Walt Richardson's Comic Reviews

Reviewer For: Multiversity Comics Reviews: 112
7.5Avg. Review Rating

8.3
Adventure Time #3

Apr 13, 2012

“Adventure Time” has been flying off the shelf, but this is not just because of brand recognition " though, okay, that certainly has something to do with it. North and company are putting together a comic that almost matches the show's sense of wonderful silliness, which is no easy feat, while telling a story that entertains on its own merits. Whether you are a kid or a twenty-something hipster, “Adventure Time” is sure to entertain.

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4.5
Age of Ultron #5

Apr 12, 2013

Back in February, I named Bendis the best writer of the month, and I stand by it — for that month. With “Age of Ultron,” though, we see him slipping back into some of his bad habits. On its own, this issue is dull, and Hitch's art doesn't help it go down any easier. As part of a whole, it's unfortunate. The “event” is finally gaining some momentum, but only at the halfway point. Some readers may view this issue as a step in the right direction — personally, I think it's too little, too late.

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7.9
All-New X-Men #9

Mar 22, 2013

“All-New X-Men” may have made fans' eyes roll when it was first announced, but as it has gone on it has shown itself to be one of the best of the Marvel NOW! titles currently being published. This issue is another well-done read, but doesn't quite stand out from any of the ones before it, and will almost certainly be overshadowed by what is to come. Still, those who have been reading the book should be satisfied with the return of the always brilliant Stuart Immonen, and excited for what Brian Michael Bendis has to come. Fans who are interested in jumping on board in only the span of a few issues, though, might be better served by reading the three issues of “Uncanny X-Men” out so far and picking up the next issue instead.

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6.8
All-New X-Men #13

Jun 28, 2013

"All New X-Men" #13 opened with a big bang, leading the reader to believe this was going to be one heck of an issue. Sadly, despite some interesting development regarding Mystique's sinister plan, the issue quickly fizzled into an abrupt cut-off without much grace

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7.8
Amazing Spider-Man #680

Mar 1, 2012

Amazing Spider-Man is one of the more enjoyable superhero titles on the spin-racks these days. A mixture of fun adventuring and engaging character-based drama, it hits all the beats that Stan Lee and Steve Ditko established many moons ago. It isn't always great, but it almost never is bad. The $3.99 price tag is still lamentable, but good comics are good comics.

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6.0
Amazing Spider-Man #692

Aug 24, 2012

On the plus side, though, those Marcos Martin variants are f***ing fantastic. Everyone else might as well stop trying.

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5.5
America's Got Powers #1

Apr 12, 2012

If the book still sounds like it might be up your alley " and I can't blame you; Hitch drawing massive-scale destruction is hard to say no to " I have good news: The first issue of "America's Got Powers" is a great bargain. At $2.99 for a little bit under forty story pages, it's on of the best deals on the shelves this month. Like last month's debut of "Saga," the extra pages allow Jonathan Ross to establish everything needed to make the reader feel well-grounded " a trend that will hopefully catch on more and more in the realm of monthly comic series. On top of that, a 38-page book that costs $2.99 certainly feels like less of a waste than a $3.99, 20-page book if you buy it and don't exactly care for it " which may very well be the case.

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6.5
American Vampire #27

May 31, 2012

"American Vampire" is still one of Vertigo's best series, but this issue may very well be the weakest one yet. The story, while interesting, is one that will probably only appeal to fans who have been reading since issue #1, and even then only in a sense of getting the whole picture. Snyder is still doing a great job, even if he is not firing on all cylinders, but Burchielli's seemingly rushed art brings down this issue significantly. Still, if this is the worst "American Vampire" gets, it speaks volumes about the rest of the series.

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8.0
American Vampire #34

Jan 4, 2013

For the most part, this issue does exactly what is intended: it gets long-time readers excited for what's to come, then leaves them hanging (in a good way). This issue represents a big shift for Snyder in terms of writing style, and even if he makes a slightly distracting mistake, he still manages to pull it off well. All this, while Albuquerque continues to dominate the page. Goodbye for now, “American Vampire” — you will be missed.

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9.0
American Vampire: Lord of Nightmares #1

Jun 15, 2012

This comic has a shining moment for both writer and artist — Tommy Glass and the horrifying climax, respectively — but those shining moments only barely eclipse the rest of this comic. Scott Snyder's writing is on point like it has not been in quite some time — not that he has not had any good comics out, of course — and Dustin Nguyen's art looks better than it ever has been. “Survival of the Fittest” was greeted with applause from critics, and some might even say it was even better than the main title. Could “Lord of Nightmares” go the same way? Certainly, if the other issues are just as good as this one.

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8.6
Animal Man #20

May 2, 2013

If crossover fatigue led you to drop “Animal Man” during the perhaps too long ‘Rotworld,' the second part of ‘Tights' is a great chance to return to the fold (I know, because I did just that). Jeff Lemire dresses up his expertise with character-driven drama in capes, while John Paul Leon delivers the quality line work his name is synonymous with, resulting in a comic that's hard to say no to even if superheroes aren't your typical thing.

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6.0
Batman (2011) #18

Mar 15, 2013

Put simply, this is an average story that is told in an only slightly above average way, where the art is poorly executed not in composition by the artists, but by the pairing of editorial. Snyder's “Batman” started as one of the best books of the New 52, and while it is still near the top of the list, that's only because the rest of them are no longer that great, either. People who are reading the comic because it's Batman and they always read Batman will probably find this to be a fine issue, with little to complain about, but those who were looking for the precise touch Snyder brought to “Detective Comics” will probably use this as a chance to jump ship before the next little bout of continuity porn — ‘Year Zero.'

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6.5
Batman (2011) #22

Jul 12, 2013

Aside from some great Alfred dialogue about midway through, #22 is more entertaining than it is notable, continuing the book's trend of coasting along. The issue does take one risk, and would get points for that were that risk not pretty horribly botched (though this isn't necessarily Snyder's fault).

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6.5
Batman and Robin (2011) Annual #1

Feb 1, 2013

I haven't been reading “Batman & Robin” since the New 52 began, and while this issue was not bad, it has not convinced me to change my ways — and I doubt it will convert anyone else, either. It's an issue that attempts to bring more character to the Bat-family's core, and while the plot is somewhat contrived and unclear — what exactly is Damian's point? — it still allows for a fun diversion. Those folks who go to the comic shop particularly for Batman comics shouldn't be disappointed with this one, but I can't help but feel there are better choices on the shelf for a better price.

