Matthew Peterson's Comic Reviews

Reviewer For: Major Spoilers Reviews: 1795
6.7Avg. Review Rating

8.3
A-Force #1

May 21, 2015

Great cast, great art, fascinating story. It's the real deal…

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8.0
A-Force #4

Sep 12, 2015

The traitor I expected, but with unexpected consequences (and some lovely art.)

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8.3
A-Force (2016) #1

Jan 9, 2016

An interesting start for a title that simply CANNOT pick up where the last volume left off… Plus, the art is stellar.

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4.0
Action Comics #888

Apr 19, 2010

Action Comics #888 is well-drawn but hard to understand, earning 2 out of 5 stars overall. Both Greg Rucka and James Robinson are writers that I admire, and I hope that Ill be able to be more charitable with their next works

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7.0
Action Comics #894

Oct 31, 2010

Its been a while since I picked up Action Comics, but I have to say, this issue wasnt a disappointment at all, even if it didnt go where I kind of wanted it to.

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8.0
Action Comics #900

Apr 28, 2011

I am frankly overwhelmed by the amount of stuff going on in this issue, which is both a good thing and a bad thing. It's good in that the amount of story content for the dollar is very strong, but not so much with the good that it's hard to remember the first story once you've gotten to the end. I've read the issue three times through and I'm still finding things that I missed in prior readings. I am thankful that we have very little "Superman as Jesus" going on, a metaphor that has officially worn out it's welcome in my corner of Stately Spoilers Manor, and a couple of points in the issue (Superman arriving at a demonstration and standing silently in solidarity, the hero of a lost race commisserating with the Man of Steel about their status as outsider and protector) are quite unique and excellent. It's a shame that DC chose not one, not two but THREE spectacularly unappealing covers, with David Finch's striking me as particularly misbegotten to look at. Overall, though, you take the

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7.0
Action Comics (2011) #28

Feb 6, 2014

Pak and Kuder have delivered on the book's title, with a lot of action (a fight scene with Superman and Ghost Soldier against an army of stone monsters is pretty exciting) but a thoughtful story in place as well. It's nice to see someone putting the lie to the expectation that having super-powers makes Superman utterly without weakness and boring, and I'm hoping to see much more from this team, even if higher profile Superman books like Unchained and the upcoming Geoff Johns run on 'Superman' may overshadow it.

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8.3
Action Comics (2011) #50

Mar 14, 2016

Strong pacing, great character work and a big finish make this an entertaining read, even if you haven't been following Superman's adventures...

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6.6
Action Comics (2016) #976

Mar 22, 2017

As with any story whose primary function is revising the story as written thus far (See: Avengers Forever, Crisis, Zero Hour, et al) the balance of in-universe to out-of-universe is key, and Jurgens does an okay job of making it work. He is not up to the task of hiding all the metaphorical men behind the curtains, though, and after reading, it seems clear that the idea of fixing continuity was the most important part. Still, Action Comics #976 manages that point with such a clear affection for Superman and his cast that I can overlook any of that, especially since Superman looks like himself again and his happy family is reunited.

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7.4
Action Comics (2016) #981

Jun 18, 2017

Though bits of the plot are familiar, their assembly here works to great effect, leaving Action Comics #981 an effective and engaging read with excellent art on every page.

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5.6
Action Comics (2016) #984

Jul 31, 2017

In a nutshell, the sheer number of characters, events and bits of business in these pages make it feel like it would be better served as two issues, or perhaps as the same story with fewer characters in play (even though that's not how Jurgens does things.) Action Comics #984 is still an above-average read, though, with some lovely art throughout, progressing the plotlines in interesting ways and once again reminding everyone that Mister Oz is out there someplace.

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8.0
Adventure Comics Vol. 2 #1

Aug 14, 2009

We also get some interesting bits of Legionnaire business, in the coming attractions section that Geoff Johns seems to put in his #1's these days, including hints about Dream Girl, Mon-El, Element Lad, complications for Blok and a fist wearing both a Legion flight ring and a Green Lantern ring. Clay Henry nails the Legion portion of the issue, even giving life to some of those weird Gary Frank costume designs from Action Comics, while Francis Manapul tries out a softer, more "pencilly" style in the Kon portion of the title, creating a nostalgic feel for the kid's homecoming. This issue was pretty much a laying of groundwork on both fronts, with enough information to bring those unfamiliar into the stories, while giving those of us who have been following the characters in "Legion of 3 Worlds" something new and shiny to obsess over. In three words or less? It's good. Good to see Kon back, good to have a Legion title again, good to have the ORIGINAL Legion back. Questions of

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8.0
Adventure Comics Vol. 2 #2

Sep 17, 2009

The Smallville half of this issue is very nicely handled, showing Kon's search for identity very neatly, and giving us a deeper glimpse into the relationship between Connor and Cassie. I especially like the fact that she sees right through his recent actions, telling him that he's obviously trying to grow up just like Superman. Ma Kent's sadness about the loss of her beloved husband as she watches the kids kiss is beautiful as well, making the first half of the issue pretty bittersweet. As always, Geoff Johns has a wonderful ear for dialogue, and Francis Manapul makes Wonder Girl so beautiful and expressive that the reader half falls for her as well. The Legion story is a bit more problematic, though, as it's almost entirely about Lightning Lad. That's not inherently a bad thing, but with this incarnation of the Legion just relaunching, it seems questionable to spend a whole story on ONE member of a team of 24, ESPECIALLY when a good portion of that team is missing. Even so, the story

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9.0
Adventure Comics Vol. 2 #3

Oct 18, 2009

Geoff Johns continues to deliver on both fronts with this book, as Kon's story deepens with each issue and this issue's Legion vignette gives us something entirely new and wonderful. I'm enjoying Francis Manapul's art on the S-Boy portion of the tale, offering a lighter touch and a more "pencilled" look than his work on LSH recently. The coloring is nicely handled, using pastels and sepia tones that give the story a quiet, retro feel. The moment where Red Robin takes off his mask and the two old friends finally got to see one another face to face is great. ("You really need a haircut," says Connor. "You need a real costume," retorts Tim.) As wonderful as last issue was for Connor and Cassie, this issue surpasses it, as best friends finally come clean with one another and their friendship is rekindled. As for the Legion, the new friendship of the Sun Boy/Polar Boy team shines, as we get one of our first looks at Tharr and get to reconcile the nerdy, reject Polar Boy with the Levitz-era

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6.0
Adventure Comics Vol. 2 #5

Dec 17, 2009

This was an oddly uneven issue, as themore engaging tale of the two has a much less entertaining or sympathetic protagonist. Tom Welling Prime is a whiny, pathetic little weasel, but his rage, his loss, and his pain really come through. Jerry Ordway's art is it's usual excellent self, to the point where I was able to identify Dan Didio immediately during his cameo appearance... The Kon-El second feature has a much more relatable character, but is short enough that it doesn't quite gel for me, giving just the hint of the coming Luthor/S-boy conflict, and returning (presumably) Lex's lost half-sibling Lena Thorul to the continuity, a very Geoff Johns touch. Francis Manapul's new art style is refreshing and fun, looking like it's shot direcly from the pencils. All in all, this issue balances itself out, with a slightly strong moment for, strangely enough, the Kryptonian from Earth-Prime. Adventure Comics #5/#508 is a well-handled issue on all fronts, earning a respectable 3 out of 5 stars

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6.0
Adventure Comics Vol. 2 #6

Jan 15, 2010

The solicitations say that this is Geoff and Francis' big goodbye to Kon-El, making me wonder if Adventure Comics is even going to continue with the announcement of the new Legion of Super-Heroes series and the return of Kon to the mainstream DCU. Even knowing that this could be a big swan song, this issue does two things that bug me... The first is taking the really entertaining and fun checklist bit away long before it would have gotten old (for me, anyway.) This is doubly noticeable when I realize how much of this issue is drawn completely from old Silver Age Mort Weisinger edited comics: Lena Luthor. The Time Bubble. The Luthor/Brainiac team. The whole "Am I good or am I evil?" schtick was the real hook for this particular series, in my mind, and I'm left wondering where young Tom Welling goes from here. The second complaint comes in the fact that this is the second issue to not feature the LSH at all, in what is ostensibly their home title... Still, the strength of Manapul's art h

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5.0
Adventure Comics Vol. 2 #8

Mar 13, 2010

I love me some Legion, and its good to see old friends again, but that lone wont carry an entire issue. Balancing out the excellence of the co-feature (an unusual protagonist in a by-the-numbers action movie plot) and the mixed bag of the primary feature (the revelation of the Legion, but as an ongoing chapter of a story I havent been reading, but super-fine art) ends up putting this one right down the middle

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7.0
Adventures Of Superman #466

Jul 3, 2010

Flash takes the lead with a completely run-of-the-mill story pairing him with/against Weather Wizard, while Deadman gets a more unusual tale with some really impressive art by Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez.

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5.0
Adventures Of Superman #519

Oct 20, 2010

Adventure Comics #519 is undermined by clashing styles, and while not truly awful, is a sadly below-average reading experience overall, rating 2 out of 5 stars overall, with one 1/2 star awarded solely on the artwork of Asrar. A few years ago, they tried to launch a series that would tell flashback stories of the original Legion, and now I start to realize why they scuttled it: It leads to stories that are either silly and dismissable, or meaningful but hard to reconcile with what we already know

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6.0
Adventures Of Superman #520

Nov 3, 2010

All in all, its an imbalanced but not terrible issue overall, with excellent art throughout the book. Adventure Comics #520 is slightly better than okay, but better than it might have been, earning a composite score of 3 out of 5 stars overall. If we get Mon-El out of the zone, this is potentially really good stuff

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5.0
Adventures Of Superman #522

Jan 10, 2011

The bottom line for me is that this issue felt quite generic, from the good-but-not-terribly-unique art to the overblown computer effects to the patented "Take-out-Dawnstar-so-she-can't-track-someone" subplot that gets namechecked in our brief Tellus sequences. The issue features 2 Legionnaires (3 if you count Dawny floating in a bacta tank) and one villain, and stretches out a minor fist-fight/exposition sequence to 22 pages without a whole lot to merit the attention. I like Mon-El as the Legionnaire chosen to wear a Green Lantern ring, but wonder why any Legionnaire had to wear one in the first place, and Sun-Killer not only bothers me for duplicating the abilities of existing Legion of Super-Villains member Sun Emperor, but for reminding me of Sun-Chained-In-Ink from Kurt Busiek's Trinity series not so long ago. It's not a disappointing issue so much as it is a completely uneventful "meh" kind of thing, a day-in-the-life of some Science Police guys who get to watch Mon-El fight and

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9.0
Adventures Of Superman #523

Feb 11, 2011

The new kids are intriguing, the use of Glorith (who was the main villain of the Volume Four Five-Year-Gap series) is interesting and alarming, and every one of the supporting character appearances made me smile. Blok and Mysa's absence from the team is more justified in just a few panels here than when they left the main LSH book, and seeing Chuck and Lu discussing the new young heroes reminds me of how old we've all gotten together. Seems like only yesterday they were getting married on Mars, or fighting imaginary yetis on Wondil IX. Night Girl's mysterious disappearance from the main team post-Action Comics is finally explained as well, and her six on one battle sequence shows what a fun character she can be. Levitz & Jiminez hit all the right notes here, and Phil's art is just beautiful. His future Metropolis is reminiscent of things we've seen before (Coruscant in the Star Wars prequel trilogy for one) without being cribbed, and the range of body language and expression in his art

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7.0
Adventures Of Superman #524

Mar 19, 2011

Nothing makes me more irritated than attempts to try and "toughen up" the image of the Legion of Super-Heroes, whose core concept is 'happy teenage heroes from the future.' This issue continues the trend of misusing or sidetracking characters with potential (and once again shows how ugly the new costumes are in Cosmic Boy's short appearance) but has some fun with the new Academy kids. Duplicate Damsel's drill sergeant routine is fascinating to watch, especially as Bouncing Boy serves as her quiet, humorous foil. I'm liking this arc in it's micro-scale moments, with the dialogue shining in a brief appearance by Legion mainstay Doctor Gym'll, even while some of the larger scale bits play less well for my biases. All in all, though, Adventure Comics #524 does a good job advancing the new characters and their arc, earning 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. Now, if only we could overcome the seeming belief that nobody but the founders, Brainiac 5 and Earth-Man deserve airtime, we might get the 30

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6.0
Adventures Of Superman #525

Apr 16, 2011

The Legion of Super-Heroes isn't the Avengers or the JLA, a group that has to be limited in scope or membership. One of the underlying problems that I'm having with this arc is the fact that it seems quite clear that none of the Academy cadets (some of whom have been at this for DECADES) aren't going to make it into the team, and that the reasons given for not using interesting characters will be unsatisfying and nonsensical, much like the non-reasons for (Yes, I'm going to keep harping on this) Matter-Eater Lad's exit. Power Boy's density powers and Lamprey's electromagnetism are no more impressive than Cos' own powers or Sun Boy's or even Dawnstar's. This arc (and the concept of the Legion Academy) are designed to have characters try out for the LSH, and when most, if not all of them fail, it raises larger issues about the story being told. That said, this book is very nice to look at, thanks to Phil Jiminez and company, and if you're of a mind not to over-think things, it's an enjoy

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10
Afterlife With Archie #5

May 21, 2014

If you've been privy to any of my previous reviews of ‘AwA', then you probably know what I'm going to say: I want you to go and read this book. It's truly inspiring how well the creators have been able to adapt the existing characters and personalities of the Archie ouvre into a story of terror and suspense, and there may not be a more creatively synced writer/artist team working in monthly comics today. Afterlife With Archie #5 takes an unexpected turn, but still holds together and deepens the already intriguing elements at play, and looked phenomenal doing it, earning 5 out of 5 stars overall. I don't know where the series goes from here, but I'm frankly dying to find out. (*THAT* one was a pun.)

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10
Afterlife With Archie #8

May 10, 2015

Puts a whole new face non a decades-old franchise, and does it with style (and menace.)

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6.0
Age of Heroes #1

May 31, 2010

Unfortunately for the readers, it's a case where we need a bit more show and abit less tell to get things going.

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4.0
Age of Heroes #2

Jul 3, 2010

The Young Masters (the quasi-villain counterparts of the Young Avengers) get a moment in the sun (literally a moment, it's two pages long) andGauntlet of Avengers: The Initiative gets one page showing hisreturn to Iraq.

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3.0
Age of Ultron #2

Mar 13, 2013

Age Of Ultron #2 gave me issues with plotting, with dialogue, with pacing and with art, and feels not only similar to the recent giant uber-crossovers, but to one of the most iconic story arcs in comic book history, leaving a taste like flat orange soda in my metaphorical mouth. There are some interesting threads here, but 20 percent of the way through the crossover, I'm just not feeling it"

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6.0
Age of Ultron #4

Apr 7, 2013

We still don't know when this is, but now that the story has finally started moving (and know that we know that Ultron's end-game involves time-travel) I'm a bit more forgiving this time around. The narrative flow is unusual, but Bendis manages to avoid some of his regular pitfalls in dialogue and plotting, even if there are still problems with both. The heroes utter hopelessness is demonstrated rather than just yackety-yacked about, which helps as well. Still, I don't understand quite how the characters were able to coordinate, although with Emma Frost in Cap's group, it'd be easy to explain it with a few lines of dialogue. Age Of Ultron #4 makes a drastic improvement over previous issues by actually doing something, and demonstrating the live-or-die stakes that the heroes face.

