and cryptids, Medellin will get the opportunity to draw lots of them. Clearly, the guy has a real knack for monsters and I'm ready to see him handle some a few more of them.

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8.0
Hoax Hunters #2

Aug 8, 2012

Alex Medellin's art looks solid. Not every panel looks spectacular, but when he knocks it out of the park he reallymakes it count. The first few pages are stellar, there is a bit of a dip in quality after that, but it picks right back up once people start lighting their heads on fire. Of course, the best thing in this entire issue has got to be the last page. Medellin gets to draw a big, gross monster and it absolutely kicks ass. It's horrifying and amazing. If this series is going to give us more great moments like this, than it'll be a series worth picking up each month.

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7.5
Hoax Hunters #3

Sep 12, 2012

The art is the issue is pretty good, too. Axel Medellin really excels when it comes to monsters and death and destruction. Unfortunately, he doesn't get to draw nearly enough of that in this issue. He handles most of the character work fairly well, although things slip a bit during the extended flashback. It becomes a little tedious; almost boring. Things pick up again by the end and we get more monsters, mayhem, and that dude that is really a murder of crows wearing spacesuit. That's the kind of stuff that makes this book worth the cover price each and every month.

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8.7
Hoax Hunters #5

Nov 14, 2012

Adding to this issues awesomeness is Emilio Laiso. His art is simply magnificent. There characters have a slightly exaggerated, cartoon look to them at times which is in no way a bad thing. This book just has a style that was missing from the earlier issues. Mix in some inspired color work by Rosario Costanzo and you have one sweet looking package. Hoax Hunters needs to stay in this sort of territory, it's really given the series a whole new life.

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7.0
Hoax Hunters #6

Jan 16, 2013

This issue does struggle a bit in the art department. Axel Medellin opens really strong, but once the scene shifts to the convention, things fall apart slightly. It's not bad, but the pages feel a bit empty. The backgrounds drop out too often. Things don't get much better in an awkwardly staged dinner scene. However, once those murderous gnomes show up, the book looks great. The monsters look fantastic and the gore is great. The more monsters, the better.

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7.0
Hoax Hunters #7

Feb 14, 2013

This issue isn't without problems and the biggest one is the art. Axel Medellin starts off awesome and then completely falls apart. The beginning of this issue looks amazing; the structure of each page is exciting and engaging. The characters look slick and the world is rich and detailed. By the end, things start to look awkward and rushed. The exciting layouts become paneled pages of the characters just staring at you at eye level. It's a bummer, because the end of the book is when the story really starts to ramp up. Hopefully, Medellin can rally and pull it together for the next issue, because it seems like Hoax Hunters is headed into really interesting territory.

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8.0
Hoax Hunters #10

Sep 4, 2013

Artist T-Rex Jones makes a huge splash in Hoax Hunters, giving the series something it sorely needed: atmosphere. It's not that Hoax Hunters ever looked bad, it certainly didn't, but it always felt like something was missing and it turned out that something was T-Rex Jones. His dark, gritty style gives a look to this world that we haven't seen before. The tired and broken characters look tired and broken; Hoax Hunters looks lived in, like everyone is at the end of their rope. It's hauntingly and gorgeous, a truly unique looking comic.

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7.0
Hoodlum #1

Feb 27, 2013

Hoodlum #1 looks mighty fine as well. John Toledo delivers a vivid and detailed world. Every panel is filled to the brim, there's no wasted space. He uses a heavily inked look that lays shadows on extra thick, and that's not a bad thing in this bleak setting. The only problem is the absence of color. Black and white books are fine, but Toledo's heavy detail work sometimes is difficult to sort out, and color would definitely help clear up some of the bigger scenes. All in all, Hoodlum is a series worth checking out, especially if you like your worlds of the crazy town banana pant variety.

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5.3
I Love Trouble #1

Dec 5, 2012

Now, if the book has a high point, it's the art. Not the whole time, though. Some pages are choppy and poorly structured, but when Mark Robinson draws a great page he really draws a great page.The gutters feel to big most of the time and the art seems too small, but what we do get is mostly easy on the eyes. The origin scene looks especially fantastic. Of course, with all the great Image titles out there, a few pretty pages aren't enough to justify a monthly buy. I Love Trouble needs to step up it's game.

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9.0
Indestructible Hulk #3

Jan 16, 2013

As far as I am concerned, Leinil Yu draws the Hulk as good, if not better, than any artist who has ever handled the character. Waid writes the Hulk as larger than life and Yu draws him that way. When Maria Hill says that the Hulk is a WMD, you believe it. The green giant is bursting at his seems. His muscles and veins look like they are about to explode. Seriously, this is incredible stuff. Every page feels like it should be a poster. I just want to wallpaper my house with this book. It's freaking stunning.

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9.8
Indestructible Hulk #6

Apr 3, 2013

As previously stated, Walter Simonson's name on the cover should be enough to sell this issue. Simonson drawing Thor just seals the deal. This issue is a thing of beauty, a paneled alter that we should all be worshipping at. Page after page, I found myself gently wiping drool from my chin. That's right, Indestructible Hulk #6 is so good it'll make you drool. There's your cover quote, Marvel. The only complaint I can levy at this thing is a small one: I kind wish Hulk's armor would have opened up, like it did in previous issues. Hulk just doesn't quite feel as big as I want him to feel in this issue. But really, other than that, this thing is damn near perfection.

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9.6
Indestructible Hulk #7

May 1, 2013

Indestructible Hulk #7 is a blueprint for constructing the perfect superhero comic. Beautiful, fun, and brilliant.

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9.0
Indestructible Hulk #9

Jun 19, 2013

Matteo Scalera steps into the artist seat in this issue. His dramatic, scratchy style makes for killer set pieces, like a high-speed cab ride through the streets of New York or a violent battle in a bar affectionately referred to as the "Anti-Cheers." There are a few a moments in the issue's opening that are little difficult to track, but since these moments take place during a frantic, claustrophobic fight inside a battleship, it's slightly understandable. All in all, this is a gorgeous issue and another superb adventure of everyone's favorite indestructible hero.

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7.8
Indestructible Hulk #10

Jul 10, 2013

Matteo Scalera, once again, does some mighty fine work. His Hulk is imbued with a carnal rage that leaps off the page. Everything feels bigger than life, which is obviously a good thing for a Hulk book. There are few moments where movement becomes an issue, however. It'll take you a moment to figure out exactly what is happening. Did the subway train crash into Hulk or did he jump out of the way? You'll have to study the panel to put the pieces together. Still, the good far outweighs the bad in Indestructible Hulk #10. This is another good issue of a really great comic series.

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8.4
Indestructible Hulk #11

Jul 31, 2013

Matteo Scalera is on art again and does some great work in this issue. His characters look great and there is a moody, frantic look to nearly every page. As with previous issues, some of the action can be a bit difficult to follow, but the good far outweighs the bad. The real champion in this issue is Val Staples, who produces some glorious color work. The first few pages are mesmerizing, and it's largely due to Staples' incredible coloring. Indestructible Hulk is one hell of a comic book series and something that fans of the big green brute should worship.

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8.5
Indestructible Hulk #12

Aug 21, 2013

Matteo Scalera works some real sorcery in these pages. His scratchy style gives a sense of movement to every panel. This issue never slows down, and that's not a bad thing. As with previous issues, there are scenes that get a bit muddled and it can be difficult to tell exactly where characters are positioned, but overall this thing looks great. Plus, Hulk fights dinosaurs and it's awesome. Dinosaurs, guys! Val Staples lays down some killer color, as well, creating a superbly constructed comic.

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8.7
Indestructible Hulk #13

Sep 11, 2013

Matteo Scalera is joined by Kim Jacinto in this issue, but you'll hardly notice when one jumps in and the other jumps out. They draw faces differently, but other than that they are a perfect match. Scalera still has some of those staging issues that can cause action to be a bit confusing, but it's better than it was. In fact, this might be his best looking issue yet and maybe that's because he really gets to cut loose and draw some crazy stuff. The double-page spread where we see the time displaced army is a thing of beauty, the sort of image that should be made into a poster. This is an all-around gorgeous issue.

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6.7
Indestructible Hulk #14

Oct 23, 2013

The really problem Indestructible Hulk #14 has is its art. Mahmud Asrar handles the first fine pages and they look good. Kim Jacinto steps in for the rest of the issue and the results are bit more muddled. Jactino's drastically different style clashes with Asrar's first five pages and at times it becomes a scratchy mess. The Hulk looks good, but the human cast often resemble weird, deformed cartoons. Some pages are just a mess while others look frantic and exciting. Sadly, the bad outweighs the good here. Indestructible Hulk has certainly looked better.

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5.8
Indestructible Hulk #15

Nov 21, 2013

Kim Jacinto's art only adds to the problems. There are some pages that look really great, while others a jumbled mess, with no clear point to draw your eye. It's frantic to the point of confusion. There are even a few coloring errors that cause even further distraction. That said, Jacinto's Hulk looks great, a true monster crashing through the pages and producing endless chaos.

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5.9
Indestructible Hulk #16

Nov 27, 2013

Mahmud Asrar is a fine artist, but a bad fit for the Hulk. His pages lack and real punch and his Hulk almost devoid of energy. There's nothing bad on these pages, per se, but there's also nothing particularly exciting. It's almost boring, like the issue is just going through the motions. The biggest problem, again, is that none of characters look familiar. The whole world just looks different, which means any attachment we had to what was happening is gone. Hulk's even traded in his purple armor for purple armored shorts, which is pretty weird. Really weird, actually.

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9.0
Infernal Man-Thing #1

Jul 5, 2012

Even if you don't enjoy the bizarre nature of this book, you can't help but marvel at the art of Kevin Nowlan. Every page is a painted masterpiece. The introduction in the beginning of the book tells us that it took Nowlan a week to produce a single page and it shows. The Infernal Man-Thing is gorgeous; truly a work of art. In an age of slick, brightly colored artwork, Nowlan's work will make your jaw drop. It's a thing of beauty, the kind of work that the comic industry just doesn't do much of anymore, but one that is sorely missed. This is a comic book that looks and reads like a true labor of love, and we're lucky that it finally made it here.

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8.0
Infernal Man-Thing #2

Jul 18, 2012

As with the previous issue, regardless of where you stand on the extreme weirdness of this book, you can't help but marvel at the artwork of Kevin Nowlan. If the overwhelming sense of weird contained in this book turns you off (you guys get that I am saying this book is weird, right?), then do yourself a favor and still flip through it. It's truly a work of art, a painted comic book that deserves to be hung on a wall.

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6.0
Inhumanity #2

Jan 29, 2014

Where this issue excels is in its visuals. Nick Bradshaw is a hell of a talent, and he shows off in this comic big time. Todd Nauck also steps in for a few pages, and his stuff looks pretty great, too, although it's jarring change when one artist takes over for another. It certainly hurts the issue overall having two artist and four folks inking. On their own, the pages looks sharp, but in context with each other it's kind of a hard to read. Inhumanity #2 isn't a bad comic, not by a long shot, but it misses the mark often enough that you can't call it a good one either.

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8.0
Invincible Iron Man #500

Jan 20, 2011

Overall, "Invincible Iron Man" #500 shows what a great creative team can do when it's given the room to stretch its legs. Fraction is also clearly laying some groundwork for future stories, but mostly, this is a self-contained, and very satisfying story about Tony Stark and the brain that's always getting him into trouble.

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8.7
Iron Fist: The Living Weapon #1

Apr 10, 2014

As enjoyable as the story is, the reason to buy this Iron Fist comic is the art. Andrews delivers some of his best work to date, designing and drawing the hell out of this thing. It looks unique, smooth and gorgeous. Every page feels like a work of art, perfectly designed to tell the story of that moment, that scene. This book looks incredible and is worth your hard earned bucks for its pretty, pretty pictures alone. Don't let another awesome Iron fist story slip passed you. Pick this up now.

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4.5
Iron Man (2012) #1

Nov 7, 2012

Iron Man has quickly become one of Marvel's marquee characters, and this book could have been a great chance to grab some of those folks who loved the movies. Let's just hope that any would-be Iron Man fans don't pick up this comic, because it's likely that it will be that last one they ever read. With Iron Man 3 right around the corner, Marvel really needs to step up their game. Iron Man deserves better. We deserve better.

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6.1
Iron Patriot #1

Mar 26, 2014

The issue looks good, at least. The smaller moments, like the ones featuring James and his father, don't look quite as sharp as the big, bombastic action scenes. Brown excels with technical detail; the backgrounds look fantastic. Iron Patriot is an awesome force on the page, flying through his enemies. Everything else in between just doesn't grab you the same way. The emotion isn't there. There' no weight to moments that should have really weight. Iron Patriot #1 is not a bad comic by any stretch of the imagination, but it won't exactly leave you clamoring for the next issue.

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8.0
Itty Bitty Hellboy #1

Aug 28, 2013

If anything, the only problem this comic has is that it doesn't really need to be a Hellboy comic. There are some nice jokes at little red's expense and a few funny character moments, but most of the charm and humor exists outside of the Hellboy mythos. It just plays like a comic about a a group of neighborhood kids. This won't hurt your enjoyment of the comic, but it is an odd choice. If you're going to do Hellboy, do Hellboy.