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7.5
Batman Incorporated #4

Oct 25, 2012

"Batman Incorporated" is one of those books that has reached a certain point in its run where if you like it, you will probably keep liking it. Some issues may be less enthralling than others, but nothing has happened yet that will shake those who read and loved volume one (except maybe the DC Reboot, but that's outside of Morrison and Burnham's responsibility). To speak personally, I was not a fan of #2, but I didn't even hesitate to pick up #3. Editor-in-Chief Matt Meylikhov was not a fan of this issue, but you know what? I doubt he'd think twice about buying #5 without reading it. The latest issue of "Batman Incorporated" is what we'd expect from the book at this point: Morrison telling a great story, though not without his occasional flaws of execution, and Chris Burnham cranking out some great comics art. Sure, maybe "what we'd expect" isn't what some people are looking for in a Morrison comic, but that doesn't mean it isn't good.

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9.0
Bedlam #1

Nov 1, 2012

From cover to cover, “Bedlam” is a grade-A comic book thriller. Spencer knows just how much disturbing imagery is enough, and stops right at the magical Price-Is-Right line that keeps us horrified and yet dying for more, while Rossmo draws the crap out of it — like everything he does. At $3.50 for a double-sized issue, there is really no reason not to check this new series out… that, of course, and because it's just damn good comics.

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6.7
Bedlam #6

Apr 4, 2013

As “Bedlam” ‘s first arc comes to a close, it's in a difficult place. While it started off very strongly, it has quickly petered off to being very good, but not quite excellent. This issue is a bit basic, though not bad, and as its the conclusion of the first arc, it's a bit hard to recommend the book as is to anyone who hasn't checked it out yet. A simultaneous pro and con of the arc-based standard of the industry is that the end of the story is a good time to decide “should I drop this title?” There's a big difference between a book being bad enough to drop without any thought of monetary necessity and simply not being good enough to keep paying $3.50 a month for, and while this title is no where near the former category, I can understand if some people think it falls into the latter as it enters its second arc. Personally, I'll stick around to see if Ryan Browne injects the book with new life, but perhaps not much longer than that.

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7.8
Blackacre #1

Dec 6, 2012

Boudreau and Cavalcanti have provided a very solid start with this first issue of “BlackAcre,” but, to repeat myself, you only get started once. This issue is definitely good as a #1, but does not give much of an indication of what can be expected to follow, in terms of quality. Don't let my cynicism fool you, though; this is a strong start that warrants sticking it out until the second issue before passing final judgment, especially when everything else that can be said about it is positive.

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6.4
Bloodstrike #26

Mar 29, 2012

“Bloodstrike” had the unfortunate situation of following up the critically acclaimed “Prophet” and “Glory,” but just because it is not quite as good as those two does not mean it is not worth checking out. This first (well, twenty-sixth) issue may not have been great, but there seem to be some elements that could explode into an incredibly entertaining read. You might not want to pick it up at the moment, but keep your ears open when the next few issues roll around.

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8.0
Colder #1

Nov 8, 2012

Don't get me wrong, though — “Colder” is off to a very solid start, presenting a comic that stands out as something truly unique. Paul Tobin has seemingly come up with a story unlike anything he, or many other people, has written yet, and while this first issue has that typical first issue problem of a lack of direction for said interesting story… well, it's a typical first issue problem. Even if the next issue is still a bit shaky, though, at least we'll have more of the excellence that is Jaun Ferreyra.

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8.5
Conan the Barbarian #1

Feb 9, 2012

The Brian Wood and Becky Cloonan combo has rarely failed before, and the addition of Dave Stewart only makes their work stronger. Their take on Conan is exciting even to those who have little to no exposure to the barbarian, and this issue stands as an excellent example of how to pull off an issue #1 for a previously existing property. What does a neophyte know about Conan? That he is a barbarian. What does he need to know? That he is a barbarian. And how do you get that neophyte to stay? With excellent writing and art.

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8.0
Conan the Barbarian #11

Dec 13, 2012

Brian Wood has been exploring multiple facets of Conan's personality ever since this book started, and this issue in particular showcases his ability to mine the human side of the protagonist while keeping him… well, barbaric. Declan Shalvey is a perfect companion in this take, and it will be a shame to see him go. This ongoing is the Conan comic for those who never considered themselves Conan fans — and has the potential to turn them, by Crom.

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8.5
Creator Owned Heroes #2

Jul 5, 2012

The second issue of “Creator-Owned Heroes” keeps all the great things about the first issue, while trying its best to remedy the ills of the first issue. If you come looking for exactly what the title promises, you'll find exactly what you seek — and perhaps a little bit more, besides. A hearty thanks to all the creators involved in making this dream reality.

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8.5
Daredevil (2011) #9

Feb 17, 2012

The new volume of Daredevil has garnered plenty of critical acclaim since its debut, and this is just one more positive review to add to the pile. It's an entertaining book where the writer and artists are in almost perfect harmony, and stands as the prime example of how to do an ongoing superhero series. If you haven't been reading it, you better hunt down those back issues before it's too late.

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8.0
Daredevil (2011) #15

Jul 20, 2012

Writing-wise, “Daredevil” #15 may not be quite as good as preceding issues, but it is still an entertaining read that sets up what is to come while still providing its own, albeit brief, story. Visually, though, this is a fantastic comic, and a beautiful work of art. After a slightly hesitant start, Samnee comes up right next to the giants that are Rivera and Martin, proving that he deserves to be a part of this Eisner-winning cast of talent.

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7.5
Daredevil (2011) #21

Dec 21, 2012

“Daredevil” hasn't been quite as good this year as it was in its previous one, and this issue is kind of indicative of its whole year. “Hawkeye” has taken its place as the book that anti-big two readers make sure they aren't caught reading — now it's just another pretty good superhero book. The issue's end, though, hints that things could be getting back on track, which can hopefully restore the series to its former glory. On the plus side, though, at least Chris Samnee has been proven to be more than an adequate follow-up to this book's stellar launching artists!

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1.0
Deadpool (2008) #49

Jan 26, 2012

And god f#*$ing damn it, “Chocolate Rain” was almost five years ago.

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7.8
Debris #2

Aug 30, 2012

“Debris” may not be the best comic that Rossmo and Weibe have worked on, but it is well worth checking out — especially if you are a fan of either of the two creators. However, fans of Rossmo may be more pleased than fans of Weibe, as the writer has yet to really “bring it.” It's entirely possible that Weibe is going to turn things around in the next two issues, turning the over-saturated genre on its head, but for now, it doesn't stand out from a story prespective, despite the solid characterization. At halfway through a four-issue miniseries, that is not a good place to be in. Rossmo, though, reminds readers and reviewers alike that this is a visual medium, and does enough truly great work to make sure we will stick around for Weibe to pull the Ace from his sleeve.