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6.0
Age of Ultron #6

Apr 21, 2013

After the first four issues of this book amounted to little more than a decompressed prologue, I was surprised that last issue was as enjoyable as it was. It was still overly talky and full of plot-point-necessary stalling, but it set up something different than what we'd seen in previous world-spanning crossovers. Age Of Ultron #6 is likewise an improvement, with Pacheco and Peterson both delivering work superior to Bryan Hitch's first couple of issues, while Bendis manages to surprise more than once, delivering a decent reading experience, earning 3 out of 5 stars overall. More and more, I'm starting to wonder if this series isn't going reboot part of the Marvel chronology to better support the Marvel NOW! initiative, but either way, the book is improving...

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6.0
Age of Ultron #8

May 19, 2013

The pacing of this series has been utterly jacked since issue #1, with the first three issues containing a lot of meandering and mystery-building, leading to a pretty phenomenal couple of issues leading into this weird dystopian Avengers Of Future-Past world. There are some nice moments here, especially for Susan Storm, but overall the issue is filled with posturing and talky-talky the leads directly into a massive ultra-battle whose scope is hampered somewhat by a lack of consequences. Still, it's a good looking issue, with Brandon Peterson giving us some interesting alternate takes on characters we know and love, and even with weird pacing, there's some nice science-fiction stuff going on in the issue. Age Of Ultron #8 continues the inconsistency that has made this series such a difficult read, but delivers above-average work in a solid chapter.

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3.0
Age of Ultron #9

Jun 10, 2013

Along with a puzzling decision by Wolverine at the end, this issue left a very bad taste in my mouth, and reminds me that Marvel's current publishing strategy is one of volume. We're certain to see miniseries exploring and expanding the alternate futures seen in this issue and previous ones, which will give the depth and background to make the carnage seen at the beginning of this book meaningful. Unfortunately, there's none of that here, which makes even the shocking death of Iron Man seem like a meaningless fillip, while the conversation that sidetracks the second half of the issue feels like unproductive filler.

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4.0
Age of Ultron #10

Jun 19, 2013

In short, this "big finale" is nothing more than the setup for another new era, as so many of Marvel's event-comics have been before. There are some intriguing bits in here (like what may or may not happen to the Ultimate Universe, and the appearance of Richard Rider in the same panel as the Guardians of the Galaxy, making me wonder about his actual fate), but mostly it's a mish-mash of half a dozen big ideas that don't have a whole lot of connection to one another or to the reader. If you're interested in EVERYTHING that happens in the Marvel Universe, a big fan of Angela, or someone who likes big swathes of fighty-fighty, this is your book. For me, Age Of Ultron #10 is disappointing, albeit not unexpectedly so, and all its shocking reveals were pimped well ahead of time.

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9.0
Agents Of Atlas Vol. 2 #1

Feb 15, 2009

This issue was delightful in tone and dialogue, with the Agents of Atlas achieving a wonderful character balance throughout. Venus is flirty and interesting, Gorilla-Man the sarcastic veteran, Namora serves as the taciturn enforcer, and Marvel Boy and Human Robot counter-balance one another as strangely alien presences, each revolving around secret agent Jimmy Woo, now the head of a universal secret agency. The whole team is entertaining, and Jeff Parker turns in a script that emphasizes the team's unique place in this new world order, even making Norman Osborn seem intimidating... Carlo Pagulyanchimes in with a pretty spectacular art job, and the overall effect of this issue is one of the few bright spots in the dark and gritty sameness of Chocolate Reign, and the whole package is wrapped up in a gorgeous Arthur Adams cover. The backup tale is one of the few times that I've been entertained by Wolverine in recent months (unless you count the story where he diced Jubilee

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9.0
Agents Of Atlas Vol. 2 #2

Mar 16, 2009

This is a good book. That's really all there is to it. Two different art teams handle the two different eras, but both are distinctive, and both are very well done. Jeff Parker continues to nail the characterization, with Namora's flip-out sealing a deal with Osborn, while Gorilla-Man is sneaky and snide, Marvel Boy detached and ominous, Venus ever-changing, and The Human Robot completely inscrutable, as always (though it should be noted that the Robot goes out of it's way to stop Namora's rampage, implying something...) Overall, it's a total package, putting new(ish) characters in an old and deep setting, and doing a very good job of some seamless retconning. Agents of Atlas #2 is a gem, earning 4.5 out of5 stars. I'd love to see this book get some mainstream love, because it's the best Dark Reign title thus far.

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6.0
Agents Of Atlas Vol. 2 #3

Apr 10, 2009

Which is a surprise that might have worked better had he not been on the cover. Still, it's a good issue overall, though better in the present than the past. The moral ambiguity of passing themselves off as villains is fascinating, and Marvel Boy's telepathic peek in to the minds of Sentry and Green Goblin during their meeting is terrifying, on both counts. The use of Venus as camp counselor is perfect, and M-11 once again proves itselfto be more useful than a hundred Eagle Scouts with Swiss Army knives and the assistance of Phineas, Ferb, all three Brainiac 5's and R2D2... though I may be exaggerated. I was a little disappointed with the pacing of the issue, as the flashbacks seemed to take over much of the book, and having the cover featured character appear only in a cameo on the last page bothered me a bit. Still, the two art teams deliver some pretty pictures, and the dialogue and character moments make the book sing. Agents of Atlas #3 still makes the grade, earni

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9.0
Agents Of Atlas Vol. 2 #4

Jun 6, 2009

Criminally underrated, and excellent as always.

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8.0
Agents Of Atlas Vol. 2 #7

Jul 4, 2009

Excellent work as always, with plot twists that no one could have predicted.

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8.0
Agents Of Atlas Vol. 2 #8

Jul 18, 2009

Jeff Parkerrevels in the cool touches (an issue summary to the tune of the Brady Bunch theme,Jimmy's old Edsel refitted as a flying interdimensional transport) and the art isnicely handled throughout.

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8.0
Agents Of Atlas Vol. 2 #9

Sep 7, 2009

I'm fascinated to find that the Agents may have a decent counterpoint to their Venusian/Atlantean/Siren/technological/were-ape awesomeness, and I really want to knowhow Suwan managed to put together her OWN giant cabal of evil (called 'The Great Wall') that rivals her uncle's.

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10
Agents Of Atlas Vol. 2 #11

Sep 24, 2009

This issue is a fascinating read, with unusual strategy by Woo, and character-based brilliance across the board. This three-issue arc hasn't been a typical fighty-fighty, instead hinging upon Jimmy's unorthodox tactical brilliance and Jade Claw's not-quite-absolute villainy. There has been a lot of noise about AoA getting cancelled, but the AoA/X-Men series has been solicited, as well as the Agents as a backup feature in Incredible Hercules.So, the time has come for Matthew to call upon the Faithful Spoilerites...If you've been uncertain about this book, pick it up. Pick up the X-Men crossover over, if you're an X-Men fan. Pick up Hercules and enjoy TWO wonderful stories.I really think that if even a few of ourresident"wait for the traders" jump in and start following the Agents, we canhelp revive a title truly worthy of adulation (I'm looking at YOU, 'Dark Wolverine.') The art in this issue is by Dan Panosian and Gabriel Hardman, and it's phenomenal throughout, with the robot battles

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5.7
Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. #1

Jan 17, 2016

Doesn't quite have it's legs yet, but strong art helps to overcome story problems…

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6.0
Alice Cooper #1

Sep 8, 2014

Honestly, I am pretty much this book's target market: The comic geek old enough to remember the rock of previous decades and appreciate a meta comic book take on 'em. Even though the book wears its influences on its sleeve, Alice Cooper #1 pulls off a pretty amazing trick, engaging me as a reader, and making me want to come back next issue

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5.0
All New Atom #24

Jun 11, 2008

This issue is well drawn by Pat Oliffe, and Rick Remender's story is good, but it's another lame duck incarnation, andyou can feel it in the story.

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8.3
All-New All-Different Avengers #1

Nov 13, 2015

A fun introductory tale, lots of great interaction, and exellent art make for a good start for the most intriguing Avengers lineup in years…

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8.0
All-New All-Different Avengers #3

Jan 18, 2016

Excellent character work, great action sequences and exciting art… What else do you need from your Avengers book?

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8.3
All-New All-Different Avengers #10

Jun 6, 2016

The Waid/Asrar ANAD Avengers has been a fast-paced ride from the beginning, and this issue is no exception, but it doesn't move so fast that it leaves the characters behind, with everyone working together mostly seamlessly and using their strengths to the team's advantage.

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8.0
All-New Captain America #1

Nov 14, 2014

Still, even those are minor complaints, and the amount of effort put into the character work for heroes and villains alike shows on the page. I'm a long-term fan of Sam Wilson as a character, and I'm happy to see that he's not being immediately set up for failure in what will probably be a short tenure (I'm saying 24 issues or less) in the red-white-and-blue costume, but instead celebrated and given a mission worthy of a character this cool and this established. All-New Captain America #1 is a solid outing, building off not only the last volume of Captain America, but the entire history of the character, putting Sam Wilson in a new role and a flattering new light, and looking good in the doing.

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5.0
All-New Doop #1

Apr 11, 2014

In short, while I love Milligan and I dig the hell out of Doop, the issue doesn't quite get itself over the hill to the side of must-have. The art is above average most of the issue (although I don't care for any of the various Iceman portrayals we see), and the Doop character fares pretty well in his first solo, though his character doesn't quite make the transition to being on-screen for the whole issue without annoyance. Still, all in all, All New Doop #1 isn't a bad issue, and sets up what could be a very interesting new status quo for our pickle-shaped hero, with some lovely art, earning an above-average 2.5 out of 5 stars overall. It's not perfect, but it's not the disaster that a few of my associates had predicted his first solo comic would be…

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6.0
All-New Doop #2

May 22, 2014

The idea of Doop as a character who exists in the background for a reason is a perfectly realized, perfectly MIlligan, perfectly ridiculous premise. The balance of goofy to dramatic is well-executed, and a part of me is actually rooting for the little guy (though a bigger part finds the concept of Kitty kissing Doop revolting.) In short, All-New Doop #2 is a very Doop-y experience, equal parts adorable, disgusting and thought-provoking, with art that is appropriate (if inconsistent), and earns a very irrational 3 out of 5 stars overall. The fact that Doop was instrumental in the biggest twist of the Battle Of The Atom crossover is more interesting than the love story to me, but I'm enjoying both of the intertwining stories so far…

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6.0
All-New Doop #5

Sep 6, 2014

When it comes to the Doop, you're either the kind of person who knows you like weird stuff, and are probably already interested, or you think the whole concept is ludicrous, and have no interest at all. If you're one of the latter, though, you're missing quite a ride. All-New Doop #5 brings the series to a close with a bizarrely touching, visually interesting last chapter, breaking my heart just a little

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8.0
All-New Ghost Rider #1

Mar 26, 2014

All in all, All-New Ghost Rider #1 manages an impressive feat: reminding me of the cool stories of the past, while taking a new path, and the art is visually distinctive enough that I'd have enjoyed the issue even if the writing were less capable.

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8.0
All-New Miracleman Annual #1

Jan 2, 2015

All-New Miracleman Annual #1 is a good'n, with stylish art in both stories, and massively different but very enjoyable stories in both halves of the issue, earning an impressive 4 out of 5 stars overall. If you've never read Miracleman before, there's no better time to start"

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4.0
All-New Savage She-Hulk #1

Apr 18, 2009

I'm still on the fence about this issue, for a lot of reasons. I don't like the use of the She-Hulk name, especially with the original actually in the book, and I'm not entirely sold on Lyra as a character. Her visual, however striking it may be, is just a mashup of She-Hulk and Thundra, and the issue doesn't give us a whole lot to love about her in terms of character, what with the mass destruction, and the yelling and the GLAVIN! Still, it's well written (by Fred Van Lente, one of my new fave-raves) it fits snugly into continuity at some point during the Dark Avengers fiasco, and there's a Norman Osborn appearance with both Venom AND Dark Wolverine that threatens to take my "TOPICAL CAMEO" meter into the red, with the possibility of bursting into flames. There's potential here, and the art is very striking throughout, so it's not as though the issue was a failure, but it's still got a lot of rough eges that I'd like to see sanded down before I can whole-heartedly recommend it

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8.0
All-New Wolverine #8

May 22, 2016

Clever plot, excellent art, good dialogue and character work... An all-around entertaining read.

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6.0
All-New X-Factor #9

Jun 6, 2014

The overall effect of the issue is an odd one, with some redefined characters experiencing strong character moments in a plot that leaves them feeling a bit at sea, making it a less-than-ideal place to start this story. Still, there's interesting stuff going on, and a mix of characters at play that has a lot of potential to be even weirder than the old ‘Havok/Multiple Man/Strong Guy/Etc' lineup, in all the best ways. Long story short, All-New X-Factor #9 is more about building up the team and status quo than breaking new ground, even if it's a bit wobbly in the doing, earning a more-than-respectable 3 out of 5 stars overall. I'm intrigued enough to give next issue a chance, which means this issue passes the real test of picking up a random comic issue to read…

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8.0
All-New X-Men #6

Jan 19, 2013

The biggest problem with this story for me is the coyness about the timelines, with meta-jokes being played out about how long ago 1963 was when the characters can't really have been much further back than the Clinton administration, given their ages. (That's presuming that Cyclops was 15 or 16 at the founding of the X-Men and is over 30 now. If he's supposed to be in his late twenties, we're looking at more turn-of-the-century origins for the All-Old X-Men.) The problem certainly isn't insurmountable, and there's a lot of charm here to cover up any gaps in the timeline, as well as some very smooth art. Kitty and Wolverine playing mentor to the characters who were their senior back in the Claremont/Byrne days works quite well, and all in all, I stayed engaged throughout the book. All-New X-Men #6 is a head-scratcher in some ways, but it's an interesting take on the characters (even if I wonder when they'll press the reset button) earning 4 out of 5 stars overall.

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5.0
All-New X-Men #7

Feb 9, 2013

So, we run up against the underlying problem of All-New X-Men: When they run out of people to be shocked that they've come forward in time, then what? The characters aren't on a quest to get back home, and this issue shows their first attempts to bring themselves in line with current X-Men combat training programs, which implies some sort of long-term agenda, but I can't for the life of me tell you what it is. I like some of the concepts here, and the idea of being ostracized for something you haven't done yet is pretty compelling, but we're seven issues in and I just kind of want someone to DO something already. All-New X-Men #7 continues with a compelling premise, but moves awfully slowly and has some troublesome plot moments that cloud the story's success, earning 2.5 out of 5 stars overall. It's not a bad book, but it seems like once we get past "kids from the past in the future," there's no clear direction or goal for these characters...

