Matt Dodge's Comic Reviews

Reviewer For: Multiversity Comics Reviews: 147
7.6Avg. Review Rating

2
A+X #13

Oct 18, 2013

"A+X" #13 features a super soldier, a mutant who shoots lasers from his eyes, and a master spy, and a telepath who can turn her skin into diamonds, and still manages to be dull and uninteresting. The Captain America/Cyclops story, meant to break away from the one-shot model of the rest of the series, is bogged down by endless talking and exposition, with a tiny fight scene crammed into the final pages. And they even keep talking as they fight. The Black Widow/Emma Frost story feels dated in the way it uses its female characters, and just ends up being silly. Not every comic needs to be grim and gritty, far from it, and Marvel has a number of series ("Daredevil", "Hawkeye") which know the difference between being fun and being silly.

View Issue       View Full Review
5
Action Comics (2011) #23

Aug 9, 2013

This particular arc on "Action Comics" is not shaping up to be an especially memorable one. In defence of Scott Lobdell, however, he inherited a bad situation. For the next couple months he is essentially acting as DC's pitch hitter for Superman, and he gave them what they wanted: a not terrible Superman story. It's unfortunate that his way of doing that was by moving the setting to the present and linking it to the "Superman" title, instead of allowing "Action Comics" to have its own unique feel.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Action Comics (2011) #23.2

Sep 12, 2013

Zod is a character that is closely associated with Superman, but has never had the same prominence or impact within the mainstream comics that he has in other media. In "Zod", Greg Pak and Ken Lashley deliver an entertaining issue that firmly entrenches the character within Superman's family history, and makes him feel like an organic and meaningful person in the history of Krypton, instead of a character crammed into continuity due to the popularity of the films.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Action Comics (2011) #23.3

Sep 20, 2013

"Lex Luthor" is good re-introduction to a character who has been mostly absent from Superman's adventures in the New 52, and should appeal to any reader who likes their bad guys efficient and ruthless.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Action Comics (2011) #25

Nov 7, 2013

Superman is not the easiest character to write for, even for experienced authors, but Greg Pak proves he is up for the challenge by crafting a story that is true to the core of Clark Kent, but also shows a side of him with which the reader is not used to seeing. Aaron Kuder makes a big splash, no pun intended, on art duties, as he strikingly renders a violent storm bearing down from the ocean. A bit of a caveat: there is nothing to tie this issue to the main 'Zero Year' storyline, but instead focuses on the wider events happening at the same time. "Action Comics" was a series in need of a major course correction, and with issue #25, Greg Pak and Aaron Kuder have done exactly that.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Action Comics (2011) #30

Apr 4, 2014

"Action Comics" #30 functions primarily as a transitional issue between story arcs, and as a result remains not strictly that important to either. The story is still solid, if a bit familiar with its 'Superman is too soft' argument. The art is very good, it's just very easy to tell that three separate artists had hands on the issue. The book is successful in raising interest in the "Doomed" crossover, but it's in-between status prevents it from reaching the heights of Pak and Kuder's first story arc.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
All-New Captain America #3

Jan 16, 2015

One of the best and worst things that can be said about the "All-New Captain America" is that it feels a lot like the old Captain America. It's a solid story that deals with WWII, the Red Skull, and moral righteousness with plenty of action along the way. It's a smart decision to appease long-time fans and assure readers that no one is trying to reinvent the wheel that is Captain America, but it just seems like they could have done something that was grounded more in the world of Sam Wilson than Steve Rogers.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
All-New Hawkeye #3

May 29, 2015

Tasked with following up a critical acclaimed run that revitalized its titular characters, Jeff Lemire and Ramn Prez have moved quickly to apply their unique sensibility to the world of Clint and Kate. Lemire's story is fast-paced, emotional and entertaining while he explores both the similarities and differences between the two Hawkeyes. Prez continues the recent artistic tone and tradition of the series, being sure to add his own style along the way. The creative team is only halfway through their first story-arc, but they have ready demonstrated a very strong grasp on Clint, Kate and the unique way that they view the superhero world.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
All-New Ultimates #2

May 16, 2014

"All New Ultimates" #2 really does live up to the name: new characters, new team, new status quo, and new creators. Michel Fiffe has handled the transition from creator-owned and self-published work to the grind of a big Marvel relaunch well. The characters all have distinct personalities, and with group dynamics that make sense. On the art side, it appears that Amilcar Pinna still has a few kinks to work out. His is work is vivid and detailed, there is just an tendency for odd angles and framing. Pinna does have great potential, and he certainly deserves more than a couple issues to grow into the series.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
All-New X-Men #18

Nov 14, 2013

"All New X-Men" #18 is marketed as a jumping on point for new readers, and in that regard it is mostly a success. The main plot points of the series and of the "Battle of the Atom" are distilled to the bare minimum, and the exposition is not overdone. If readers are new to the X-verse entirely, there will be some head scratching surrounding characters like Magik and the Stepford Cuckoos, but the abundance of familiar faces, minus Wolverine of course, should be enough to get the audience on board. Brian Michael Bendis does a good job crafting a story that will appeal to new and old readers, even if it is mostly setup, and Stuart Immonen's art is as enjoyable and emotive as always. And there are spiffy new uniforms!

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
All-New X-Men #22.NOW

Jan 24, 2014

An enjoyable issue from the great Bendis/Immonen creative team, and should make the readers hungry for the larger story.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
All-New X-Men #23

Feb 14, 2014

Every reader who picks up this issue will likely have strong opinions regarding the twist at the end. Without spoiling anything, new readers will likely be flabbergasted, and possibly confused by the sequence, and long time X-readers will likely be pleased by the return of familiar space farer. Even if this plot point back fires and creates a confusing mess of mutant history, it at least proves that Brian Michael Bendis is not holding back in his exploration of the mutant universe. Stuart Immonen fills the issues with his usual high quality art, and his proves that he can easily adapt to the cosmic setting and a multitude of new characters. After two issues that told the same story, "All New X-Men" feels like a welcome boost to the arc, and will surely keep readers intrigued.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
All-New X-Men #26

May 1, 2014

Jean Grey's trial is over, but that doesn't mean that the X-Men will get any time to relax. Brian Michael Bendis does a nice job combining the fallout of the previous arc with the new plot, and addresses personal issues that would surely arise from Cyclops and Jean being around each other without getting creepy. Stuart Immonen makes the barracks and forest seem as vivid as any outer space battle, while adding many smaller character moments that greatly contribute to the tone of the story. The team is back on earth, but "All New X-Men" keeps things entertaining by throwing everyone right back into the fire.And X-23 FIGHTS OFF A BEAR.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
All-New X-Men #28

Jun 12, 2014

There has been many a dystopian future depicted in the X-Men comics, so Immonen wisely keeps the big war scene down one double page spread. It's enough to get a very impressive look at an action pact mutant fight, but not enough to feel like a retread of past storylines. Once the issue leaps to the present, the look becomes a bit more stylized, fitting a psychic showdown. Colorist Marte Gracia makes the art stand out by covering entire pages in light blue or a harsh red, expertly manipulating the tone. Immonen handles the big cast of characters very well, with no obvious discrepancies between panels and the action whirls around the pages. The last page is a destined to be an awesome poster, and really cranks up the excitement for the next installment.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
All-New X-Men #31

Aug 29, 2014

With appearances from Tony Stark, SHEILD, and other neighborhood heroes, this feels less like "All New X-Men" and more like the best issue of "A+X" ever made.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
All-New X-Men #32

Sep 19, 2014

The main draw of "All New X-Men" #32 is the cross-universe appearance of Miles Morales, but we never forget that this is a team book. Brian Michael Bendis crafts a story that lets all the X-Men explore the far corners the Ultimate Marvel U and clearly set up a bunch of different and interesting story threads, while Mahmud Asrar fills every page of the issue with great art, and doesn't falter under the weight of the million different visual elements Bendis throws at him. "All New-X=Men" #32 is a very fun read, and sets a good pace and a wide scope for the rest of the crossover, all while avoiding the tropes of superhero team ups.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Amazing X-Men #2

Dec 6, 2013

Despite the fact that this is only the second issue, McGuinness' style along with Aaron's expert take on the characters have combined to give "Amazing X-Men" its very distinct tone. This is an issue where characters travel to the depths of Hell, with a river of blood and everything, but the story never feels dark or dreary. This is an adventure, with a pirate ship and sword fighting, and seems perfectly suited for a swashbuckling character like Nightcrawler. With the news that Jason Aaron will be stepping away from "Wolverine and the X-Men" due to a busy schedule, he has set up "Amazing X-Men" as the natural continuation of the same types of stories he excels at telling, and given the fact that this first arc travels to the afterlife, Aaron and McGuinness have given them a wide berth to tell the biggest adventure stories they can think of.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Amazing X-Men #5

Mar 28, 2014

The climatic showdown between Nightcrawler and Azazel is rendered like a classic battle between a hero and his nemesis. The lines are sleek and firm, keeping the action clear, and while making sure that the characters don't look like posed statues. McGuinness hits all of the right balance between making everyone look incredibly muscular without straying into 90's era gigantism. Colorist Marte Gracia contributes a lot to the issues, especially in the way the backgrounds appear almost painted. With so many costumed characters, the issue is just very bright to look at, and the level of color certainly keeps the tone very enjoyable.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Ant-Man #4

