Cameron Kieffer's Comic Reviews

Reviewer For: Geek'd Out Reviews: 40
8.6Avg. Review Rating

9.4
Adventureman #1

Jun 10, 2020

Fraction has created a bevy of fun, pulp-inspired heroes and villains along with a more-than-capable lead in Claire.

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8.8
America Chavez: Made in the USA #1

Mar 3, 2021

If there is anywhere that the book falters, its in the writing of America herself. Typically portrayed as a badass neer-do-well, she mostly just coasts through the proceedings, displaying little of her trademark personality. It may be more of an introspective portrayal, but it seems an odd choice considering how much the story focuses on her. There are moments where her personality comes out, particularly during an interaction with special guest star Spider-Man. Vazquez also dispenses with any real exposition, making no mention of the Young Avengers and only hinting at Americas power-set. Despite the lack of accessibility, its a refreshing change that puts trust in the reader to have at least a rudimentary knowledge of the characters.

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8.2
Barbarella (2021) #1

Jul 14, 2021

Its too soon to tell if this series will match the quality or success of Dynamites previous volume written by Mike Carey, but theres enough potential to warrant a second look when the next issue hits, especially if youre a fan of likable characters and fun retro-space concepts. If nothing else,Barbarellais a damn fine-looking book, as is its leading lady.

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8
Black Panther: Legends (2021) #1

Oct 13, 2021

Artist Setor Fiadzigbey brings this world and its characters to life with a very unique and lavish style. The lush forests of Wakanda nicely contrast with the sleek, futuristic design of its buildings and technology. The book has such a dynamic look that evena boardroom scene focusing on Wakandan politics looks incredible. Paris Alleynes colors have such a pure, watercolor style that meshes perfectly with Fiadzigbeys pencils. Its a beautiful book that youll want read again with each subsequent issue.

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9.5
Black Stars Above #3

Jan 29, 2020

For more details, check out our review of the debut issue ofBlack Stars Abovehere!

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9.2
Black Widow (2020) #1

Sep 4, 2020

Overall, it's a gorgeous book from start-to-finish and is definitely worthy of the Black Widow legacy, as well as your time and money.

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7.5
Buffy the Vampire Slayer (2019) #5

Jun 5, 2019

One thing the previous arc had going for it consistently was the excellent art. Sadly, thats another area that has taken a hit in quality. Art duties are handled by David Lopez, and while his layouts are great (particularly in an early two-page spread), his character work leaves a lot to be desired. Certain players, especially Willow, just come off looking odd, with expressions ranging from bored to manic. Fortunately, previous colorist Raul Angulo has returned to work his magic and, along with letterer Ed Dukeshire, provides some much needed artistic continuity.

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8.4
Chronophage OGN

Feb 2, 2022

The story does feel a bit uneven at times, and certain events seem contradictory, but much of it is in the service of the story, with Seeley keeping certain twists and revelations close to the chest. Enter into this story with an open mind, and you'll finish it with one that is properly blown.

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7.6
Count Crowley: Amateur Midnight Monster Hunter #1

Mar 23, 2022

Perhaps the books greatest strength lies in its look and style, thanks in part to the outstanding art by Lukas Ketner. Taking place in the early '80s, the characters and locations look and feel genuine. The brilliantly-muted colors by Lauren Affe give the entire book a weathered, purely vintage aesthetic. Theres no ironic commentary or overly-saturated nostalgia here; it literally reads like the adaptation of a 1983 horror flick, only with much better writing. Equal parts Fright Night and Creepshow, Count Crowley: Amateur Midnight Monster Hunter is an entertaining yarn thatboth respects and embraces the genre to which its paying homage.

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9
Cursed Pirate Girl: THE DEVILS CAVE #1

Jan 21, 2022

Cursed Pirate Girl: The Devils Caveis a beautiful and unique masterpiece that is just one part of a larger narrative, where every new chapter is worth waiting for. Mark my words, youll want to set aside plenty of time to pour over every page and just bask in the imagination of one of comics most unique and skilled voices. To get caught up, check out Cursed Pirate Girl and Cursed Pirate Girl: 2015 Annual #1 in either print or digital wherever you buy comics.

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8.4
Daisy (2021) #1

Dec 8, 2021

Lorimers art is perfectly in sync with his writing; his realistic approach to the characters and locations never feels less than believable. This style gives the quieter moments a naturally tense feel while the heavier moments, including the grotesque Biblical flashbacks, are comparatively more intense and horrifying. Plus, Joana Lafuente's and Anita Vus colors add even more layers of beauty to the horrifying carnage. Finally, Jim Campbells lettering is perfectly suited to the storys tone. All in all, Daisy #1 is a fantastic first issue from a talented creative team.