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3.0
All-New X-Men #17

Oct 6, 2013

Even having read the first three chapters of the crossover, there's a large disconnect for me getting into Chapter Six, and the pricing issue really does stick in my craw, especially given that this issue is really more like half an issue. All-New X-Men #17 looks pretty amazing, admittedly, with some nice designs and craft, but not a lot of story to be had, and the lion's share of the character work devoted to an YET ANOTHER alternate future reality in the X-Men's array thereof.

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7.3
All-Star Section 8 #1

Jun 13, 2015

Flashes of brilliance, less coherence, but still some funny moments herein…

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6.0
All-Star Western #21

Jul 1, 2013

All in all, it's a slightly confusing issue for me, as I haven't read anything of the new Batwing, I didn't get the issue where Booster arrived in the past, and I haven't read enough Batman to know if the new Gotham is really this bad of a hive of scum and villainy. It's a fine looking issue, and I enjoyed the reading of it, but it's not a book that I expect I'll be raving over in a week or three. Moritat does very good work with the art here, and his horrifying Gotham cityscape is pretty excellent, but the Booster part of the story passed quickly, leaving Hex in a strange predicament that nonethless feels familiar.

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8.0
Alpha Girl #1

Feb 5, 2012

The creators of this book have managed to do something that a lot of first issues don't: Imbue their creations with character and life, and even thought Judith/Alpha Girl doesn't do a lot in this issue, I was interested enough to want to read more of her story. The fact that the end of the world is played with sardonic humor appeals to me, as does the deceptively simple art style. Alpha Girl #1 is a fun start to what could be a very interesting story, and even with a few disjointed transitions, tells the beginning of a story that I want to hear more of, earning 4 out of 5 stars overall for clear storytelling and striking character design. I'm liking what this seems to want to become, and will be back next issue for more...

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5.0
Amazing Spider-Man #580

Dec 20, 2008

Maybe Spider-Man should be married, and maybe he shouldn't, but at least the creative team is doing something with Marvel's flagship character that doesn't make me roll my eyes.

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9.0
Amazing Spider-Man #587

Feb 27, 2009

This is a really good issue, with great dialogue, a stellar art job from John Romita, Jr and more subtlety and plot ins and outs than I thought Mark Guggenheim capable of. The story as a whole is suspenseful and nicely done, and the cameos by Iron Fist and Daredevil nicely handled. It's nice to see some of the ongoing plot points starting to wrap up, even though I am unhappy with the revelation that most of the cops featured in the book are corrupt. Overall, it's a very strong issue, with the only weakness being the fact that the weekly frequency makes it really hard to keep up with all the various developments in Peter Parker's life. Amazing Spider-Man #587 earns a very impressive 4.5 out of 5 stars, and I'm looking forward to how this whole thing wraps up this week...

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1.0
Amazing Spider-Man #618

Jan 30, 2010

In two words: Brutal Honesty.

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7.0
Amazing Spider-Man #627

Mar 31, 2010

The upside of this issue was its retro feel, steeped in continuity, referencing previous Spider-Man/Juggernaut battles, name-checking the kidnapped Madame Web (a plot point of Nothing Can Stop The Juggernaut, as well) and delivering a clever Spider-Man who works things as much with his mind as with his radioactive spider-bitten muscles. The downside is pretty much the same, as all the references take up a lot of time, and much of the issue felt like familiar ground for me.

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6.0
Amazing Spider-Man Annual #1

Nov 16, 2008

So, who is Jackpot? Apparently, she's a Nancy Reagan PSA lost in time for a couple of decades. Like I said up top, either she was Mary Jane or she wasn't, and either way there's negatives to her identity. Jackpot's costume, her demeanor, and her overall sauciness led me to really like her, even given the few interactions that I've had with her, and I'm saddened to think that she's probably going to be nothing more than a footnote in Spider-Man's history, a living example that drugs're bad, mmmkay? Still, it's not a terrible issue, with a nice turn by Marc Guggenheim in terms of Betty's characterization, Spider-Man is suitably irreverant and fun, Reed's cameo is well-handled and the art is absolutely amazing throughout the issue. Walter DeClun falls absolutely flat for me, though, a poor man's Kingpin, and Alana's death was weirdly anticlimactic. Amazing Spider-Man Annual #1 earns a better than average 3 out of 5 stars, giving me a new appreciation for Guggenheim's work (I f

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7.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #4

Jul 28, 2014

There's a lot stuffed into this issue, and even though it's marked as an Original Sin crossover issue, the OS material takes up about four pages in the early stages of the book, with the bulk of our story leaping into getting Cindy Moon out of her jail cell and into Spider-Man's arms. I enjoy the depth that Slott gives to Cindy and her story, but both the rapidity of her introduction and lingering questions about how long she's been locked in Ezekiel's basement make for odd pacing, and the ending is shocking in bad ways as well as good. All in all, Amazing Spider-Man #4 is a pretty good issue overall, as it introduces a character who might be very important in the long run, but does so in a Cliff's Notes manner, and even the fact that I don't care for the art team doesn't torpedo my enjoyment.

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8.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #9

Nov 7, 2014

The entire premise of this story is one that has a massive meta tongue-in-cheek moment: Look how many alternate Spider-Man stories we've done! Clearly the death toll is not final, and I'm afraid that some of my favorites (Spider-Ham, Spider-Gwen, and even Ultimate Jessica Drew) might buy the farm in this crossover, enough so that I might have to keep reading the entire thing. Amazing Spider-Man #9 finally brings all the players together and kicks off Spider-Verse in style with a well-drawn, engaging issue featuring characters I never thought we'd see again, much less care abou.

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7.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #14

Feb 15, 2015

Far too many characters in play for everybody to get their moment in, but still a satisfying payoff… But what do we do with 43 Spider-Men?

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8.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2015) #1

Oct 10, 2015

An impressive new start for our Web-Head, with a fun array of cast-members, some surprises and a ton of coming attractions built-in.

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7.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2015) #7

Feb 7, 2016

Knee-deep in continuity, with a lot of talky-talky, but solid art throughout. The inverted Cloak & Dagger is a neat visual touch…

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8.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2015) #10

Apr 19, 2016

Heroic Spidey using all his strength and resources against the one foe who is (literally) always a step ahead. Worth it for the last page cliffhanger...

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6.0
Amazing Spider-Man (2015) #30

Jul 15, 2017

In short, Slott and Immonen and the creative team have worked really hard to make the balance between Spider-Man story and crossover story work within their framework, but there isn't enough to the main story other than the shock value. Amazing Spider-Man #30 has some excellent art, some wonderful Peter Parker moments, heavy-duty Spidey/Ock rivalry and uses the tone of Secret Empire to good effect but still getting dragged down by it.

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2.0
Amazing Spider-Man Presents Jackpot #1

Jan 8, 2010

There are a number of issues with this comic, not the least of which come with the art. Boomerang is comically cross-eyed in a panel where he was ostensibly meant to be threatening, and the New Rose has fists like country hams while standing four feet high and measuring about four feet wide. At it's best, the art resembles Todd Nauck, at it's worst, I'm reminded of early 90's Image Comics, books that were high on enthusiasm but low on craft. Moroever, the timing of this issue couldn't be worse, as most of the plotlines from the 'Brand New Day' arc of Spider-Man have been wiped clean as that book moves into it's new phase. The mystery of whether Jackpot is Mary Jane has been answered with a resounding "Nope," and a lot of the appeal of the character was in the 'Was She or Wasn't She?' question. And while the story of Sara Ehret (Rear Haste?) is an interesting one, she was clearly NOT interested in being a superhero in her previous appearance, and it's hard to believe her change of heart

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6.0
Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows #1

Jun 6, 2015

A tale of hard choices that isn't given enough room to really explore them, and falls a bit flat for me.

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8.0
Ambush Bug: Year None #1

Aug 11, 2008

This issue was a non-stop series of comic book in-jokes, slowed only by commentary on the current DC Universe, served with a side of snark. If that's your bag, as it is mine, you should enjoy this series. Writer Giffen is joined by Robert Loren Fleming for the first time in over a decade, and the proud parents bring back the Bug in style. There's more narrative than the last couple of times we've seen Ambush Bug (though his cameo in 52 was pretty awesome) and I suspect that the series may have a narrative through-line, even if I (and Ambush Bug) miss the thought balloons. I suspect it's not an easy series to jump on to, as Giffen's art is more normal than his esoteric Trencher days, or the original A.B. series where he was aping Jose Munoz, but it's still not your average comic pictures. I'll tell you this: I loved it, and I think with an open mind (and Wikipedia) you can love it, too. Ambush Bug: Year None #1 earns an impressive 4 out of 5 stars, and I hope that I've bee

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2.0
Ambush Bug: Year None #2

Sep 8, 2008

'" HA!) Old-school jokes like Mitsu Bishi (the Japanese version of Ambush Bug) and the Amber Butane Corps return, and more madness from Go-Go Chex, the de facto villain of the book.

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4.0
Ambush Bug: Year None #3

Nov 20, 2008

"This is a doll, right?" It's cute, occasionally funny, but it's also as scattershot as all hell.

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4.0
Ambush Bug: Year None #4

Dec 20, 2008

I can only imagine what those of you who aren't aware of how cool the Bug used to be must think of this.

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5.0
Ambush Bug: Year None #7

Nov 8, 2009

In a word: Piquant.

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8.0
America #2

Apr 10, 2017

Long story short, America #2 is a solid, entertaining comic book issue with some great guest-stars, action, adventure, romance and philosophy.

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7.0
America's Got Powers #1

Apr 13, 2012

All in all, there's nothing wrong with familiar, especially in television (where one of our primary storytellers made his name) and all the various elements play seamlessly as a well-oiled book. For any complications that come from Hitch's previous work, the action sequences are smooth and dynamic, and the overall effect from reading this title is very pleasant. America's Got Powers #1 is a true elevator pitch ("It's like The Hunger Games meets Heroes!"), but hybridizes well enough, and puts all the various elements together with skill, earning 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. I think this title has the potential to transcend the sum of it's parts, and I, for one, hope that it does...

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7.0
America's Got Powers #2

Jun 4, 2012

A great many things are revealed in this issue, and it works both as a single issue and as a chapter in the ongoing narrative, while still maintaining some secrets for the 2nd and 3rd acts. The creators don't rage against the indignities of reality television, but they pointedly use all the criticisms of that medium to underline the brutal and dehumanizing conditions of our strange/familiar world. America's Got Powers #2 goes down smooth, playing with tropes but playing fair, and delivering a good reading experience, for 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. There are sci-fi, comics and young adult fiction bits floating around, but it's makes for an interesting goulash at the end...

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8.0
America's Got Powers #3

Aug 24, 2012

I'm a little surprised that Ross' celebrity status hasn't gotten this book coverage by the "mainstream" press, and I haven't heard all that much from within the comics industry about it, either (unless you count Twitter feeds.) There's a lot to like in this book, as it's starting to emerge from the shadow of 'Rising Stars' and 'Wildguard' to carve it's own niche in the superhero-as-celebrity subgenre. America's Got Powers #3 is building up steam for what I hope is a slam-bang conclusion, and manages to be both well-written and well-drawn without many people noticing, earning 4 out of 5 stars overall. This is a good book, and I think you should read it...

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9.0
Angel & Faith Season 9 #1

Sep 2, 2011

This issue sets us off on an intriguing adventures, shows us the characters flaws rather than monologuing about them, gives us a quest (one that is both wacky and touching at the same time) and an enemy to overcome, doing everything that #1 issue is supposed to do.

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6.0
Angel & Faith Season 9 #25

Aug 30, 2013

The best parts of the issue are in the details, and there is a nice tie-in to the Buffy Season 9 comic as Faith considers a job offer working for Kennedy in her security agency (staffed by former slayers, one might recall) but things never quite get up to speed for me. I really appreciate that the big fighty-fighty wasn't the only focus of this last issue, and honestly prefer that we got to see more of the aftermath, but the way this issue breaks down really undermines the seriousness of the threat that we spent two years establishing. It's a good issue, but one that doesn't quite give me the emotional punch that I was looking for, while the decisions of our three lead characters to go their separate way feels less than organic, more like an editorial decision to set up the next season of stories.

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7.0
Angela: Asgard's Assassin #2

Jan 11, 2015

Our story wraps up with a moment that clearly explains why Angela and Thor don't get along, as she gleefully leaps into battle against Dark Elves, reminding us that they're very similar creatures. Having limited experience with Angela as a character (mostly her Image/MacFarlane stuff), I wasn't in any way excited to see this series, finding her origins problematic and her nature boring. Gillen, Jiminez, Bennett and Hans (along with the rest of the team) have changed that for me, putting her in a situation where her nature is kind of fascinating and giving us lovely dialogue and some snappy plotting as well.

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8.7
Angela: Queen Of Hel #7

Apr 28, 2016

Very literary, very touching and rife with metaphor... Sad to see this one go.

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6.0
Angelus #4

Jul 3, 2010

Her fellow angely types arrivein time to bust her out, and a bigfight between herheavenly host and his dark minions begins.

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9.0
Animal Man #1

Sep 8, 2011

I'm not entirely sure what all is in store for Buddy Baker and his costumed antics, but I'm on board for the long haul here, as Animal Man #1 impresses the heck out of me.

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7.0
Animal Man #3

Nov 4, 2011

The visuals this issue are wild, they are imaginative, but most of all, they are creepy as $&@*. Every page seems to be filled to the gills with the hybrid children of Heironymous Bosch and H.R. Giger, in ways that I haven't seen since the heydey of Vertigo back in the mid-90′s. I've long maintained that the #3 issues of the New 52 are going to be the ones that are make-or-break for these titles, and Animal Man #3 (for all the vague notions that parts of this are retellings) is up to the challenge, earning 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. It's not as strong as the debut issue, but things have to get darker before we get any signs of dawn, and it gets the job done.

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8.0
Animal Man #19

Apr 7, 2013

The last panel of this issue says it all, with a dejected Animal Man standing alone on the plain where the tree of life that he used to access The Red used to stand. It's a stark and disturbing panel, a perfect dark and depressing end to an issue that sets out to break your heart in the most powerful way possible. As with any story-telling device, the loss of a child can be used terribly and awkwardly, and I hate it when it's haphazardly tossed in as an afterthought. Jeff Lemire uses Cliff's demise organically and powerfully, making it feel more real and horribly true-to-life than any comic death in recent memory.

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8.4
Ant-Man #2

Feb 9, 2015

Fun, weird and engaging, with some great art, and the funniest Iron Man appearance since the first movie.