Apr 10, 2015

As a team, Roman Rosanas and Nick Spencer work together to create a distinctive tone that is present in every panel of "Ant-Man" #4. They work hard to balance a story that has real stakes with a spirit of fun and enjoyment. Spencer's dialogue is really funny, without venturing into flat out wink-at-the-audience joke territory. Rosanas' art also fits in many fun visual moments, while also delivering character and action driven scenes that are equally good. This a really great issue, and will make you root harder for reformed D-list villains then you ever thought possible.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Ant-Man #5

May 8, 2015

"Ant-Man" #5 is the conclusion of the first arc from the creative team of Nick Spencer and Ramon Rosanas, and highlights the main themes of the series. Scott Lang has every indication of being a roguish adventurer, but here he is forced to deal with the consequences of having a family while being a superhero. The team have crafted a story that shows how Scott is stretched between two worlds, and he come to the conclusion that if he doesn't choose one of them, both will fall apart.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Avengers (2012) #32

Jul 11, 2014

This is one tie-in definitely worth checking out, and Jonathan Hickman should win an award for least-boring-massive-amount-of-exposition.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Avengers World #1

Jan 10, 2014

With the onslaught of "Avengers" related books, there was every chance to that this series could be an also-ran or just come off as completely unnecessary right out of the gate. Instead, Hickman and Spencer have made the book feel like a natural part of the larger "Avengers" story, while infusing a level of charm that helps bring this cosmic characters back down to earth. "Avengers World" is the perfect jumping on point for new readers, and, as long as it doesn't become inseparable from the other titles, should remain that way for the foreseeable future.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Batman (2011) #23

Aug 16, 2013

The third installment of the 'Zero' Year features possibly the most important moment in the Snyder/Capullo run on "Batman", the moment when Bruce realizes his destiny. Scott Snyder has written a story that honours the past origins of Batman, while adding plenty of new depth in the wake of the New 52. It would have been easy to brush past Batman's origins, and let the seminal 'Year One' remain in a hazy mist of continuity issues, but instead they chose to tackle the birth of the Bat head on. There was the potential for it to be repetitive at best and boring at worst, but instead the story is captivating. The creative talent behind 'Zero Year' know exactly what they want to accomplish, and Batman #23 stands as testament to their talent.

View Issue       View Full Review
4
Batman (2011) #23.1

Sep 5, 2013

This book seemed to be poised as a flagship title in Villains Month, featuring one of the most recognizable bad guys in pop culture, and in the end "Joker" feels like a misfire. The ideas in the main part of the story " Joker grooming a sidekick, mimicking Batman and Robin " are interesting, but suffer from a lack of real development and an odd semi-conclusion. The flashbacks to the Joker's past, sure to be a main draw, are far too similar to many other villain origin stories. Solid art, especially in the flashbacks, is in many ways the saving grace of the book, but even that's not enough to keep "Joker" from feeling like a missed opportunity.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Batman (2011) #23.2

Sep 13, 2013

In a sea of Villain's Month titles which feature tired origins, "Riddler" stands out by keeping the story in the present and showing how the Crime Syndicate's global takeover is affecting Gotham City. Ray Fawkes, with the assistance of Scott Snyder on plot, captures the maniacal and obsessive nature of Edward Nygma, and establishes a place for him in the New 52 that is far from his gimmicky roots. Jeremy Haun brings a different visual style to Gotham then that which is normally seen in "Batman" and while the art is very well done, the nature of the plot confined Haun a little, and it would be interesting to see what he could do with a story set outside an office building. Overall "Riddler" is a very good comic book, and accomplishes the impressive feat of tying into the universe wide event while furthering the story being told in the main "Batman" title.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Batman (2011) #24

Oct 10, 2013

Buy it, then buy another so you can frame the art. "Batman" #24 stands with #5 and #17 as the best of Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo's incredible run.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Batman (2011) #27

Jan 23, 2014

With this issue, another chapter of the 'Zero Year' arc nears it's conclusion, but the story keeps getting bigger and bigger. It's not just about how Bruce Wayne put on the cowl, but about how the Bat-family first started to evolve, and how Gotham became the city of the Bat. Scott Snyder has weaved a multi-layered tale that encompasses many different elements of the Bat-universe, and Greg Capullo's art just keeps getting better and better. 'Zero Year' takes a one issue break next month, but it will only serve to heighten anticipation for the story's world defining climax.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Batman (2011) #30

Apr 17, 2014

"Batman" #30 begins the third and final act of 'Zero Year', and shows Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo operating at the peak of their skills. Snyder has laid out a detailed story, and filled it will great character moments, while Capullo spends every issue finding new interesting ways to render Gotham and its terrified inhabitants. The conclusion of 'Zero Year' is getting closer, and Snyder and Capullo seemed poised to deliver something thrilling and impressive.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Batman (2011) #33

Jul 25, 2014

This issue invokes the entirety of the story-arc, and the arduous journey Bruce takes to become the Bat. The reader sees the character at his highs and contemplating-dangerous-medical-procedures lows. The one thing that is perfectly clear is that there was a void inside Bruce, one that he spent years trying to fill. Once Bruce finds a purpose, one that lets him channel the anger and confusion of a frightened child into something positive, Alfred knows that he will never stop. In 'Zero Year', Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo have crafted on origin story that is not about how Bruce Wayne put on a costume, but how he found a purpose for dressing up like a giant bat and choosing a life in the shadows.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.9
Batman (2011) #35

Oct 10, 2014

Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo dispel any notions of a 'Zero Year' burnout, and immediately jolt "Batman" right back to the center of the DCU. The pacing is excellent, the dialog flows and avoids narrative traps, and Snyder has designed the kind of contingency plans that would flow from the brilliant and semi-deranged mind of Batman. Capullo brings his own unique look to the Justice League, and it fits perfectly with the distinctive style has created for the series. The whole issue really subverts expectations. If readers were expecting a nice simple story filled with exposition that would spell out the new status quo after 'Zero Year', they won't know what hit them. Whoever said there was a status quo in Gotham must have been joking.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
Batman and Robin (2011) #24

Oct 17, 2013

"Batman and Two-Face" #24 is a decent, but not amazing, start to a new era for the series. Free of responsibilities to the stories of other books, Peter Tomasi and Patrick Gleason can finally carve out their own place in Gotham City. The books present a lot of ideas which are mostly handled well, but there still is a bit of 'first issue syndrome' to be found. The retelling of Two-Face origin is the main problem of the book, as it actively makes Batman's and Dent's relationship less interesting. It's hinted that there's more to the story, but if it remains changed it's a real flaw.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Batman and Robin (2011) #30

Apr 18, 2014

"Batman and Wonder Woman" #30 continues the Dark Knight's globe trotting adventure on the trail of Ra's al Ghul, and Tomasi and Gleason manage to deliver one of the best issues of their run. Peter J. Tomasi avoids super messy exposition, and is sure to include smaller character moments along with bigger plot developments. Patrick Gleason accomplishes the difficult task of combining the Jim Lee realistic Wonder Woman and the Cliff Change stylized version. This was a solid and entertaining installment of the "Batman And…" series, and with the Tomasi/Gleason team at the helm, this is a title that could have real legs.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Batman and Robin (2011) #32

Jun 19, 2014

Once the action kicks in everything brightens up, finally releaseing the tensions that's been building since page one. The fight looks fittingly chaotic as the bad guys swarm Frank and Bats, but it never looks confusing or blurry. Once Batman reaches the Batjet with Damian's remains, it's time for the main event to start. Batman and Ra's have an absolutely brutal one on one fight, which should rank among their best encounters. In Gleason's hands the fight is thrilling, not pose-y, and bloody without becoming gory. The anger these two characters feel for each other is palpable on the page, and this scene is definitely the highlight of the entire arc.