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8.6
Deadpool (2019) #1

Nov 20, 2019

The launch of this new first issue (his ninth, I believe) does coincide with Marvels recent Dawn of X relaunch. Unlike many of the new X-books, however, this series appears to be largely self-contained and new-reader friendly, despite Deadpools frequent inclusion with the Merry Mutants. In fact, apart from the appearance of a couple characters from Thompsons recently-concluded West Coast Avengers, this issue is perfectly accessible to first-time readers and long-time fans. With its hyper-violence and edgy, yet mostly lighthearted humor, this new arc acts as a spiritual successor to the now-classic runs by Gail Simone and Joe Kelly, which is a very good thing for both the character and readers alike.

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6.7
Draculina (2022) #1

Feb 9, 2022

While this book seems dependent on familiarity with the writers earlier works in the Vampi-verse, he provides just enough clues and exposition to help new readers kind of figure out whats happening. Fans of Priests signature style–starting off each scene with a new title card–will be glad to know he uses it here, although it doesnt serve much purpose and is frankly more of an annoyance than anything. The dialogue and pacing of the story are handled much better than the style aspects, although the dark humor is sparse enough to seem almost out-of-place with the otherwise serious tone.

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8.1
Fearscape #5

Apr 24, 2019

Fans of David Lynch, Neil Gaimans Sandman, and Mike Careys The Unwritten will find plenty to like in this five-issue series, although the casual reader may be left confused. Theres a clever amount of world-building here, with plenty of potential to expand.

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8.8
Ghostbusters: Year One #1

Jan 22, 2020

The focus on Winston is an inspired choice, especially since he's generally considered the least fleshed-out member of the team (as far as the films go). Here, he gets the attention he rightly deserves, providing his own perspective of the film's events and his role in them.

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8.8
Grrl Scouts: Stone Ghost #1

Nov 24, 2021

Included in this issue are a series of bonus features, including some back-up comics, which are every bit as entertaining as the main story, if not more so. The first is a no-holds-barred trip into Mahfoods irreverent style, while the second is an autobiographical tale that is heartbreaking in a number of ways. And while they couldnt be more different, both tales enrich and inform the main story, peeling back the layers to reveal the deeply personal story Mahfood is trying to tell. Its an experience that ultimately sticks with you well past its blood-soaked cliffhanger.

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7.9
He-Man & the Masters of the Multiverse #1

Nov 20, 2019

Nostalgically speaking, there is a lot of fun to be had, particularly with the many references to the MOTUs less popular canon. The inclusion of one such character is likely to cause certain readers to rejoice, while others may turn away in disgust. The scope of this series and the respect to the characters varied history is evident in the last page reveal, which is likely to be equally polarizing to long-time fans. Despite a few missteps, there is a lot of potential to this series, and Im excited to see where it goes from here.

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9.2
Hulkling & Wiccan (2022) #1

Jun 15, 2022

If this one-shot has any shortcomings, its in the conversion from digital-to-print. Originally published as a scrolling digital series on Marvel Unlimiteds Infinity Comics platform, the art often appears faded or even blurry, especially in contrast to the sharp and distinct lettering by VCs Ariana Maher. Its a small gripe and certainly doesnt detract from the enjoyment of the book, but its certainly an area that could be improved as more digital pieces make their way to print.

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7.9
Impossible Jones #1

Sep 22, 2021

Despite the occasionally complicated narrative choices and a couple very bizarre character moments, this is a solid introduction to an exciting new world with familiar archetypes and clever mash-ups. Thanks to the witty dialogue and beautiful art, this latest offering from Scout Comics was pretty much impossible to put down and has enough subtext to warrant multiple readings (Ive already read it twice). It may not be perfect, but if the last scene is any indication, Impossible Jonesmay be a worthy addition to your pull-list.

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8.6
Joker/Harley: Criminal Sanity #1

Oct 11, 2019

Speaking of Joker, despite having top billing in the title, the Clown Prince of Crime doesnt appear anywhere in the issue. Not unlike the killer in Seven, he exists as a force of nature to move the narrative forward, his actions appearing only in flashback. Even Batman only appears in a single panel, during one such sequence that provides one of the books more emotional moments.

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7.9
Lego Ninjago: Garmadon #1

Apr 6, 2022

Not every piece comes together perfectly, however. While Vuongs art matches the tone of the story and his depiction of Garmadon is spot-on, the LEGO aesthetic isnt used throughout. The characters look and move like mini-figs but apart from the occasional weapon or prop, nearly everything is drawn in a more traditional style. It would have been nice to see more of the set pieces actually look as though they were built from pieces of a LEGO set. Additionally, while the recap is helpful, those who arent devout fans of the LEGO Ninjago television series may find themselves a tad overwhelmed and needing to review a wiki for more info.