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3.2
Dial H #2

Jun 8, 2012

A Vertigo-esque take on a Silver Age comic, even if not very good, should at least leave the reader thinking "Well, that was" different." "Dial H" does not even do that; it is a dull, confusing read that is noticeably average " which, of course, means it is not average at all.

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8.0
Doctor Who Vol. 3 #1

Oct 4, 2012

More than a few people who couldn't care less about what is in between the covers of this comic will pick it up. That's the power of a popular franchise. Those of us who are discerning when it comes to licensed properties, even (and perhaps especially) those we love, have nothing to fear from this new Doctor Who series — well, at least not from this first issue. With the comic franchise in Andy Diggle's capable hands for the time being, fans of the man in the big blue box can count themselves lucky… especially if, like me, you have not been too pleased with Moffat's recent handling of the show. But that's neither here nor there.

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8.0
Eerie Comics #1

Jul 12, 2012

With thirty pages of story at $2.99, plus the fact that it is an anthology, this meaning higher odds that you will find at least something you like in it, “Eerie” #1 is one of the safest purchases you can make this week. For those who have never really tried the more old-fashioned, pre-CCA style horror comics, this is as good a time as any to give them a whirl. For longtime fans of this book and its older sister, “Creepy,” though, “Eerie” #1 is a no-brainer.

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6.0
Fairy Quest: Outlaws #1

Feb 7, 2013

While the concept behind "Fairy Quest" is much more interesting than its bland name might suggest, it doesn't quite hit all the bases. Despite its experimentation, Jenkins unintentionally dulls the book's edge, and even though Ramos's art is in top shape stylistically, he has let his usually honed sense of dynamic motion fall on the wayside. Still, while many all-ages books are fine with treading water, Jenkins and Ramos are trying to push the envelope, and even if the landing hasn't quite stuck, it is an admirable effort.

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8.8
Fantastic Four #603

Feb 23, 2012

Since “Three,” the run has had its ups and downs, but if the final issue of “Forever” continues the trajectory set between this issue and the one before it, we're in for one hell of a finale.

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7.0
Fantastic Four (2012) #1

Nov 15, 2012

This is a typical first issue of a new superhero ongoing: a hook is introduced, as well as some of the main characters, but there isn't really enough to go off of. Could this be a great new series that follows in the crater-sized footsteps of Jonathan Hickman's run, or could it be a work by a major name that later gets shoved into storage and forgotten about after a year or two passes, a la Grant Morrison's “Three?” I personally want to believe the former, but that is entirely based on my own pre-formed opinions on Matt Fraction — nothing in the book strongly indicates the series going either way. Still, it isn't bad, and it does its job as a number one, so there's no real reason to at least check out this first issue — though it may take until number two to make up your mind, as is unfortunately the typical case in ongoing comics.

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8.5
Fatale #10

Nov 30, 2012

With the year reaching its end, you are going to see “Fatale” on a lot of “Best of 2012″ lists, and #10 is a great example why. This isn't just a cool blend of horror and noir — it's solid comic book-ing by a duo who are so in sync you could be forgiven for thinking this was the work of a writer/artist. If you aren't reading “Fatale,” unless you have maybe an aversion to violence, I don't know what to tell you.

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8.0
FF #18

Jun 1, 2012

Not only is this issue a delight, but it has perhaps the biggest ramifications for issues of “Fantastic Four” and “FF” to follow, post-Hickman. Both Hickman and Dragotta have put a lot of work into this issue, and it is sure to be enjoyed by those who have been reading “Fantastic Four” for many years. If the implications of this issue's finale, however, are glossed over in favor of a field trip to Wakanda, Hickman will be missing out on a great opportunity — and one that he created.

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9.1
FF (2012) #3

Jan 25, 2013

If comics like this and “Hawkeye” are any indication, 2013 is going to be Matt Fraction's year. “FF” is mad and wonderful at the same time, offering the kind of off-kilter ridiculousness that could only be seen in superhero comics, and Mike Allred is the only artist who could do it justice. Sorry, Young Avengers fans — “FF” is still the best of the Marvel NOW! books so far.

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8.0
Ghost #0

Sep 20, 2012

In the past year or two — in case you haven't noticed — more than a few characters and franchises have been rebooted. DeConnick and Noto's “Ghost,” though, is one of the few reboots done right. Whether you're a long-time fan of the character, someone who has wanted to check her out for a while, a follower of DeConnick and/or Noto, or, finally, just someone who loves good comics, give #0 a try and see if you like it. You just might.

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8.0
Ghosts #1

Nov 2, 2012

Perhaps the one adjective that could best describe this Vertigo anthology is “clever.” All but a couple of the stories in this book do something unique and thoughtful, and execute it well. $7.99 is a lot to cough up for one book, but at 70 pages, it's a nicer deal than most of DC's books that are “holding the line.” Fans of Vertigo both new and old are sure to enjoy this anthology, as are those who want something a little unexpected from their weekly comics haul.

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8.2
Godzilla #1

May 25, 2012

The new "Godzilla" may just be dumb fun, but it is some of the best dumb fun I have had in quite a while. Wednesday is a couple days past now, but I am sure some of you will be in your comic shop over the weekend; if, while you are in there, the eye-catching Art Adams cover does its job, you will probably find your eye settling on this. I guarantee that it is worth opening that cover to see what lies inside. Just don't blame me when you find yourself walking out of your store a few dollars short.

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7.8
Great Pacific #1

Nov 16, 2012

While it doesn't start off with the proverbial bang, this first issue of "Great Pacific" promises an interesting and smart new series. While it is not without its faults, it is a strong first issue that uses the amount of pages it contains to get the ball rolling smoothly. For this alone, Harris and Morazzo deserve praise " the fact that it is off to an intriguing start sweetens the deal.

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6.7
Green Lantern (2005) #62

Feb 18, 2011

As that last sentence indicated, I'm dropping this book as of this issue. It's still enjoyable for the most part, but I can't add two more books to my pull right now in order to follow the crossover. By all reports, War of the Green Lanterns is going to end at a good spot for readers to jump in, so I figure I'll start picking the book back up then. Until then, I'll just read a friend's copy of the issues and maybe, maybe get the trade if it ends up being better than I thought.