View Issue       View Full Review
5
Batman and Robin (2011) #33

Jul 25, 2014

If you like your heroes constantly bickering in different locations, than this is the book for you. But there is a new Bat-suit specifically designed to punch gods in the face, which would be pretty cool if they didn't just argue about it.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Batman and Robin (2011) #39

Feb 20, 2015

This is really a set-up issue after the previous action-heavy installment, but Peter Tomasi manages to keep the change of pace from feeling especially jarring. He dispenses with the necessary exposition by a third of the way into the issue, and uses the rest to juxtapose the new version of Damian reacting to both new and familiar situations. Patrick Gleason knows Damian and Gotham like the back of his Bat-gloved hand, and floats from scene to scene with ease, creating many visually exciting and memorable moments even as the level of action quiets down. Despite the fact that he now has superpowers, Damian is still the same kid that liked to smash cars and beat up villains, but it's clear that what's going on inside is a lot different.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Batman and Robin (2011) Annual #2

Jan 31, 2014

Given the big changes that "Forever Evil" has in store for Dick Grayson, a long flashback to the beginning of his crime fighting career feels like a nice bookend before his identity is made public. Peter J. Tomasi knows how to write a good story with multiple members of the Bat-family and remain true to their core characteristics. And seeing him have the chance to write for Damian Wayne one last time feels very satisfying. Mahnke, with the help of Gleason, pencils an issue that meets his usual high standards, minus an old Bruce Wayne here and there. This is an Annual, and won't play into any of the ongoing stories in any the other Bat-books, but the issue is an enjoyable read if only for the novelty of seeing Dick Grayson as Robin one more time.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Batman/Superman (2013) #2

Apr 3, 2015

Pak has written a perfectly decent story that's full of fun action and adventure, while remaining true to the traditional roles of Batman and Superman. It's not the most original or unpredictable story involving these two characters, and it really makes no claim to be so. The art team gels together surprisingly well, although it's apparent when the switch happens mid-scene. The action scenes are all penciled very well, and it doesn't devolve into a blur of fists and kicks. It is nice to see Batman developing a begrudging respect for Clark sans powers, and Pak even manages to get a rare smile to appear under the cowl.

View Issue       View Full Review
3
Batman/Superman (2013) #3.1

Sep 26, 2013

As the only character to ever kill Superman, Doomsday holds a special place in the DC Universe. Unfortunately, the "Doomsday" issue of Villains Month is a jarring mass of flashbacks and perspective shifts. It does nothing to address the character's confusing place in the New 52, and in actual fact features little of the titular villain at all. There are some interesting moments, with visually interesting art, but it isn't enough to prevent "Doomsday" from feeling like a missed opportunity.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Batman/Superman (2013) #6

Dec 5, 2013

After a one issue dip, "Batman/Superman" is again on the rise in quality. Pak has de-cluttered the story to the point where it's mostly understandable, and given the ToyMaster a clearer goal. It's mostly a fight issue, but Pak's excellent use of character narration keeps it interesting. Booth's art is greatly improved after the last issue, with much more consistent character designs and normal looking faces. He makes great use of the wide cinematic scope, and it feels like Booth is ready to step up to the big leagues and pencil an A-list title. It doesn't quite reach the peaks of the first arc with Jae Lee, but "Batman/Superman" #6 proves it's not time to write off the series just yet.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Batman/Superman (2013) #10

May 8, 2014

"Batman/Superman" #10 is a throwback to the Bruce/Clark adventures of the Silver Age, but modified to fit with the New 52 DCU. The result is a fun adventure actually proves that there is room for slightly less gritty stories at DC. Jeff Lemire takes what could have been a bland filler issue and turned into something very entertaining, filled with quippy dialogue and good action. The main drawback is the issue's art. While Kerschel and Hepburn are talented and have the potential to produce high quality work, their team up seems forced and rushed, and the changes between the two are just to jarring to notice.

View Issue       View Full Review
5
Batman/Superman (2013) #12

Jul 4, 2014

The feeling that this issue was a rushed filler becomes even more apparent when Ken Lashley shows up to pencil the last four pages, and starts right in the middle of the big climax. Batman and Superman are climbing to the top of Darkseid's machine and just as they near the summit, everything looks different. But one page later there is a giant explosion, so maybe they were hoping no one would notice. Lashley's art does have a bit more of a darker, shadowy vibe to it, harkening back to the Lee drawn issues, but suffers from the same odd facial contortions. Superman's scrunchy face aside, the sequence where he saves Huntress from the exploding Batplane, and fades back into intangibleness as she plummets into a boom tube is hands down the best looking page in the whole issue. The potential for great art was here, but the whole thing seems like it had to come together at the last minute.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Batman: Arkham Knight #1

Mar 13, 2015

It's hard to say that non-gamers will truly appreciate "Batman: Arkham Knight", but the creative team has done their best to make a book that is fairly new reader friendly. This book easily could have been a corporate-mandated mess, (looking at you "Mortal Combat X"), but Peter Tomasi and Viktor Bogdanovic has clearly put effort into making this book stand on its own. There are strong character moments to balance out massive exposition, and they do seem genuinely excited to explore a new post-Joker Batman. If the only goal was to get us excited for the game then they definitely succeed, but the creative team actually created a decent book within the rather strict confines of a tie-in.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Batman: Eternal #1

Apr 10, 2014

The issue takes place at night, and almost entirely underground, so Fabok doesn't really get the opportunity to show off with fancy or colorful backgrounds. The issue's explosive climax, however, allows him to draw a number of emotional and harrowing scenes. While it's normally Batman who gets raging and screaming closeups, seeing regular people, and Batman's allies, in such terror and anguish is very effective. The unexpected emotion sets it apart from the frequent scenes of destruction in Batman comics, and Fabok's art adds a tremendous amount of depth to the issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Batman: Li'l Gotham #12

Mar 14, 2014

After two years of digital publication, "Li'l Gotham:" reaches it's finale with issue #12. The first of two stories featured is among the darkest and affecting that the series have ever done, and definitely not one for the kids. The final tale solidifies the series as something truly for all ages. It doesn't pander to kids with sugar coated stories, or to adults who just want another capes vs no capes fight. It's was something different, that broke the New 52 mold at DC. Dustin Nguyen and Derek Fridolfs crafted two dozen stories that were entertaining, emotional, and stayed true to the heart of the characters, big heads and all. Dustin Nguyen is surly about to become one of the most in demand artists at DC, but hopefully he and Fridolfs can find the time to return to "Li'l Gotham".

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Black Canary (2015) #2

Jul 16, 2015

One of the most impressive things about the book is the way that it expertly balances its dual premises. Dinah does appear to be committed to the band, while she knows from her experience in this world that superheroes don't really get to walk away. She is combining her two worlds, trying to please all those around her. Dinah quickly accepts that she can't just leave the superhero behind, so she is facing the challenge. As told by Fletcher and Wu, this is a very welcome change from typical angsty heroes who constantly lament the struggle to balance conflicting aspects of their lives. Dinah is determined, confident and more than capable of holding her own, which makes "Black Canary" a very enjoyable read.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
C.O.W.L. #2

Jun 27, 2014

"C.O.W.L." #1 showed tons of potential, and this second issue only makes the work bigger and deeper and the characters even more compelling. Kyle Higgins and Alex Siegel expertly pace the issue and avoid boring exposition, while Rod Reis delivers page after page of gallery worthy art that is different from just about anything else in stores right now. The plots can feel a little disparate at times, but there is every indication that it will all come together as the series progresses and the union's future becomes even more uncertain.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
C.O.W.L. #5

Sep 25, 2014

The art really ramps it up when Arclight confronts the treacherous Pierce in an alley. Pierce chases a pair of robbers, breaking the C.O.W.L. strike, and engages in the only fight scene in the issue. This is when the images get their most surreal, and the motion of the robbers creates a wave that affects the entire panel. When one of their guns goes off, the images ripples like a bomb went off, lending real gravitas to the scene. When Arclight delves out some street justice, the art goes into some McKean-esque "Arkham Asylum" territory. This really works as this is the most viscerally violent scene in the issue, and Arclight's actions are representative of the damage that C.O.W.L. has suffered. Reis furthers this tone by making the art look damaged and distressed as well.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
C.O.W.L. #10

May 18, 2015

This team has created a dense and complicated world filled with complex characters in only 10 installments, and if this installment is any indication there will soon be huge ramifications for both.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Captain America: Living Legend #1

Oct 4, 2013

"Captain America: Living Legend" #1 is off to a good, if slightly protracted start. The story from Andy Diggle is compelling, and Adi Gravnov's art is beautiful to look at, it just suffers from a bit of 'first-issue-syndrome'. The set-up takes a bit of time, and future issues would be smart to balance out the three timelines a little more evenly. Nevertheless, the book sets up an interesting story that actually manages to bring Roger's WWII past into the present without feeling forced or corny.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Captain America: Living Legend #2

Nov 1, 2013

"Captain America: Living Legend" #2 manages to pull though the tricky situation of an artist switch without losing steam or quality. Andy Diggle still delivers a back-to-basics Captain America story that stays to true to the characteristics that define Steve Rogers. Agustin Alessio was brave to step up to the challenge of following Adi Granov, and succeeded by delivering art that is so good, it packs one wish that Alessio had a bit more of a visually dynamic story to work with. The issue still poses many questions, and hopefully the final two issues from Diggle and Alessio will answer them all.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Captain Victory and the Galactic Rangers #1

Aug 7, 2014

"Captain Victory and the Galactic Rangers" #1 is a hard sci-fi action series that embraces the genre and makes no apologies for that. The tone is pulping and fun, and Joe Casey isn't afraid to challenge the readers with big ideas and lots of them. Nathan Fox, Jim Rugg, Ulises Farinas and colorist Brad Simpson step up to provide a look that harkens back to classic Kirby, while creating dynamic and action packed sequences that bring the reader into this new universe. "Captain Victory" is off to a strong start, and is a worthy successor to the work of the legendary Jack Kirby.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Conan: The Avenger #1