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8.2
Lifeformed #1

Aug 25, 2021

The reasoning behind the invasion is but one mystery that is begging to be solved, but readers wont have to wait long. Following the debut issue, the remainder of the story will be collected in one volume, rather than serialized in monthly installments. Still if you want in on the ground floor, youd do well to pick up this issue just so you can say you readLifeformedbefore it was cool.

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8.4
Midnight Western Theatre #2

Jun 30, 2021

Scout Comics has been putting out a number of fun and unique books, and Midnight Western Theatrecontinues that trend with a supernatural western that is a little bitDeadwood and a little bitTwin Peaks with just a dash ofTrue Detective. Definitely pick this up and track down the first issue if you can " I know I will!

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9
My Video Game Ate My Homework OGN

May 6, 2020

The story is very much a fantasy with shades of science fiction, but the relatability of Dewey and his friends keep everything grounded. Between Deweys dyslexia and Beatrices anxiety, the cast is depicted in a very real, honest way that never feels heavy-handed. With every new level, the kids work together to solve problems, help each other, and push themselves harder to get to the next stage. However, the books visuals dont fare quite as well; there are some noticeable inconsistencies with perspective, and the characters expressions seem limited and very Muppet-like. These are minor quibbles though, and the art gets better and more stylish as the story progresses. Cory Breens lettering is excellent and very easy on the eyes, and Hansens coloring is beautiful. There are also plenty of fan service moments and several subtle nods to its placement in the DC Universe (or somewhere in the multiverse), but those moments never feel forced or distracting.

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9
New Mutants (2019) #1

Nov 6, 2019

Much like the other titles in the Dawn of X line, this is not the most new reader-friendly book on the stands. At least a rudimentary knowledge of the mutants new status quo is required to fully understand the issues opening scenes. The X-Men line in general is notorious for using caption boxes that provide character names and abilities, however, those are noticeably absent here. It may be beneficial to have a Marvel encyclopedia handy to know more about characters like Mondo, whose powers are only vaguely hinted at. Despite the lack of general accessibility, this is a highly entertaining first issue that should appeal to X-fans of any generation.

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8.8
Red Sonja (2021) #1

Sep 3, 2021

Handling the art is Giuseppe Cafaro, whose style and character designs are similar to Andolfos own without ever seeming like an imitation. The outbursts of violence are bloody and graphic but handled masterfully and made all the better with excellent coloring by Chiara Di Francia. Every decapitation and dismemberment is a thing of beauty. Cafaros depiction of Red Sonja is just as fantastic; he keeps the traditional look of the buxom red-head in a chainmail bikini but avoids any gratuitous imagery or cheesecake poses. His Sonja is beautiful, as always, but meant to be feared, not ogled. Its a refreshing change of pace that once again never disrespects the traditional aspects of the character.

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8.6
Sabrina the Teenage Witch (2019) #2

May 15, 2019

Those still lamenting her previous all-but-cancelled series may be left wanting something darker and edgier, while those used to her appearances in the core Archie and Jughead titles may be put off by the creepy vibes. The book as a whole is very entertaining, with Thompson doing an admirable job of bridging those two series into a hybrid that is both fun and creepy. Its likely not a coincidence that the tone and style of this series is very close to that of the current Netflix series but still manages to keep things lighthearted.

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9.1
Savage Avengers (2019) #1

May 1, 2019

While its hard to judge a new team without all the components, this book is off to an interesting start. Duggans approach is a bit of a slow-burn, but its apparent that hes building toward something exciting. The book has a lot of potential, is filled with gorgeous art from start to finish, and should definitely be considered for your pull-list.

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8.8
Shang-Chi (2021) #1

May 21, 2021

All in all, this is a fun first issue that serves as a direct continuation of the creative teams vision, while providing a serviceable introduction to fans. They clearly have a lot of love and respect for our hero, striking a good balance of humor, drama, and incredible action thats worthy of the character. The lack of background doesnt take away from the enjoyment of this issue, and, if anything, the unanswered questions are more intriguing than frustrating.

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9
Spy Island #1

Apr 1, 2020

This latest Dark Horse miniseries is groovy, sexy, and weird in all the ways comics should be. WARNING: May contain hairy men in Union Jack speedos.

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7.6
Star Wars: Obi-Wan (2022) #1

May 4, 2022

As the story progresses, the dynamic between Obi-Wan and his friend Gehren is delightful but it fizzles out far too soon, leaving one characters fate left up in the air (you can guess who). As such, the main story feels like its just a one-and-done with no real resolution. Its relatable in a way–the idea of growing apart from a good friend and never knowing what happens to them–but here it just seems like the start of a story that may never continue. Hopefully there is a theme or overarching narrative that will provide greater meaning to this series; otherwise it runs the risk of being another forgettable tie-in simply made to lead into Kenobis upcoming live-action series.