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8.2
Judge Dredd: Mega City Two #1

Jan 22, 2014

That said, the absolute best thing about this comic is the artwork. Ulises Farinas crams an insane amount of stuff onto every page. There's an indie feeling to this issue, the kind of look you don't often see in mainstream, licensed comics. Just gaze at the first spread that gives us a full view of Mega-City Two and you'll understand. The coloring is fantastic, too, thanks to Ryan Hill. Some of these pages practically glow, bathing you neon light. Mega-City Two is the opposite of Mega-City One in just about every way, but that's not gonna stop Dredd from unleashing some brutal justice.

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7.0
Judge Dredd: Year One #1

Mar 20, 2013

Simon Coleby's art ranges from awesome to stiff throughout this issue. There's a gorgeous level of detail on nearly every page that helps to breathe life into the dark and crazy world of Judge Dredd. Dredd himself looks fantastic, but many of the other characters look awkward and posed. Lots of panels look photo referenced to the point that they have a mannequin like quality. It's a bummer, because when this comic looks good it looks really, really good.

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7.8
Judge Dredd: Year One #2

Apr 24, 2013

Simon Coleby's art also shows improvement from the first issue. The characters don't look as stiff and staged. The gritty, run-down look of the world is fantastic. Coleby can draw the hell out of Judges and he does that page after page here. The only time things feel slightly off is when he draws kids. The younger crowd just doesn't look right; their anatomy is just a little off. Heads are too big, arms too short. It's a minor offense though, especially when you consider how good the overall look of Judge Dredd: Year One is.

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4.5
Justice League International #10

Jun 6, 2012

The art is better than the script, fortunately. Aaron Lopresti does a fine, if some what forgettable, job. There is nothing exciting or dynamic in these pages. His art looks good, but it lacks that punch that holds you on a page for a moment. Sadly, this is the kind of comic that you just read, close, and forget. Justice League International doesn't leave a lasting impression. It is guilty of the worst and most heinous of all comic book crimes: it is boring.

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7.5
Justice League of America (2013) #7.2

Sep 11, 2013

Visually, the issue is nice, too. Santacruz doesn't skimp on detail, rendering every page to the max. When we get to the costumed action towards the end, the book really soars. It looks dynamic and exciting, big and bold. The only problems occur at the beginning, were the story drags a bit. The characters tend to look staged and stiff, their expressions never quite selling their emotion. It's not bad, but it certainly doesn't live up to the back half of the comic. That half looks fantastic.

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4.8
Katana #2

Mar 13, 2013

Alex Sanchez's art is a somewhat mixed bag as well. The first issue had some stellar pages that gave a fluid grace to the book. This issue is stiff and severely lacking in the dynamic department. Even the fun, sketchy quality of the first issue disappears as Sanchez is joined by inker Claude St. Aubin this time around. There's really not much to love in this issue. All in all, Katana is a clunky package that doesn't do much to justify its existence.

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2.0
Katana #3

Apr 24, 2013

However, where this issue suffers the most is in the art. Cliff Richards takes over pencil duties, but his line work isn't really the problem. The problem is that there are four different inkers on this book. All four of these inkers bring something to the table and the end result is that every few pages there is a drastically different visual aesthetic. It only adds to the stuttering narrative and wonky structure. It comes down to this: Katana has a long climb to become the series many of us hoped it would be. A long, long climb.

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8.8
King Conan: Hour of the Dragon #6

Oct 30, 2013

Tomas Giorello is the belle of the ball in this series. His furious pencil work leaves every panel with just the right amount of dirt, anger and blood. Every character is scarred and worn. The world looks lived in and dangerous. Jose Villarrubia's incredible colors work perfectly with the detailed art, blending in and enhancing it, but never obscuring the line work. Seriously, this is a stunning comic book, a violent tribute to the world of Conan and something that all comic book fans should be reading.

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9.8
Lazarus #5

Dec 12, 2013

Lazarus looks amazing, too. Lark draws and letters this thing, and he does so wonderfully. Many moments in this issue depend on a sideways glance or small look from a character, and Lark delivers them in spades. That gorgeous opening wouldn't work as well as it does if it wasn't for look on a young Forever's face when she disappoints her father. It's stuff like that that makes Lazarus a must read. This is an incredible issue of a superb series. Don't miss out, get onboard with Lazarus, you won't regret it. Promise.

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8.7
Lazarus #7

Mar 19, 2014

Michael Lark's art is great, as always. He handles the ark and the lettering on this series, which gives each issue a cohesive and unique feel. That said, there are times where the lettering is a little confusing.A guard hands Forever a file and seems to answer a question she never asked. Stuff like that can give you pause, but it hardly takes away form the greatness of the series. Visually, Lazarus is spectacular; a bold, sublime comic series that deserves your attention.

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8.0
Lost Vegas #1

Mar 6, 2013

Janet Lee forgoes her normal painted style here and the results work very well for this book. Her art is colored by Chris Sotomayor and it gives Lost Vegas a distinctly more "comic book" feel (as opposed to the storybook nature of her previous works). Regardless as to whether the story of Lost Vegas catches your fancy, you'll no doubt enjoy the art. Lee has a unique style that allows for some very graceful and fluid storytelling. Lost Vegas #1 is a good looking comic book.

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9.0
Lumberjanes #1

Apr 10, 2014

This is like summer camp versus monsters and the mystical unknown. It's fun stuff and definitely a book to keep your eye on.

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7.0
Magdalena #12

May 30, 2012

Magdalena is a great comic that is worth a read if you have never checked it out before. Unfortunately, the art " or lack of art " in this issue doesn't do the best job of representing this stellar series. I mean, if there is one issue that you should draw the hell out of, it is the one that features your hero facing off against a dragon.

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8.7
Magnus: Robot Fighter #1

Mar 12, 2014

The art provided by Corey Smith is top notch. The opening has a quaint, rural feel. A few pages later, we are treated to a sprawling city. He never skimps on detail, fleshing out every character, building and robot. The best scene is the aforementioned robot beat down. It's exploding with energy, Magnus' hand flying towards us as he punches a robot's head. It's a bit of a shame that we don't get more action in this issue, because it's clear that Smith excels at it. Hopefully, as Magnus: Robot Fighter continues, we'll get more awesome pages like this.

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7.0
Mars Attacks #2

Jul 18, 2012

John McCrea is an artist that simply is not around enough these days. His detailed style of cartooning is a great fit for this series. Martian attacks have never looked so good. There is a visceral, raw nature to his art that lends it self wonderfully to thing like giant robots attacking cities or a martian getting an American flag jammed through the side of his head. Every page looks awesome, even if the script is just throwing out random scene after random scene. Mars Attacks is an expertly drawn book that looks way better than it has any right to.

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7.5
Mars Attacks #3

Aug 22, 2012

Any comic book that John McCrea draws is a comic book worth buying. In this issue, he gets to draw page after page of giant insects tearing people to pieces. It's gory and horrific and all kinds of awesome. While the story " or lack there of " won't leave much of an impression on you, McCrea's art surely will. Every page is a work of art, the kind of thing you'd hang on your wall, assuming you don't mind having images of giant ants eating people hanging on your wall. Maybe there are people out there that don't enjoy seeing giant scorpions attacking a city, but I don't know them, and frankly, I don't want to.

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7.0
Marvel Knights Spider-Man #1

Oct 2, 2013

Matt Kindt is certainly the writer of the moment, popping up all over the place. Seems like he's writing books for nearly every major company, and he's writing them well. This issue isn't his best work, though. He never really finds Spidey's voice. None of that stops this issue from being good, but it doesn't exactly make it a "must buy" either. The story structure is interesting and I'm curious to see where it's going, but Spider-Man should really sound like Spider-Man. There are enough books out there where he sounds like somebody else (because he is!).

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8.6
Marvel Knights X-Men #1

Nov 14, 2013

What really makes this is issue great, though, is the art. Revel's art " with colors from Christine Peter " is fantastic. There's a almost dirty quality to some of the pages, a sense of scattered shadows and rotting wood. Given the story's location, it fits like a glove. Marvel Knights: X-Men doesn't look like any other X-Men book around. This is a great comic book and a superb start to a what looks to be a kick-butt series. More like this please, Marvel.

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8.2
Marvel Knights X-Men #2

Dec 5, 2013

The art takes a slight dip in quality, but it's still fantastic. Some scene look more rushed than others, but overall Revel's style gels perfectly with this small town, backwoods tale. The best bits involve Wolverine slicing his way through several (possibly imaginary) dudes. Hell, if Revel wanted to do a Wolverine book, Marvel would be smart to let him. There's a darkness and grit to his art that really make this book tick. Doesn't matter what corner of the Marvel Universe you dig into, the X-Men books are all really good right now, and Marvel Knights: X-Men #2 is no exception.

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6.0
Marvel Knights X-Men #3

Jan 22, 2014

The subpar art is a real bummer, because the story is actually quite good. The small town setting, with the prophet-like bad guy who is high on mutant juice is intriguing. It's cool, down to earth stuff, which you don't always get in an X-Men comic. It offers something unique when compared to all the other X-titles on the stands. It's heartbreaking that the art is slowly making the story less engaging, because I want to see where this thing goes.

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5.5
Mass Effect: Homeworlds #1

Apr 25, 2012

Mass Effect: Homeworlds is not off to a very good start. It's generic, boring and doesn't seem to have a real reason to even exist. Hopefully, as the series progresses, we'll get to that whole "Hell on Earth!" thing, because that sounds like it'd be fun. Or maybe James and his dad could wear president caricature masks, rob banks and go surfing. Just throwing that out there.

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8.5
Mind MGMT #1

May 23, 2012

If there is one thing some readers might have a problem with it is the book's art style. The artwork looks and feels like an independent comic book, which totally and completely okay with this reviewer. However, if you only buy books with glossy pages, sleek digital coloring and big splash pages, this might not be the comic for you. Kindt's art is cartoony, sketchy and finished off with water colors. Personally, I think it looks great, but not all comic book readers will enjoy it. It'll turn some people off, which is a shame because this is shaping up to be a great series.

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8.0
Mind MGMT #3

Aug 1, 2012

Kindt's sparse, water-colored style really shines this issue. The pages that feature the visions of an old man look especially stunning. They are bigger and grander than anything we have seen in this series so far. Even the look in the old man's eye as he watches Meru walk away is stunning. Kindt knows when to breeze over a scene and when to bring it close for detail. The effect is superb.

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8.0
Moon Knight (2011) #11

Mar 28, 2012

The biggest problem with this issue, and it's a problem that has plagued this whole series, is that it feels like it was written for the impending collection. Moon Knight #11 doesn't feel like an issue that can really be enjoyed unless you've read the previous ten. This is clearly not a great jumping on point for new readers and it's not meant to be. Those readers that have been following this new series will get plenty out of this issue, but if you're new to the character or to this particular take on him, then it'll leave you wondering why Wolverine keeps popping up and how Moon Knight came to be armed with Captain America's shield.

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8.5
Moon Knight (2011) #12

Apr 25, 2012

It's been a hell of a ride, and I'm glad Bendis and Maleev got to see their story through to the end. Fans of this series couldn't have asked for a better wrap up; it really hits all the right notes. Moon Knight deserves to be treated this well all the time; he's a great character with plenty to offer the Marvel Universe.

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9.9
Moon Knight (2014) #1

Mar 5, 2014

Moon Knight #1 is a masterpiece, anyway you cut it. Whether you are a longtime fan or new to the character, this is a comic you need to read. Like, right now. Stop what you are doing and read Moon Knight.

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8.7
Moon Knight (2014) #2

Apr 2, 2014

Delcan Shalvey and Jordie Bellaire make this issue. The story itself is mildly interesting, but certainly not enough to draw you into the comic. What grabs you and holds your attention is the beautifully orchestrated art. The extended chase sequence is amazing and nearly silent. There's no sound effects and a minimal dose of dialogue. It's as if Ellis knew to just step back and let the art team take the reigns. Moon Knight #2 looks even better than Moon Knight #1, which is no small feat. This is one mesmerizing comic book.

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6.5
Morbius: The Living Vampire #1

Jan 2, 2013

The art is nothing spectacular. Richard Elson does a serviceable job, but there's nothing that'll wow you in these pages. It looks and reads like every other standard superhero book on the stands. It's not bad, not by a long shot, but it's nothing to get excited about either. The color work by Antonio Fabela adds to the overall generic feeling of the book. When you have a comic starring a C-list character, you really need to come out of the gates strong and give the reader something unexpected. This first issue of Morbius doesn't do that, at least in the art department.

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8.0
Morning Glories #7

Feb 24, 2011

Overall, though, "Morning Glories" is a miraculous title. In a world where so many works across all mediums have tried to capture the same feeling that "Lost" had, Nick Spencer has found the perfect balance between mystery and character and delivers a riveting comic that also has believable characters with realistic motivations. These are the sorts of things that add weight to the intrigue and keep you interested, not just following bread crumbtrails of clues. This issue focused mostly on Zoe. Hopefully it's the first in a series of closer looks at each character. It would be the only thing in this book that wouldn't surprise me.