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9.0
Happy #3

Dec 20, 2012

While "Happy" has been just as weird as everyone thought it would be, this issue gives it some solid footing before launching it into its sure to be outrageous finale. Morrison and Robertson work together very well, and it is a shame that they will be parting after only one more issue. Both creators clearly have at least one foot firmly planted in the real world " which is what makes the rest of the comic that much crazier. For a re-entrance into creator-owned comics, Morrison could not have picked a better partner.

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6.5
Hardcore #1

May 17, 2012

Sometimes a book is so good writing or art-wise that the other can be a complete failure and the comic will still be worth purchasing. Usually, though, one factor is almost good enough, but needs the other to be at a certain, albeit lesser, level before a potential consumer can justify buying the comic. Unfortunately, while Kirkman inches past the cut with this issue, Stelfreeze does not, making this book just barely miss the buy mark. Still, it is just close enough to that mark that it is definitely a book worth flipping through in the shop and seeing if you do not mind the art so much.

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9.0
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #3

Oct 19, 2012

Comics this good don't happen on accident. This isn't something that Matt Fraction and David Aja just “lucked into.” These first three issues show off the Marvel Method at its very best, with incredibly visual storytelling and a clever script that avoid ever getting in the way of each other. It's a bit early to claim this the best series Marvel is currently publishing, but that's only because we have yet to see what artist Javier Pulido has to offer. If the next issue is just as great, or even near as good, as this issue and the two before it, it will take the crown from the current reigning champion — i.e., whatever you think is better, even though you are, as a pure matter of fact, wrong.

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5.5
Hellblazer #300

Feb 21, 2013

I am neither Milligan nor Camuncoli, nor am I one of the many readers who have been reading John's adventures since his appearance in “Swamp Thing.” Still, I can't help but shake the feeling that this is not the finale anyone, creators included, wanted. Everything about this issue feels half-hearted: John's explanation for what he has done, the methods he accomplishes it with, and the pencil strokes that depict him doing so. Perhaps the cards were stacked against Milligan: could any fan, new or old, be impressed with the end of “Hellblazer?” Milligan did what he could in the amount of issues he had, and for that he deserves some credit. Still, this week an era ends with a whimper, and not at all with a bang.

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7.5
Horizon #1

Jul 15, 2016

"Horizon" #1 is a promising start to what could be a very good sci-fi series. Both Thomas and Gedeon give us just a taste of what they can do, and while they don't exactly blow the reader away it's certainly reasonable to expect great things to come from them. Martin colors? That's just gravy. Now that the righteous fury that appears to be the comic's driving force has surfaced, it will be worth checking out how the series develops in the issues to come.

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6.5
Infinite Vacation #4

Mar 22, 2012

“The Infinite Vacation” has been notoriously delayed " there's even a joke about it on the recap page " but I feel like this issue could have used a little bit more time. I would have preferred to wait twice as long in between issues if it meant Ward could have put out the astounding work that we know he can accomplish. The layouts are there, so hopefully that rough yet precise style he had down to a science in the first two issues will return in the finale.

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6.0
Justice League #7

Mar 23, 2012

But if I have to read some variation on “We got this” one more f#$*ing time"

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3.0
Katana #1

Feb 15, 2013

To call this comic terrible would be an exaggeration. Unfortunately, it is very, very not good. Ann Nocenti's plotting provides a bumpy ride, her dialogue and narration are groan-worthy, and Sanchez's art displays a lot of potential that isn't fully realized. DC certainily needs more good books with female leads, but the key term is “good.” The first issue of “Katana” isn't good, or even average. It is, sadly, a pretty bad comic, and is already early fodder for the inevitable next wave of DC cancellations — unless, of course, it gets a sizable amount of residual sales boosts from “Justice League of America.”

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9.0
Lazarus #1

Jun 24, 2013

It's difficult to make dystopian science fiction stories fresh these days, but “Lazarus” pulls it off beautifully, showing more depth in its first issue than many stories in the genre do by the time they're done. In the post-Occupy resurgance of Haves versus Have Nots literature, Rucka avoids sticking to labels, addressing a complex topic with significantly more maturity than many of his peers. The issue is a visual treat, with Lark and Arcas working in perfect harmony, which is particularly impressive considering, as far as I can tell, that they have never worked together. At $2.99, and with some impressive back-matter to enjoy, there is no reason to leave a copy of “Lazarus” #1 on your shop's shelf this week.

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7.0
Magic: The Gathering #1

Feb 3, 2012

This book might not be one of the best on the stands, but I'd certainly recommend it to anyone who is into the fantasy genre, whether or not you've touched a Magic card in your life. It's fun, exciting, and flat-out looks great. My accolades to the entire team for proving my expectations quite wrong. Plus, it includes an exclusive variant card!

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6.5
Memorial #2

Jan 20, 2012

At the end of the day, I'm going to be much more interested in checking out the third issue of a series that started off weakly and then took a major step up to "pretty good" by the second issue than I would be with a series that started off quite nicely and stayed that way between issues. It's a bit of a backhanded compliment, yes, but Memorial definitely falls into the former category, and I can guarantee you that I won't be missing its third issue

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8.5
Mind MGMT #2

Jul 6, 2012

"Mind MGMT" not only tells a story, but tries to pack as much information into a single, 22-page issue that it can without seeming too crowded, and in this effort it succeeds with high marks. More comics should strive to give readers the experience that "Mind MGMT" does, rather than provide their hopelessly loyal fan base with yet another comic that is not even close to worth its cover price. "Mind MGMT" has it all: solid writing, beautiful art, and a cost that makes sense " to the point that even if the reader is not crazy about it, that $3.99 cost hardly seems like a waste

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7.9
Morning Glories #26

Apr 25, 2013

This issue of “Morning Glories” isn't so much dollar-priced for the sake of new readers as it is for the sake of getting trade readers to switch to monthly, and that's fine. For the most part, this issue is interesting due to fine-tuned construction, and though both Spencer and Eisma bring some of their common missteps to the book, it's nothing fans of the book aren't already used to. Still, between that and the issue's rather inaccessible nature, don't expect this to win over many newbies or naysayers.

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8.0
My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic #1

Nov 29, 2012

The comic adaptation of My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic may not be your thing — heck, it isn't my thing — but that's really the only strong complaint one can levy against it. Katie Cook and Andy Price have made a fun all-ages book that is generally well put-together: it looks nice, it reads smoothly, and it has more than a couple of clever moments in both the writing and the art. Even if you aren't a full-fledged brony, you're doing your medium of choice a disservice if you don't point any friends or relatives who are already fans of the show toward this new comic.