Apr 24, 2014

The character of Conan has been through many different incarnations over the past 80 years, but given the recent work at Dark Horse it appears that comic books are a surprisingly good fit. "Conan the Avenger" #1 will please fans of the previous series by continuing with the consequences and ramifications of that story, while being open to new readers as well. Fred Van Lente makes the sometimes silly world of high fantasy feel dangerous and grounded, and the great art from Brian Ching has a very strong and positive effect on the tone of the book. This new series is off to a very promising star, thank Crom.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Conan: The Avenger #2

May 29, 2014

"Conan the Avenger" is a step backwards from the stellar first issue. The writing feels too loyal to the original text at times and less so at others, and the narration actually interferes with the pacing of the story, while visually Conan goes from svelte to scrawny multiple times. There are still good things in the issue, especially Conan's internal struggle with his own sanity, but it feels like the creators need just a bit more time to get used to this world.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Conan: The Avenger #14

Jun 1, 2015

A fun read if you're a fan of Conan or sword-and-sorcery style fantasy, but unfamiliar readers would do better to wait for the trade collection.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Cyclops (2014) #1

May 9, 2014

"Cyclops" #1 takes the X-verse into deep space, and but the story is less about adventure and more about family bonding. This is very much a setup issue, but Rucka makes everything feel natural, with the right amount of self-aware narration that basically any X-book requires now. Dauterman makes the most of his Marvel debut and proves that he can handle a large alien cast of characters and large action scenes with a great deal of ease. Greg Rucka and Russell Dauterman elevate what could have simply been a hey-here's-series-where-Cyclops-isn't-a-jerk book into something unexpectedly emotionally and more character based.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Daredevil (2011) #30

Aug 23, 2013

After more than two years on the book, Waid and Samnee's "Daredevil" seemed to have received so much critical acclaim that it was impossible for them to set the bar any higher, but issue #30 does just that. It has character development, serious and affecting subplots, action, and a gripping story told through gorgeous art, all in 32 pages. Mark Waid and Chris Samnee deserve to counted among the all-time great "Daredevil" storytellers, along with Bendis, Brubaker, and Miller. "Daredevil" #30 is just a great comic book from start to finish, and the whole series is one of, if not the, best at Marvel right.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Daredevil (2011) #31

Sep 19, 2013

"Daredevil" #31 is yet another in a long line of excellent issues. Mark Waid and Chris Samnee manage to tell a superhero story that addresses real world problems, but instead of wallowing in misery or becoming unbearably preachy, they aim to offer some hope to the reader. This makes the book feel incredibly refreshing, without losing sight of the serious issues that are present. And any story that features Daredevil trying to call up Thor and instead settles for an army of ants saving the day deserves a read.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Daredevil (2011) #32

Oct 25, 2013

Every issue of "Daredevil" from Mark Waid and Chris Samnee feels like it has the same amount of plot, action, and excitement that is normally found in a three issue arc of most other series. They continually buck the trends of decompression and gritty realism found in many comics, and still craft stories that are entertaining, fun, and very engrossing while remaining true to the character. "Daredevil" #32 is a rare example of a book that has a fun holiday theme, but will not seem incredibly dated three months from now.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Daredevil (2011) #34

Dec 20, 2013

This era of "Daredevil" is coming to close, and with his impending move to the west coast, it feels like many things in Matt Murdock's world are coming to an end. The fight against the Sons of the Serpent has been a long running plot throughout the past thirty issues, and Waid has integrated the group in and out of our heroes life, and has positioned them for a world shattering conclusion. Or at least a Hell's Kitchen shattering conclusion.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Daredevil (2011) #35

Jan 17, 2014

"Daredevil" from Mark Waid and has been consistently the best superhero book on the market, and as the series reaches its close there is every inclination that these master storytellers will bring the tale to an unexpected yet satisfactory end. This issue, despite being mainly set up for the grand finale, never feels like it's stiff or boring and crammed with exposition. It is as well crafted and enjoyable of every issue of this character defining run.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.8
Daredevil (2011) #36

Feb 20, 2014

This is not really the end for "Daredevil", as "All New Daredevil" #1 comes out next month with the Mark Waid/Chris Samnee team intact, so this is not a tear-filled farewell. This is the end of a chapter in Matt Murdock's life and Waid ensure's that the change feels as natural and organic as possible. The final rooftop scene provides Samnee with the chance to pencil a send off for Hell's Kitchen that double's as a perfect example of his gorgeous art. It's everything one could want in an issue of "Daredevil".

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Daredevil (2014) #1

Feb 27, 2015

The last Waid/Samnee "Daredevil" story-arc kicks off with an issue that highlights have far they have developed these characters, while only setting up the large threat of the Owl. Waid addresses the concerns of Matt Murdock, and the character's fans, that he might be doomed to a series of tragic relationships, and assures Matt and the readers that Kirsten McDuffie is not a stereotypical superhero love interest. Chris Samnee returns after a very brief break to prove why he will go down as one of the best artists who has ever worked on the series, and fills a book that features little action with page after page of visually striking art. This is a great duo, and this fun and exciting issue displays every indication that their last story-arc while be the perfect summarization of their whole run.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.8
Daredevil (2014) #5

Jul 11, 2014

But the best part is that Foggy was already a hero for bravely facing something that an Avenger never will, and doing what they cannot. Matt knows that, and now every New Yorker knows it as well, and there's something beautiful about that.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Daredevil (2014) #13

Feb 27, 2015

The last Waid/Samnee "Daredevil" story-arc kicks off with an issue that highlights have far they have developed these characters, while only setting up the large threat of the Owl. Waid addresses the concerns of Matt Murdock, and the character's fans, that he might be doomed to a series of tragic relationships, and assures Matt and the readers that Kirsten McDuffie is not a stereotypical superhero love interest. Chris Samnee returns after a very brief break to prove why he will go down as one of the best artists who has ever worked on the series, and fills a book that features little action with page after page of visually striking art. This is a great duo, and this fun and exciting issue displays every indication that their last story-arc while be the perfect summarization of their whole run.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Death Of Wolverine #4

Oct 16, 2014

It is a bit silly at moments, but in the pantheon of comic book deaths, Charles Soule and Steve McNiven have created a fitting end* for Wolverine by subverting expectations and crafting a much more personal story. And the rebar claws were pretty cool.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Deathstroke (2014) #1

Oct 24, 2014

If you know Slade Wilson as the raspy voiced bad guy from Arrow, you'll likely be satisfied with this issue's reinterpretation of the character as hardass adventurer. The bright side is that it at least seems like DC has a much clearer vision for the character than seen in earlier New 52 appearances, and the story is fairly entertaining and never drags. Daniel's art is fantastic and the book definitely hits its severed limbs quota. For longtime fans of the character, however, there are still a couple missing key elements that keep the issue from feeling like a truly classic Deathstroke story.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Detective Comics (2011) #27

Jan 9, 2014

While one or two stories fall flat, the rest are great and do an amazing job honoring Batman and everything the character has stood for throughout the past 75 years.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Detective Comics (2011) #29

Mar 6, 2014

"Detective Comics" #29 is the end of the John Layman era, and the writer, along with artist Aaron Lopresti brings the 'Gothopia' arc to a satisfying end. The characters all act appropriately, the dialogue is to the point and not overdone, and Layman makes wise story telling choices that avoid repeating familiar twists and tropes. Perhaps the biggest complement that can be given is that the tone harkens back to Batman: The Animated Series, with its use of familiar motifs, and blimps, to tell engaging and entertaining stories. If the story had been stretched out to several more issue, it would have very likely been lethargic and predictable; the brisk pace makes for an enjoyable read.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Detective Comics (2011) #32

Jun 13, 2014

An old fashioned, but not repetitive, detective story and beautiful art ensure that the Buccellato/Manapul run on "Detective Comics" will stand out among the plethora of Bat-books.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Doomed #1

Jun 22, 2015

A perfectly charming and entertaining book. There is some real potential here, so I am more than willing to give it another couple of issues to find its footing.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Fantastic Four (2014) #3

Apr 25, 2014

The new era of the "Fantastic Four" is wasting no time throwing the team out of whack. Robinson's choice to have the Human Torch depowered, instead of die (again), is an interesting way to break up the team, but Johnny seems so unfazed that it's slightly difficult to get emotionally invested. This is a very word-y issue, and although Robinson makes it flow as well as possible, it might seem just a tad repetitive. Kirk steps up to the challenge by delivering high quality and interesting art, it should be worth the wait when he really get the chance to show off. James Robinson and Leonard Kirk are a talented team, but this is a book that will need space to grown before the big picture comes into focus.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.9
Fantastic Four (2014) #645

May 4, 2015

While it seems improbable that this is truly the last ever issue of "Fantastic Four", James Robinson and Leonard Kirk, along with a their group of collaborators, have worked hard to craft a story that feels fun, exciting and heartwarming, while providing a justly earned sense of conclusion for this family.

View Issue       View Full Review
5
Flash (2011) #26

Jan 3, 2014

Following up a fan favorite run on a series is always a challenge, and unfortunately it seems like the issue fell short of expectations.The story is formulaic, and comes across as a little more than a primer for those unfamiliar with Barry Allen, but will be boring to anyone who does. The art is inconsistent, and while some moments are nicely rendered, the differences are too great to ignore. Both creators have proven themselves capable of telling compelling and entertaining stories, but it feels like it just wasn't the right fit for "The Flash".