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6.0
New Warriors (2014) #1

Feb 19, 2014

New Warriors is a little rough around the edges. It's got a long way to go before it justifies a spot on your pull list, but it's not all bad. If the creative team an manage to make every page as compelling as the Scarlet Spider pages, this could become a pretty great book. Also, more Nova is always a good thing. There's not enough Nova in here.

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7.0
Nightwing (2011) #0

Sep 19, 2012

The book mainly suffers in the art department. This is a book that is heavy on emotional moments, and that is not Eddy Barrows' strong suit. He handles action and movement wonderfully. Human expression? Not so much. Characters often look like mannequins, with broad smiles and wide eyes. It makes sincere moments look a little creepy. Fortunately, once Bruce and Dick are fighting side by side, the book looks great. When there are backflips and roundhouse kicks, Barrows kills it.

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8.0
Nightwing (2011) #8

Apr 18, 2012

We can only hope that the Night of the Owls continues to be this awesome. So far it looks to be a great event for all the characters in Gotham City, not just Batman.

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9.0
Nightwing (2011) #9

May 16, 2012

Kyle Higgins, Eddy Barrows and Andres Guinaldo are on fire this issue. It hooks you early and never lets go. The art, the story, the dialogue; all of it is top notch. There is one double-page spread early on that is practically perfect. Night of the Owls is the event to beat this year, but this issue of Nightwing has assured that it isn't some frantic cash grab; it is an important part of the Dick Grayson's mythos now and, in a way, feels like it always has been.

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6.0
Nightwing (2011) #11

Jul 18, 2012

The script, by Kyle Higgins, is solid if unmemorable. There is a good balance between action and story, but most of the action doesn't seem to carry much weight. Perhaps it's still the lingering from Night of the Owls, but Nightwing doesn't seem to have much at stake here. Large parts of the book seem to be retreads of common comic book moments. The villain just set a large piece of debris hurdling towards the street! The hero saves the people and stops the villain! It feels like filler. Well-written filler, but filler none the less. I'm ready for the gray son of Gotham to step up his game and stop fighting with nobodies like Paragon.

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8.5
NOIR #1

Nov 14, 2013

Andrea Mutti's art is perfect for this story. The issue is heavy on shadows and darkness, with thick black lines splashed across the page. The characters look great and the world has just the right amount of lived in murk to it. This is, no doubt, one of the better looking Dynamite books. There are a few moments where the characters look a little stiff and posed, but said moments are few and far between. Overall, Noir #1 looks and reads great.

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7.6
Nova (2013) #1

Feb 20, 2013

Now, this is all fine and dandy, but Nova will really need to find its own voice very quickly. I can forgive these familiar story beats in a character's origin, but once the ball is rolling we'll need more. I don't want to read a well-done retread forever. Nova is a character that many people have a lot of love for (myself included), so here's hoping that its creative team can give us something fresh to grasp onto.

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7.5
Nova (2013) #2

Mar 20, 2013

Ed McGuinness' art shines, as usual. With inks by Dexter Vines and colors by Marte Gracia, Nova #2 is a slick looking comic book that has tons of visual character. The art is barely contained by the panels most of the time, especially once Sam puts on the helmet for the first time. He flies through the pages, jumping through borders and gutters. The reader can feel that energy and magic, which is exactly how they should feel when they read a comic book.

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8.0
Nova (2013) #3

Apr 17, 2013

This is also the best looking issue so far. Ed McGuinness and Dexter Vines produce some smooth and pretty pages . Space looks good; damn good. There's an openness to this book; a sense of a huge universe and that's not an easy thing to capture. Then there's the excitement on Sam's face when he returns from his first major flight which is almost infectious. It's also insane how often McGuiness breaks the panel borders. Every bit of action leaps of the page and comes flying towards you. It crackles with energy and life. Nova is getting there and it'll be fun to see where it goes.

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8.5
Nova (2013) #4

May 15, 2013

Once again, Ed McGuinness works his awesome magic in this issue. The book has a widescreen feel, with pages often having no more than 4 panels. There's lots of room for the artwork to breathe and the art team takes advantage of that. This format really clicks with McGuinness' style and makes for a face paced, breezy read. The action is rarely confined to the panels, with characters often breaking free, giving an added layer of depth to the pages. It's really, really well done. It won't take you long to read this issue, but it's a nice ride while you're on it.

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8.6
Nova (2013) #5

Jun 26, 2013

This sounds like a backhanded compliment, but Ed McGuinness draws the emptiness of space perfectly. Seriously. His pages give a feeling of the wide open worlds beyond; a vast infinity. The characters move and soar through the stars in way that feels cinematic and epic. If Marvel were smart, this would be their next big film or TV franchise. It's superhero science fiction for the whole family, something that film audiences would eat up. But hey, when Loeb is involved, you'd have to expect that was kind of the intention, right?

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7.7
Nova (2013) #7

Aug 21, 2013

Paco Medina's pencils look good, even though there are times when the character's expressions seem off. The costumed characters look the best; it's clear that Medina knows how to draw superheroes. However, the real star of the art team is colorist David Curiel, who makes this issue glow. There's shine and a brightness to the world, a sense of adventure that radiates in through the colors. Coupled with solid ink work from Juan Vlasco, Nova #7 is a mighty good looking comic book.

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7.8
Nova (2013) #13.NOW

Feb 19, 2014

Paco Medina's work is a little varied here. Some of the page layouts are choppy and confusing. The characters are too often standing in front of blank backgrounds and there is some strangely staged action. That said, the man draws some fantastic looking superheroes. Beta Ray Bill is creepy and menacing. Nova has a sense of energy and movement as soon as he puts the helmet on. When things are exciting, Medina delivers. It's not always good, but when it is good, it's really, really good.

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7.4
Nowhere Men #1

Nov 28, 2012

Nate Bellegarde provides the art, and while it looks good, it is not without its faults. The characters look good, and since this is a character driven book, that is a very good thing. However, everything that surrounds the characters lacks definition. The backgrounds are boring to non-existent, often leaving the characters standing in front of plain, colored boxes. Buildings lack features. Everything just has a sense of plainness. Now, the gem encrusted gorilla? Totally awesome. More of that and we'll be fine.

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9.0
Nowhere Men #3

Jan 30, 2013

Of course, it helps that this issue looks amazing, too. Nate Bellegarde draws this character driven issue splendidly. His clean, solid style fits the story like a glove. It never looks stiff or posed; the art just flows, from start to finish. It helps that the always incredible Jordie Bellaire is on board, weaving her color magic into an already great looking story. If this issue is any indication of the quality we can expect from Nowhere Men from now on, then you need to add this book to your pull list, pronto.

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7.1
Occupy Comics #1

May 22, 2013

But it is not all good. There are a few art pieces that look unfinished. There's some heavy handed commentary that adds little to the conversation of the Occupy Movement. There's several pages of J.M. DeMatteis talking to you. Literally, they just draw him talking to you and sometimes pausing cause he's sad or thinking. He says some interesting things, but the presentation is so bizarre.

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9.1
Phabula #1

Feb 6, 2013

The best thing about this first issue has got to be the art. Rose has a style that will remind you of popular all-ages entertainment, but with a violent twist. It's cartoony and kinda sweet, until monsters start getting beheaded and disemboweled. Do yourself a solid and spend a buck on Phabula. It's only a dollar -- you spend four of those on a single issue of a crappy comic from other publishers. It looks better, reads better, and costs less. Do the math, guys.

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10
Plutona #1

Aug 5, 2015

You, like me, are no doubt always on the look out for something fresh and new to add to your weekly read pile. You want something that feels different, but is captivating and easy on the eyes. Well, starting this September, Plutona should be your new thing. Buy the first issue and spend some time with two comic creators who are doing fantastic work.

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7.0
Polarity #4

Jul 3, 2013

Jorge Coelho produces some killer looking pages in this issue, but nothing quite as strong as we saw in the previous issues. Largely, that is due to the fact that he excels at character work and cityscapes, but not so much at large scale superhero battles. The fights look choppy and odd, lacking the flow and energy needed to give them any sense of excitement. Again, like the story itself, there is nothing bad here, but Polarity #4 doesn't deliver on the promise of what came before. It's a good ending, but hardly a great one.

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7.5
Punisher (2014) #1

Feb 6, 2014

The Punisher brings our favorite skull-wearing vigilante back into the spotlight in a storm of bullets, violence and death. There's nothing new here, but any time Frank comes back is a good time indeed. Glad to have you back, Mr. Castle.

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7.0
Punisher (2014) #2

Feb 19, 2014

The real reason to check out this book is Mitch Gerads. His art is fantastic and wonderfully gritty. He brightens up Punisher's world with his colors, which match the tone and feel of Edmondson's script. He draws a great California Frank Castle, complete with a Hawkeye t-shirt and lush, wavy hair. The issue looks great, even when the action is a little muddled and confusing. Some of the tech looks a little strange, too, but it's nothing that'll stop you from enjoying the comic.

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6.6
Punisher (2014) #4

Apr 2, 2014

Mitch Gerads carries a lot of the weight in this comic. It's his art that makes this thing worth reading. The opening pages of this issue are the best; watching Frank get tortured is truly brutal and intense. Some of the shooting that follows is a little odd, thanks to strange staging and movement. Frank seems to be constantly in a half turned around position and it looks stiff and awkward. Other than that, this issue looks spectacular. The story isn;t all that engaging, but the art will keep you coming back month after month.

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5.6
Punisher: Nightmare #1

Jan 2, 2013

What is good is the art. Mark Texeira delivers some killer pages here. It has a completely different look and feel than his previous run on the Punisher (the one that took place in space). There's a dirty, gritty feel to every page. It's truly awesome stuff that is unfortunately covered in text half the time. Add in some the inspired color work of Frank D'Armata, and you have one sweet looking comic book. If nothing else, I'll be picking up the next issue to see some more of this gorgeous art work.

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4.5
Punisher: Nightmare #2

Jan 9, 2013

Like the previous issue, the only real saving grace of Punisher: Nightmare is Mark Texeria's art and Frank D'Armata's colors. However, even those two can't save this awful issue. Texeria delivers some pretty pages, but more than a few turn into a muddled mess. The brief scenes of action we get lack any sort of punch or excitement. An okay art package coupled with trite writing makes for one crappy comic book.

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8.0
Punisher: Trial of the Punisher #1

Sep 25, 2013

Marc Guggenheim is a guy who knows a thing or two about courtroom dramas, so he's a natural fit for this tale. His Punisher is a more classic version of the character, heavy on internal monologue. There are a few moments where it feels a bit overdone, but the majority issue runs smoothly. Guggenheim definitely has a lock on the character's voice, which makes it bummer that this thing is only two issues long. These guys do a bang up job here, it'd be nice if they did a longer run. We Punisher fans need our fix.

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7.1
Punisher: Trial of the Punisher #2

Oct 30, 2013

Mico Suayan steps into the art duties and does a bang up job. It's a little strange to have two different artists for a series that only had two issues, but Suayan is a great match for the look and tone established in the first issue. The big spreads look amazing, especially a flashback sequence featuring Punisher and Daredevil battling it out on the rooftops. Still, there are a few disconnects; nothing too jarring, small stuff really. For example, the first page opens with the line "The courtroom's packed" but the art makes the place rather sparse and empty. It's kinda weird.

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6.5
Punisher: War Zone #4

Jan 30, 2013

On a positive note, Carmine Di Giandomencio delivers some of the series' best art here. If you haven't been a fan of the way previous issues have looked, this one isn't going to change your mind, but for those of us that have enjoyed the exaggerated style, you'll get a real treat here. One of the best looking moments comes when Captain America and Wolverine have a brief and tense conversation in a bar. It's subtle but well done. The characters look great and the scene really pops. If nothing else, Punisher: War Zone is getting better as it goes on, but since there is only one issue left, that might not be saying much.

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7.8
Punisher: War Zone #5

Feb 27, 2013

Carmine Di Giandomenico's art is as fluid and graceful as ever. When Punisher: War Zone #5 looks good, it really looks good. There are times when the line work can feel a bit muddled and incomplete, but gorgeous coloring by Matt Hollingsworth helps smooth out the rougher moments. Still, the best coloring in the word can't save some of the action scenes at the issue's end, which have strange and confusing flow. This issue is a solid end to an amazing run, but still not quite the heights we expected.

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9.0
Punk Rock Jesus #2

Aug 8, 2012

When it comes to the art, Murphy is just as good as he always is. His sketchy but detailed style looks gorgeous in black and white. The characters all look worn and beaten, like they the world has chewed them up and spit them out. Murphy nails the characters' expressions and emotions, too. You'll want to punch the TV producer when he smiles and you feel the darkness inside of Thomas every time he is on the page. You should be reading this book; it's like a lesson on how to tell a great story.

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8.8
Punk Rock Jesus #5

Nov 14, 2012

The strongest aspect of Punk Rock Jesus is - always has been -- the art. Murphy's scratchy line work looks brilliant in black and white. There is a richness to every panel; an overabundance of detail and emotion. The double page spreads are serious things of beauty; true works of art. Murphy's use of light and dark makes this book soar. Even if you find the subject matter offensive, you can't help but marvel at the pretty, pretty pictures.