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6.0
Aphrodite IX #3

Jul 22, 2013

There's a LOT of discussion about God in this book, with a cyborg taunting Marcus about his devout nature, and Aphrodite murdering a woman in cold blood as she is praying, all of which left me cold. The visuals never quite marry with the dialogue (of which there is a LOT), and they never quite get the fluidity that could make this story breath-taking, but I have to admit it's a good-looking issue. Successfully navigating the difficulties of its main character, Aphrodite IX #3 gets a lot of things right, and is visually impressive, and even though it doesn't quite stick the landing, it ends up being a better-than-average reading experience, earning 3 out of 5 stars overall. I have to admit, I liked it a lot better than the original collection, too...

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7.0
Aphrodite IX #11

Jun 18, 2014

I've been shocked at how good this series is before, mostly because of my grave dislike of the original material (which I didn't read until a year or so ago for the Major Spoilers Podcast trade paperback discussion), but I'm really impressed with the work here. The creators have put together a believable future world, with realistic consequences and a decent set of antagonists, while making our cyborg protagonist relatable and interesting for perhaps the first time (for me, anyway.) In short, Aphrodite IX #11 is a good'n, putting a new spin on the old concepts, with attractive art and some major steps forward for Aphrodite herself.

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8.0
Aquaman (2011) #4

Dec 30, 2011

This issue wraps up the first arc well, gives us drama, superhero moments, and horror, but I'm still of the opinion that the introduction of The Trench played the mystery a little bit too close to the vest. Aquaman and Mera are clearly defined, well-drawn characters (in all senses of the word 'drawn') and their new hometown has been given a personality that works as well. Presuming that the next arc is what the preview makes me think it is, I expect this new Aquaman to hit heights we haven't seen since 'The Atlantis Chronicles.' Aquaman #4 is is a good issue overall, even with the stumbles, clearly focusing Aquaman's latest personality and status quo, earning 4 out of 5 stars overall.

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7.0
Aquaman (2016) #1

Jun 27, 2016

Strong story and plot, art with lots of potential and a new angle on the superhero who deserves much more respect. A very good first issue...

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6.6
Aquaman (2016) #15

Jan 22, 2017

Aside from the fact that Black Manta is a little bit overexposed for my tastes and the inconsistencies in the art, this issue is quite good, bringing 'The Deluge' arc to a close with a bang and reminding readers why Aquaman is cool and unique. Aquaman #15 works on a number of levels, even with the weaknesses of art here and there.

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9.0
Archer & Armstrong #3

Oct 15, 2012

This is fun. The use of "nunja" is itself worth the price of admission, but the thickening plot is well-handled, the art is awesome, and it's clear why our protagonists have teamed up: They need each other to balance out. Character-wise, I find this incarnation of the heroes to be superior to the original (where Archer was kind of annoying, to be honest) and Archer's use of fake curse words to express his frustration is a scream. Archer & Armstrong #3 keeps the streak intact, delivering an entertaining reading experience that's multi-layered and fun, earning 4.5 out of 5 stars overall.

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10
Archie #600

Sep 12, 2009

A couple of digressions: Recently, one of my agents (James, if you must know) was reading a "Betty and Veronica Digest" that he bought at the grocery store between calls at work, and I spent a few moments reminiscing with him over how awesome the old-school Archie comics are, with their perfect love triangle, and the simple stories that still pack andramaticpunch. It was a little weird thinking about being a kid and reading these stories, and even weirder to run into them in a work setting. Digression the second: There wasa time in my childhood where one of my most anticipated moments was Saturday mornings when I could watch cartoons, and I clearly remember seeing "The Archies" in that bizarrely primitive Filmation cartoon style, and just loving the characters to death. With that in mind, I guess I shouldn't have been surprised to enjoy this story as much as I did. Archie, Jughead, and his friends are allstill the charactersthat I remember, and the MacGuffin is done in such a cute and

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10
Archie #629

Jan 26, 2012

Archie #629 is slam-bang fun that seems to effortlessly leap all the hurdles to an awesome story.

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9.0
Archie #630

Feb 24, 2012

You should absolutely check this out. I'm not sure if Archie does TPB collections, but they really need to make an exception if you don't. The only thing this crossover was missing was a flexidisk with the soundtrack on it, like Billy & The Boingers had that one time. Archie #630 delivers the goods on all fronts, doesn't forget the second-stringers, and puts Kevin Keller in the makeup of The Fox, earning a darn-near perfect 4.5 out of 5 stars overall. You have to love a book like this, and the best part is, you can do it in a totally non-ironic way (seeing as the hipsters are the villains.)

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9.0
Archie #636

Aug 22, 2012

This issue reminds me of the Archie stories of my youth, where everybody has a particular character quirk (Archie's smitten, Ronnie's vain, Juggie's disdainful, Betty is clinically insane) and the punchline comes at the end. Everybody laughs. Curtains. But I haven't read an Archie book this gorgeous since the heydey of Dan DeCarlo, with Gisele's art perfectly complimented by excellent inking and coloring. Archie #636 is a fun, frenetic bon-bon of an issue, setting out to entertain and doing so in fine fashion, earning 4.5 out of 5 stars overall. I wouldn't analyze it too deeply, just enjoy Valerie Brown looking like Kofi Kingston and have a soda...

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7.0
Archie #666

Jun 11, 2015

There's a lot of meta in this issue, but it's the closure that classic Archie deserves…

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6.0
Armor Hunters #1

Jun 11, 2014

In short, this issue serves as a good first chapter, kicking off the big multi-title event, and does so with a well-written well-drawn issue. While the idea of “giant aliens coming to blow $#!+ up” may not be a new one, particularly to long-time Valiant readers, having the conflicts be approachable and lucid helps greatly. Armor Hunters #1 is a decent springboard to bigger things, deftly explaining the main character, introducing and legitimizing the villains, and setting the pieces up for a big ol' summer blockbuster, and that's perfectly okay, earning the book 3 out of 5 star overall. I'm kind of interested to see how this all shakes down for Valiant, and how Venditti will build on Aric's mythology with the introduction of these new foes.

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6.0
Armor Hunters: Harbinger #3

Sep 10, 2014

It ends up being an okay issue, and perhaps one that holds the key to the overarching conflict of Armor Wars in the form of the unkillable lady (though I don't know for certain if that's the case without reading more books, I'll wager) and at least delivers some effective horror and battle sequences. Armor Wars " Harbinger #3 isn't exactly what the title promises, but isn't bad by any means, just somewhat expected.

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8.0
Army Of Darkness Vs. Hack/Slash #1

Jul 27, 2013

All in all, it's a clever, well-written story that fits well within both characters' canonicities, and makes for a good read. The over-the-top nature of Ash's movie adventures makes his easy acceptance of Cassie's arcane trappings, while she proves to be more than a match for his fast-talking mojo. All in all, Army Of Darkness Vs. Hack/Slash #1 hits the spot, delivering a fast, fun, readable story that lets both main characters strut their stuff, earning 4 out 5 stars overall. Bruce Campbell should be proud, wherever he's got to...

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9.3
Art Ops #5

Feb 29, 2016

Wild concepts and truly beautiful art make up for any shortcomings in the plotting, dragging you along on a wildly inventive ride. A truly beautiful issue...

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7.0
Astonishing X-Men #51

Jun 21, 2012

Reviewing an x-book is always difficult for me, as I have a fear of getting involved in a story and having it disappear into crossover madness or evaporate (X-Factor, X-Statix, Joss Whedon's run on this very title), leaving me with nothing but Iceman and Rogue. Treating Northstar as a character with history, bringing in his family AND Kyle's, addressing the strangeness of mutants and the attendees' questions about a gay wedding all leads to a book that could have been talky and boring. That bullet was dodged, though I'm not sure that I'll be back to find out what happens next issue with Karma and all, this is an enjoyable enough reading experience. Astonishing X-Men #51 is a commendable act by Marvel, one that I hope leads to a higher profile for Northstar (an under-used and great character in Marvel's vast library), earning 3.5 out of 5 stars overall.

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10
Astro City (2013) #1

Jun 5, 2013

ProsThe perfect introductory issue.A lovely callback to stories past.ConsThere are no cons.Shut up and read it.

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10
Astro City (2013) #2

Jul 16, 2013

Nobody does it better than the Astro City team, and this issue is why. Debuting an interesting new hero (The Wolf-Spider, seen on the cover, gets a page or two inside, making me want to know what his deal is), taking an unexpected tack on the tropes of the nearly century-old superhero game, and making us CARE about Madella's life turn this issue into a treat, a filet mignon among the bologna sandwich crossover schmaggegis we've all grown tired of. Astro City #2 is the real deal, turning answering phone calls into effective and moving drama, while not skimping on the action and cool art

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10
Astro City (2013) #12

May 16, 2014

So, yeah, this issue proves I'm a terrible person full of schadenfreude (for enjoying Ned's turmoil) and jealousy (for my grinding envy of Busiek's towering writing talent), and yet I'm still going to recommend it, and let you decide whether you wanna listen to the advice of a terrible, horrible evil man. The question of whether anyone else could make Astro City look as amazing as Brent Anderson is answered, the question of what drives people to do self-destructive things is examined, and most impressively, a twenty-odd page comic book becomes a portal into another person's life, a story full of emotion and authenticity. Astro City #12 hits the proverbial home run touchdown sports metaphor thingy, with beautiful art and an affecting story, earning a well-deserved 5 out of 5 stars overall. I keep saying this, but if you're not reading this book, you're missing the most consistent monthly book around…

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10
Astro City (2013) #13

Jun 13, 2014

That would be telling. But it's a really wonderful reveal, as the last page of the issue takes place first in chronological order, and makes what comes before that much more unique and special. There's really no sense in futzing around with this: Astro City #13 is another wonderful standalone story, albeit one that stands out even among its brethren, earning 5 out of 5 stars overall. What Busiek, Anderson and company have done with this book is simply extraordinary, and you owe it to yourself to read this one (three or four times, actually.)

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10
Astro City (2013) #16

Oct 11, 2014

I admit it, this issue might have had me a little misty a time or two, and the use of Busiek's old script emphasizes the archetypical nature of the heroes of Astro City, where you can tell a tale that reminds you of Doctor Strange, or Superman, or even (as with last issue) your Grandma while still maintaining cohesive and compelling stories. Astro City #16 hits a dead-solid perfect drive and gives us an ending that's both poignant, unexpected and lovely.

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9.0
Astro City (2013) #18

Dec 14, 2014

Astro City #18 gets a little bit heavy, if you're really paying attention, but still delivers a little action, a little human drama and a lot of the usual AC quality.

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9.0
Astro City (2013) #19

Jan 19, 2015

When it comes down to it, there are literally hundreds of superhero titles available every month, but Astro City provides more than just the latest crossover schmageggi or fistfight (not that there's anything wrong with either of those.) The story this issue gives us measured bits of progression, but most of the focus is on the woman inside the armored Quarrel suit, her life, her family, her loves and her drive, and it's a hell of a good read. Astro City #19 shows what you can do when you realize there's more to character than dead parents and a unique suit color, providing excellent story.

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9.0
Astro City: Astra Special #1

Oct 5, 2009

Brent Anderson is on his game this issue, giving Astra a grown-up version of the features established in her previous appearances, and making her seem credible as party-girl, superhero, while maintaining an air of innocence about her at the same time. The story is fun, especially the contrast of Astra's extraordinary life with her boyfriend's increasing disbelief, and the moment where the monsters (led by a dragon who looks remarkably like Fin Fang Foom) burst out of a six-inch deep creek to crown her as their princess. Kurt Busiek's Astro City scripts are wonderful to behold, unfolding naturally, with amazing depth and character work throughout. If I weren't so in love with this series, I'd be jealous of how amazing the writing is... It's a difficult proposition, creating characters and situations that are so engaging that, a decade later, still feel like old friends. Astro City: Astra Special #1 earns a wonderfully complex 4.5 out of 5 stars, losing points only for the conceit that A

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6.0
Astro City: Astra Special #2

Nov 8, 2009

In a word: Cathartic.

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10
Astro City: The Dark Age Book 3 #1

May 14, 2009

It's a taut little issue, and the moments where Royal sneaks about the Pyramid compound are claustrophobic and well-handled. Brent Anderson's art is note-perfect, especially in the rare glimpses of superhero activity from the Apollo 11 and the First Family. Throughout the first couple of arcs, Royal is the one we worry about, with stable Charles trying to save his criminal sibling, but here the balance shifts, as we see a competent Royal navigating difficult waters while Charles seems to have popped his cork. The reveal at the end was surprising, and the "inside look" at a Kobra Hydra Pyramid induction process is an eye-opener. Kurt Busiek makes a personal search for closure into a pretty good adventure-type story here, and it's well worth the wait. Astro City: The Dark Age Book III #1 earns a spiffy-keen 5 out of 5 stars, even if I've been drinking the Kool-Aid for years. In a perfect world, this book would be the weekly dose of Busiek...

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9.0
Astro City: The Dark Age Book 3 #2

Jun 7, 2009

It's still unclear what Pyramid actuallywants (they seem focused on the superhero team called the Apollo 11) but what is clear is that neither Williams brother is going to be able to survive it alone. Kurt Busiek's script manages to remain personal and focused on the main characters, while giving us a grand scope and the superhero-type stuff that Astro City is known for. Each concept is more outrageous and awesome than the last. Brent Anderson's art is sublime as always, giving each character a completely unique and recognizable face in every scene. Since this series wasn't solicited until the issues were mostly completed (in order to keep it on target for monthly release) we know that the next part of the story will ship on time. This is good, as Astro City issues are always fascinating reads, and always make it to the bottom of the read pile (where I put the good stuff that I want to savor.) This issue is another good one, moving the story along without forgetting that

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8.0
Astro City: The Dark Age Book 3 #3

Jul 12, 2009

It's good to get Astro City on a monthly basis again, even if I know that next issue is the last one of this arc... Kurt Busiek manages to tell stories that remind me of classics like the Kree-Skrull War or the Justice League's battles in the Microverse, while being about more than the super-pants dancing around. The story of Charles and Royal's quest for justice has been going on for well over a dozen issues now, and while it's frustrating to see a near-miss like this, it's also impressive to note that the characters' don't feel like they've been spinning their wheels to get here. The return of the Silver Agent (prophesied in his last appearance) was a thread I had almost forgotten about, but it effortlessly tied into events that have been set up throughout this volume. Brent Anderson's art is as quirky as ever, with character designs like Encephalon (a cross between a flying squid and the Metaluna mutant) sharing an unlikely sense of reality and tangibility. It's no secret

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7.0
Astro City: The Dark Age Book 3 #4

Sep 7, 2009

Royal's quest for vengeance leads to 3.

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9.0
Astro City: The Dark Age Book 4 #1

Mar 6, 2010

It's a whole world of awesome that comics fans should be in on.

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9.0
Astro City: The Dark Age Book 4 #1

Mar 6, 2010

It's a whole world of awesome that comics fans should be in on.

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9.0
Astro City: The Dark Age Book 4 #2

Apr 3, 2010

This comic makes Rage Cage and Jables throw 4.

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10
Astro City: The Dark Age Book 4 #3

May 1, 2010

Astro City does the nearly unthinkable every month, but this month's achievement is very impressive, taking a retro story and making it feel completely contemporary and exciting without having to resort the universe-building tricks that the Big Two seem to be completely dependent on (see previous and following reviews for what I mean by that.