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6.0
Mystery in Space #1

May 10, 2012

In the end, the good comics outweigh the bad in this collection, but just barely. At $7.99 for 72 pages, or 11 cents a page, it is certainly a better deal than DC's normal offering of 15 cents a page, but still, $7.99 is a hefty price tag for a collection with only twelve pages of truly great comics, a handful of good ones and a lot more mediocre to awful pages. Allred and Diggle's contributions might be worth the price of admission to some, but probably not for all.

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7.4
National Comics: Madame X #1

Oct 26, 2012

"National Comics: Madame X" is not the comic of the year, but it's the perfect example of a comic worth picking up if you have a few bucks more than you thought to spend for a few reasons: first, and most importantly, it's a well put-together read; second, you can approach it without any knowledge of the character or the DCnU in general (thanks, reboot!); finally, as a one-and-done, this is one of the few $3.99 comics on the shelves that is worth the price of admission. It doesn't read through in half a minute, and it doesn't make you feel obligated to pick it up next month to find out if you like it or not.

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7.5
Negative Space #1

Jul 13, 2015

A gorgeous book that could end up being damn good" but that emphasis is on could.

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8.7
New Avengers (2013) #1

Jan 3, 2013

“New Avengers” may not explode to life, but it is still an exciting first look at what could be the most ambitious of the Marvel NOW! books. Master manipulator Jonathan Hickman is the ideal choice for Marvel's shadowy bunch of string-pullers, and it will be great to see the synergy he and artist Steve Epting developed in “Fantastic Four” brought to bear right from the get-go. $3.99 is a bit much to throw down on yet another first issue that reads like it is somewhat unfinished, but other than that setback, this issue is pure quality, and a great way for Marvel to start off the new year.

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4.5
Night Force #1

Mar 9, 2012

I don't want to go so far as to call this a bad comic, but it certainly isn't a good one. Perhaps it will be more entertaining to those who read the previous two volumes of “Night Force,” but I do not have any personal nostalgia riding on this series. I might end up coming back for the second issue, but if I do, it will be more from a respect for Marv Wolfman as one of the most influential writers of the 80′s than from any particularly positive quality of this issue.

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6.5
Nightwing (2011) #10

Jun 22, 2012

“Nightwing” may not be the best book on the stands, but in a world saturated by Batman titles, it is one of the few that is worth checking out — and it doesn't even directly involve Bruce! While the actually Nightwing story may not be off to the greatest start, it will be interesting to see how Dick's hopes play out, and inevitably crash and burn.

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1.5
Non-Humans #1

Oct 5, 2012

“Non-Humans” succeeds in using sequential images to tell a story, and… well, the praise ends there. Unsure of whether it wants to be mature or juvenile, “Non-Humans” is difficult to read in both the textual and visual sense. Perhaps the themes will become less tangled as the story goes on; perhaps after getting his grounding with this first issue, Glen Brunswick will be able to focus his effort and tell his story in a much more enjoyable manner; perhaps Portacio will add more substance and less style. I am not sticking around to find out, though.

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8.0
Pathfinder #1

Aug 16, 2012

“Pathfinder” may primarily attract fans of the titular roleplaying game, as well as other pen and paper lines, but it is sure to be a success among any other fans of fantasy who are willing to look past the fact that it's a licensed property they are unfamiliar with. Jim Zub and Andrew Huerte work very well together, and while it may not reinvent the wheel when it comes to the action/fantasy genre, it reinforces why we've been rolling on that same wheel for so long. What's important is that the story is enjoyable, and that the characters entertain (check and check). And, besides: for all of its hilarious qualities, Zub's “Skullkickers” seemed to be firmly rooted in fantasy conventions in the first few issues. Have you been reading the current arc? Who's to say that “Pathfinder” won't go through a similar spin? We're only one issue in, folks — bring on the rest.

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8.1
Peter Panzerfaust #1

Feb 8, 2012

I've said before that I'm a bit prejudiced toward first issues, but this new series is off to a solid start. The ending might have disappointed me a bit, but at the same time it just makes me wish I had the second issue on hand already. Tricky maneuver, guys. Wiebe has yet another solid creator-owned title under his belt, but I'm particularly interested in seeing where artist Tyler Jenkins ends up in the future. Until then, though, I'll be content with getting my fix from both of these guys on a monthly basis through Peter Panzerfaust.

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8.5
Planetoid #1

Jun 14, 2012

Every month, more and more evidence piles up that it is a good time to be a fan of science fiction comics. If this first issue is any indication, “Planetoid” is sure to be a favorite for those who enjoy the genre, especially when it is not polished up by the lens of space opera. Not only that, but Garing's work is sure to appeal to any comic fan just looking for some great sequential art — which, let's be honest, is what ever comic fan should be looking for. Whether you are looking for unique science fiction or well-crafted comic art, pick up “Planetoid.” You just might love it.

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8.3
Resident Alien #2

Jun 28, 2012

“Resident Alien” is one of those comics that could easily slip from the comic-reading public's attention due to its surprisingly non-gimmicky nature, which would be a travesty. Smart writing and smart artwork make this book one of the few new Dark Horse series that are leading the company's struggle to reclaim the title or creator-owned monarch from Image Comics. If you haven't yet, try to find the #0 and #1 in your local comic book store, and pick up this little book that could.

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8.5
Resident Alien: The Sam Hain Mystery #3

Aug 3, 2015

Another great issue from a book you might not be picking up; look for the trades if you haven't.

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9.5
Saga #1

Mar 13, 2012

This could be a mediocre comic, and the price tag alone would sell it. Thankfully, it isn't. This is one of the best first issues I have seen, and will hopefully set a precedent for other comics to follow. The hype surrounding Brian K. Vaughan's return to comics was massive, and almost impossible to live up to, but with the helping hand of the outstanding Fiona Staples, every expectation for this first issue was surpassed. Bring on issue #2.

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9.0
Saga #11

Mar 21, 2013

Issue number one of “Saga” was great. Issue number two of “Saga” was great. Issue number three… are you seeing a pattern here? “Saga” hits that pleasant middle ground that many other comics miss — it may not be everyone's favorite comic, but nearly everyone is reading it. That could be because it is one of the most well-crafted comics being published these days, and avoids falling into a niche subgenre (of which there are many in science fiction). In fact, I'm willing to be that's exactly why.

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8.8
Secret #2

Jun 7, 2012

“Secret” has not garnered the same praise as Hickman's other new creator-owned series, “The Manhattan Projects,” but both books easily deserve to be mentioned in the same breath. Hickman, Bodenheim, and Garland work with the synchronization that many comic teams dream of, and are not only working well with each other, but with the reader as well. Though it could be argued that not much happened in this issue, it hardly seems to matter; this comic is well put-together enough that it can be enjoyed just as much as a fine piece of sequential art as the component of something greater.