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9.7
Punk Rock Jesus #6

Jan 2, 2013

We've praised Murphy's art since the very first issue, and all of that praise certainly applies here. Punk Rock Jesus is a gorgeous, black and white masterpiece. From the simple police interrogation in the first few pages to the bloody and violent final page, you'll find yourself in awe of Murphy's work. From his layouts to his use of shadows and detail, Murphy shows the skills of a grand storyteller. Punk Rock Jesus is awesome, in nearly every way. Buy this book so Vertigo will pump out more like it. The world needs more comics like Punk Rock Jesus.

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8.8
Quantum and Woody #1

Jul 10, 2013

If you need that extra push to purchase this comic then it is: Quantum and Woody is drawn by Tom Fowler and colored by Jordie Bellaire. Seriously, that is all you need to know. Fowler is probably the most underrated artist in the industry, a guy that the Big Two should be begging for. His characters are some of the most expressive you'll see in modern comics and his action is second to none. We don't see a lot of that action in this issue, but with Fowler on board you can rest easy knowing that when crap hits the fan, it's gonna look damn good.

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9.3
Quantum and Woody #2

Aug 7, 2013

Tom Fowler, guys. Tom Fowler. The man can draw, oh my, my. His character work is some of the best in the biz. Aside from drawing the fantastic expressive lead characters (who are naked for like 50% of the issue) he also gets to populate the world with some insanely grotesque humans. The little man at the end is amazing, riding in a cybernetic wheelchair and promising to dump his pee on those who oppose him. It's so wonderfully offensive and beautifully bizarre. Nobody is making superhero books like this, which is exactly why you should be paying attention to Valiant Comics.

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9.8
Quantum and Woody #3

Sep 4, 2013

When you think of heaven, some glorious place beyond, a realm of perfection and wonders, you think of it rendered by Tom Fowler. The man can draw, is what I am trying to say. The dynamic and vibrant world of Quantum and Woody is largely due to Tom Fowler's stunning artwork. Color sorceress Jordie Bellaire does her usual magic here, too, which means you should sell your possessions, give up everything, and turn to a life of worshiping this comic. This is all you need to be happy, just Quantum and Woody. That's it.

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8.9
Quantum and Woody #4

Oct 2, 2013

James Asmus is unrelenting. This issue, like the ones before it, never pulls its punches. Quantum and Woody say awful things, do awful things, and somehow remain lovable. The flashbacks to their childhood aren;t always as heartfelt as they try to be, but it's good stuff nonetheless. Oh yeah, and the goat. The best part of this issue involves a goat and takes place largely off panel. It's funny, violent, and totally unexpected, sort of like this series in general. Whether you are reading the rest of the Valiant Universe or not, Quantum and Woody is a comic series you should be reading. I love this series so hard.

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7.3
Quantum and Woody #5

Nov 7, 2013

Ming Doyle takes over for Tom Fowler in this issue, and there's a noticeable dip in quality. Doyle is a fine artist, and she excels when it comes to character expressions. This issue is a talky one, so for the most part it's good, but when there is action stuff starts to look a little off. The character's anatomy and posture seems strange. It's not bad, but there is unnoticeably "off" quality about it. Still, she nails those expressions so damn well, the jokes really land home, which is what this particular issue is all about.

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7.5
Quantum and Woody #6

Dec 5, 2013

Ming Doyle excels at the closeup, character driven situations. The opening scene looks fantastic; you can see how happy Quantum is and just how much it confuses Woody. If this were the whole comic, the score for this issue would be a lot higher. Trouble is, the action scenes still look a little rough, with characters awkwardly staged and lacking any sense of movement. Sometimes it's funny, other times it just looks off. Doyle is good, no doubt, but you can't help but notice that superheroes might not be her bag.

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9.0
Rat Queens #1

Sep 25, 2013

Of course, none of the aforementioned humor and intrigue would fly if it wasn't for the superb artwork of Roc Upchurch. Rat Queens looks frantic, exciting, and fun. Half the humor of this book comes from the characters' expressions and posture. Betty's insistence that the crew partake in some mushrooms on a trip is only sold by the look of disappointment and stubbornness on her face. Seriously, folks, Rat Queens #1 is funny, action packed and looks freaking fantastic. Just buy it, okay?

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7.8
Rat Queens #3

Nov 27, 2013

Roc Upchurch's art is amazeballs. He delivers some of the most expressive and unique looking characters in all of comics. You can read the emotion on their faces, see their hurt, anger or passion. It's seriously stunning. It could be said that the backgrounds are lacking at times, but the characters look so good it's a forgivable offense. I'm on board with this series. Where ever Rat Queens is going, I'm following. You'd be hard pressed to find a funnier, better looking comic series on the stands.

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9.8
Rat Queens #4

Jan 16, 2014

Roc Upchurch's art is big part of the appeal here. His approach to the fantasy is unique, while still hitting all the hallmarks. You've got the extreme armor, huge weapons and bloody warfare. That stuff looks great. But you also get the smaller, the moments where Betty smiles and offers to make drugs for somebody. The look on her face when she yells, "Let's. Get. Stabby!" The characters are what this comic is all about, and Upchruch imbues each of them with a personality and spirit that practically leas off the page. Except for Gary. Screw that guy.

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8.2
Red Sonja (2013) #4

Oct 9, 2013

Geovani's art is solid. The characters and world look great. There are times when the action seems to lack energy, which is a bummer since this is an action heavy book. Those bad moments are far outweighed by the good moments, of which there are many. Red Sonja herself has rarely looked so good; she's sexy, but powerful and dangerous. All in all, this is a great comic book and it deserves your attention.

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9.0
Red Team #6

Nov 14, 2013

Craig Cermak beautifully renders this issue, showing just how tired and torn the team has become. The scene's after a funeral are wonderful; you can see by looking into the character's eyes just how far this has gone. This comic has looked great from day one, but this issue ramps it up a notch. Truly, Red Team #6 shows that even a book that features long scenes of folks just talking can be visual interesting. Adriano Lucas' clean colors top things off nicely and make Red Team a book that everyone " seriously, everyone " should be reading.

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9.5
Regular Show #1

May 15, 2013

The short B story in the back is pretty great, too. It has a unique look and doesn't try to mimic the show, which is totally fine. To put it simply, buy Regular Show or I will face you in game of punchies and you will lose.

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8.5
Revival #3

Sep 19, 2012

Mike Norton's art is solid stuff. His characters express emotion and mood. You can see the pain and the horror. There are no show-stopping panels in this book, but its also doesn't have a single bad page. It all flows well and adds to the great package that is Revival. If you're looking for a book that's a little outside of the box, check out Revival.

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8.6
Revival #4

Oct 24, 2012

The art by Mike Norton is the same great quality we have come to expect. Lots of detail, especially when it comes to the aforementioned gut spilling. This is character driven though and Norton gives the characters' expressions and emotions lots of heft. It looks great. Mark Englert's color work adds to the books dull, snowy grey look. Revival is a book to keep your eye on. Wherever it's going, it's someplace awesome.

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8.0
Revival #6

Jan 23, 2013

Mike Norton's art ranges from serviceable to great in each issue. It never looks bad, but some pages really pop when compared to others. There's nothing particularly dynamic about the opening pages to this issue. However, when you get to scene with Em sewing her tattered sweatshirt, the book really becomes a thing of beauty. All in all, Revival is a solid package. If you are looking for something different to spice up your pull list, give Revival a shot. It's worth it.

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8.8
Robocop: Last Stand #1

Aug 7, 2013

Korkut Oztekin is an inspired choice for art, as his work feels like something out of the era this work is trying to capture. Few modern comics look and move like RoboCop:Last Stand #1, which is probably a good thing. The RoboCopseries has always been a run down alternative future, and the art of this issue captures that. There's a lot of setup in this issue, but the few moments of action we get are pretty damn awesome, so it's fair to say that hopes are high for the future of this series. I thought about inserting an "I'd buy that for a dollar!" joke at the end here, but that's just too obvious, right?

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7.2
Robocop: Last Stand #5

Dec 5, 2013

Korkut Oztekin does some stellar work on these pages. He renders Robocop's world with gory detail, showing every eyeball that is punched from a head, every splash of brain matter on a wall. There's a real sense of energy and movement to these pages. Some of the action gets a little muddled at times, and you'll have to study panels to figure out who is who. The pages that look awesome outweigh the bad ones, but the bad ones are there and can't be ignored.

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9.0
Rocketeer Adventures Vol. 2 #2

Apr 18, 2012

IDW continues to do right by the Rocketeer's legacy. The Rocketeer Adventure books are great fun and completely and totally worth your time and money. This issue is no exception and if you haven't bought it yet, hurry up and rectify that.

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9.0
Rocketeer Adventures Vol. 2 #3

May 30, 2012

Where this issue really pulls out all the stops, though, is with the art. Chris Sprouse, Kyle Baker, Eric Canete, and Eric Powell all in one comic book that is wrapped in a cover by Darwyn Cooke. Seriously, editor Scott Dunbier is a god amongst men for assembling a crew like that. Every page is great, but if you have to say somebody is the standout of the issue, then that somebody is Eric Canete. Every single one of his pages could be a poster. Actually, forget could be, they should be posters. Get on that, IDW.

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9.5
Rocketeer Adventures Vol. 2 #4

Jul 5, 2012

For this issue, we get some huge artists. J Bone, John Byrne (whoa) and Walter-freaking-Simonson. As you might of guessed, this book looks gorgeous. Every page is worth your attention. It's hard to pick a favorite with a lineup like that. Byrne has the classic Rocketeer feel. J. Bone delivers nonstop fun and over-the-top goofiness (in a good way). And Walter Simonson is Walter Simonson. Anything he draws you should read.

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8.8
Rogue Trooper #1

Mar 5, 2014

Alberto Ponticelli does some stellar work in this issue. He manages to inject a ton of movement and life into these pages, even when the setting is nothing more than a barren wasteland. He really kicks it into full gear when the bullets are flying and the blood is spilling. The violence is great, if that's your thing. The blue man cuts a path of destruction and death through his enemies and it's a thrill to watch. Since this thing is mostly just a bloodbath, this comic looks great the whole way through. Rogue Trooper is off to a killer start and I can't wait for more.

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8.5
Samurai Jack #4

Jan 22, 2014

Andy Suriano does a great job of capturing the look and feel of Samurai Jack. His storytelling is silky smooth, giving a nice sense of movement and action. The fight scenes are the highlight, as Jack slices several robots to pieces with fluid grace. The backgrounds drop out a little too often, but that also fits in with the Samurai Jack cartoon, which often used solid, sparse backgrounds to contrast the characters. All in all, Samurai Jack is a fun, great looking comic book that is worth your hard-earned bucks.

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6.0
Saucer Country #4

Jun 13, 2012

Ryan Kelly's art doesn't feel quite as sharp this issue. Nothing pops or looks especially great; it just kind of comes and goes. Add in some poor coloring choices that make some of the male characters look way too similar and you have an all together ho-hum package. Hopefully, things will pick up and Saucer Country will start to become the book that the first issue promised it to be.

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8.7
Savage Wolverine #8

Sep 18, 2013

Look, the reason I slapped my hard earned dollars down on the (metaphorical) counter for these issues was Joe freaking Madureira. Without a doubt, Savage Wolverine has been some of his best work ever. It's stunning. This issue is the weakest of the three, relying heavily on silhouettes and smokey environments, but it still looks amazing. Not as amazing as the two issues that came before, but amazing nonetheless. The panel where Wolverine finally loses it and gives into his animal side alone is worth the price of admission. Madureira delivers the goods in Savage Wolverine and I, for one, couldn't be happier.

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7.6
Savage Wolverine #9

Oct 2, 2013

The landscape problem could be a metaphor for the issue itself, which also feels pretty empty. There's simply not much happening here. Fans of Jock's art will love this issue, but if you are looking for a Wolverine story you can really dig into, this isn't it. Yet. Wolverine lands on a planet and then a little kid shows up and shows him a needle. That's pretty much the story. Of course, we are only one issue in, so things could change, but for now just know that not much happens in this first issue.

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6.2
Savage Wolverine #10

Oct 23, 2013

Unfortunately, the great art is dragged down by a sparse, clunky story. Things move at a snails pace most of the time, which means we get things like a 10 second countdown that takes up five page. The dialogue is empty and shallow, certainly not carrying enough weight for how little there is. At this price point, the only reason to buy this book is if you absolutely adore Jock's art. The story isn't worth the price of admission, that's for sure. I love Jock, so I bought it, but I was definitely hoping for more.

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7.0
Scarlet #4

Jan 24, 2011

Overall, "Scarlet" is a very different kind of comic than Bendis and Maleev's previous work together. Ostensibly it might be seen as a comic with a "message" (though its anti-establishment"ness is a bit too cartoonish to be taken seriously), these are two creators who excel at depicting the most human aspects of drama. Regardless of where her story takes her, Scarlet will always be an interesting character to watch.

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8.0
Secret #1

Apr 11, 2012

If you are a fan of Hickman's work, you won't be disappointed here. Secret will sink its teeth into you and drag you along for the ride. Let's just hope it takes us somewhere we want to go.