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Flash (2011) #29

Mar 27, 2014

A new creative team will be taking over "The Flash" next month, and it's hard not to feel like this issue is just treading water story wise. Brian Buccellato had worked with co-writer and artist Francis Manapul to produce over two dozen issue of "The Flash" that received critical and fan acclaim, but with the duo preparing to take over "Detective Comics", it almost seems like Buccellato was drafted to fill time until the new creative time was ready. Artist Agustin Padilla does some great work, it's just a shame that his exciting images had to be covered up with so much unnecessary exposition.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.5
Flash (2011) #41

Jun 26, 2015

"The Flash" #41 well certainly feel familiar to viewer of The Flash TV show, perhaps a little too familiar. There have many so many small screen scenes where Barry promises to bring justice to his imprisoned father that it ceases to be particularly effective. Venditti and Jensen are good writers, and Booth is a good artist, but all the pieces just don't come together in this issue. It's very hard, and really unfair, to judge a story arc based solely on the first issue, and the final scene does point to an interesting new direction in the coming months. It's a bit of rough start for Barry, but the creative deserves another couple of issues to find their footing.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Flash (2011) Annual #3

May 2, 2014

Brett Booth draws the darker future timeline, and it provides a great dichotomy with the Central City of the present. Booth just wrapped up an extended run on "Nightwing" so he knows exactly how to draw angry, night-based heroes, which strangely applies to future Barry. Booth's style is very realistic, and is apt for the grim timeline, and for making a potentially comical villain like Gorilla Grood seem pretty terrifying. Flash himself has new costume/look, which manages to seem like a gritty version of Flash's duds without going all '90's on it. The bulk of the action scenes are found in the future timeline, and Booth renders the brutal fight to a visceral level of detail. This is a far more ruthless version of Barry, and Booth's art greatly adds to the feeling of wrongness in the future.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Forever Evil #2

Oct 3, 2013

The "Forever Evil" miniseries and event march on, bringing turmoil and destruction to the DCU. In issue #2, writer Geoff Johns successfully juggles the book's large cast and creates many great character moments, while artist David Finch shows the reader a world full of menace after the arrival of the Crime Syndicate. The issue is crammed full of storylines, but the creators have a clear plot in mind and never lose sight of it. After a month of villains' books that featured both highs and lows, "Forever Evil" #2 serves a great example of the true potential of this event.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Forever Evil #6

Mar 7, 2014

"Forever Evil" #6 features big reveals as the event heads towards the grand finale. Geoff Johns displays his considerable talent with economical and equal opportunity writing. Everyone gets their moment to shine, and Johns only needs a few lines to establish their basic character traits. David Finch produces art worthy of a universe altering event, and the issue greatly plays into his strengths for all things darker and grittier. The issue finally provides answers to longstanding questions in a way that actually feels natural and not shoehorned in, while still leaving plenty for the big finale next month.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Gotham Academy #2

Nov 6, 2014

There's a scene where a dog digs up a suspiciously human-looking bone which serves as a particularly good analogy for the series. It looks innocent, but there's creepy stuff happening just below the surface.And any book the brings a villain from the Adam West Batman tv show into the New 52 and makes it totally work deserves your money.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Gotham Academy #7

Jun 12, 2015

This is a complete story told in a single issue, but it never once feels rushed or dashed off. Writers Becky Cloonan and Brendan Fletcher have crafted a story that ebbs and flows, which moves the plot along quickly while ensuring the dialogue and narration with strong character moments. Mingjue Helen Chen stays true to the specific look that was established by Karl Kerschel, while clearly putting her own visual stamp on the issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Gotham By Midnight #3

Jan 29, 2015

"Gotham By Midnight" is only three issues into its run, and it has ready carved a unique spot for itself in the DCU. Ray Fawkes and Ben Templesmith has created a horror book that grabs the reader's attention by taking real world fears and adding a supernatural twist that makes it even unnerving. Fawkes plays with genre conventions of both police proceduralss and horror books to create something different than either genre, and Templesmith's art is gripping and just unrelentingly creepy. This creative time has picked up right where the glory days of Vertigo finished, and are doing something that feels different and stretches the constraints of a mainstream DCU comic.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Grayson #5

Dec 5, 2014

Some critics will surely point out this issue is a little light on the plot, and they are not wrong. In the grand scheme of things, this will not go down as one of the most essential issues of "Grayson". The issue, however, is an excellent character piece that speaks to the creative team's larger intentions with the character. They acknowledge and respect his past, and use to build his present day personality. If fans were worried that the Dick Grayson they loved reading as Robin and Nightwing was gone, this issue will set their minds at ease. Throw in some great art, and the result is an issue that is quite impressive in its minimalism.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Green Arrow (2011) #32

Jun 5, 2014

Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sarrentino have brought back "Green Arrow" from the brink of total disaster by expanding the character's mythology and creating a huge adventure arc. This issue kicks a new story that successfully proves that this creative team can make traditional bad-guys-in-the-hero's-city just as exciting as globetrotting escapades. It is a great entry point for new readers without regurgitating old information, and Sarrentino's art is just incredible.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Green Arrow (2011): Futures End #1

Sep 5, 2014

The ending of this creative team's last issue of "Green Arrow" will surely leave fans wanting more, and that's a good thing. While some will surely decry the "Future's End" tie-in, upon further study Lemire has actually crafted a fitting end for Oliver's time as the Green Arrow. Expanding on the nature of identities becoming symbols and commenting on the everlasting nature of superhero comics, Green Arrow lives on even without Olivier Queen, and now without Jeff Lemire, Andrea Sorrentino, and Marcelo Maiolo.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #11.NOW

Jan 30, 2014

Much like its "All New X-Men" counterpart, "Guardians of the Galaxy suffers from being mostly setup and no payoff. To the point where both issues end (SPOILERS) on the same panel, and so the story literally doesn't move further ahead. The backstory is fleshed out, but a quick glance at any of the promo materials for 'The Trial of Jean Grey' would reveal basically the same information. Instead it's the humorous and fun writing of Bendis and the always dependable art of Pichelli that make the issue an enjoyable read despite its short comings.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #12

Feb 27, 2014

Browse. A cohesive team, emotional character moments, and basic introductions finally out of the way make "Guardians Of The Galaxy" an enjoyable read, despite the nagging feeling that something bigger should be happening by this point.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #21

Nov 21, 2014

And just when you thought you weren't going to bother with the next issue, something awful happens to a fan favorite character in the last and flips their signature line around in a scary way. This story-arc clearly has potential, but it's not a great start.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Guardians Team-Up #1

Mar 6, 2015

"Guardians Team Up" #1 is a perfectly fine comic book. It delivers exactly what it promises: the Guardians of the Galaxy partners with the Avengers to fight aliens. If you are a ready of either the "Guardians" or "Avengers" series, both of which featured long-running story-arcs, you won't find much of a continuation here. This is a good book for new readers, and once the cast gets pared down a bit and becomes a little more manageable there will surely be more room for story and character development. If that's what you're looking for, maybe give the series a few issues to get going before jumping on board.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Harley Quinn (2013) #0

Nov 21, 2013

Overall, it's hard to judge "Harley Quinn" #0 as representative of the new series, and the fact that it is not #1 makes a lot of sense. It is not remotely like a typical issue of any comic book series, with constant fourth wall breaking and the dozen-odd artists. The story is non-existent, but that's not the reason anyone will be picking up this book. It helps that Amanda Conner and Jimmy Palmiotti keep the whole thing very tongue in cheek, and don't try to make some big serious story fit in with all the different art styles. This book has one of the best collections of artists in recent memory, and balances the big names like Jim Lee and Walter Simonson, and newer talents like Becky Cloonan and Jeremy Roberts. "Harley Quinn" #0 is the most unique book DC has put out all year, and brings a ton of attention onto a fan favorite character, and for those reasons it's worth a look.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Harley Quinn (2013) #1

Dec 19, 2013

There is not one single problem that arises when reading the issue, but rather it is with the overall nature and tone of the book as a whole. What made the zero issue so refreshing to read is that it was unlike anything else DC has published since the New 52 reboot. The push for a unified publishing universe and had a homogenizing effect most of DC's books, and the prelude issue was such a break from that it gave hope that the series could break away and forge its own path through the gritty realism found everywhere else. "Harley Quinn" #1 is funny, strange, and wacky, but the overall story does feel like it took a giant step towards the average DC book.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Hulk (2014) #3

May 23, 2014

It was recently announced that Mark Waid's time writing "Hulk" would end with the currant arc. Although the series has flown under the radar, it seems like Waid and the always stellar Mark Bagley are readying a thrilling conclusion.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Inhuman #1