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10
Astro City: The Dark Age Book 4 #4

May 10, 2010

Its rare to see a story end in a manner this satisfying, especially when the characters are UNSUCCESSFUL in their quest, but Busiek and company pull it off. Astro City The Dark Age Book IV #4 is a fitting ending, earning 5 out of 5 stars overall, and bringing the Williams brother saga to the better of its several possible endings Im also psyched to see that a Silver Agent micro-series will be coming in a month or two to finish HIS story as well. If only we could get a monthly Nexus comic again

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8.0
Atlas #1

May 31, 2010

Here's hoping that Atlas goes 100 issues this time around.

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7.0
Avengers (2010) #1

May 20, 2010

Avengers #1 starts off the new franchise in a good way, earning 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. Its not the lineup I would have gone with, but its a good one nonetheless

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3.0
Avengers (2010) #2

Jul 3, 2010

Their experiment is interrupted by Wonder Man, who attacks out of nowhere with unexplained fury and vehemence, then explodes into nothingness.

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7.0
Avengers (2010) #5

Sep 24, 2010

Given that it has a couple of Oh, hell yeah! moments, a Heel Turn for a guy who never really went face and Thor shoving a hammer up Galactus nose, I cant in good conscience let those moments destroy the book for me. Avengers #5 is good, certainly better than 1 through 4, and earns a slowly-coming-together 3.5 out of 5 stars overall.

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3.0
Avengers (2010) #7

Nov 21, 2010

I like JR Jrs art this issue, which may or may not be attributed to Tom Palmer on inks, but the wheels are spinning in empty space for the most part. Avengers #7 is disappointing across the board, and even the good parts arent enough to make me happy to spend four bucks on a series of what amount to trailers, leading to 1.5 out of 5 stars overal

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3.0
Avengers (2010) #19

Nov 22, 2011

All in all, Avengers #19 is mostly filler, well-drawn, but essentially same ol', same ol'.

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3.0
Avengers (2010) #25

Apr 18, 2012

The problem I have is that the issue was identified as an important AvX tie-in, with ramifications about Captain America's declaration of war, and we got literally a quick page and an issue-long flashback. As wonderful as it is to see Simonson's work in a full-length title (Thor was particularly well-served this issue), I have an unpleasant suspicion that we're in for the same thing we got during Secret Invasion: stories that are pretty much inessential background fodder for the big crossover book that I'm not entirely sure I want to read. This issue's attempt to deal with outstanding storylines feels inconsequential, and the use of the Avengers Vs. X-Men material feels forced and mercenary, leaving both parts of the story ill-served. Avengers #25 is neither fish nor fowl, and while it's a good looking book, it really doesn't have anything much to say, earning 1.5 out of 5 stars overall. I hope this isn't a harbinger of how AvX is gonna go...

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4.0
Avengers (2010) #27

Jun 16, 2012

There is an upside and a downside to giant universal crossovers: Your favorite guy or gal is usually not left out, but with EVERYONE involved, they may not do much more than stand around for reaction shots (as happens with Valkyrie this issue.) The Avengers in this issue pointedly do NOT include several of the characters shown on the cover, and most of them don't have anything to do anyway. Avengers #27 is lovely to look at, but ultimately doesn't do much more than flesh out the background of a comic that came out several weeks ago, leading to a crossover-shell-shocked 2 out of 5 stars overall. Decompression and marketing have left this one signifying very little amongst the sound and fury of AvX.

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6.0
Avengers (2010) #32

Oct 25, 2012

Still, I'm mostly pleased with this story, as it returns the one founding Avenger with style and a normal sense of humor to the fold, and looks pretty good overall. Avengers #32 sticks the landing, even as it undoes another of Bendis' big changes to the Avengers status quo in preparation for a new creative team in this sandbox.

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2.0
Avengers (2010) Annual #1

Jan 7, 2012

I suspect that this issue (and it's predecessor) were created with the though that people would jump at the chance to see the team behind Secret War working together again, but Secret War, for all it's faults, had more story behind it than this. At $4.99 for 25 pages of story, I'm already miffed, but $4.99 for the second half of a four-month-old story, one which has already been essentially duplicated in New Avengers, not to mention negated by Fear Itself? Stick a fork in this one, because I'm about done. Avengers Annual #1 is nothing more than another Brian Bendis "Why SHOULD the public trust the heroes?" tale, covering ground which was done to death long before the first half of this story came out, earning a disdainful 1 out of 5 stars overall. If Marvel editorial wants to address the reality of their characters, that's fine, but you can't keep asking the same rhetorical question over and over without either answers or anything new to say about it...

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8.0
Avengers (2012) #1

Dec 5, 2012

All in all, this reminds me of the Grant Morrison relaunch of the Justice League in the 1990s, where the characters were treated as a pantheon of incredibly powerful types, each with their own strengths, and the focus was on the epic tales and legendary feats. Avengers #1 is at least different, and sometimes that's half the battle, but it's interesting enough to get me really wondering where ithings are going.

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8.0
Avengers (2012) #2

Dec 20, 2012

I have to be honest: I'm somewhat bugged by the bi-weekly frequency of the book, something that I hope doesn't last too long, but other than that, the issue brings the same thunder that #1 did without losing too much momentum. I'll be interested to see how (if at all) the upcoming moments of Peter Parker and Carol Danvers' books affect this story, and I think that the inclusion of Wolverine feels very much sales-driven, but overall #2 doesn't drop the ball that #1 so ably put into play. Avengers #2 looks good, reads well and has a lot of good character stuff to play with, earning a very nicely done 4 out of 5 stars overall. Assuming this first arc to be six issues long, I think we're precisely where we need to be at this point in the story, and Hickman seems to have a lot of arrows in his storytelling quiver for this big relaunch...

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8.0
Avengers (2012) #4

Feb 2, 2013

Things in the pacing department are a little bit odd for me, but this issue is still a clear sign that Marvel intends to take their not-a-relaunch seriously in terms of changing things up. There are echoes of The Authority here, yes, as well as a couple of other stories (including Gruenwald's old 'Squadron Supreme' and it's world-changing scope, ironically) but this isn't a carbon-copy of what has come before. A.I.M. comes across as intimidating and competent, the last page reveal promises more intrigue, and the art never dips below remarkable. All in all, Avengers #4 keeps up the streak, delivering another strong issue, albeit one going a bit slower than #1 or #2, but still holding my interest in the Avengers New World Order, earning 4 out of 5 stars overall. It's my favorite of the relaunched Avengers titles, and the only one that has solidly nailed the landing in showing us a whole new world for Earth's Mightiest...

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7.0
Avengers (2012) #9

Apr 14, 2013

All in all, Avengers #9 comprises a strong middle chapter of an ongoing story, and works both in terms of the art and the story, making for an above-average reading experience and earning 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. Once the whole arc is done, I can see readers going back and tearing these issues apart looking for the clues, hints and interactions that built to the final reveal.

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9.0
Avengers (2012) #12

May 25, 2013

That last page left me with a chill, working perfectly within the scope of the book, but most importantly, giving us a believable reason for the villain of the piece to be there. The characters get their spotlight this time around, with more light shone on the new cloud-cuckoo-lander Captain Universe, as well as Hyperion, Thor and a lovely showcase for Spider-Man's new attitude. Avengers #12 works as a narrative, as well as a single issue, and has lovely art throughout, combining the Avengers we know with something new and different, successfully navigating tough waters to earn 4.5 out of 5 stars overall. If you're wondering what new ground can be sown after 50 years of the same characters, this book is the place for you...

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9.0
Avengers (2012) #13

Jun 11, 2013

Hickman's Avengers hasn't been getting blockbuster attention, something that I attribute to the publishing frequency of the book, as we're getting something like 3 issues per month. It's a shame, really, because this series is as transformative as his Fantastic Four was on a much larger scale that affects many more characters. Avengers #13 is a great issue, even with my complaints about its frequency, and absolutely deserves it's 4.5 out of 5 stars overall. This is the Avengers book I never knew I always wanted.

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6.0
Avengers (2012) #19

Sep 16, 2013

Realistically speaking, the Marvel Universe has been preternaturally active over the last ten years or so, with barely any downtime between battle sequences, which does damage my enjoyment of this issue and the big Infinity morass. On the one hand, I like Hickman and what he's doing, on the other hand, it feels like a slightly updated 'Operation: Galactic Storm' or Kree/Skrull War. All in all, though, Avengers #19 manages to overcome some of the weaknesses inherent in the art, but doesn't quite justify itself as more than just a chapter in the big picture story of Infinity.

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6.0
Avengers (2012) #23

Nov 25, 2013

The Infinity crossover has been pretty well contained (and well-written) within the Avengers titles, and has been successful in setting up meaningful stakes for our team. That said, it's yet another giant crossover shmageggi, which leaves me with the empty fear that nothing that happens here will have any consequence in 3 months when the new crossover takes precedence. Avengers #23 strikes a hard balance between creating a compelling individual issue story and serving as an ongoing chapter of the big Infinity saga, while falling short in terms of art, earning 3 out of 5 stars overall. With a new chapter of the Avengers saga on the horizon, this one promises to have long-term repercussions, but I'm a little bit skeptical, given what happened with Age of Ultron and the rest of the giant crossovers of recent years. World War Hulk, anyone?

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8.0
Avengers 1959 #2

Oct 22, 2011

This book is a goldmine of interesting things, from the Wakandan ambassador to the use of old-school nazi villains to a fortyish Blond Phantom in action.

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8.0
Avengers Academy #6

Nov 6, 2010

I find the concept pretty fascinating, even as I wonder who picked the five most fed up Avengers to play den-mother, and this issue proves once again why Avengers Academy is the best Avengers title on the stands right now. Avengers Academy #6 continues their streak with another solid tale, fine art and story, and even a little dinosaur mayhem for Rodrigo, earning 4 out of 5 stars overall. I continue to be pleasantly surprised by this title every month

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7.0
Avengers Academy #11

Mar 17, 2011

This issue is kind of a mixed bag for me, in that Mike McKone is officially announced to be out, and Tom Raney in as new artist. Raney's facial expressions are more cartoony than McKone's work, and it's clear that some of the subtle bits of costumery than I liked (Veil's mask, Finesse' weird costume trim things) may be going away, and I was very disappointed to see that the grown-up Academites look pretty much exactly like their teenage selves, save for a goatee, some digital effects, and Mettle giving up his shirt. Christos Gage, as always, manages to give these characters dignity and identity even though their powers, costumes and gimmicks are kind of familiar. There's a few good lines (Striker has a quip about Reptil getting in the cartoons that's pretty meta) and overall, it's a strong issue. The visuals aren't bad, they're just not as good as previous issues of this same book, and the Wasp swerve wasn't telegraphed at all (save for the appearance of Korvac in the solicits), but th

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6.0
Avengers Academy #21

Nov 5, 2011

A lot of the character work this issue is very nicely handled, especially the awkward not-quite-sex scene and Finesse's obvious dismay at Julie's new role as Quicksilver's assistant, but the new characters barely get any dialogue and no character, reminding me of the old 'Defenders For A Day' storyline.

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4.0
Avengers Academy #31

Jun 11, 2012

All in all, while it's not a bad issue, it's certainly not an essential one. The characters whose title it is are side-tracked and over-whelmed by guest-stars, with core members Stryker and Mettle little more than cameoing in this issue, playing second fiddle to Hercules (which is understandable) and that naked blue girl from Generation Hope (which just flat isn't.) I'd rather have read an issue that was actually ABOUT these characters, rather than just happening around them, and the inappropriateness of the art to the story becomes more obvious with each page. Avengers Academy #31 suffers most in comparison to earlier issues of the title, coming across as talky, while sidelining the characters from the story (which you'll only find by reading AvX) earning a disappointed 2 out of 5 stars overall.

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7.0
Avengers Academy #39

Nov 8, 2012

Avengers Academy #39 is ending before it wore out it's welcome, and has outlasted nearly every other artifact of Dark Reign.

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7.0
Avengers Arena #9

May 9, 2013

As these teens devolve further into savagery, I have to admit that this series is overcoming the weaknesses inherent in the premise (or, to be fair, the weaknesses inherent in the MARKETING of the premise) and delivering some interesting character work. That said, it's slow going, and the pacing this issue isn't the best, focusing a lot on the flashback to make the climax carry enough emotional weight, but it's at least an interesting flashback, with a character whose decisions, however unpleasant, make sense in context. In short, Avengers Arena #9 was better than I expected, with art that works hard to show the characters' descent, and some really nice writing that conveys the volatile and contradictory teenage mind, earning a slightly surprised 3.5 out of 5 stars overall.

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6.0
Avengers Arena #13

Aug 19, 2013

Avengers Arena #13 is a remarkably strong character piece, playing on themes of family and paranoia using one of the original Marvel heroes, while clarifying our timelines (the kids have been missing, by the way, for just over three weeks) and squaring away a lot of loose ends.

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7.0
Avengers Undercover #1

Mar 18, 2014

This issue feels to me like a story that Hopeless & Walker really wanted to tell, but knew they had to set up for first. Many readers hated the journey taken in ‘Arena', as well as lamenting the deaths of Darkhawk, that Sentinel kid and ol' what's-her-name, but had they jumped straight to this point, the backlash would have been even stronger. As someone who has been knocking around the Marvel Universe since Tigra was the newest Avenger, this story takes risks in the vein of a Steve Gerber or a Chris Claremont, stretching characters past what we know about them to make them into something new and different. I expect many fans will still be angry about it, but Avengers Undercover #1 is a strong start for an interesting premise, with good art and some great characterization, earning a very impressive 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. I'm in for at least six issues of a book I hadn't intended to read, a testament to how good this one reads.

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10
Avengers vs. Agents of Atlas #4

May 1, 2010

I'm so glad to hear that this isn't the last hurrah of the AoA, and really happy to have read this miniseries, something I can always say when a limited is over.

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9.0
Avengers Vs. Atlas #3

Apr 3, 2010

Young Nastyman uses his power (that telekinesis, Kyle) to killa yak from 200 yards away.

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7.0
Avengers Vs. X-Men #1

Apr 5, 2012

Avengers Vs. X-Men #1 gets it's point across, starts the crossover off and explains the things that need explaining, and if I take away my worries and reservations about what it's exemplifying, it is crafted well enough to earn 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. There is more here than "And then they fight!", but how much more is still unclear"

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7.0
Avengers Vs. X-Men #2

Apr 21, 2012

My biggest complaint about the issues is specifically that matter of focus, that no matter how good the character confrontations are (and some are quite good, including a Doctor Strange/Magik moment that foreshadows a deeper clash), there's a lack of larger perspective for me. The fight is kept at super-close-up range, save for a few medium shots, and I think that I missed some information that might bridge #1 to #2 by not picking up the appropriate crossover. It's a stronger issue than I expected, though, and it is successful in an individual human level like no crossover since (for me, at least) Infinity Gauntlet. Avengers Vs. X-Men #2 is much more coherent than a book with this many writers has any right to be, and is an effective an issue-long fight scene as I ever recall reading, earning 3.5 out of 5 stars overall.