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8.5
Secret #2

Jun 6, 2012

You cannot talk about this issue with out talking about the opening scene. The first six or so pages of this comic might be the best opening sequence of any comic in recent memory. Hickman draws it out perfectly and Bodenheim draws the hell out of the thing. Again, like the rest of the book, you might not know all the details of what is happening, but you know enough to be horrified. It's brutal and brilliant all at the same time. I can't imagine anybody reading those opening pages and not wanting to read the rest of this series. Give it a shot, you'll be hooked.

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8.8
Secret Avengers (2014) #1

Mar 12, 2014

Michael Walsh does some amazing work on these pages, as well. He's not the guy you would normally think of for an Avengers book, but that doesn't stop him from nailing this thing. His M.O.D.O.K. Is fantastic looking and sinister. He does drop the background out a little too often. It looks slick during the action scenes, but other moments feel baseless and empty. All in all, this is a great looking comic book and one you should check out if you are looking for an Avengers book that isn't afraid to have a fun.

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8.7
Secret Avengers (2014) #2

Apr 10, 2014

While those other Avenger's title spend all their time taking themselves so seriously, Secret Avengers remembers to just have fun. This is, for my money, the best Avengers book on the stands.

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10
Seven to Eternity #1

Sep 20, 2016

Seven to Eternity #1 is divine. It's an incredible debut issue that will suck you in, chew you up, and spit you out (and you'll love every second of it). Add this one to your pull list, you won't want to miss a single issue. Hell, if I missed a single panel of this comic I'd be kicking myself. It's too damn good to ignore.

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8.1
Sex #3

May 22, 2013

The visuals are nice, too. Piotr Kowalski's art coupled with Brad Simpson's colors makes for one pretty package. There's a washed out tinge to the pages, like the brights are no longer quite as bright. It's a great example of the art fitting perfectly into the storytelling. The only problem with Sex is the lettering. I applaud Rus Wooton for taking a risk and doing something unique looking, but it really feels like it's not working. It's harder to read than it should be and messes with the flow of the story.

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9.0
Shadowman #0

May 1, 2013

The black, icky feeling that fills these pages is largely due to the art. As is becoming the norm for Valiant, there's a whole lot of artists jammed into this issue. There's four listed, although it seems like Robert De La Torre and Mico Suayan do the bulk of it. Regardless, the absolutely brilliant color work of David Baron ties this thing together in a bleak and ghastly package. Shadowman #0 looks incredible and stands on its own as a fantastic piece of comic book storytelling.

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8.9
Shadowman #1

Nov 5, 2012

Shadowman is another awesome notch in the belt of Valiant. If you've enjoyed the rebirth of Valiant, you are going to love this book. If you haven't picked up any Valiant comics yet (what's wrong with you?) then this is as good as place as any to start. It's bleak and gross. Buy Shadowman and let it haunt your nightmares. You'll be happy you did.

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8.6
Shadowman #2

Dec 5, 2012

The high point of this series is still Zircher's stunning artwork. Few comic books look as good as Shadowman, and that's because Zircher is an incredible artist and storyteller. You never get confused with the action or lost in scene. It's smooth and gorgeous. And, man, there is so much blood. So much. It's practically dripping off the page. Also, in this issue, he draws a giant demon getting fitted for a suit! That happens!

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8.7
Shadowman #3

Jan 9, 2013

Zircher's art is brilliant, as usual. The scenes in the Deadside look especially great, thanks in part to some expert color work by Brian Reber. The dead glow and jump off the page, bringing an awesome sense of horror to the pages. Zircher's art has a photo realistic quality, but none of the stiffness that normally comes with that art style. Valiant did the right thing in scooping Zircher up, as he brings a lot to this book and the Valiant Universe as a whole. Shadowman simply looks incredible.

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8.5
Shadowman #4

Feb 6, 2013

I cannot stress enough how amazing this book looks. It's heavy, filled with shadow (weird, I know) and some of the best character work you'll find anywhere. There are so many epic panels; so many gorgeous moments. Zircher just draws the hell out of every page. Enhancing this whole thing is the color art provided by Brain Reber. It's absolutely incredible. It's amazing how such a dark and sinister book can look so bright. It almost glows. When it comes down to it, Shadowman is the prettiest belle at the ball.

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7.8
Shadowman #5

Mar 6, 2013

Justin Jordan and Patrick Zircher still deliver the same high quality writing that has also been a hallmark of this young series. The legacy of Shadowman is as compelling as ever, and it'll make you anxious for the next issue. The best bit comes in the beginning, which features a scene that plays out like a finely crafted action movie. It's stuff like this that should give Shadowman a well-deserved spot on your pull list. Trust me, you are buying books that are half as good as this. Ditch 'em, and give Shadowman a chance. You won't regret it.

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7.0
Shadowman #6

Apr 3, 2013

As previously mentioned, having three artists working on a single issue is really starting to kill this title's momentum. In this issue we get Patrick Zircher, Lee Garbett, and Neil Edwards. They all do fine work, although it does feel like all the backgrounds suddenly disappear about half way through and some sections look way better than others. The real problem is these three guys have wildly different styles and the book is not structured to complement shifting art tones. You just turn the page and things look crazy different. It gives Shadowman #6 a clunky, oddly-paced feeling. This title used to be my favorite Valiant series, but it has slipped a bit the past two issues.

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7.2
Shadowman #7

Jun 5, 2013

Shadowman's biggest problem is its art. Neil Edwards is not a bad artist by any stretch of the imagination, but his straightforward style doesn't fit with this series. It's too cartoony and lacks the gritty detail that this horror tale needs. The scenes that take place on the Deadside look better than the world of the living, but they still aren't a match made in heaven. Edwards has a great style and look, it just isn't gelling with Shadowman.

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8.0
Shadowman #8

Jul 3, 2013

Again, the issue is split between three different artists. Robert De La Torre, Neil Edwards and Lewis LaRosa all do great work, but De La Torre is the one who truly brings a unique spirit to this book. His pages stand high above the others, which only serves to give the whole thing an uneven feeling. That said, those pages are worth the price of admission alone, giving a creeping horror and eeriness to the comic. If only he could do the whole book.

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6.0
Shadowman #9

Aug 7, 2013

Art isn't the only problem, as the ending of this arc is a confusing one. Justin Jordan brings everything together in this issue, but how and why events fit together isn't clear. Even after reading the book twice, I'm still not sure how Shadowman defeated Master Darque. He used Darque's own magic to suck Darque into a magic tower that then exploded? I think? Maybe. Anyway, there are some cool scenes here, but they get lost in a convoluted ending that tries too hard to bring everything together.

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7.5
Shadowman #10

Sep 4, 2013

Unfortunately, once again, Shadowman suffers in the art department. This issue is drawn by Diego Bernard, Andrea Cuneo, Mico Suayan, Lewis La Rosa and Carmen Nunez. It's inked by Alejandro Sicat, Stefano Gaudiano, Brian Level and Carmen Nunez with colors by David Baron and Matt Milla. As you can imagine, that many artist results in some dramatic shifts in tones throughout the issue. Some pages look great, some look okay. Some are dark and brooding, some aren't. Nobody does bad work here, but this series could really benefit from a stable art team. Or at least maybe just like only two artists and two inkers? Shoot for that first and go from there.

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5.0
Shadowman #11

Oct 2, 2013

The art doesn't help much either. Miguel Sepulveda's characters always look awkwardly staged and posed. His Shadowman actually looks pretty good, and he draws some great looking demons, but since nearly every scene is played for laughs, there is a big disconnect. Zub and Sepulveda are working on two different books, apparently, never quite getting on the same page. Sahdowman is in a sad state, which hopefully will turn around when the new creative team jumps in. In the meantime, you might want to check out some of Valiant's other titles, 'cause those are great. This one? Not so much.

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9.0
Shadowman #13

Dec 5, 2013

This issue looks incredible too, thanks to Roberto de la Torre. His gritty, scratchy artwork is perfect for this series. It helps that he has the book all to himself now, instead of only handling a few pages while other artists divide up the rest. Roberto de la Torre brings a unified and bleak look to this title, a sense of despair and darkness. This is the Shadowman we saw glimpses of over a year ago, maybe even better. Let's hope these guys stick around for a while, they seem to be telling a story worth reading.

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8.0
Shaolin Cowboy #1

Oct 9, 2013

When it comes down to it, the reason you bought this comic is right there on the cover: the gory, dirty detail of Geof Darrow. The man can draw, to say the least. Most of this issue takes place in a barren desert and he still fills it with an unparalleled amount of detail. There's some chainsaw on zombie action, with a promise of more to come. There's a car full of dudes whose jerkiness jumps right off the page. My favorite image though, the one that really sells this comic, is the one of a giant satellite. It's beautiful in its ugliness, which kind of sums up this entire comic.

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7.0
Shaolin Cowboy #2

Nov 14, 2013

Okay, if you are still here, still reading this, I'll assume you, like me, love Shaolin Cowboy. If you do, the endless carnage of this issue is a treat. Yes, it's certainly not the best Shaolin Cowboys, it is certainly missing that trademark humor and wit, but holy crap is it pretty. You'll get lost in it. It sucks you in because you simply can't believe how long it's going on for. Some much death, some much blood and guts. It's a whirlwind of violence that you simply can't look away from.

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9.8
She-Hulk (2014) #1

Feb 13, 2014

She-Hulk is stunning. Beautifully written, wonderfully drawn, this is a comic book you should be reading. Whether you are a Jennifer Walters fan or not, you need to give She-Hulk a shot. It's just that good.

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8.5
She-Hulk (2014) #2

Mar 6, 2014

Javier Pulido does his best work on the slice-of-life pages. She-Hulk sitting in her new office. She-Hulk drinking too much. She-Hulk stumbling into work hungover. His inspired cartooning brings such a sense of character and life to these moments it really makes the book shine. The fights look less impressive, although they never look bad. She-Hulk is a good looking comic, anyway you cut it. It's fun, fast and easy on the eyes. It's great to live in an age where Marvel puts out awesome, unique comics like this. You could definitely do worse in a monthly superhero comic.

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8.6
She-Hulk (2014) #3

Apr 2, 2014

Javier Pulido is great, as usual. The opening double-page spreads are his best work, big, sprawling pages that are filled with detail and personality. Each page is an adventure that you can dig into. It;s stunning stuff, really. There are also some action scenes in this issue that don't really play to Pulido's strengths. He draws wonderful characters and scenery, but orchestrating a superhero fight scene is not his strong suit. It's not bad, but certainly not as great as those opening pages which just feature She-Hulk and her client chatting about his case. That stuff is magical.

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9.0
Shutter #1

Apr 10, 2014

Leila Del Duca does a fine job, as well. Her art is exciting and detailed. A lot of Kate's afore mention personality can be attributed to the artwork. Del Duca can tell a story in a look, wether it's a half-opened, sleepy eye or angry glare. Shutter #1 looks damn good and reads like a dream. Even the opening "credits sequence" is absolutely captivating. Beautiful work, all the way through. Once again, Image is providing us with unique and compelling new series that are just begging to be read. Add this one to your pull list.

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4.7
Sidekick #1

Aug 7, 2013

The art doesn't help, as Tom Mandrake produces some messy, cluttered pages. The characters look drastically different from page to page and faces become distorted messes when a few shadows come into play. The action is confusing and poorly staged. There are whole pages in this comic where I have no idea what happened. Mandrake is a fantastic artist, but this is not his best work by a long shot. If you hate superheroes and want to read something to kicks them into the dirt, there are way better comic books to read.

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8.5
Silver Surfer (2014) #1

Mar 26, 2014

All in all, this new Silver Surfer series is off to a great start. Marvel is putting out more and more comics that focus on having fun and you can count this one in that bunch. If you are looking for dark, brooding space battles, you might want to go elsewhere. If you want crazy, psychedelic space trips, check out this book. It's a great read with a unique look and fun, familiar tone.

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9.6
Six Gun Gorilla #1

Jun 12, 2013

Jeff Stokely's art is on another plane of existence. Page after page, your jaw will drop at the frantic detail, the scratchy intensity. If you just read the stuff that goes on in this issue, you would probably laugh. It's unreal beyond belief. But, Stokely's cartooning gives it life and makes it engrossing. Seriously, even if this thing didn't have a word printed on it, it'd be worth your money. It's a visual feast that'll fill you up like Thanksgiving and still, some how, leave you wanting more. The wait for the next issue is going to be a long one.

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7.5
Skullkickers #13

Apr 4, 2012

This is not to say that Skullkickers #13 is not worth your time and money, because it absolutely is. It's a fun book that is worth a read if you have never given the series a chance in the past. It's easy to get sucked into and there is plenty to enjoy in this issue. At the very least you'll like looking at all the pretty pictures, which is not such a bad thing.

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7.5
Skullkickers #16

Jul 18, 2012

Everything else aside, the strongest part of any given issue of Skullkickers is the artwork of Edwin Huang and Misty Coats. Skullkickers #16 is a great looking comic book. Towards the end of the book, the ship that the characters are on hits a heavy storm and begins to be tossed about in the waves. As this happens, the panels in the book begin to sway back in forth. They tilt sideways and send the characters sliding across the page. Then it tilts back and sends them the other way. It's a cool effect and a great reminder that the art in Skullkickers is always topnotch. Even if the bad jokes rub you the wrong way, give Skullkickers a chance. It's a really pretty book.