Apr 3, 2014

"Inhumans" #1 throws a lot at the wall, and unfortunately not a lot of it seems to stick. For every moment that writer Charles Soule successfully integrates background information as part of the story, there's another scene where everything just spills out awkwardly, as with Dante. And for everytime that artist Joe Madureira draws a thrilling action scene, there's a panel where somebody's leg is larger than their torso. There is definitely potential to the Inhumans, and Disney likely has bigger plans for them, but what the series needs right now is a little more focus and clarity.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Injection #1

May 14, 2015

It will be easy for some to dismiss "Injection" #1 for feeling more like a giant teaser than actual proper introduction to the series. Nothing is revealed, resolved or explained, and that is clearly not intent of the creative team. The lack of clear information in the issue is not due to any mistake or lack of skill on the part of the creative team, but is in fact carefully laid out and fully intentional. It's like staring at a corner of a painting, only around it may be blurry but you can still see that it's there. We just have to wait a moment before we can step make and view the whole thing. "Injection" #1 will be sure to please fans of Warren Ellis and his densely plotted stories. It moves and flows with grace, and gives readers every indication that this series soon be taking unexpected turns.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Iron Man (2012) #23.NOW

Mar 20, 2014

"Iron Man" #23 takes the mystical and technological aspects of the Marvel Universe and mashes them together, with the result being surprisingly cohesive. Kieron Gillen wrote a acclaimed run on the Thor-themed "Journey Into Mystery", so another adventure through the Nine Realms plays right into his strengths. He was wise to keep Stark's cynicism and general weariness with the magical elements of the world front and centre, as he essentially becomes the voice of the audience who were not expecting Elves to show up in their "Iron Man" book. Artist Luke Ross deserve a lot of credit for combining the two worlds successfully, as he kept both realms grounded in his realistic style.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Iron Patriot #1

Mar 25, 2014

Setting the series into such a traditional framework is likely a smart decision when dealing with a lesser known character, as it proves that Rhodes can handle the same scenarios of other men of steel and iron.Ales Kot and Garry Brown successfully create a fleshed out world for Iron Patriot. They don't reinvent the metaphorical wheel that is mainstream superhero comics, but prove that James Rhodes doesn't need Tony Stark or Nick Fury in order to establish his own presence in the Marvel world.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Justice League #23.1

Sep 6, 2013

"Darkseid" #23.1 has the potential to be one of the standout titles during Villains Month. It re-positions the dense history of the New Gods into an engrossing cosmic fairy tale, remaining true to the past while being accessible to new readers. Greg Pak crafts an origin story without resorting to any of the usual tricks, and the art from Paulo Siqueira and Netho Diaz in the first half the book is very impressive and, while losing detail, does maintain the kinetic energy that builds throughout. In a sea of villain books that will likely be hit or miss, "Darkseid" #23.1 was a satisfying read.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Justice League #23.4

Sep 27, 2013

Perhaps the biggest gripe some will have with the "Secret Society" issue is that it features very little of the Secret Society of Super Villains itself. Their origin was already detailed in various books leading to 'Trinity War', so it's actually a positive thing that they chose to avoid chasing that story. The title is still misleading, however, as the book is essentially an Alfred/Owlman adventure occurring right before the Crime Syndicate's take over. A better title would have been simply "Earth 3", marketing potential notwithstanding of course.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Justice League #24

Oct 24, 2013

The biggest gripe that some will have with "Justice League" #24 is that while the series is priced at usual $3.99, it lacks any backup feature or extended storyline. The previous issues of "Justice League" featured a long running backup from Johns and Gary Frank the introduced Billy Batson and Shazam in the New 52, which sometimes were the best part of the issue. This issue ends feeling kind of slim, with the main driving force behind the price point being the tie-in to "Forever Evil". Given the fact that issue ends on several large cliffhangers, a short story, say focusing on Johnny Quick and Atom's rampage for example, could have made the book feel more complete.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Justice League #25

Dec 12, 2013

Much like "The Avengers" and "New Avengers" books during Marvel's "Infinity" event, it feels like key moments of the "Forever Evil" story are playing out in "Justice League". The more limited focus in this issue gives the characters much more room to breathe than in the main series, and features good development without the need to cram a multitude of global events into its pages. Johns and Reis are wisely using the JL title to further flesh out the world of "Forever Evil", and it helps to make the whole event a much more interesting read.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Justice League #28

Feb 21, 2014

Justice League" #28 is dense. A little too dense. There is so much ground to cover that the result is almost overwhelming. It set's up the Metal Men, their origins, abilities, and weakness, as well as attempting to include an emotional arc for their creator. The fact that the whole thing doesn't completely come off the rails is a testament to Geoff Johns talents as master story juggler. There are three artists who worked on the issue, and the results are surprisingly uniform. There is no big sudden shifts in style or tone, and no one has a completely different face from panel to panel. The Metal Men themselves are fun and interesting, both visually and story wise. If this is a build up to a "Cyborg and the Metal Man" series, it could very well be a nice change of pace in the New 52.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Justice League #30

May 22, 2014

"Justice League" #30 kicks off an exciting new chapter for the series. Geoff Johns makes the issue feel like a new start, not a re-tread of the end of "Forever Evil", and makes up for a lack of action with character development and fun lighter moments. The art team of Ivan Reis and Doug Mahnke handle the transition between them quite will, and keep the book looking consistent and high quality.

View Issue       View Full Review
3
Justice League 3000 #5

Apr 11, 2014

"Justice League 3000" #5 is not a good comic book. It doesn't do anything new or interesting with the characters, and their status as malfunctioning clones removes any chance for real character motivation. The art feels rushed and incomplete, and the weird faces that abound in this issue are definitely off-putting. "Justice League 3000" #5 is weird, and not in an interesting way, instead it's just a mess.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Justice League United #1

May 15, 2014

This is a fun book and, numbering issues aside, readers should definitely take a shot on these new northern warriors.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Justice League United #4

Aug 15, 2014

This issue is the finale of the first arc of "Justice League United", and it is far from the explosive climax found in typical superhero comics. The big cosmic fight has already happened, and instead Jeff Lemire spends the time exploring and fleshing out the characters, and setting up some larger plot threads. Mike McKone shows up some serious talent, and pencils everything from realistic cities to Canadian winter demons without missing a beat.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Justice League United #11

Jul 9, 2015

Aside from the odd panel here and there, "Justice League United #11" is a decent book with a lot of potential. Parker continues the fun tone of the series, while juggling the old and new members very well. Foreman bounces around various location and characters fairly well, with only a couple rushed moments in one of the more crowded scenes.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.9
Justice League United Annual #1

Oct 31, 2014

"Justice League United" Annual #1 is quite ambitious, to its own detriment. With the new characters, all the expositions and the Arrow-led team's planet hopping side adventures, it's just too much going on all at once. The return of the Legion of Super-Heroes is a welcome development and they fight much better into "United" than in their previous New 52 incarnation. Lemire fills the issue with fun and interesting character moments, and Edwards' art makes the long flashbacks much more interesting, but readers will find it hard to keep track of everything going on. There is a lot of fun adventure to be had, just don't try to understand everything.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Men of Wrath #1

Oct 3, 2014

"Men Of Wrath" is a great comic and definitely not for everyone to read. Ira Rath is not a good person. He's not an anti-hero. He probably wasn't ever a good person to begin with. Imagine if Walter White has 10 more years of Heisenberg sucking away his soul, and that still doesn't compare to Rath. But maybe's that's the point. Rath is unsympathetic in every way, but he still has a story to tell. And it's a mean one.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Mickey Mouse (2015) #1

Jul 2, 2015

The first issue of the relaunched "Mickey Mouse" is harmless and pithy fun. The main audience is clearly children and Disney-fanatics. Don't go into it expecting deep, earth-shattering changes to the Disney universe. The younger audience is sure to like the fun and adventurous stories, while long-time Disney fans will like the way they honor and continue the legacy of these characters in comics.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Nightwing (2011) #24

Oct 11, 2013

"Nightwing" #24 brings Dick Grayson's Chicago adventures to a satisfying end. With the initial crossovers within the Bat-family books, and the events of "Forever Evil", it looks like this arc will be Nightwing's only self-contained story in the immediate future of the New 52. Will Conrad fills the pages with explosive images and keeps the pace of the book speeding towards the conclusion, and fills Chicago with rich details that really flesh out the world. Kyle Higgins embraces the opportunity to tell a story that is unique to the history of Dick Grayson himself, and not tied to his past as Batman's sidekick. Higgins crafts an arc for the character that lets him release a great deal of his anger, and avoids the easy trap of making Nightwing into Batman-light.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Nightwing (2011) #25

Nov 15, 2013

Like "Action Comics" last week, this 'Zero Year' tie-in doesn't seek to add anything to the main story itself, but fleshes out the wider world of Gotham during the blackout. It is really just a fun installment in the adventures of young Dick Grayson, so readers looking for additional insight into the Riddler's plot against the city will be disappointed. The story itself is well done, and gives some good insight into the journey the character has to go on to become Nightwing. Higgins knows the character well enough that he is able to include plenty of moments that foreshadow the future. Will Conrad is proving himself very qualified to handle the regular art duties on "Nightwing". He has proven himself capable of rendering the big explosive action scenes and, while this issue features its share of fighting, the past setting gives Conrad the opportunity to visually explore a different side of the character, and he pulls it off very well.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Nightwing (2011) #26