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4.0
Avengers Vs. X-Men #4

May 18, 2012

Things quickly devolve into madness this issue, as the concept of hero vs. hero is clearly the point of it all, and most of the other concerns are merely tangential. The arrival of the Phoenix will hopefully move the plot along (if the solicitations are to be believed, there are still some twists and reversals of fortune to be had in this book) but this issue feels much like treading water to me. Avengers Vs. X-Men #4 is exactly what it says on the package, characters opposing one another, fists flying and a few bits of character here and there, for a decidedly lukewarm 2 out of 5 stars overall.

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9.0
Avengers Vs. X-Men #6

Jun 26, 2012

I honestly expected this book to be all hat and no cattle, but I have to say that I'm surprised. Unlike Civil War, which ended with a thud, the conflict between the X-Men and the Avengers seems to already have a clear victor, leaving me wondering what is going to happen next. The dark undertones of Cyclops and his compadres, combined with the Avengers discord, makes me think that things will be getting interesting in coming days. Avengers Vs. X-Men #6 is impressive work that might herald something entirely new, earning 4.5 out of 5 stars overall. I know it will likely fall apart in the end, but this issue makes the journey seem worth watching...

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5.0
Avengers Vs. X-Men #7

Jul 7, 2012

Avengers Vs. X-Men Round 7 is what wrestling announcer Tazz would call a rocket-bus, hitting me with lots of action, desperate heroes trying desperate gambles, and intrigue, but fails to give me enough grounding or background to fully parse everything that happens.

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6.0
Avengers Vs. X-Men #8

Jul 18, 2012

Avengers Vs. X-Men #8 is a good comic with some flaws, not quite up to the best of this series, but still above average in terms of reading enjoyment.

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8.0
Avengers Vs. X-Men #9

Aug 1, 2012

I've been impressed with the execution of the main Avengers Vs. X-Men title, even as I've had some issues with the overall presentation of the crossover. This issue makes up for the frustrations of last, making epic cosmic fighty-fighty feel personal and approachable, and delivering a great sequence for Spider-Man that reminds me of his turn in Uncanny X-Men #190-191 back in the day. (He died in that issue, you might recall.) Avengers Vs. X-Men #9 is the reading equivalent of a Big Mac, with no big surprises, but a nice finish with a crisp hint of pickle, earning 4 out of 5 stars overall. You can (and I have) complained about the overall Avengers Vs. X-Men crossover, but these individual issues are pretty well-done. I'm kind of excited to see where all this sturm and drang is leading us, though...

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7.0
Avengers Vs. X-Men #10

Aug 15, 2012

This has been a pretty enjoyable crossover event for me, and there have been some very enjoyable moments throughout, including a couple that should have long-term, meaningful effects for the Marvel U. I truly hope that actually happens in the next couple of issues, but the Next Big Thing is already in motion at Marvel, and the solicits make it clear who wins and who loses the big picture game. Still, as someone said, it's the journey, not the destination that matters, and there's still a chance to make this trip unforgettable, if the creators have the guts to pull it off. Avengers Vs. X-Men #10 loses points in the dismount, but manages to pull of a couple of impressive moments, earning a still-impressive 3.5 out of 5 stars overall.

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6.0
Avengers Vs. X-Men #11

Sep 12, 2012

From the beginning, it was clear that Cyclops was on a slippery slope, that somebody had to be consumed by the madness of the Phoenix, and that the battle pretty much couldn't have a twist ending like Civil War did. Now that we're here, it feels a little bit hollow, although a killer issue #12 with some real consequences might change my opinion of things. All in all, Marvel's reveal this morning did a disserve to me, at least, as I spent the issue knowing that Profesor X wouldn't make it, even as the story itself posited him as the last bastion against the Phoenix. Avengers Vs. X-Men #11 was less successful than previous issues, with a long stretch of overly talky part and a telegraphed ending, but still did well enough to earn 3 out of 5 stars overall. Both the art and story work about 75% of the time, for a slightly-above average reading experience...

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7.0
Avengers Vs. X-Men #12

Oct 3, 2012

I'll admit it: I was kind of expecting a train-wreck full of deus ex machina this month. I was wrong, mostly (there's still a little bit of inexplicable 'return-to-status-quo' near the end of the issue, but that development is actually a couple of years overdue by my standards.) All in all, it doesn't disappoint as a single issue story, and doesn't lose the small moments entirely in the din of the giant guy in the hat screaming "CROSSOOOOOVER!!!!!" I agree with those who say that the death of Professor Xavier seemed tacked on to this whole crossover, but comparatively speaking this is an effective ending to the story being told. Avengers Vs. X-Men #12 avoids some of the bigger pitfalls, with some excellent dialogue and good work on art, earning 3.5 out of 5 stars overall.

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9.0
Avengers World #1

Jan 11, 2014

It is tough to make an issue that feels believable in terms of conflict, but still has sufficient threat-level to challenge a team with a Norse god, a couple of living suns, three alien-ish powerhouses, an immortal soldier, the greatest combatant on Earth, and 40% of the founding New Mutants, but Spencer and Hickman deliver a tale that hits the mark. Artistically, this issue is a lovely affair, with everyone looking great, and even Maria Hill getting some nice dialogue, supporting the example set by her movie counterpart. In short, Avengers World #1 works as a #1, it works as a story, and it showcases a lot of Avengers doing a lot of various Avengery things.

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8.0
Avengers: Children's Crusade #4

Jan 8, 2011

The Young Avengers have been trapped in a cycle of big-event crossover madness since about 2007, with Marvel seemingly willing to wait as long as it takes for Heinberg and Cheung regardless of the wait between series (or, indeed, between issues.) In this case, though, I agree with the decision, as the team works terribly well under the creators and less so under other pens. Avengers The Childrens Crusade #4 is a fine comic with wonderful art, and earns a delayed but still quality 4 out of 5 stars overall.

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7.0
Avengers: Children's Crusade #6

Jul 3, 2011

Given the span of time it's taken to get the book this far, we've already seen changes to the lineups of the teams that cross-over, and the appearance of certain characters in the book seems to imply spoilers if it takes place in the future. Likewise, if it takes place in the recent past, then things involving Iron Man, X-Factor, and the lineup of X-Men shown are already problematic. Of course, when the book looks this good, you can forgive all manner of madness, and Jim Cheung's art is completely heart-breaking in its beauty. You actually want to forgive Wanda for her actions, and a sequence where she and Billy are reduced to tears, realizing their familial ties, is utterly wonderful. Even characters like Strong Guy look cooler than they've ever looked before, and the entire issue is cool and smooth like a frozen frappucino. That said, I found myself periodically dragged away from the story by the question of 'WHEN THE HELL IS THIS, ANYWAY?', a sensation that occurred enough to bring

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4.0
Avengers: Children's Crusade #8

Dec 31, 2011

There are rumored to be big plans coming out of Marvel after this series ends, which hopefully means a little more Young Avengers in our future, but the issue ends up not working as either a cohesive story or as a penultimate setup to whatever blowoff we're going to get next time 'round. Avengers: The Children's Crusade #8 spends all the goodwill credit that the first seven issues earned, hits the reader over the head with the writing equivalent of too much eye contact, and leaves me with a disappointed 2 out of 5 stars overall. At least I'm not worried about there being two active Hawkeyes anymore...

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7.0
Avengers: The Initiative #12

May 17, 2008

Still, it's a pretty good issue, overall, tying up old threads while giving us the beginnings of the new storyline and some new mysteries to focus upon (although the question of who Mutant Zero is, as well as what happened to War Machine, and others have yet to be answered.) The art by Steve Uy is good, but is ill-served by some rather agressive pastel computer coloring, especially in the Cloud 9 and 3-D Man's horribly gauche new uniforms. Chris Gage and Dan Slott bring the funny and the touching in equal amounts, and manage to wrap up the first arc of the Inititive with style, in a 3.5 out of 5 star outing that makes me like Iron Man for a while, makes me dislike Ms. Marvel as usual (dressing up a teenage girl in your old uniform? Mid-life crisis much, Colonel Danvers?) and makes me wonder what the next batch of recruits will bring...

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7.0
Avengers: The Initiative #15

Aug 14, 2008

As crossovers go, it's quite decent.

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4.0
Avengers: The Initiative #16

Sep 14, 2008

Hmm. This issue has a ton of things going on, and it never quite gels into something coherent. Delroy's new importance to the world is undermined by the fact that he keeps having to be pulled out of danger by the Kill Krew, whereas the events at Hammond and in New York are just little behind-the-scenes bits that, once again, tread water with the main plot until Bendis breaks the internet in half again. Dan Slott and Christos Gage give us some interesting dialogue, but the time switches really don't do the story any favors, and the whole "This has been a commercial for War Machine: Director of SHIELD" sequence did little more than irk me. The issue was all over the place, and I'm waiting for Secret Invasion to catch up with itself and GO someplace, already, and the loss of momentum here really hurts this book. The artwork, by Stefano Caselli and Luca Malisan, is actually quite good, especially their technology, and they've finally managed to give 3-D Man a mask that doesn't ma

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7.0
Avengers: The Initiative #17

Oct 6, 2008

This was actually a veryeventful issue, with a lot of plot and a lot of character moments for the regulars, but it suffers a bit from having sooo many different angles to cover. The Shadow Initiative. Ant-Man. 3-D Man. The greater war. The Skrulls final weapon. There's a ton of stuff going on here, and not enough space devoted to most of it. Dan Slott and Christos Gage really know how to put a tale together, but it's a case of a little bit too much going on, jumping back and forth in space and time. The art (by Harvey Tolibao, though I'm not sure if it's a fill-in or a new assignment for him) is fair enough, with Mutant Zero's dressing sequence being the best rendered bit, but there's an element of grotesquerie to his art, with bulbous noses, huge sunken eyes, and (in the case of Queen Skrull Spider-Woman) a chest that looks like she's been shot square in the back with a pair of cruise missiles. His faces have the strange scratchy lines that I associate with Leinil

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7.0
Avengers: The Initiative #18

Nov 20, 2008

It's a nicely done issue, full of geekery and "Hey, it's THAT GUY!" and makes the crossover blues a bit more palatable.

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6.0
Avengers: The Initiative #19

Jan 8, 2009

detracting from the story.

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8.0
Avengers: The Initiative #20

Jan 11, 2009

This was actually fine issue for me, with Dan Slott and Christos Gage delivering a nice script, using the image of the Wasp to great effect, and coming up with some horrifying imagery when Trauma shows Tigra her greatest fear (imagine the birth scene from "The Fly" with a litter of green tiger-hybrids.) The art isn't bad either, from a name I don't recognize, Steve Kurth. His faces are occasionally a bit blank, but the overall effect isn't unpleasant. Some might find troubling overtones in Tigra's decision, but bearing in mind that Greer was a product of the Women's Lib movement of the '70's, her status as Pro-Choice rang fine to me. Overall, this issue was chockfull of moments that enriched my Secret Invasion reading experience, and it hopefully sets up Henry Pym as someone to watch in the New World Order. Avengers: The Initiative #20 earns a nicely done 4 out of 5 stars, setting up new storylines well, and giving us some of the human cost of the interstellar conflict that a

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5.0
Avengers: The Initiative #22

Mar 17, 2009

Humberto Ramos' art feels oddly unfinished throughout the issue, though, and undermines the story a bit.

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5.0
Avengers: The Initiative #23

Apr 29, 2009

Again, good stuff happens, but it's damagedboth by not feeling timely and by not feeling all that important.

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6.0
Avengers: The Initiative #24

Jun 6, 2009

That can't be good.

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5.0
Avengers: The Initiative #25

Jul 4, 2009

Hope still remains for the future, though.

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7.0
Avengers: The Initiative #26

Aug 8, 2009

All in all, it's a strong issue from Christos Gage, and along-overdue return to badassery fromthe legendary Were-Cat.

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7.0
Avengers: The Initiative #27

Sep 7, 2009

Johnny's face turn combined with Greer's perfect seasoning of a dish served cold earns3.

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5.0
Avengers: The Initiative #28

Sep 27, 2009

The little characters bits work better than the overallstory (Butterball's newfound famebrings a smile)but I'm still finding this book too scattered to be really enjoyable.

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7.0
Avengers: The Initiative #29

Nov 8, 2009

In a word: Intriguing.

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6.0
Avengers: The Initiative #30

Jan 2, 2010

My New Year's Resolution for this book is a whole new focusunder Norman's successor (whom I suspect is someone that we have known and loved for many moons.

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1.0
Avengers: The Initiative #31

Jan 30, 2010

Two words: Action.

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7.0
Avengers: The Initiative #33

Mar 6, 2010

The Marvel Universe moves pretty fast, and I'm quite certain that if we don't enjoy these characters quick, they'll disappear for a year or three.

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4.0
Avengers: The Initiative #34

May 1, 2010

Marvel has gone back to their Secret Invasion tricks of showing us everyone's perspective in the moments leading up to the scene we all know about, and it's not working for me anymore.

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6.0
Avengers: The Initiative #35

May 31, 2010

It's a good ending to a decent book.

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7.0
Avengers: The Initiative: Special #1

Dec 20, 2008

Good thing, too, I hear this Secret Invasion thing is going on.

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8.0
Avengers: Ultron Forever #1

Apr 4, 2015

I'll be honest, I came into this issue expecting a forgettable throw-away movie tie-in, but what I got was a story more in the vein of 'Avengers Forever' than the bloodless in-name-only one-shot I worried it might be. The parallels with AF are certainly intentional, but end up being the weakest part of the issue for me, with the presence of two Thors recalling that stories use of two Hank Pyms, and several other moments that harken back to Busiek's story. Still, it's a story that I enjoyed reading and one that debuted a new favorite character in Danielle 'Captain America' Cage.

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5.0
Avengers: X-Sanction #2

Jan 10, 2012

There's a lot more going for this issue than my review of the first one might have you believe, but when you boil it all down, this series (so far, anyway) has been nothing more than Cable putting the smack-down on a couple of Avengers. I can appreciate the impetus that would make you read the book, but I just can't justify the decision to spend 8 bucks (so far) on half-an-issue worth of action and a couple of emotional flashbacks.

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2.0
Avengers: X-Sanction #4

Mar 24, 2012

The past four issues were big, loud and dumb, as well as overpriced and overdesigned, and this issue was no exception. Hope's secret has been out for a while (I think even Bishop hinted at it), Cable's fate never really seemed to be up in the air, and the Avengers were pretty much spectators with a few tough-guy lines (Red Hulk's John Wayne routine about burning out the poison with fever is especially suspect to me.) Avengers: X-Sanction #4 comes across as a big money-grab with little to redeem it, not upsetting or offending, but simply boring the pants off me for 1 out of 5 stars overall. I had hoped the ending would give us at least some tension for the upcoming AvX crossover, but even that is absent here...