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8.3
Skybreaker #1

Apr 3, 2013

All that violence looks awful pretty too, thanks to Drew Zucker. His art has a clean and crisp quality that gives Skybreaker a smooth feel. The best bits are also the most violent, when axes hit heads or brains get splattered. It's good stuff. The only thing really missing is color. Skybreaker is a black and white book, but Zucker's art is just begging for some colors. He does some grayscale work here and there, which looks nice, but there are plenty of panels that feel sparse due to the lack of color. Skybreaker is a mighty fine comic book and further proves that Monkeybrain is the publisher to watch these days.

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6.8
Skyman #1

Jan 16, 2014

Skyman is off to an okay start, and it has a ways to go before it becomes a must-read title, but it certainly has potential. There is some cool stuff in this issue, and maybe once the fat is trimmed and the art gets dialed in, we'll have a really great comic book. Captain Midnight has become a superb comic series, there is no reason Skyman couldn't join him. The creative team is strong, and they have the chops to make this comic book soar.

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8.7
Sledgehammer '44: Lightning War #1

Nov 27, 2013

Laurence Campbell's art is drastically different from what we got in the first series, but that's okay. He brings a great sense of mood and darkness to the pages, showing you just how ugly the war is and the affects it has had on our characters. He doesn't get to draw too much action in this issue, but judging from the ending things are about to go ballistic very, very soon. Dave Stewart's colors are masterful, as usual, and only add to the visual greatness of this comic. Sledgehammer 44 is an awesome series, just make sure to read it from the beginning to get the full effect.

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8.5
Sledgehammer '44: Lightning War #2

Dec 19, 2013

Laurence Campbell is a guy we probably don't see enough, so it's a true pleasure to experience his work again. The man delivers one hell of a moody story, filled with darkness and grim. These are broken down and beaten bloody characters, and Campbell shows us that perfectly. WWII was bleak, and this comic " despite being populated with super beings and monsters " really gets that across. Dave Stewart ands to the awesomeness with spectacular color work. The punches of lightning jump off the page, shooting across the night sky. It's really beautiful.

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8.5
Space Punisher #3

Sep 26, 2012

The art matches the story perfectly. Mark Texeira makes every page look like the cover of some awful (read: fantastic) dime store, science fiction paperback. Like the story itself, it's a total throwback. It's goofy and over the top. By this issue's second page, The Punisher is standing on a pile of dead Hitlers that is as tall as a castle wall. Like, a mountain of dead Hitlers, literally. That's the kind of stuff that happens every two or three pages in Space Punisher.

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7.0
Spaceman #6

Apr 25, 2012

I am really enjoying this series, and hopefully it'll all come together by the time issue #9 rolls around. Right now, it's just starting to wear a bit thin. It feels like we're being pulled along and that is not a good feeling. Let's just hope that Azzarello and Risso can pull everything together.

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6.0
Spaceman #7

Jun 27, 2012

The main reason that this book stays on my pull list is the inspired cartooning of Eduardo Risso. He masterfully plays with shadows and darkness in Spaceman. His characters look so good that you hardly notice that there is no background half of the time. When Risso's artwork and Azzarello's writing groove, you end up with masterpieces like 100 Bullets. When the art looks great but the story sags, you end up with Spaceman.

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5.5
Spaceman #8

Jul 25, 2012

The one saving grace of Spaceman is Eduardo Risso. His art is always great and it looks even better than usual here. His style of cartooning gives every character a sene of emotion and expression. His use of shadows is nothing short of incredible. It's a shame he is not drawing a book that is particularly worth reading right now.

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8.5
Star Wars #4

Apr 11, 2013

Carlos D'Anda draws the hell out of this issue. Darth Vader? Stunning. Spaceships and robots? The best ever! His character work doesn't quite reach the same heights, but it's never bad. Not even close. The biggest problem is usually with the women, who all seem to have really long necks. That's a very small complaint for an otherwise stellar looking comic. Now, we just need to get all these pesky characters out of the way so we can just look at D'Anda drawn spaceships all day.

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9.5
Star Wars: Legacy Vol. 2 #2

Apr 24, 2013

If nothing else, Star Wars: Legacy is freaking beautiful. Hardman's artwork is drool worthy. Star Wars always looks best when it has that "lived in" feeling and Hardman delivers that in spades. The action scenes soar as well. You can just see the ships flying across the page; there's movement and intensity. Mix in some stunning color work by Rachelle Rosenberg and you have everything one could possibly want in a Star Wars book. Amazing work, folks.

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5.5
Static Shock #8

Apr 4, 2012

A lot of us had high hopes for Dwayne McDuffie's creation in this new series. There was hope that Static would have a monthly series that did him justice and that he'd find his proper place in the new DC Universe. Sadly, we're left with eight issues of mediocrity. Things never really got off the ground, and this final issue does what it can, but it's not much. Hopefully, one day, Static will be tackled by a new creative team that really gets what makes the character so great, because this series clearly never had a firm grasp on it.

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7.3
Storm Dogs #1

Nov 7, 2012

Braithwaite's art is pretty good, for the most part. The issue could benefit from some solid inking, since most of it looks like the colors were just added to the pencil work. This gives everything a soft look and the effect is not the greatest. It's not bad, but stronger lines could definitely help bring the pages to life. Still, the world looks good. The aliens look great. The universe looks lived in. If you're a fan of science-fiction, check out Storm Dogs.

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8.5
Stormwatch (2011) #8

Apr 4, 2012

Here's hoping that Stormwatch continues in this direction. It's getting better and better with every issue. And here's hoping that Jenny finally gets that puppy she wants so very badly.

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9.0
Stray Bullets: Killers #1

Mar 12, 2014

If you've read Stray Bullets before, you know what to expect in the art department. Lapham's gorgeous black and white style is as amazing as ever. He draws characters that look really and flawed. It's part of what makes this comic so believable and so painful. He paces it wonderfully, too. The 32 pages of story we get here feel even longer in a good way. You get sucked in. We don't get many comics like this and when we do it should be celebrated. Thanks for bringing back Stray Bullets, David Lapham.

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4.0
Superboy (2011) #8

Apr 11, 2012

Iban Coello and RB Silva fortunately manage to draw a beautiful looking book. Their character work is pretty great although at times the perspective feels a bit off. Superboy kicking Grunge in the neck looks especially strange. Still, Superboy is, in general, a good looking comic book. The colors are perfect. The inking is smooth and clean. It's nice to look at. Unfortunately, comic books should be nice to look at and fun to read. Superboy feels more like a chore when it comes to the latter.

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5.5
Superboy (2011) #9

May 9, 2012

If the writing has taken a small step forward, the art has unfortunately taken a step back. Rob Lean and Iban Coello can't be totally blamed for the way this book looks; they have to draw a ton of characters all in similar " and pretty boring " costumes fighting in a somewhat featureless arena. There is not much to be excited about. A lot of the fighting looks awkward; there is a severe lack of intensity in the battle and everyone just seems posed with their hands up. It doesn't feel like a huge fight between two super-powered groups; it's a little bit boring.

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6.5
Superboy (2011) #10

Jun 13, 2012

Almost everything positive I have to say about this issue is because of Sebastian Fiumara. Folks, he is fantastic. There is a brushy, almost chalky quality to his work that is gorgeous. His killer style is wasted on a title like Superboy, although Lobdell at least had the good sense to give him a T-Rex to draw. Somebody pull this guy off Superboy and get him on a Jurassic Park book.

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6.0
Supergirl (2011) #8

Apr 18, 2012

After eight issues, Supergirl still hasn't found its voice. It's not terrible, but, with 51 other options, it's getting hard to justify picking up this book each month. At least in this reviewer's opinion.

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7.5
Supergirl (2011) #9

May 16, 2012

The issue does look great though. Mahmud Asrar does a stellar job with the action and this is a book that has plenty of it. There is a raw intensity to his panels, giving the action a frantic, violent feel. His characters are great, especially his Black Banshee who looks sinister as hell. Asrar has been fantastic this entire series, and it's awesome to see him back and kicking butt.

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8.6
Superior Foes of Spider-Man #9

Mar 12, 2014

Steve Lieber is awesome, as usual. He's joined by Rich Ellis in this issue, although it's not entirely clear what additional art Ellis is providing. Regardless, this comic looks great.The stuff with Boomrang is the best, especially his encounter with Bullseye. The characters ooze personality, which really seels this thing. The only clunky moments are when Lieber adds quick movements into the page (like an extra arm to show the character is waving at a fast speed). It's a little addition that isn't needed, especially when everything else looks so damn good.

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6.5
Superman (2011) #23.1

Sep 4, 2013

The issue looks nice, thanks to Jeff Johnson's pencils and Andy Smith's inks. Superman #23.1: Bizarro has a light feel, an almost cartoon tone which would fit a Bizarro story perfectly. It would have been nice to let these guys cut loose on more time with the lumbering grey dude, but them's the breaks. Adding to the slick art package is some great colors by Javier Mena and the mighty Jordie Bellaire. Yes, this issue is easy on the eyes, it just doesn't go anywhere or tell much of a story.

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6.1
Superman (2011) #27

Jan 29, 2014

Ed Benes's art is the best thing about this issue. His highly-detailed style fills every page and panel with flying debris, fire and muscle. Parasite looks fantastic, a giant purple hulk that dominates every scene. That said, there is a bit too much black, a heavy-inked look that overshadows many otherwise great moments. Peter Pantazis colors are bright and poppy, so it would be nice if that ink was scaled back some, if the colors had more room. Regardless, Superman #27 is a handsome comic book, it's just a shame so much of that art is covered by excess narration and monologues.

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7.0
Superman Unchained #4

Nov 7, 2013

Jim Lee's art is exactly what you'd expect from him, although his style hurts this tale a bit. Lee tend to draw everything with a futuristic edge, giving every city a high tech look and slick shine. That's fine, but when a large part of the story is focused on tech terrorists, it sorta loses that wow factor. The terrorists in question use big robot to act cities, but it seems like everybody has big robots. Hell, Lex Luthor built one out of a model in his jail cell. It's hard to really understand the tone of the book, because Lee's art never gives you a clear sense of the world.

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5.0
Team 7 #0

Sep 12, 2012

If you were excited for this new series, you have reason to be concerned. On paper, the idea of a new Team 7 book written by Justin Jordan and drawn by Jesus Merino sounds like something cool and exciting. In execution, it's a rather tired comic that feels like it came out fifteen years (or five years, I guess) too late.

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5.5
Team 7 #1

Oct 10, 2012

Jesus Merino's art is all over the place in this issue. Some panels are finely detailed and look great. Others look rushed and lacking a polish. Overall, it gives the book a lackluster feel. The biggest art problem, however, is the overall design and look of the book. The characters look silly; the furthest thing from cool. Everything is battle armor and pouches. Seriously, if you didn't know better, you could easily mistake this book for a lousy title from the 90s. It has the all bad hallmarks, but none of the over-the-top fun. None of the heart. In short, the only thing that Team 7 has revealed about the history of the New 52 is that it's a time that is better off forgotten.

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4.0
Teen Titans (2011) #7

Mar 28, 2012

The one positive thing about this is issue the art. Brett Booth's pencils, Norm Rapmund's inks and Andrew Dalhouse's colors all do their job very well. It still feels a bit overblown at times, but it gets the point across. Booth has done a great job on this series and definitely adds some dynamics to the story that the words do not. It's a shame that Lobdell doesn't trust him more to let the art convey the message. Kid Flash's head hurts? Yeah, we can see that, we don't need dialogue telling us that too.

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4.5
Teen Titans (2011) #8

Apr 25, 2012

Somebody needs to save the Teen Titans, and I don't mean the team -- I mean the book. It's bad and getting worse and they deserve so much more than this. It's sad to see characters I really enjoy end up like this, because we're eight issues in now and this series is still not worth reading.

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5.0
Teen Titans (2011) #9

May 23, 2012

On art, Ig Guara is okay, but this is not his best work. You only have to look at Superboy's face on the second page to get an idea of how awkward this issue is at points. Now, this isn't entirely Guara's fault. Most of the issue takes place in a featureless landscape populated by characters wearing identical costumes. It's boring to look at, but I don't know that we can blame Guara for that. In reality, this event, right from the very beginning, has been pretty boring. Perhaps we are to blame for hoping the ending would be somewhat exciting.

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6.0
Teen Titans (2011) #10

Jun 27, 2012

Brett Booth's art is solid, if slightly overdone here. The pages feel crowded, filled with too much detail instead of focusing on the characters. Perhaps he just really loves dinosaurs, but the man manages to squeeze one into nearly every panel of this comic. They are everywhere and they are doing nothing, just standing there watching people talk. Maybe it's because I was raised on Jurassic Park, but if you are going to put raptors into a comic book, then they better be doing something awesome. Instead, these raptors just stand around and watch Red Robin, Superboy and Bunker swim. Awkward.

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4.5
Teen Titans (2011) #11

Jul 25, 2012

This issue also has a short back-up feature by Fabian Nicieza and Jorge Jimenez. It's about five pages long and better than the entire comic that proceeds it. DC, I think you have found your new Teen Titans creative team.