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8.7
Skullkickers #13

Apr 5, 2012

It may have been gone for a little while, but “Skullkickers” #13 reminds readers of what they've been missing. And if you haven't been reading it, don't worry! The first two pages recap the story so far quite adequately. “Skullkickers” is still exciting, hilarious, and engaging, and continues to blow every other humor book on the shelves out of the water.

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9.0
Skullkickers #18

Sep 27, 2012

At standard comic book pricing, this anthology would be worth every penny. At $3.99 for 35 story pages, it's an absolute steal. 'Son of Tavern Tales' is everything you love about "Skullkickers" except for Jim and Edwin themselves " though the former finds his way into a few stories in ways readers unfamiliar with the man's versatility may find surprising. Whether you've been interested in "Skullkickers" but have yet to dip into the series, or if you have been reading since issue one, the various creators' authenticity to the characters and the humor insure that #18 is just as good a place to start as #1.

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7.0
Skullkickers #100

Aug 10, 2015

A fun finale that doesn't quite have the same charm as its preceding issues, but that still manages to serve as a solid end to an excellent series.

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8.8
Snapshot #3

Apr 5, 2013

As it races to its conclusion, “Snapshot” is a prime example of one of the finest duos in comics doing what they do best. From the first issue, this mini has been a well-executed ride that blends noir and action without much of a hitch — a volatile combination that sometimes leads to things such as Frank Miller's The Spirit. This issue delivers both on a plot development level and a guns firing, cars zooming level, showing that Diggle understands how to balance an issue, and Jock's art looks as great as always (with a few minor quibbles). There's no question about this one.

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4.2
Son of Merlin #1

Feb 8, 2013

I said before that If I could pick a word to sum up the premise of “Son of Merlin,” it would probably be “plain.” Well, if I could use a phrase instead, I would call it “by the books.” It's not that it is bad — for its faults, the first issue still manages to be pretty fun, and while Zid's artwork may not read well (at all), it still looks nice — it just isn't interesting. If the premise seems like it may be your kind of thing, there's no harm in picking it up for its single dollar price tag, but I wouldn't be surprised if you completely forget to pick up the second issue.

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7.9
Spider-Men #4

Aug 9, 2012

Skeptics will say that “Spider-Men” is just a cash grab, citing that infamous quote about the possibility of a 616/Ultimate crossover. Even if it is, though, Bendis writing Spider-Man is nearly always a treat, and the presence of Sara Pichelli on art almost makes this an instant buy. However, from a practical point of view, $3.99 is an awful lot to pay for a comic with twenty pages of story, digital download included or not. If you are a fan of Bendis's “Ultimate Spider-Man,” or of the character in general, this heartwarming issue is certainly worth a buy; however, if you do not care strongly about the character, there is probably a better choice for you on the shelves this week — and one with a better price-to-page ratio, too.

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8.8
Star Wars #1

Jan 9, 2013

You know the Star Wars canon is in a weird place when a back to basics approach is considered ambitious, but… well, here we are. Brian Wood and Carlos D'Anda have more than earned the right to have a #1 out there simply titled “Star Wars,” with equal amounts of nuanced writing, well-composed art, and respect toward the source material. Whatever the fate of this book, considering the recent re-licensing, you can be sure I will stick with it until the end.

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7.5
Star Wars: Darth Vader And The Ghost Prison #1

May 24, 2012

Agustin Alessio's art is very impressive, considering his role as the sole artist, and it will most likely be worth keeping tabs on him for the next few years. That being said, "Darth Vader and the Ghost Prison" does not offer too much that non-Star Wars fans will be terribly interested in, but that might just be the case with this first issue; it looks like this miniseries could be one of those few Star Wars properties that actually brings something new and intriguing to the massive Extended Universe.

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7.5
Starve #1

Jun 2, 2015

The first issue of "Starve" shows a lot of potential. However, the majority of the issue is just that: potential. While fans of Wood, eelj, and Stewart will likely trust the team enough to pick up the second issue, this first issue might not have enough meat to it to sell the next one to the average reader trying something new, who doesn't know whether or not these three can walk the walk. Still, it's a great looking book with a neat premise, well worth trying out " and, for what it's worth, I think these guys are well-equipped to give us a great show.

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8.6
Stumptown Vol. 2 #1

Sep 13, 2012

The first volume of “Stumptown” was great, so is it any surprise that the second volume looks promising in its first issue? I don't think so. Rucka, Southworth, and Renzi have made for us another great comic, because that's what they do. That you don't even need to have read the first volume beforehand is icing on the cake. There's no justifiable reason to purposefully miss out on this comic, so stop reading this review and go get yourself “Stumptown” if you haven't already.

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6.4
Supergirl (2005) #61

Feb 18, 2011

Overall, while this is a nice enough comic with some solid art, it's hardly above the curve. I'll probably keep reading until the end of this arc, but unless it takes a big step up in quality by then, I don't see myself reading much further. It's a shame, considering how much of a supporter of this book I was when Gates was onboard.

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9.0
Supreme #63

Apr 6, 2012

There's little that can be said about Alan Moore that hasn't been said before. Everyone and their mother have read “Watchmen” and “V for Vendetta,” but if you have yet to delve deeper into the oeuvre of the most famous name in comics, his final issue of “Supreme” is as good enough a place to start as any. Me? I am going to try my best to find the out-of-print trade for “The Story of the Year” somewhere.

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3.0
Supreme #64

May 3, 2012

The promise of an unpublished Alan Moore story was enough to get the hype ball rolling on the relaunch of “Supreme,” but Eric Larsen has managed to kill every bit of momentum within the span of a single issue. It is not even a matter of the comic being noticeably bad; rather, it is so noticeably not good. Perhaps the idea of “What if Superman was a dick” is appealing enough to you to warrant buying this comic, but I guarantee that concept has been done to death, and by better writers than Larsen.

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9.0
Swamp Thing (2011) #7

Mar 8, 2012

Despite the exposition, this has always been one of the better titles of the reboot. This issue, though, can safely be applauded as the best DCnU issue of the month, even if it's the first week of March " and might even be labeled the best DCnU issue yet. Snyder and Paquette form a well oiled, if slightly swampy, machine, and I doubt that future issues are going to slow down the stride of this titanic run in the slightest. If you've been missing the run so far, be sure to pick up the first trade in August.