Dec 13, 2013

"Nightwing" #26 is the beginning of the end for the character. Soon the series will catch up to "Forever Evil", and Dick Grayson will have the face the world without a mask. Kyle Higgins and Will Conrad seemed to determined to send the character off on a high note, with one last adventure across the rooftops of Chicago. The story moves along a good pace, and features several scenes of Nightwing adapted to his new life with his trademark humor and determination. Higgins and Conrad are successfully guiding Nightwing to the end of one chapter of his life, and the book remains as enjoyable and entertain as ever.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Nightwing (2011) #27

Jan 16, 2014

"Nightwing" is in the middle of its current story arc, and the introductions of a well known Bat-villain combined with a new (sorta) anti-hero in the character of Marionette hint at the larger story at play. Kyle Higgins has a firm grasp on Nightwing's personality, and the character's choices require no explanation, allowing the focus to shift to other parts of the story. Conrad and Richard are both skilled artist, and in the previous issue they work well together, it's just unfortunate that one scene at the end of the issue makes their different styles blatantly obvious. Everything else looks very good, especially the opening fight, but the awkward last pages leave a strange final impression.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Nightwing (2011) #29

Mar 13, 2014

Given the fact that this is possibly that last time Kyle Higgins will write "Nightwing", it would have been very tempting to go for the huge, bombastic, explosive ending, but the author was wise to avoid this. The Higgins' run on "Nightwing" was easy to overlook, but it always stayed true to the character, and never sacrificed Dick Grayson's ideals and integrity for gimmicks and grimness. It's a shame that there wasn't the opportunity for an artist to stay on the series for a sustained amount of time, but Dauterman does an admiral job stepping to the series for this two issue arc, outlandish hair choices aside. The character shattering identity reveal is just around the corner, so the smaller, more personal finale is very fitting. The choice for Nightwing to touch on his past to impart wisdom on another young innocent is a simple and elegant way to mark the end of this era.

View Issue       View Full Review
3
Nightwing (2011) #30

May 30, 2014

"Nightwing" #30 is a mistitled mess. Far from being the send off for an incarnation of a character beloved of a large number of people, it really is just an information dump for the new series. Each of the three stories at least has its own feel, but they have nothing new to say about the character or his superhero identity. The art is descent overall, and Mikel Janin's work is sure to create interest in the new "Grayson" series, but is not enough to save the issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Nightwing (2011) Annual #1

Oct 31, 2013

On a quick final note, the issue is marketed as tie-in to the recent 'Batgirl: Wanted' storyline, but in actuality has next to nothing to do with it, and only comes up when Barbara dons a costume other than her traditional Batgirl cowl.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
ODY-C #1

Nov 26, 2014

Despite the fact that the Odyssey is a very familiar story, Matt Fraction and Christian Ward play on audience expectations to craft a story that stands apart from the many adaptations of Homer's work. The abstract art creates a singular look for this world, which simultaneously appears futuristic and classic, and is rich in detail and subtle symbolism that elevates the story's themes. Fraction's decision to flip the genders is an interesting enough choice on its own, but he takes it on step further by playing against the contrasting warrior/mother sides of Odyssia. This team has singular creative vision, and they work together perfectly to execute it.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Past Aways #1

Mar 26, 2015

"Past Aways" #1 is a very successful first issue, as Matt Kindt and Scott Kolins collaborate to create an entertainingly irreverent story of bored time-travelers trapped here with us cavepeople.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Powers (2015) #1

Jan 23, 2015

The return of "Powers", and the premiere of the TV adaptation, is sure to please fans of the series, but the first issue might leave them leaking a little more. The creative team of Brian Michael Bendis and Michael Avon Oeming include all the familiar elements, Pilgrim, Walker, Powers, crime, but it is clearly designed more as an entry point for new readers. It's an engaging and entertaining story with plenty of super-powered mystery and intrigue, with funny, and abundant, dialogue and great art. But if you have read every other issue there isn't really a whole that's new.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Prometheus: Fire and Stone #1

Sep 12, 2014

"Prometheus: Fire and Stone" #1 is not a terrible comic, and it's not a great comic either. The basic premises fits nicely into the familiar Alien mold: misfit crews investigate moon, mysterious creatures emerge, ulterior motives are revealed, and xenomorphs pop up. The problem is that the shift in POV, exposition driven dialogue, and softly lined art make it difficult to get a grasp on the characters. But let's be honest: no one is going to buy this book because they want complex and multilayered space marines. What they want is more xenomorph action, and this book seems poised to deliver.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Robin Rises: Omega #1

Jul 18, 2014

While the folks at Marvel have mastered the art of the brisk recap page, DC has been reticent to adopt such a feature at the start of their comics. This makes it a bit of a surprise when this supersized one-shot begins with not one, not three, but seven pages of recap. And it doesn't just cover the death of Robin and the subsequent search for his body, but every major event since Damian first showed up in the pre-New 52 days. Everything from 'Batman and Son' to 'Death of the Family' is covered; even the ambiguously canonical '

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Sensation Comics Featuring Wonder Woman #1

Aug 22, 2014

At DC, Wonder Woman has often been victim of editorial trying to fix something that's not broken. With a mishmash of characterizations being presented in the New 52, it seems like the perfect time to introduce a new continuity-free series that lets all-star creators tell short stories that can speak to the core of Diana Prince's character without having to tie into the larger DCU. Gail Simone and Ethan Van Sciver are a very talented creative team, and while the story starts strong it loses steam by the conclusion. The art becomes more rushed, and the story doesn't take full advantage of the continuity free opportunity. And it would be nice to see Wonder Woman stand in her own unique world, and not rely on the famous Batman villains to draw in an audience.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Silver Surfer (2014) #5

Aug 29, 2014

The latter half of the issue features a series of nightmares, punctuated by attacks from the Lovecraftian forces of the Lord of Nightmares (so metal), and this is when the effect of Allred's style is most obvious. The creatures are all tentacles and teeth, monsters to be sure, but the intent here is not to terrify or repulse the reader. These same creatures rendered by Travel Foreman or Rafael Albuquerque would have been grotesque and horrifying abominations, and make the book into something darker and more grim; that is not what "Silver Surfer" is about, at least not in this incarnation. Allred draws the monsters in a way that makes them clearly threatening and dangerous, but the reader expecting blood and guts to start flying. There are definitely stakes to the story, but Allred doesn't resort to harsh violence in an attempt to make everything seem more important.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Southern Bastards #6

Dec 11, 2014

"Southern Bastards" is a series that loves to mess with your expectations. First the big good guy / bad guy fight goes completely wrong, and now it twists the familiar villain origin story. Coach Boss is man of great conviction, and remorseless violence. Jason Aaron writes an origin that makes us feel sympathy for the character, without trying to claim that Coach Boss was ever completely innocent. Jason Latour keeps producing great art for this series, and there are moments where the dirt and grime look like it's going to slip off the page. "Southern Bastards" isn't trying to make an anti-hero out of Coach Boss, but it is succeeding in making him a more complex and layered character.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Southern Bastards #9

Jun 18, 2015

Jason Latour presents the the violence in this issue in a way that is not gratuitous or expletive, but instead as stark and emotionless. Jason Aaron subverts expectations by focusing on the corrupt sherif, only to reveal another victim of Coach Boss. If the origin story didn't make it clear, it's now apparent that Boss truly views the people around him as mere x's and o's to be lined up and moved around. And, as the ending twist reveals, Boss' completed disregard for other people is infecting the next generation of Rebel fans. “Southern Bastards” may have returned to the present, but in Craw County all that means is that the violence is a little more fresh.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Star Wars (2014) #4

Apr 24, 2015

"Star Wars" #4 changes the breakneck pace that the series was quick to establish, and the creative team effectively uses the opportunity to explore these iconic characters a little more. Jason Aaron has a strong grasp on what makes these characters tick, and shows their emotional state after the destruction of Death Star in way that is much realistic, and much less rosy, than what we have seen in the films. John Cassaday does great character work throughout the issue, and Han, Leia, Luke and the rest appear just as they do on screen. There are one or two uneven moments, but overall this quiet does not drag or feel boring.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Star Wars (2014) #6

Jun 8, 2015

Aaron and Cassaday have created an issue that is guaranteed to excite, challenge and thrill Star Wars fans. You can't ask for much more than that.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Star Wars: Princess Leia #5

Jul 6, 2015

Mark Waid and Terry Dodson have shown that Leia is every bit the hero, just like Han and Luke. It's a great miniseries and a great reminder as to why this character has remained popular and important, both in and out of Star Wars, for so many years.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Strange Sports Stories #1

Mar 20, 2015

The four stories found in "Strange Sports Tales" #1 are varied and different from one another, but are unified by the idea that sports can be about more than just the game itself. None of these stories really focus on who wins and who loses, but about how the characters are affected by sporting events. All the creators involved are very talented, and they each accomplish more in fewer than 10 pages then other series do in full issues.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Superman (2011) #38

Feb 5, 2015

"Superman" #38 marks the end of an improved period for the series and the character. For a while it seemed like DC had no idea what to do with its flagship character, but by employing what is truly a star creative team it shows that they are finally addressing the problem. Geoff Johns knows Superman, and he has written the character in a way that long-time fans will finally recognize. He is inspiring, determined and hopeful, and Johns has done a lot to right the Superman ship. John Romita Jr is already a well-established artistic force in comics, and his work on "Superman" how allowed him to show off his talent in a completely new setting. The slightly rushed looks of few panels is hard to overlook, but it won't erase all the good work Romita has already done on the series. This first story-arc isn't perfect, but at least it feels like a true Superman story. This issue nicely wraps up this arc and sets the stage for more interesting things to come.