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3.0
Teen Titans (2011) #12

Aug 22, 2012

This issue is not Brett Booth's best. It has some slick double page spreads and a few nice moments, but the action is seriously muddled. The characters fly across the page constantly and it never looks very good. The intense fight between Wonder Girl, Superboy, and Red Robin is anything but. It's awkward. Really, the only good thing in this book is the coloring work by Andrew Dalhouse. He brings a sense light and energy that this comic does not deserve. Don't spend your money on Teen Titans.Spend it on something more worth while, like paying somebody to punch you in the face.

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8.0
Teen Titans (2011) #13

Oct 24, 2012

The best thing about Teen Titans #13 is art. Ale Garza draws this book exactly how it should have always been drawn. It's fun. It feels youthful and filled with energy. This is a gorgeous looking book! Garza just kills it on every single page.That's right, Teen Titans was well-written and beautifully drawn this month. Does anybody else feel like their world has been turned upside down? Everything is different now.

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8.6
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #30

Jan 29, 2014

Ross Campbell's finely detailed cartooning is the stuff of dreams. Yes, the turtles still look a little weird without their masks, but Campbell does amazing work in this issue. The visions Leo experience are incredible, from a deformed wooded landscape, to a peaceful walk with a ghost. Every artist that has come into the newly relaunched TMNT world has done great work, and Campbell is among the best. The dude just gets it, and we are lucky enough to experience it. It's a great time to be a Ninja Turtle fan.

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9.1
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Secret History of the Foot Clan #1

Jan 9, 2013

Santolouco's art is fantastic throughout the entire issue. It feels big and dynamic; exciting and legendary. The scenes in ancient Japan look great and it's almost a shame that the whole book doesn't take place there. Almost. The art is enhanced by the graceful color work of Joao Vieira. The opening of the book, a flashback to an ancient battle, is filled with purples and soft greens. It's so unique and cool looking, you'll be instantly sucked in.

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9.5
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Secret History of the Foot Clan #3

Feb 27, 2013

The issue is scripted by Santolouco and Erik Burnham, and together these guys hit the Ninja Turtle nail on the head. There's an artful grace to this story, a natural feel that gives us history without ever feeling forced or intrusive. The Turtles share their page time with flashbacks to the origins of the Foot Clan -- shocking, given the series title, I know -- and it is all captivating. The only thing this series is doing wrong is ending after the next issue. It should go one forever and ever.

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8.5
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Secret History of the Foot Clan #4

Mar 20, 2013

As with the three issues that proceeded, this comic looks freaking grand. Shocker, I know. Santolouco just blows it out of the water, from the cover to the final panel, it all looks jaw-dropping gorgeous. The scene where April punches a dude out is my absolute favorite, as it feels like the guy is flying off the page; like he might fall out of the comic you are reading and into your lap. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Secret History of the Foot Clan has been a hell of a ride and one that every comic fan needs to experience.

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9.0
The Avenging Spider-Man #5

Mar 28, 2012

If you are a fan of Spider-Man, Captain America or just excellent comic booking, buy this issue. It's worth the inflated cover price.

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7.5
The Avenging Spider-Man #7

May 9, 2012

If you have been enjoying Avenging Spider-Man so far, this issue will probably hit all the right notes. It doesn't quite reach the heights of previous issues, but it's still a fun read and sharp looking book.

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7.5
The Avenging Spider-Man #10

Aug 1, 2012

Terry Dodson delivers some gorgeous pages in this issue. His art has a clean, finished style that fits a Spider-Man story like a glove. His Captain Marvel looks fantastic, too. This is a character driven issue that features lots of people pointing fingers at one and other and yelling. As far as action is concerned, there ain't much. Dodson makes it all look great and filled with energy. When you pair that up with some bright, eye-catching color work by Edgar Delgado you end up with one really, really pretty comic book.

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6.5
The Avenging Spider-Man #11

Aug 29, 2012

Where the book falters is in the art department. Steve Dillon seems to phone this one in. Now, I'm a Dillon fan, so I don't say this lightly, but he really misses the mark in this issue. There is nothing dynamic or interesting about the characters, nothing to catch the eye. While this a book that focuses on two people standing in front of a grave, it doesn't mean every panel has to be a straight forward shot of them talking. Dillon is better than what he delivers here, which is a shame because the story is so strong.

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9.0
The Avenging Spider-Man #12

Sep 12, 2012

Now, without a doubt, the most stunning thing about this issue is the artwork of Aaron Kuder. It's absolutely amazing. Since most of this issue takes place in a dream, Kuder really cuts loose. The absurdity of each and every page is brilliant. Other than Deadpool and Spider-Man, every character is bizarre and twisted creature. It looks fantastic. The panels are never boring;they shift perspective constantly. Shell casings fly towards you and broken teeth litter the page. And Deadpool looks pretty good in a skirt. Keep your eyes on Aaron Kuder, this guy is going to be a freaking superstar.

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8.9
The Avenging Spider-Man #13

Oct 10, 2012

Now seems like as good of a time as any to start the campaign to get Aaron Kuder a regular Spider-Man gig. This guy goes with Spidey like peanut butter goes with jelly. From the very first page it's clear that you are in for a treat. Even if you hate Deadpool, hell even if you hate Spider-Man, you can still marvel at the incredible artwork in this book. It's quirky, fun and a perfect fit for everyone's favorite web crawler.

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7.4
The Avenging Spider-Man #14

Nov 7, 2012

The art, like much of the writing, plays to Devil Dinosaur's strengths more than it does Spider-Man's. Gabriele Dell'Otto delivers in spades. This issue looks brilliant. If there isn't a petition yet for a Dell'Otto drawn Devil Dinosaur series, then let's get one going. This issue looks a lot darker than previous Avenging Spider-Man entries, and some of the fun is missing, but holy crap the dinosaurs look incredible. It's stellar stuff.

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6.5
The Black Bat #1

May 1, 2013

The art, provided by Ronan Cliquet, is mostly pretty great. Some of the action is as jumbled as the script, but in general this is a smooth ride from start to finish. Really, the biggest problem is that Black Bat never looks as cool as he does on all those covers Dynamite provides. Far from it, in fact. In the comic he just kinda looks like a dude in coat and a mask. But man, look at Marcos Martin's cover and try telling us this isn't a bad mother of a character. Hopefully the comic will kick it up a notch and match those gorgeous covers.

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8.9
The End Times of Bram and Ben #1

Jan 9, 2013

Rem Broo's art complements the book's quirky tone perfectly. His exaggerated cartooning helps send the jokes home. The characters look great, the backgrounds are finely detailed and the pages are beautifully structured. Everything just looks awesome. You can actually see the characters' different personalities in their bodies and movement. So far, Ben is the only character that feels fleshed out, but we'll have to see where the series goes from here. If The End Times of Bram and Ben can keep this up, we'll have an early contender for Best Mini-Series of 2013. Fingers crossed.

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8.7
The End Times of Bram and Ben #2

Feb 14, 2013

Rem Broo's art has a frantic, exaggerated feel that adds to the fun. This issue looks a bit sketchier than the previous one, and has a slightly more incomplete feel. The backgrounds drop out a bit too often and details drift in and out of panels. Still, when the book looks good, it really looks good. Ben's trip through hell is especially fantastic, as is the battle between a helpful demon and a socially-awkward angel. It comes down to this: The End Times of Bram and Ben is comic book nirvana. Read it, seriously.

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8.3
The Fox #1

Oct 30, 2013

On the story end, Haspiel has help from Mark Waid, who might know from every awesome comic book on the stand. Haspiel plots and paces the issue, and he does it well. There's a slight drag in the beginning, but once things get going they really get going. Waid's dialogue is awesome, for the most part. There are a few too many pop culture references, but the ones that hit really hit (like a well place Man of Steel dig). Like the art, The Fox's story feels like a classic, a story from 50 years ago that you just happened to miss. Expect for that Justin Bieber reference.

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8.2
The Fox #3

Jan 9, 2014

This is a great looking comic, as well. Haspiel's cartooning is bold and frantic, perfectly suited for the silliness that fills these pages. He manages to plug so much character into the Fox's simple design, often with just the subtlest tweak of the ears. It's the art that really sells this thing, no doubt. Haspiel packs each page with tons of stuff, never wasting a page or panel. As previously stated, The Fox feels thick, there's just a lot going on in here, a lot to dig into. As long as Haspiel and Waid are on this book, it's worth your time and money, especially if you're a fan of big, dumb fun. It's great stuff, really.

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7.9
The Green Hornet (2013) #1

Mar 27, 2013

Artist Daniel Indro does awesome work in these pages. His style is dark and detailed, which fits the pulp tone and setting wonderfully. He really excels with the characters; he bring tons of emotion and grit to their expressions. The one hang up is his over use of stray lines and scratches that often times surround characters. They seem out of place and pointless, at times making it appear as though everyone is standing up against a beat up wall. Aside from that, the book looks great and seems like it's gonna be a series worth reading.

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4.5
The Hypernaturals #1

Jun 27, 2012

It's not unusual for two artists to split up a book. Usually it's because one of the artists simply cannot finish their pages before deadline. It is unusual for two artist to split a first issue. In fact, The Hypernaturals has a total of four people credited with the art of the book. Brad Walker and Andres Guinaldo are given top billing, with Walker taking the first six pages and Guinaldo handling the rest of the issue. Guinaldo also has two other artists listed as assisting him. The end result is that the book looks weird. Not bad, but weird. The fact that this all happened in the first issue is even weirder. This series really needs to figure out what it is doing and fast, or they won't have very many readers showing up for future issues.

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5.0
The Hypernaturals #2

Aug 1, 2012

The art for Hypernaturals only adds to the whole yawn factor. Like the writing, it's not all that bad. It just feels stale, like we've seen this book before. There is nothing exciting or eye-catching about it. Just as the first issue this book features multiple artists, Brad Walker handles the first six pages of issue #2 and Tom Derenick draws the rest. There is not a huge difference in either of their styles; nothing that really lets you know that a new artist is jumping in. They both do an okay job, but it's still got that aforementioned bore factor. Really, it's pretty bizarre that after two issues this series has to feature something like five different artists. Maybe there is a good reason for it, but like the book itself, I just can't figure it out.

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8.6
The Legend of Luther Strode #1

Dec 5, 2012

But, what we all came to see was the blood and guts, and Tradd Moore delivers that in spades. His art style is unique and instantly recognizable. There's movement to every page, a frantic, bustling energy that you just feel. And buckets of blood. Blood everywhere. If Marvel ever decides to do a Hulk MAX series where the Hulk just crushes people, they had better call Tradd Moore to draw it. I'm hard pressed to think of anybody that draws this level of violence and intensity better.

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7.0
The Legend of Luther Strode #2

Jan 9, 2013

Of course, you can come for the story, but we all stay for Tradd Moore. His hyper, kinetic art gives the book a fierce, violent energy that few other artists can match. Luther looks so freaking sinister and tough. You can see his power and feel his speed on every page. The Legend of Luther Strode is a damn fine looking comic. If dudes have to get their heads punched off, then let Tradd Moore be the man who draws it.

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9.0
The New Deadwardians #2

Apr 25, 2012

If you are looking for something different, do yourself a favor and check out The New Deadwardians. It's a fantastic book that serves as a reminder of the awesomeness of Vertigo Comics. Use your money to support something new and different so we can get more great books like this.

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9.5
The New Deadwardians #3

May 30, 2012

I.N.J Culbard continues to make The New Deadwardians one of the best looking books on the stands as well. It's hard to imagine another artist making a book about vampires and zombies look so graceful and elegant. Every time you see Suttle's eyes, you're reminded how dead he is, regardless of the fact that he is walking around talking. There is a simple beauty to his work; it's stunning, really. Dead never looked so good.

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8.5
The New Deadwardians #4

Jun 27, 2012

As with the three issues that proceed it, issue #4 looks fantastic. I.N.J. Culbard's simple line work looks great and his character work is some of the best in the business. The New Deadwardians is a series that, so far, features almost no action. It's a comic about characters and a world gone wrong. It's about a interaction, conversation, and mystery that feels like nothing you have ever read. I can't a think of a better artist for this book than Culbard. This is what it comes down to: if you are not buying this series, then you are doing it wrong.

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9.5
The New Deadwardians #6

Aug 29, 2012

Since this is a book that centers largely around characters talking, I.N.J. Culbard is the perfect artist for it. His simple-lined cartooning gives a sense of order and cleanliness to a world that should be dirty and dead. He also draws you into a conversation and hides the bigger scene from you. It feels cinematic when someone slowly traces circles in a bit of salt. This is a beautiful book and one that you, all of you, should be buying and reading.

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9.7
The New Deadwardians #8

Oct 31, 2012

Since the first issue, we have been singing the praises of the work of artist I.N.J. Culbard. He delivers some of his best stuff this issue. There is a massive riot taking place and violence is spilling out into the streets all around town, but you see little of that. Instead, we see the characters, and that is where Culbard truly excels. This series looks like no other, and that is a very, very good thing. Just like the story, the art has a style all its own. The comic industry needs more books like The New Deadwardians. More fresh and new spins. New stories, not just the same old stuff over and over again. The New Deadwardians gave us that, and it's hard not to be a little sad that it's over now.