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9.0
Sweet Tooth #40

Jan 10, 2013

The brief delay between #39 and #40 may make this issue seem to be a bit abrupt at first, but as a bookend, it brings the story of Jeppard and Gus to a very satisfying conclusion. “Sweet Tooth” has been quite a ride from issue #1, a roller coaster of emotion and imagination, and while it is strange to finally see it ending, Lemire played off his cast with a strong sense of closure and dignity. Goodbye, Sweet Tooth. Goodbye, Big Man. That sure was a story.

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8.7
The Answer! #1

Jan 24, 2013

Lately, Dark Horse has been working hard to reclaim the title of #1 third-party publisher from the usurping Image Comics, and “The Answer” only adds more fuel to the fire. Denis Hopeless and Mike Norton have crafted a superhero tale that we can buy simply because it's great, rather than because we feel obligated to keeping up with continuity, and I can't thank them enough for it. “The Answer” #1 is devilishly clever, and sure to leave you wanting for more.

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7.8
The Avenging Spider-Man #7

May 11, 2012

Price is, unfortunately, a factor that must be considered in a review, especially when you're rating on a scale of Pass/Browse/Buy. Normally, I would be opposed to shelling out $3.99 for a single-story one-shot, and even more opposed to paying that same price for a comic with only twenty story pages, but beyond the actual quality of the book, “Avenging Spider-Man” #7 has one other saving grace: the free digital copy download code. Twenty cents a page is still quite a steep price, but if you are looking for straight-up fun superheroics without the baggage of continuity, this book is worth every penny.

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8.5
The Black Beetle #1

Jan 17, 2013

Fans of Francesco Francavilla through his work on "Detective Comics" and "Zorro" " again, as a remind, you need to read his "Zorro" " have anxiously been awaiting for him to step back out of the world of company-owned characters, and "The Black Beetle" does not disappoint. A visual delight, and a genuinely entertaining read, the first chapter of "No Way Out" is just the thing for those with a love for all things pulp, or who just enjoy this talented artist's work. And, hey, if you still aren't familiar with him, there's no better place to start than here!

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9.5
The Creep #2

Oct 11, 2012

John Arcudi is great at both dialogue and plotting. With those talents, you could make the most plain story interesting. “The Creep” is anything but plain, though. Arcudi has harnessed the ambiguities and discomfort of the real world to make a mystery that plays with our own preconceived notions toward people to leave us on shaky ground, and Jonathan Case turns Arcudi's story into the most well-illustrated miniseries of this year. Due to the series brevity — four issues, counting the #0 — I understand if you have missed it and think you will just pick it up in trade. If that's your thought, though, you better carry through with that thought, or we are going to have serious words.

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3.3
The Hypernaturals #1

Jun 29, 2012

Those who are just looking for DnA on a “cosmic” book will get what they came for in “The Hypernaturals.” Those who are looking for a decent read above all else, though, should look elsewhere. “The Hypernaturals” is not hyper-anything, but half-hearted on Abnett and Lanning's part, and while Andres Guinaldo does his job well enough for any other circumstance, it isn't enough to counteract the writing end of the deal.

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9.2
The Massive #1

Jun 11, 2012

The first issue for "The Massive" joins "Saga" in setting the bar for debut issues to come. Wood, Donaldson, Stewart, and "DMZ" letterer Jared k. Fletcher have come together to form one of the most promising creative teams currently working together and to create an equally promising comic, with informative and engaging back-matter to boot. Comics like this and "Mind MGMT" make it clear the Dark Horse is set on winning back its creator-owned crown from Image, but so long as the competition means more comics as good as "The Massive" are on the way, we readers are the real winners.

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8.5
The Massive #10

Mar 28, 2013

This latest arc of “The Massive” has been billed as an event, and while that term carries a lot of connotations, you can be sure it's off to a better start than any other self-described event comics I've read in the past few years. Brian Wood has been cranking out consistent levels of quality for the past year and longer, and Gary Erskine is an addition to the creative cast whom I'd welcome back in a heartbeat. Between the complex questions the issue asks and the general high quality of the workmanship, plus its ability to stand on its own as well as a link in the chain, you've got a fine comic issue — just like the other nine preceding it.

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4.5
The Shadow #1

Apr 20, 2012

There just is not much to say about this first issue. It isn't even that terrible; it is just a boring comic, and one that will probably be easily forgotten after reading the stack of whatever else was purchased this week. It may, however, be worth a second chance " as mentioned before, the one instance where things actually happened was rather well done, and if the action kicks up a notch or three in the issues to come, it will certainly be worth checking out. Until then, though, this debut should probably be left alone, unless you want that excellent Jae Lee cover.

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7.5
The Shadow: Year One #1

Feb 22, 2013

Matt Wagner is the current king of pulp — sorry Francesco — and this issue will probably be just what current fans of the monarch are expecting. The key word there, though, is “current fans” — newbies who want to learn about this iconic character of our medium's history, despite being created outside of the medium, may not be completely grabbed by the first issue. Yes, as comic fans we should know this is customary of #1s, and yes, by the next issue the book will probably hit its stride, but try convincing a new reader that they should spend another $3.99 before deciding whether or not to stick with the book.

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9.4
The Strange Talent of Luther Strode #5

Feb 2, 2012

If you're a regular reader of our site, you probably heard the hype about this series before it came out and, hopefully, had the sense to pre-order the first issue. If you didn't, though, and your local shop is out of issues one through four, I hope you'll at least go ahead and order the trade. Luther Strode pushes the bar in many ways, and looks more like the work of two industry veterans than the rookie professionals Jordan and Moore are. Now you can say “I knew them before they were popular!”

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9.8
The Underwater Welder #1

Jul 26, 2012

We have only just barely passed the halfway mark of the year, but “The Underwater Welder” is already a safe bet for the best graphic novel of the year. Nearly everything that Jeff Lemire's work has been praised for in the past is at full display in this new graphic novel, which stands toe-to-toe with the acclaimed creator's critically lauded “Essex County.” Anyone who has ever felt even the slightest desire to disappear into their own, secluded space will be unable to avoid being sucked into this incredible read, and will leave its pages feeling as if they, too, embarked on a strange journey into their own psyche. Three cheers to Jeff Lemire for creating such a beautiful and timeless piece of sequential art.

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9.8
The Unwritten #35

Mar 16, 2012

'Leviathan' and 'On to Genesis' had their moments, but it was not until this issue that "The Unwritten" reached the heights is once found in the pages of 'Dead Man's Knock.' Watch out, everyone else " "The Unwritten" is on its way back to being the best book on the shelves.