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9
Stray Dogs (2021) #1

Feb 24, 2021

Ill say again, STRAY DOGS is intended for mature audiences. While any real violence is minimal, whats seen on-panel can be a bit jarring, and the dark undertones throughout are definitely not for kids. If youre looking for something new and unique from the usual superhero fare, or if youve ever just wondered what Lady and the Tramp would be like with the tone of True Detective, then definitely give this a read. Its an effectively creepy and entertaining first issue that kind of messed me up, but in all the best ways.

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9.4
Stray Dogs (2021) #2

Mar 24, 2021

Once again, the art here is brilliant. Forstners designs are equal parts Disney and Don Bluth, which makes for a nostalgic, yet tense read. Along with Brad Simpson on colors, Forstner puts a tremendous amount of energy into every page. The book is simply gorgeous from start to finish, with credit going to Tone Rodriguez and Lauren Perry, as well. If you havent picked up Stray Dogs yet, you owe it to yourself to pick it up. Just be sure to read it with the lights on. And to hug your pet afterwards.

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8.4
Taskmaster (2020) #1

Nov 11, 2020

Alessandro Vittis art is fantastic; his layouts are on-par (not sorry) with the best artists in the business. His style is heavy on detail, most notably in the action sequences, which have a dynamic yet grounded approach. This is used to comedic effect when Taskmaster, in full garb, is evading an assassins bullet while on a golf cart, talking on a cell phone. Its a ridiculous image that Vitti brings to life in a spectacular way. My only gripe is with Taskmasters skull mask is that its always a bit jarring to see him be so expressive beneath the mask, especially with a moving jaw, but its no weirder than Spideys whole eye thing.

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9
The Mask: I Pledge Allegiance to the Mask #1

Oct 18, 2019

The art by Patric Reynolds is both beautiful and ugly in all the right ways. The setting of Edge City looks like little more than a demilitarized zone. Likewise, the photo-referenced characters are depicted as realistic, flawed, and about as far from glamorous as you can get. With the addition of Lee Loughbridges excellent coloring, the art has a grounded approach that makes Big Heads bright green visage even more terrifying in contrast to the grittiness of the environment.

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9
The White Trees #2

Sep 25, 2019

Zdarskys trademark voice was all-but absent in the previous issue, but here its very distinct and his range as a writer is on full-display. The dialogue is full of humor and heartbreak, as is the story itself. The genius lettering by Aditya Bidikar adds just enough personality to Zdarskys words, while keeping within the style of this dark and broody tale. I only hope this whole team returns to the world of Blacksand one day soon.

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9.6
Twig (2022) #1

May 4, 2022

Young and Strahm bring their mutual storytelling sensibilities together in a merger that exploits both creators' strengths in all the best ways. Youngs voice and storytelling prowess is evident in every panel, while Strahms illustrations are just perfect for this type of story. To paraphrase the song Colors of the Wind, every rock, tree, and creature has a life, a spirit, and a name. Theres a remarkable sense of continuity from one setting to the next, and theres often a subtle creepiness that hints at a darkness resting just below the surface. His artwork is complemented by colorist Jean-Francois Beaulieus extraordinary pallet, and the lettering by Nate Piekos adds to the books delightfully strange personality.

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8.8
Unearth #1

Jul 10, 2019

Unearth is weird in all the best ways possible, layered with ideas to explore while never fully disclosing what the story is about or where its heading. While that aspect can often be frustrating, its actually one of this books greatest strengths. Is the threat simply a virus? Is it aliens? Monsters? Magic? It could be any or none of the above. The mystery is at the very heart of this bizarre and horrifying tale and I, for one, cant wait to know more.

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9
Vampironica: New Blood #1

Dec 4, 2019

The only downside (and this is a common issue with a lot of comics nowadays) is that the previous series are pretty much required reading. A recap page may have been helpful, but there is enough exposition to hit the important notes without detracting from the ongoing narrative. Speaking of which, its clear that Tieri and Moreci have long-term plans for this section of the Archie-verse, and I strongly suggest getting caught up now. You wont be disappointed!

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9.2
We Have Demons #1

Mar 23, 2022

At times,We Have Demonsfeels like a direct continuation of the teams previous work, almost like it exists between the panels of epic DC stories like Dark Knights Metal and its sequel. Much like those stories, this book has enough worldbuilding to spin off a number of crazy tales. Even our star Lam feels like the spiritual successor of Harper Row, a character the creative team introduced during their epic run on Batman. Daughter of a preacher man, Lams upbringing has its fair share of tragedy and enough teen angst to make her frustratingly relatable. Lams story serves as a coming-of-age parable, which Snyder deftly weaves within a creation story that balances science and faith in a way that is outlandish, yet respectful to both ideals.

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