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6.1
The Owl #1

Jul 3, 2013

Heubert Khan Michael kills it on that first page. Things get rougher as the issue continues. There's some solid moments when the costumes are on and the action is ramped up, but when the scene moves into a police station, the book falls apart. The anatomy of the characters looks off and the angles are all wrong. The Owl never looks terrible, but it's certainly not great. Maybe they should just keep the look of that first page, because holy crap, that thing looks great.

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6.5
The Ravagers #1

May 30, 2012

The Ravagers is off to a decent start. The characters and set up is enough to warrant the purchase of a few more issues, if nothing else. Hopefully, this creative team can take these kids to some interesting places and scenarios, away from remnants of The Culling, because it seems like there are cool stories that could be told. Some new costumes would probably help, too.

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5.0
The Ravagers #2

Jun 13, 2012

On art, Ian Churchill does a solid job. The book looks good, at least. He does his best work on Caitlin, I think, and maybe that is because she is the least ridiculous looking of these characters. And she is not covered in those stupid Tron suits that the characters are still wearing. The best part of the book is when we get a peek at some of Churchill's designs for a new villain that is to be featured next issue. It's not Harvest, so it has got to be a step in the right direction.

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9.0
The Rocketeer: Cargo of Doom #1

Aug 22, 2012

If you are looking for a fun superhero book outside of the sometimes humdrum worlds of the Big Two, then look no further. Rocketeer: Cargo of Doom has it all. Waid and Samnee area a comic book dream team and they deliver one best looking, best written comics on recent memory. Buy the Rocketeer, guys. Do it for yourself; you've earned it.

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9.5
The Rocketeer: Cargo of Doom #2

Sep 12, 2012

Samnee is great, as usual. His style goes with this book like peanut butter goes with jelly. Hopefully, the villain's master plan goes into full effect, because I can't wait to see it. Surely it can't work? It has to fail. Either way, Samnee drawing it means it'll look great. The Rocketeer hasn't looked this good since his original outing with Dave Stevens at the helm. That is, quite possibly, the highest praise I can give a comic book artist. It's worth mentioning that Jordie Bellaire's color work really looks brilliant as well. This book is the complete package. It's got it all.

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8.8
The Rocketeer: Cargo of Doom #3

Oct 31, 2012

All the crazy dinosaur action looks amazing, thanks to Chris Samnee. Again, this is a frantic and chaotic issue that is at times hard to follow. The dinosaurs look huge and I'm not entirely sure how they could fit in the hull of a ship, but I don't really care either. It's fun and ridiculous and I love it. Also, Samnee draws a little tiny heart as Cliff kisses his new found ray gun and disintegrates a dinosaur with it. It's those kind of details that make the Rocketeer so great. It doesn't always makes sense, but that's not why we read comic books. We read them so we can see guys with jetpacks fight dinosaurs and the Rocketeer: Cargo of Doom #3 delivers that in spades.

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9.6
The Rocketeer: Hollywood Horror #1

Feb 27, 2013

J. Bone does some fantastic cartooning in this issue, delivering a classic, borderline-newspaper-strip feel that reads wonderfully. His version of Betty is among my all-time favorites, as he really shows off her sexiness, spunk, and fiery personality. Jordie Bellaire colors this issue like a dream, adding a rich layer of hues and tones that bring the page to life. The only real hiccup here is the lettering, which does some funky stuff through out the issue, like switching fonts mid-sentence when a simple bolding would do the trick. It's a small blemish on an otherwise brilliant issue.

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8.8
The Rocketeer: Hollywood Horror #2

Mar 13, 2013

Once again, the artwork soars. J. Bone delivers another set of fantastically cartooned pages, filled with expressive, quirky characters and tons of energy. As stated in previous review, J. Bone's Betty is seriously on another level, and since we spend a lot of time with her in this issue, that's a very good thing. Jordie Bellaire's colors are supreme, naturally. Rocketeer: Hollywood Horror #2 has a warm palette that compliments the classic, almost silly nature of this story. There's still time to catch up with this series, and that's something you should do. Don't miss out on another superb Rocketeer adventure.

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8.8
The Rocketeer: Hollywood Horror #3

Apr 11, 2013

J. Bone's cartooning is as gorgeous as ever. The page layouts are fun and fresh; a literal feast for your eyes. Okay, not literally, but it looks really, really good. Plus, Jordie Bellaire's color work is on another level, beyond superb. Sadly, once again, the lettering in this comic is just way off base. The use of different fonts for exclamations was a bad choice, and the word balloons seem to be constantly crowding each other, even when the art leaves plenty of room. It's strange, because everything else in this comic looks so damn good.

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7.9
The Royals: Masters Of War #1

Feb 12, 2014

Simon Coleby's art in the book's opening pages are freaking beautiful. They are filled with detailed and grit, truly capturing " at least what we imagine " a bombing raid looked like. It's horrific, but you can't take your eyes off of it. Things take a slight dip after that, and the extended flashback scene has some stiff moments, especially during a large party. Those stiff panels can't bring down that opening though, and the promise they show. Royals is off to a really good start and it's worth checking out. I'll be back next month, for sure.

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7.7
The Sandman Overture #1

Oct 30, 2013

This is not to say this issue is bad, because it certainly is not. There's a fairly tale like quality to it, a whimsical, song structure that breezes you from one scene to the next. You might have to read it twice just to grasp what exactly is happening, and even then it seems like the only thing we can say about it is "it looks amazing!" Who are these characters and why should we care? You won't get that, not in these pages. It's incredibly well written, but if you are looking for that feeling you had when you read the first issue of the original Sandman series, you won't find it here.

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8.5
The Sandman Overture #2

Mar 26, 2014

J.H. Williams III is the star of the this series, no doubt. His gorgeous layouts are unlike anything else being published in mainstream comics, and that's a good thing. There are pages in this issue that are downright nightmare inducing, big, haunting visions of things best left unspoken. As usual, he works primarily in double-page spreads, which look fantastic. However, if you read this digitally (like I did) the scale of the book can be hurt a bit. You can't read this thing panel to panel, you have to take in a whole page, or two pages as it were, at once. Hopefully we don't have to wait so long for the next issue of this series, because art this stunning needs to be on the shelves as often as possible.

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7.5
The Shadow #1

Apr 18, 2012

The Shadow is off to a solid start. If you are a fan of Ennis, you'll enjoy this book, no doubt. It's the perfect character for his dark mentality and it looks like it's going to be one hell of a ride. If you're a fan of The Shadow, then you'll be happy to know that the character is in great hands. Ennis obviously loves him as much as we do.

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7.0
The Shadow #2

May 16, 2012

Aaron Campbell's art looks little cleaner this time around. He still plays heavily with shadows, but it doesn't confuse any of the characters like it did in the first issue. He gets a chance to draw another scene where The Shadow appears behind a bunch of baddies and wastes them in a hail of bullets. Seriously, there could be one of these pages in each issue and it wouldn't get old. It looks freaking fantastic. The only place Campbell really falters is when it comes to a fight between two female characters. It looks awkward and lacks any feeling of movement. Stiffness aside, it's a good looking book with plenty of darkness, both in the art and the storytelling.

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6.0
The Spider #1

May 3, 2012

David Liss does a fine job with the script. Most of the characters are fine and the dialogue is good. The problem is, The Spider just isn't very interesting. As a character, he is kind of boring. He's a rich playboy that also works a consultant for the police and midnights as a superhero. He hates the crime and filth that have infected the city. That's it. There you go, that's The Spider. If we are going to keep with this series, we need more than that.

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8.3
The Wake #5

Nov 21, 2013

Boy, that Sean Murphy can draw. The best moments in this book are the quieter ones, when characters talk into a small screen while trap on the bottom of the ocean, surrounded by darkness. Those are the scenes that feel truly horrifying. It's easy to get lost during some of the more frantic action scenes, which does dampen the excitement some. Fortunately, the confusing pages are few and far between. Overall, The Wake reads and looks great. It's a bummer we have to wait so long for more.

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8.0
Think Tank #1

Aug 1, 2012

When it comes to the art, Ekedal kills it. If you aren't familiar with his work -- go buy Echoes, right now " then you are in for a treat. His moody, grey-washed style is absolutely gorgeous. The absence of color seems like an odd choice for the story, but Ekedal's grey tones carry the book well enough. His best work can be seen in the characters, in their expressions. Think Tank is a slick looking book that also happens to have a pretty interesting story. Here's hoping it take us someplace worth going.

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9.5
Think Tank #2

Sep 5, 2012

It's hard to not undersell Rahsan Ekedal's artwork. You have see it; to read it. His washy grey tones give the book a near perfect flow. Ekedal delivers the goods, panel after panel, page after page. This is a colorless book that will have you seeing red blood. His careful line work is so detailed, so wonderfully rendered, that you'll never notice that the world is so grey. Even if you have no interest in this story " and you really should have interest in this story, guys " do yourself a favor and stare at Ekedal's art for a moment or two. It's worth a stare.

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8.8
Thor: God of Thunder #2

Nov 27, 2012

Esad Ribic once again produces some killer artwork that fits the story like glove. The setting looks awesome, the characters look great, and the action moves beautifully. Ive Svorcina deserves credit as well for delivering some truly inspired color work. My only complaint, and it's a minor one, is that the butcher of gods looks a like too much like a certain evil wizard who shall not be named. Not sure what I was expecting, but I had hoped a murderer of gods would look a bit, I don't know, cooler?

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7.7
Thor: God of Thunder #4

Jan 9, 2013

The issue looks great, thanks to Ribic's art and Ive Svorcina's soft, painted coloring style. If nothing else, Thor: God of Thunder looks absolutely epic, especially in the scenes starring the old, one-armed Thor. Let's get a whole book about that cranky bastard. If there is one place the art suffers, it's in the same place the story does and that's Gorr. We've pointed out his less than inspiring appearance in past reviews, and it doesn't get much better here. The dude's name is Gorr! He should look awesome and sinister, not like a weird, noseless dominatrix.

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9.0
Thor: God of Thunder #18

Jan 29, 2014

This issue looks fantastic, too. Artist Das Pastoras is on another level, producing gorgeously painted pages that would look at home in a classic storybook. It's freaking pretty, guys. You can see the amount of love and sweat that went into this issue. There are a few storytelling hiccups, times when it's hard to tell who is moving where, but in general this thing looks amazing. There simply is not a lot of comics with this look and feel in the mainstream market, so when we get one you should embrace it. Cuddle up with it, tell it you love it and that it's pretty. You gotta lock it down, folks.

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8.6
Thor: God of Thunder #19.NOW

Feb 12, 2014

Esad Ribic delivers the goods, man. His killer art is reason enough to pick up any given issue of this series. The only pages that don't look amazing are the glimpses for the future, which have a washed out, bleak look. Of course, this is intentional, but Ribic's art doesn't excel in those conditions. His unique style looks so much better when colorist Ive Svorcina is really going for it, filling in every line completely. The fully detailed scenes are incredible, and that last page will get you all kinds of fired up.

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8.8
Thor: God of Thunder #20

Mar 19, 2014

Esad Ribic art is amazing. The dirty, barren wasteland of King Thor's Earth is stunning, especially in contrast to the vivid world of All-New Thor NOW (sorry). Some of the facial expressions are little odd looking, especially when somebody is yelling, but that's small complaint. Plus, Ribic draws the most menacing looking Galactus ever. There are clouds of dirty and dust obscuring everything, but Galactus' size and weight always bleeds through. It's epic stuff. Thor: God of Thunder is consistently great.

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6.0
Thunderbolts (2012) #1

Dec 5, 2012

So, it comes down to this: Marvel NOW! features tons of great books with more launching every week. Thunderbolts has launched with an okay first issue that is nothing to get excited about. Against all those other books, it's hard to argue Thunderbolts deserves a place on your pull list. Maybe it'll get better and the second issue will blow us out of the water? We'll have to wait and see.

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4.9
Thunderbolts (2012) #2

Dec 19, 2012

The positive thing about this issue is Steve Dillon's art and even that is a mismatched mess at times. The scene with the Punisher and Venom looks awesome, but the scene with Deadpool and Elektra is awkward and boring. Dillon can draw street level violence and horror as well as anybody, but graceful ninjas and extra large superheroes are not his specialty. They should just turn this book into a Venom and Punisher series. It'd make more sense and look a hell of a lot better.

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3.0
Thunderbolts (2012) #3

Jan 9, 2013

As with the previous two issues, the art is also a real problem. This is not the book for Steve Dillon. It's not entirely his fault, because as stated in the second act of sucking, nothing happens. He just draws people talking pretty much the whole time. There's little to no detail in nearly every panel, even when there's high-tech weaponry involved. The whole thing just looks bland, which fits in with the nice sandwich of suck that is this book. These characters deserve better. These creators can do better (they have done better). We, the fans, deserve better. Thunderbolts sucks. That is all.

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8.3
Thunderbolts (2012) #21

Jan 29, 2014

Carlo Barberi draws some gorgeous pages here. The characters look unbelievably fantastic. As previously stated, a lot of this issue features the cast just talking things out, and Barberi makes it beautiful. The hellish landscape feels little empty a lot of the time and there are more than a few panels of characters just standing against a blank background, but it's nothing offensive. All in all, Thunderbolts #21 looks superb and reads like a dream.

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8.7