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8.8
The Unwritten Vol. 2: Apocalypse #5

May 23, 2014

The Mr. Bun issues have all been well written, so it is probably no surprise that this is the best issue since "The Unwritten Fables" started. The post-Leviathan world is a bleak, bleak place, enough to make even a hard man-rabbit like Pauly Bruckner yearn for a happier, simpler place. But in a time where comics often use bleakness as an easy way to seem deep, Carey and Gross remind us that there is only one reason to make any creative choice: because it makes for a good story. Add in Pauly giving Wilson the attitude we wish Tom would give him and one hell of a cliffhanger, and Carey and Gross have reminded us why everyone was raving about this series a year or two back.

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10
The Unwritten Vol. 2: Apocalypse #12

Feb 3, 2015

It's hard to give an issue like this an "objective" score " particularly when it is the finale to your favorite series of the past few years. However, I can say the following: as a climax and conclusion, everything comes together skillfully; every main character and a few supporting characters are given satisfying ends, particularly Wilson; from cover to interiors, the book is gorgeous; finally (and this is where the fanboyism kicks in), I can't think of anything I did not like about it or anything I think could improve. With that in mind"

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9.0
Theremin #1

Apr 11, 2013

"Theremin" #1 is a bold debut that does what a first issue should do: hooks readers with an interesting premise, offers page after page of well executed comic book-ing, and ends on a note that will have readers coming back for more. Pires and Rose demonstrate an awareness of how the medium works that many long-established professionals " not naming any names " have yet to grasp. For only a dollar, you can't afford to miss it.

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8.5
Thief of Thieves #2

Mar 15, 2012

Robert Kirkman's latest experiment is shaping up to be another success, and it's particularly because of the great team he has onboard. Nick Spencer is the ideal pick for getting the ball rolling on a series like this, and Shawn Martinbrough is creating a visual style that is sure to define the series to come. This was one of those books that gathered attention due to the star power involved, but from here on the book is going to have to rely on its actual quality. I don't think that's going to be a problem.

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7.3
Thief of Thieves #8

Sep 6, 2012

“Thief of Thieves” second arc may not have started out with a bang, but that does not mean that this book lost all of its promise with the departure of Nick Spencer. James Asmus has the potential to write a really great story with this next arc, so long as he can focus his efforts a bit more. Even if he does not, the core story, characters and tone, plus the excellent art of Shawn Martinbrough are worth sticking around for until the next writer comes around. I'm optimistic for the rest of Asmus's stay, though, despite my criticisms, and hope to see how he does once his arc gains some traction.

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8.2
Thief of Thieves #13

Apr 18, 2013

This issue was the shot in the arm that Asmus's arc needed — unfortunately, it's the last issue of said arc, but that doesn't mean the issue is any worse for it. The first scene is exciting and intense, and probably along the lines of what readers have been dying for since the first issue. While the wrap-up aspects of the issue quickly pull the excitement bar down a bit, the issue does leave new writer Andy Diggle in an interesting place. And, as he has been since it began, Martinbrough is the book's secret weapon, delivering page after page of excellence. Martin-bro, anyone?

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5.5
Todd, The Ugliest Kid on Earth #1

Jan 18, 2013

The thing with judging humor objectively is that… well, it isn't objective. Sure, every form of art is beheld subjectively, but there's something about the nature of humor that makes it very much a person-by-person thing. Have you ever tried explaining why Louis C.K. is funny to your mom? Try it sometime. As such, even though I found “Todd, The Ugliest Kid on Earth” to be about as funny as me in middle school (hint: not very), I cannot lambast it too much. Even though it's a comedy, it has a well thought-out plot, which many comedies let fall on the wayside, and excellent art. If the solicit text intrigues you, don't let my numeric rating dissuade you — if the comedy clicks for you, everything else most certainly will. As for me, though, I can't say I'll be revisiting Kristensen and Perker's bag-headed child any time soon.

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8.0
Ultimate Comics: Ultimates #9

Apr 26, 2012

“Ultimate Comics: Ultimates” manages to both be a change of pace and stay on the same foundation that it was built on. This is one of Marvel's best comics that are currently ongoing, and it will be interesting to see if it manages to say that way once Sam Humphries steps up to bat. My only request? Let's see Reed fail, please?

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8.8
Uncanny Skullkickers #1

Feb 28, 2013

Every good thing that has been said about "Skullkickers" can be said about "Uncanny Skullkickers": Jim Zub's jokes are laugh-out-loud funny, the story is exciting, and the artistic team of Edwin Huang and Misty Coates is dynamite. Any new reader who accidentally picks this up with the other three Uncanny books out this week may be a bit surprised, but will close the comic with plenty of impetus to read the trades. Marvel and DC, take note: if you must relaunch a book mid-run, this is how you do it.

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7.3
Wolverine and the X-Men #6

Feb 24, 2012

I wonder how things would be if Brian Wood was writing the main ongoing seriously and Jason Aaron was writing a fun and silly companion miniseries. Hmm"

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7.7
Wonder Woman (2011) #9

May 18, 2012

While “Wonder Woman” may be a bit different from what readers were expecting, it is still one of the most interesting and engaging of the New 52. While previous issues have been a bit more action-packed, this one proves that Azzarello can also slow things down and become a bit more introspective before events explode into action yet again, and Akins does a solid enough job making sure nothing is lost from script to print. Maybe it isn't your Wonder Woman, but it is still one good read.

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7.0
Worlds' Finest #1

May 4, 2012

"World's Finest" is not exactly the best book on the stands, but if you are just looking for a fun superhero title starring two interesting female leads, you would be remiss to pick up this first issue " especially if you are already buying "Earth 2." Not everyone will love it, but it is certainly worth gambling $2.99 to find out if you are one of the many who will enjoy it.

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6.0
X #1

May 9, 2013

If violent anti-heroes are your thing, this new volume of “X” will probably be to your liking. Like many of Duane Swierczynski's comics, though, its appeal fails to transcend genre. Swierczynski is a solid writer, capable of building technically sound stories, but very often these comics end up being good, but not good enough to recommend. Eric Nguyen gives the comic a much needed pick-me-up, though it isn't without faults, but in the end you are left with a read that is entertaining while read, but quickly forgotten. And, if my review-inappropriate editorializing didn't make it clear, the issue almost entirely fails as a #1.

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5.7
X-Factor #238

Jun 21, 2012

Yet again, we have an issue of “X-Factor” that is hardly the best, but not even close to the worst, either. This seems to be becoming a trend in the book — sadly, it has been a while since Peter David has served up a zinger of an issue. Still, what was said before applies to this issue, too: if you don't like this issue, it still won't be enough to turn you off to the series. Whether or not that is abad thing or a good thing remains to be seen.

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