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2.0
AVX: VS #1

Apr 26, 2012

On most other levels, though, I have to say that the issue is a disappointment. Art-wise, nothing stands out as bad or wrong, and the Immonen portion of the book is well-crafted in it's farcical sub-aquatic glories, but I all transitory questions of that value pale to the realization that that the book is 20 pages of battle for $3.99, without even a "Previously" page to put it all in perspective. Sound and fury are both present, and the usual Shakespearian significance sadly applies. AVX: Versus #1 is, at best, a DVD extra, put forward and sold as a full episode in itself, earning both utter dismay and 1 out of 5 stars overall.

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10
Axe Cop: Bad Guy Earth #1

Mar 3, 2011

Axe Cop is the kind of comic that reminds you how much fun comics used to be, with a stream of consciousness approach worthy of James Joyce and a strict internal logic that never contradicts itself, even as we go from talking hammers to flying police cars to giants menacing the capitol building. Amazingly, there's re-readability here as well, and subsequent trips through the book reveal jokes in the art and twists of plot that might have escaped the first time around. Seldom has a comic book managed to be so perfectly consistent and flat-out entertaining for a full twenty-odd pages, and at $3.50, this issue compares well to the output of the Big Two. Heck, fifty cents more is a small price to pay given that this issue seemingly contains more plot than the every issue of the first volume of New Avengers... Bottom line for me, if you don't like this book, you are an enemy of joy and should probably find a job pulling kitties' tails or poking at orphans all day long. Axe Cop - Bad Guy Ear

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7.0
Bad Blood #1

Jan 1, 2014

In short, Bad Blood #1 is an intriguing concept, an 'elevator pitch' that seems natural without being obvious, with art and coloring that set it apart from your average horror comic.

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5.3
Bat-Mite #1

Jun 6, 2015

Not quite as ebullient as Bizarro, but still has it's moments, with delightfully goofy art.

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5.7
Bat-Mite #4

Sep 6, 2015

It's an issue that works best as a chapter of the larger story, but works as a stand-alone on the strength of the main characters delusion.

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5.7
Bat-Mite #6

Nov 9, 2015

The wrap-up feels a bit abrupt, but you have to love a happy ending.

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8.0
Batgirl (2009) #22

Jun 17, 2011

There has been much discussion about whether or not the DC Relaunch for September is going to be successful, but I have to say I'm pleasantly surprised at how many people are asking what will happen to Miss Brown after things shift about. Reading this issue, it's easy to see why, as writer Bryan Q. Miller (not to be confused with Arthur Q. Bryant, the original voice of Elmer Fudd) balances Stephanie very well on the precipice between novice and trusted member of the Bat-family. She's clearly learning her craft, making mistakes and ad libbing, but she doesn't suffer from the stupiditis that always seems to claim teen heroes in an attempt to be more "realistic." Stephanie shows wisdom, wit, and even patience in this issue, all the while feeling authentic as a contemporary young woman. The art, by Pere Perez, is quite good as well, balancing a Phil Jiminez quality (a high compliment from me) with a lean-ness that makes both Squire and Batgirl look their supposed ages and heroic at the sam

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8.0
Batgirl (2011) #2

Oct 13, 2011

Overall, Batgirl #2 is an improvement on #1 (which, since I didn't review it, I should clarify was about a 3 star book for me) and makes me less worried about the larger character arc for Barbara Gordon.

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7.0
Batgirl (2011) #9

May 15, 2012

There are a lot of lovely parts of this issue, and the back story has a lot of emotional resonance, especially when the Talon finally explains her actions to Barbara, but overall there's just a bit too much mystery for my taste. Batgirl looks phenomenal, as Ardian Syaf delivers some excellent sequences throughout the issue, but things never quite come together as beautifully as the opening would have made me hope it could. Batgirl #9 is a good one, though, don't get me wrong, and it handles the crossover well (and ends with an effective gut-punch) earning 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. It has done what a good crossover needs to do, as well, sending me out to seek the rest of the Night Of The Owls and see what's up in Gotham...

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6.0
Batgirl (2011) #13

Oct 11, 2012

The first half of the issue is quite good, with some nice tension between the lead and the villain, some real worry for Batgirl's well-being, and the reveal of Knightfall's true identity. Batwoman's arrival works okay, but things are immediately awkward, as Batgirl herself says that Knightfall will easily buy her way out of prison. There's a couple of weird moments, and a very well-written climax undermined by sub-par art, leaving me with a mixed impression of the comic in question. Batgirl #13 makes me wonder if the artist had to rush the end a bit, but has some nice character moments for Barbara Gordon, even if they're undermined by deceptive trade dress on the cover, earning 3 out of 5 stars overall. I'm interested to see what happens with the promised Joker/Batgirl confrontations, though, and this is still my favorite of DC's monthly Bat-titles...

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8.0
Batgirl (2011) #16

Jan 18, 2013

In short, this is a strong issue of a good title, and everyone who lamented and/or cheered at the annoucement of Gail's firing and re-hiring on this book should definitely pick up a copy to show DC just what kind of quality they've got on their hands. Batgirl #16 works as drama, as part of a crossover, as a single-issue, and features the amazing sight of hand-to-hand combat with a chainsaw involved, earning 4 out of 5 stars overall. If I could somehow guarantee that the rest of the crossover is of this quality, I'd even be interested in perusing the mainstream Batman titles...

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9.0
Batgirl (2011) #19

Apr 13, 2013

Batgirl #19 is a good one, successfully navigating what could have been an awkward PSA moment in less-skilled hands, transitioning seamlessly into a satisfying confrontation that was much more than just the fighty-fighty.

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9.0
Batgirl (2011) #20

May 17, 2013

Short form? This is a good'n. Visually, the multiple pencillers and inkers deliver an issue that's consistent, well-rendered, and dramatic, especially in the design of the new villain and her partner. Most importantly, Gail Simone manages to follow-up the big media reveal last issue with the best overall package they've delivered since before 'Death Of The Family.' Batgirl #20 hits the spot, and scares the heck outta me.

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7.0
Batgirl (2011) #23

Aug 17, 2013

This issue is one of the strongest individual Batgirl stories of this run, finally getting away from Gotham City's incessant crossovers and weaker artists to deliver a solid hit on both the art and story fronts. The pacing of previous issues of this book has been pretty leisurely, which has led to me misreading slowly building tension as a lack of drama, something for which I feel foolish now. Batgirl #23 is another emotional heart-breaker, and makes me want to read the next issue immediately, the sign of a strong book, earning 3.5 out of 5 stars overall.

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7.0
Batgirl (2011) #31

May 19, 2014

I think my favorite part of the issue comes in a brief cellphone conversation that Ragdoll has with an unknown party who is clearly Vandal Savage, but all of his dialogue is wonderful, leaving me wanting to take a shower in most cases. Alysia getting a romance is nice, as are the complications in Barbara's thing with Ricky, but DC's editorial schedule has led to this issue feeling a bit odd. Ricky's shooting took place at least six months ago, real-time, which makes it difficult to put all the pieces in place this time around, but the excellence of the artwork makes up for a number of those oddities. Batgirl #31 gets the job done with charisma, but still has a few rough edges here and there, with well-crafted dialogue and wonderful art, shaking down for 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. Here's hoping a full-scale reunion/revival of the Secret Six is in the cards soon…

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8.0
Batgirl (2011) #34

Aug 16, 2014

All in all, this issue serves not just as a wrap-up for this run of Batgirl, but as a coda for the no-longer-in-continuity Birds of Prey series before Barry Allen rebooted the universe in 2011, and is a satisfying way to end a run. Indeed, it's a good thing that they announced the new costume and premise early, as this issue could serve as a perfect jumping-off point for long-time readers, making a satisfying "last issue." Batgirl #34 is the end of an era, but goes out in style, looking good and giving the character closure and several amazing moments for the main character, earning 4 out of 5 stars overall. I'm going to miss Gail on this book, but at least they went out on a high note"

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4.3
Batgirl (2011) #37

Dec 15, 2014

The first issue of this creative team on Batgirl featured a character who spoke in #hashtags, and the focus on social media and the youth culture of today already feels dated. This book feels like it's trying too hard to show us a young, edgy and topical Batgirl, but what comes out is the equivalent of Bob Haney's 'outtasite, groovy' 60s Teen Titans lingo. The art is very impressive, though, especially the moment where fake Batgirl makes her gold-spangled entrance, proving Babs Tarr to be a talented artist whose skills are well beyond the scripts being delivered. Batgirl #37 is a quandary, a muddled mess of story with really problematic elements married to art that I like a great deal,.

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7.8
Batgirl (2011) #48

Feb 6, 2016

Batgirl in her element, with her friends weaving in and out of her life, feels very natural, and the art is charismatic and fun. A solid issue!

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7.7
Batgirl (2011) #49

Mar 7, 2016

A fascinating read technically, with interesting implications and what may end up being a new status quo for Batgirl...

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7.0
Batgirl (2011) Annual #2

May 1, 2014

All in all, Batgirl Annual #2 is a pretty solid issue, making Poison Ivy a character that I care about and relate to, and even a few wobbles in the art don't completely undo the spell woven by Simone's writing.

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10
Batgirl (2011): Futures End #1

Sep 11, 2014

If you need more motivation, I'll give you one last push: This is Gail's last Batgirl tale (at least for a while) and it serves as a perfect wrap-up for all the adventures that have come before, as well as acknowledging the ghosts of stories lost in the purge of 2011. Batgirl: Futures End #1 is that wonderful synthesis of concept, story and art that comes along only once in a while, and the ending is one that is both foreshadowed and surprising, with delightful new and new/old characters in play.

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8.0
Batgirl (2016) #2

Aug 29, 2016

In short, this is fun, frenetic, cool Batgirl at her best, and while I'm nervous of how often her supporting cast has changed, this issue is exciting and engaging. Batgirl #2 features our hero out of her element but still awesome, with clean, exciting art.

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7.0
Batgirl (2016) #10

Apr 26, 2017

In short, Batgirl #10 is a great middle-of-arc issue that gives you all the information you need to understand what's going on without overt infodumps, manages to deliver drama and suspense without a lot of wedged-in fighty-fighty or melodramatic nonsense, and also looks lovely.

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8.0
Batgirl (2016) Annual #1

Apr 3, 2017

I enjoy both of the stories in this issue, and I really like the thematic carry-over of friendship (a new friend in Supergirl, an established one in Alysia) through the issue. Batgirl is very resourceful, smart and heroic throughout, which is a double-win.

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8.0
Batgirl and the Birds of Prey #1

Aug 20, 2016

Strangely, it can be hard to do street-level super-tales in the mainstream shared comics universes, but this book nails the tone and also gives us some lovely interplay between the three heroes. Black Canary is low-key hilarious and witty, Batgirl smart and determined, and Huntress driven and mostly hostile, making for a good balance between the three main characters.

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8.0
Batman #680

Oct 9, 2008

Visually, Tony Daniel isn't the best storyteller around, but he gets the job done, and while the coloring is somewhat muddy in the middle, the high contrast red and black ending of the book and the Batman's-eye-view as he collapses are very well done. It's a strong issue, and I wasn't lost by it, even having only a vague idea of what went on before. Batman #680 ranks a very impressive probably-Stephen-infuriating 4 out of 5 stars, because it made me care about a character I'm not emotionally invested in anymore, and made me remember what's really fun about comics...

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7.0
Batman '66 #1

Jul 7, 2013

All in all, it's a decent chunk of story for 99 cents, and delivers on it's promise of a new kind of comic experience. While I'm not ready to trade in all my comics for an iPad, it's an interesting experience that doesn't try to transfer existing pages into a Frankenstein's "motion comic" as Marvel tried to do a few years ago. Batman '66 #1 delivers on the promise of a meaningful continuation of the 60s camp television show, as well as the promise of something entirely new in comic terms.

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6.0
Batman '66 Meets Steed and Mrs. Peel #1

Jun 12, 2016

An interesting start. Thankfully, the weekly digital format means I'll get more of the story sooner, rather than later...

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8.0
Batman '66 Meets The Green Hornet #1

Jun 5, 2014

I am a bit puzzled as to why Carmel's likeness doesn't appear in the issue while a passable Van Johnson and a so/so Bruce Lee do, but thaz's a very minor quibble in an otherwise very entertaining issue. Smith and Garman work together seamlessly, showing off strong story-telling chops and a real facility for this version of the Batman character, while keeping the guest-starring duo awesome in their own right. Batman '66 Meets The Green Hornet #1 is a strong story, with excellent art that works not only a love-letter to Bill Dozier's TV output, but as a first chapter of an ongoing tale and as a Batman story, earning 4 out of 5 stars overall.

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10
Batman '66 Meets The Legion Of Super-Heroes #1

Jun 17, 2017

With clever dialogue, a perfect handle on the meter and tone of Adam West's Batman voice (RIP, sir), and the dynamic art and colors of the Mike/Laura team, this issue is off-the-charts fun for me. There's even a board-game built in that is chockfull of references and clever bits, including cameos by Mxyptlk and J'onn J'onnzz, making Batman '66 Meets The Legion Of Super-Heroes #1 a home run for me.

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8.0
Batman '66 Meets Wonder Woman '77 #1

Nov 26, 2016

It is a short story, and mostly setup, but it's also a weekly release schedule and a 99 cent price point, so I can't complain too much. The story and art are both immediately impressive, and I love the idea of these franchises crossing over.

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10
Batman '66 Meets Wonder Woman '77 #6

Jun 28, 2017

A perfect final chapter, providing a legacy that the 1966 TV show never got while playing with the 70s and the DC Universe alike, and doing so joyfully and skillfully.

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9.0
Batman '66: The Lost Episode #1

Nov 23, 2014

This whole issue is simply beautiful to look at, and Wein makes the tongue-in-cheek tone work for him, even with a character as tragic and unusual as Two-Face is, and I would recommend this issue to anyone and everyone at $3.99. I'd recommend it to most everyone at $4.99, and even hard-sell at $5.99, but at $9.99 this book is priced way outside of the range of the payback. In short, Batman '66: The Lost Episode #1 is for the hardcore fans of its core constituencies, a lovely-crafted collectible for those who already love the creators or the setting within.

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8.3
Batman (2011) #44

Sep 12, 2015

A really strong one-shot story, with a young Batman in action, impressive art and REALLY stunning colors.

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8.0
Batman / TMNT Adventures #4

Feb 18, 2017

In short, this book is a winner all around, even overcoming the middle-of-the-miniseries blues and delivering an action-packed, ninja-kicking adventures of some of our favorite cartoon stars. Now that DC has realized that there's no shame in admitting that more than one take on their iconic characters can be valid at once, they've tapped into some wonderful stories that otherwise might never be told.

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7.0
Batman and Robin #2

Jul 18, 2009

I'm honestly impressed with how effortlessly this reinvents one of the oldest heroes around.