View Issue       View Full Review
5
Superman (2011) #40

May 1, 2015

There are a many interesting ideas and moments featured in "Superman" #40, but an uneven story and strangely retro dialogue makes the issue feel odd and disjointed. John Romita Jr is a great artist, with a long list of justly deserved accolades, but the pieces just don't come together here.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Superman Unchained #4

Nov 8, 2013

After a 10 week delay, "Superman Unchained" is back with a bang. Scott Snyder, like always, fills the book with character insights and unique details, such as this issue's paper dolls, that set his work apart. Jim Lee proves that his is still capable of delivering high quality art, even after drawing these heroes thousands of times.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Superman Unchained #5

Jan 2, 2014

A character with the nearly unlimited power set of Superman calls for big storytelling, and Scott Snyder is using "Superman Unchained" as the opportunity to tell a big story not just about good guys vs bad guys, but about the very character of the Man of Steel. Jim Lee maintains his status as a legendary artist with page after page of quality art, but Dustin Nguyen's surreal flashbacks are beautiful to look at and basically steal the issue. With a story this grand, it's easy to lose sight of the end destination, and the issue does feel very opened, but one can argue that Snyder has earned the chance to stick the landing by crafting a story that speaks to the most traditions aspects of Superman's character and the world he lives in.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Superman Unchained #6

Mar 21, 2014

For every lackluster moment, however, there are pages of gorgeous, iconic looking art from Jim Lee. Clark bursts through the Ascension submarine in a beautiful full page spread that makes it abundantly clear how powerful he is. And he literally punches the masks off of people, which looks super cool. The action packed issues highlights Lee's attention to detail, as every building or object the Clark destroys is fleshed out and doesn't dissolve into a haze a metal and debris. The menagerie in Fortress of Solitude gives the more traditionalist Lee that chance to show off his ability to render strange and unusual creatures. It's a brief scene, but it's so different from anything else in the series that Lee's great art really stands out, as well as aiding in an interesting character moment.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
The Fade Out #1

Apr 17, 2015

As "The Fade Out" returns, it's clear that almost all the characters are trying to move beyond the death of Valeria Sommers, but her murder has cast an inescapable shadow over everyone. Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips are creating a Golden Age Hollywood that is anything but. The story keeps getting bigger and deeper, while the art perfectly captures all aspects of the era.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
The Fade Out #3

Nov 13, 2014

This issue represents a change of pace for the young series, and signifies the intention of the creative team to avoid any expected or repetitive narrative structure. "The Fade Out" is not just about solving the question of who killed Valeria Sommers, but about the consequences that her death has on the close-knit studio system she was a part of. Ed Brubaker uses unexpected flashbacks and unique third-person narration to reveal the complicated personalities of two characters at the opposite end of the Hollywood spectrum. Sean Phillips and Elizabeth Breitweiser continue to create detailed and evocative art with the careful mix of shadow and de-saturated colors. For noir lovers, history buffs, and mystery enthusiasts, "The Fade Out" has already set an incredibly high bar for itself, and there's every indication it will continue to challenge and surpass expectations.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
The Fade Out #4

Jan 8, 2015

The creative team describes this issue as the end of act one of the series, and it's interesting to note how satisfying a read it has been while exactly zero mysteries have been solved. From the outset, however, Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips have stay away from any indication that this is a traditional whodunit story. There is no detailed investigation, or a careful examination of possible subject. There is only a motley crew of morally dubious characters as they try to use the bright lights of Hollywood to keep their shadows at bay.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
The Fade Out #7

Jun 29, 2015

Another intriguing issue. Brubaker is much more concerned with exploring these characters than speeding through the mystery, and the world of the series actually feels deeper and more complex for it. Phillips and Breitweiser get to expand their artistic and color palate, and grow the look of the book while maintaining a consistent tone.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
The Wake #5

Nov 22, 2013

"The Wake" has been a great success for storytellers Scott Snyder and Sean Murphy, and for Vertigo. This issue continues to grow the story, as what once seemed like a simple monster tale now involves ancient civilizations and imminent global catastrophe. Scott Snyder is an expert at balancing sweeping actions scenes with small moments that actual make the reader care about the characters stuck under the ocean. Sean Murphy's art is beautifully sinister, and adds a great deal to the overall tone of the book. And man can he make a mermaid scary. "The Wake" #5 brings one part of the story to a close, but it's clear that there are much bigger things ahead. And below.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
The Wake #6

Feb 28, 2014

"The Wake" has taken a giant leap forward, both in terms of timeline and ambition. The creature-horror feel of the first five issues has transformed into a huge tale of global catastrophe. Author Scott Snyder wisely resists the urge to overload the reader with new information about the state of the earth, and instead very effectively used the smallest amount of information necessary. Sean Murphy has taken the terror felt in his illustrations of claustrophobic spaces and transferred them to a panoramic scale, and the world he draws is both beautiful and deadly. "The Wake" #6 feels more like a new #1, like Snyder and Murphy decided not to wait to do the sequel. It's an amazing start to the second half, and perfectly displays the global intentions of the incredible creative team.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
The Wake #9

Jun 6, 2014

When compared with the first five issues, the climax of "The Wake" is moving along at bullet train speed. This is a series that will greatly benefit from a reread when it's collected in a trade, as Snyder has planted plenty of little details that aren't vital to the main story and do add to the tone. There are points in the issue where the shear amount of stuff going on threatens to get overwhelming, but Snyder and Murphy keeps the endgame in focus, even as they creates even more mysteries.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
The Wake #10

Aug 1, 2014

"The Wake" has been about twists and turns from the very beginning, even when it comes to its own genre. Scott Snyder and Sean Murphy are a great team, and they have included a surprising amount of depth (no pun intended) in this horror story that it is surely destined for further success in trade format. The ending is exciting and unexpected, which seems to fulfill goals of the series to the letter.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Ultimate Comics Spider-Man Vol. 2 #26

Aug 30, 2013

A well paced story with the right mix of humour and drama, great art, and big reveal. After thirteen years, this series still proves to be the bright light in the Ultimate Universe.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Ultimate Comics Spider-Man Vol. 2 #28

Oct 25, 2013

This issue wraps up many long running plot threads within the series in an extremely satisfying way that is sure to please fans, but leaves enough behind to ensure the readers that the story of Miles Morales is not over just yet.

View Issue       View Full Review
0.5
Ultimate FF #3

Jun 20, 2014

This series has just been cancelled and it comes as no surprise. There are amazing series' coming out of Marvel right now, and this book doesn't come remotely close to living up to the company's pedigree. It's convoluted, visually confusing, and subverts the entire point of the “Cataclysm” reboot bydragging up a bunch dense Ultimate Universe continuity. It's just not good, and Ultimate Marvel fans deserve better.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Winter Soldier: The Bitter March #1

Feb 13, 2014

With the release of the Captain America sequel only weeks away, "Winter Soldier: The Bitter March" ran the risk of being little more than a churned out tie-in filled with information redundant to old readers and too crammed together for new ones. Instead, Remender and Boschi have created an espionage tale that harkens back to the classics of the genre, and uses the familiar setting to display what a jarring effect a character like the Winter Soldier would have in this world. The dialogue and pacing are consistent throughout the book, and Boschi's art grabs the reader from the first page. It was an exciting and enjoyable read from beginning to end.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.9
Wytches #3

Dec 19, 2014

The third issue of "Wytches" is a marked departure from the previous installments, and it was a clear decision on the part of the creative team. Horror of any kind, even the supernatural, is most effective when it evokes universal emotions. Desperation, confusion, frustration. We can all relate to these feelings, and Scott Snyder effectively plays them up to give readers a glimpse into the terror that the Rooks must be experiencing. Jock and Matt Hollingsworth continue to prove that they are a dynamic team, but there are moments when their esoteric side threatens to take over. There is not a great deal of plot advancement, but instead the depth and breadth of "Wytches" and its characters gets a big increase.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Wytches #6

May 22, 2015

The first arc of "Wytches" ends with an issue that combines supernatural horror with emotional devastation. Scott Snyder crafts a well-paced story that lulls the reader into a false sense of security only to rip it away from them. Jock and Matt Hollingsworth continually elevate the artistic stakes, and create images that effectively convey the story and character moments, while making the reader a little frightened to turn to the page.

View Issue       View Full Review

Reviews for the Week of...

April

March

More