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7.0
Batman and Robin #3

Sep 6, 2009

The entire first arc of this series has had an extremely unsavory tone (owed partly to Quitely's art, and partly to Morrison possibly being bonkers) and this whole issue maintains that tone throughout. The setup of Sasha as an ongoing character is nicely done, and Damien's realization that perhaps Dick Grayson isn't useless after all is a subtle character moment for a character who doesn't really do that much subtle. I like the art, I like the overall storry here, especially the ease with which Jim Gordon seems to realize that this isn't his usual Bat-buddy. The new villains are creepy, and the setup for something even more sinister is achieved without telegraphing the relevant plot points. I don't have Stephen's love/hate relationship with Morrison as gonzo-storyteller, and I have found this new Dark Knight to be extremely entertaining, new and different. It's a reversal of the old dynamics, but it's working and working well. Batman and Robin #3 earns an unexpected 3.5 out of 5 stars,

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7.0
Batman and Robin #4

Sep 25, 2009

It's interesting to see Grant Morrison's unorthodox writing style with a more mainstream artist, and oddly, the effect (as with Tony Daniel in the 'RIP' arc) is more unsettling than having the stylized renditions of Quitely or Richard Case. Having the characters and the city look so very much like your average bat-book, with the outre concepts that G Mo brings to the table makes the madness that is Batman even more entertaining. I'm not usually a bat-reader, but the first arc of this book was a high-speed thrill-ride, with an arc that was short and to the point rather than drawn out for potential trade paperbacking down the line. This issue joyfully kicks off a new arc, and it's only real downfall is that I, at least, can't think of anyone else for the Red Hood to be other than Jason Todd. If there were other characters built up, it could be a mystery, whereas this seems more fait accompli to me. Dick and Damien's jostling for control of their relationship seems to have simmered down a

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4.0
Batman and Robin #11

May 1, 2010

Either way, the way they handle the resurrection will be what defines whether I stay on the title or not.

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6.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #18

Mar 16, 2013

In short, this issue does good work with the concept of a Batman shattered by loss. What undermines the issue comes from the shortcomings of the creative team, with Pat Gleason's Batman looking almost Judge-Dredd-like and grotesque throughout the issue. The sequences of him wrestling a monstrous tank-like Batmobile work in a bombastic way, but the emotional sequences fail under his pen. Likewise, Tomasi does a good job with the story here, but deciding that this should be an entirely silent issue puts additional strain on a plot that's pretty basic. All in all, though, Batman and Robin #18 acquits itself pretty well, even with the difficulty in grafting emotions onto the ultra-grim-and-gritty New 52 Batman.

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4.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #19

Apr 13, 2013

Batman And Robin #19 isn't a bad issue, but it neither delivers the moment teased by the cover, nor enough emotional resonance to keep the man character from feeling dangerously insane.

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6.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #28

Feb 22, 2014

While I didn't feel like they quite nailed the tone that they wanted in the courtroom scenes, it was a bit shocking to hear Harvey calling Batman “Bruce”, and the ending (which is certainly spoiled half a dozen places already) does seem to make this an important story in the Two-Face canon, I don't think everything is entirely as it seems. Remember, this is set in a world where the Joker had his face ripped off in issue #1, only to return a stronger threat than ever. Batman And Two-Face #28 is loud where it could be subtle, gruesome where it could be artistic, and chockfull of bathos, but still hits enough strong notes to earn 3 out of 5 stars overall. Tomasi is a good writer, exploring interesting themes, but his volume seems to be stuck on eleven, which damages the drama he's trying to establish…Share this:TwitterFacebookGoogleRedditTumblrEmailMoreLinkedInStumbleUponPrintDiggPinterest

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7.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #31

May 26, 2014

As a long-time fan of 'The Brave And The Bold', I'm glad that DC has a Batman team-up book in the New 52, even if it seems to be cycling through existing Batman supporting characters, and this issue tells a clever tale with some nice characterization. Unfortunately, aside from some closure for Batman and Frankenstein (and some admittedly wonderful dry wit from the monster himself), not a whole lot happens in the issue. I like seeing Batman trying to make peace rather than bulling through everyone else because he's the smartest man in the room, and I get that the creators are trying to ratchet up the tension for whatever is going to happen with the Al Ghul family, but all in all, it feels a bit slight. Batman And Frankenstein #31 makes for some nice dialogue and interaction, and has nice art, but doesn't feel like a high-stakes issue or even an important piece of the long-ongoing tale.

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6.0
Batman Beyond: Rebirth #1

Oct 3, 2016

All in all, it's a good first issue and a good redebut for Terry as Batman. Batman Beyond: Rebirth #1 looks really good and is consistent enough in the scripting to make me want to know more about Terry's adventures in Da Future.

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8.0
Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #1

Dec 10, 2015

A rock-solid first issue story, with lovely art and a good balance of tension to fun…

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7.0
Battlestar Galactica: Starbuck #1

Nov 27, 2013

I'm a fan of the old Battlestar Galactica, and fondly remember many Saturday afternoon airings of the show on Channel 41, and with such a short run, it's easy to remember all the details of the 24 episodes. (But not Galactica: 1980. Because #@*&$ that show.) As such, I enjoyed this issue, even as it mostly dramatized events that had already been referenced or described in the television show, but that familiarity is simultaneously the biggest weakness. All in all, Battlestar Galactica - Starbuck #1 is a good book, with some very expressive art, but one that could be problematic, especially if you only know Katee Sackhoff, but still does well enough to earn 3.5 out of 5 stars overall.

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7.0
Batwing #17

Feb 9, 2013

There's a lesson to be learned here about strawman arguments and the power of public opinion, but moreover, a lesson about giving new characters a chance to breathe. As someone who read and enjoyed O.M.A.C., Static Shock and JLI, this book (or at least this issue) ranks higher than my recollections of most of those books. Batwing #17 impressed me enough to make me wonder if I've missed anything in the previous issues, which will send me to the back issue bins and/or the TPB wall next time I'm at Gatekeeper, earning a strong 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. Reader darlings like Deadpool and Kyle Rayner had to start somewhere, and issues like these make me wonder if Batwing has it in him to be the next big thing, despite reader surprise...

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10
Batwoman #0

Sep 21, 2012

The ultimate upshot of all this blah-blah-blah? This book is good. It's a good read, it understands that it has to give us new insights to offset the fact that they just told this tale a year or two ago, and it looks phenomenal to boot. Batwoman #0 is really sort of marvelous, delivering strong art, good emotional impact, and making the lead character awesome without resorting to "Can't armor my head" macho foolishness, earning a well-deserved 5 out of 5 stars overall. I just wish there were a higher profile for the character and her awesomeness, rather than having to exist in the metaphorical shadow of Barbara "Batgirl" Gordon...

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10
Batwoman #1

Sep 14, 2011

Holy CRAP is this a beautiful book. Every single page is just packed with with detail and expression, and even the scenes where Kate and Bette change into their crime-fighting clothes are impressive.

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5.0
Batwoman #25

Nov 26, 2013

All in all, the issue is an okay one, but not terribly engaging in terms of making me want to come back and get dragged into Batwoman's adventures. The layouts and art are good, but Kate Kane looks like almost a different person entirely under the pens of this issue's multiple artists, and J.H. Williams creative layouts are sorely missed. Batwoman #25 serves as a run of the mill issue with a big sore thumb plot point that bothers me like a sore tooth, but doesn't serve to torpedo the whole issue, leaving us with an average issue and 2.5 out of 5 stars overall. It's not a bad book, and I might come back and see where she is once all the Zero Year stuff is done, but I don't feel a really strong compelling motive to do so.

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6.0
Batwoman #40

Mar 23, 2015

One ongoing storyline gets tied up with a bow, but not all of them, as Batwoman's solo series comes to a close.

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6.0
Batwoman Annual #1

May 3, 2014

As a whole, this issue features some nice moments for most of the cast, but the over-the-top antics of Chase and Bones are difficult to resolve, and no matter how well the loose ends are tied up, it has been more than six months since the story this wraps up appeared, leaving it feeling a little bit like leftover pizza. Sure, it's still good, but it might have been better when it was warm and fresh. All in all, though, Batwoman Annual #1 makes the best of a difficult situation and lets our hero get in her licks against the dadgum Batman, as well as giving us some closure on the previous era of Batwoman, earning a better-than-average 3 out of 5 stars overall. (Plus, Mister Bones gets shot in the head, so… y'know, bonus.)

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5.0
Batwoman: Futures End #1

Sep 21, 2014

As crossover madness one-shots go, I've read much worse, and the creative team here clearly has chops and enjoys the world of Batwoman, but I'm just not feeling this story. One of the major supporting characters doesn't seem to get named in the comic at all (though I'm assuming him to be a Clayface) which makes his death less meaningful. All told, while I appreciate what they were going for, Batwoman: Futures End #1 ends up a pretty overage comic with some occasionally bizarre art.

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8.0
Batwoman: Rebirth #1

Feb 17, 2017

In short, Batwoman: Rebirth #1 is a great start for more Batwoman, and even though I would love to see her hanging out with Spoiler and company in Gotham, the decision to spin her out on her own again is both understandable and exciting.

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9.3
Bee and PuppyCat #9

Oct 5, 2015

A quiet, almost poetic tale with truly wonderful art throughout…

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9.0
Before Watchmen: Comedian #1

Jun 23, 2012

Interestingly, Eddie Blake's story is rendered in a much-more photorealistic way than Silk Spectre's or Hollis Mason's, which fits the character well. The use of real historical figures (or at least the implication of them) makes the story feel more immediate for me, tying it to a specific place and time as successfully as Watchmen itself is locked into the mid-80s. The art throughout the issue is very well-done, with subtlety in detail (the appearance of a Joe DiMaggio autograph, for instance) and great facial expressions throughout the issue. Before Watchmen: The Comedian #1 continues DC's streak of well-crafted and thought-out issues, and even though part of me didn't think when this project was announced that these stories were necessary, I want to read more about Eddie Blake, as this issue earns 4.5 out of 5 stars overall.

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3.0
Before Watchmen: Comedian #2

Jul 25, 2012

Sadly, thought J.G. Jones turns in another wonderful job with the art, the story pulls back too far, creating an alienation from the story for me, serving more as an analysis of the Vietnam conflict than as a single comic book issue. Before Watchmen: Comedian #2 is a disappointing experience after last issue's showing, with the real-world aspects overshadowing Eddie Blake's story to the detriment of the issue, earning 1.5 out of 5 stars overall. I'm hoping this to be a one-time aberration, but if you were waiting for the first Before Watchmen issue to really drop the ball, I'm afraid this is it...

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3.0
Before Watchmen: Comedian #6

Apr 28, 2013

Is this an interesting story? It has glimmers of it, and I think that, separate of the Watchmen trappings it could easily be a fascinating tale, but the depressing ending makes explicit things that should have stayed shadowed, and shadows that which needs serious clarification, all the while serving as a less-interesting side-story to a book that I really enjoyed back in the day. Before Watchmen - Comedian #6 even makes it hard to understand what happens in the pivotal scenes, leaving me cold no matter how good Jones art is (and it is pretty good) earning a severely conflicted 1.5 out of 5 stars overall. That the final BW issue released would be so ill-advised seems to be emblematic of the series' overall failure, something that makes me sad but does not really surprise me...

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9.0
Before Watchmen: Minutemen #1

Jun 7, 2012

Before Watchmen: Minutemen #1 is interesting, mixing the new and the familiar in clever ways, and doesn't create any major contradictions or dissonance to Watchmen itself, earning 4.5 out of 5 stars overall. Certainly, if you feel the 12-issue original is sacrosanct and must not be trifled with, this isn't going to change your mind, but if you're able and willing to give BW: Minutemen a chance, it's good work.

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7.0
Before Watchmen: Minutemen #6

Jan 25, 2013

There are some problems here, and I still wonder if the story needed to be told, but this issue puts a bow on a very well-constructed mystery. More importantly, it adds more depth to the backstory of the Minutemen, one of the most fascinating parts of the original Watchmen tale. Will this every be essential reading the way the original series has become? Probably not, but Darwyn Cooke is a very talented creator, and makes a pretty strong piece out of what amounts to a collection of story scraps off Moore & Gibbons work-table. Before Watchmen: Minutemen #6 is a strong ending to a pretty good tale, and though it'll never be what the original was, it's still a very nicely executed book.

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6.0
Before Watchmen: Ozymandias #1

Jul 5, 2012

My initial assessment that this would be my least favorite of the Before Watchmen project may have been a self-fulfilling prophecy, but that doesn't mean this issue is a bad one. Lee does some lovely work (especially the first two pages, where Adrian and Bubastis brood in the Fortress of Bastardtude) and all the pages featuring Miranda, and Len Wein gets the tone right enough that I believe this is the same Ozymandias seen in the original book. Some of his complexities seem to be smoothed down, and his matter-of-fact acceptance of violence throughout the book seem like the creators may be trying a bit hard to establish him as a man for whom the end always justified the means, but it's overall an interesting look into the mind of the character. Before Watchmen: Ozymandias #1 doesn't quite make me like it as much as the Silk Spectre or Comedian #1s, but it hangs together well enough to earn 3 out of 5 stars overall.

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9.0
Before Watchmen: Silk Spectre #1

Jun 15, 2012

For all my worries about the Before Watchmen project, we're two issues in with two decent reading experiences under our belts. The fact that both issues feature a measure of Darwyn Cooke probably has a lot to do with that, but this issue is a nice reading experience, if completely unlike Minutemen #1. From an art perspective, it's an amazing experience, and it's truly nice to see younger versions of Sally and Laurie that LOOK like younger versions of the characters as drawn by Dave Gibbons, and the story is personal and painful as high-school drama always is. Before Watchmen: Silk Spectre #1 does its main character justice, reads well, and looks gorgeous, earning 4.5 out of 5 stars overall. I don't know how long they can keep this kind of quality up, but I'm enjoying the ride while they do...

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5.4
Ben Reilly: The Scarlet Spider #3

Jun 18, 2017

This issue serves as a good example of how a good comic can be struck down by one misguided sequence, character moment or conversation, leaving a bad taste in your mouth for the entire issue. Ben Reilly: The Scarlet Spider #3 is impeccably drawn, featuring some potentially great moments, but is brought low by a writer tirade that makes me not want to come back for more of the good stuff.

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7.0
Betty & Veronica (2016) #1

Jul 23, 2016

Clever writing and fun art, with one super-problematic chunk in the middle...

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5.0
Birds of Prey (1998) #119

Jul 16, 2008

I want to know where this Platinum Flats business is leading.

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3.0
Birds of Prey (1998) #120

Aug 14, 2008

I'm disappointed in this book, which had recently been sooo much better.

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4.0
Birds of Prey (1998) #122

Oct 12, 2008

Tony Bedard is not at his best here, and the art, while acceptable, is a bit sketchier and more angular than a book filled with attractive women probably should be.

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4.0
Birds of Prey (1998) #125

Jan 8, 2009

Tony Bedard has never gotten the voices of Dinah and Barbara to my taste, and this issue doesn't change that.

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10
Bitch Planet #1

Dec 13, 2014

Bitch Planet #1 has a GREAT title, a strong premise and some wonderfully expressive and dynamic art, and clearly has Important Things that it wants to say, doing so with enthusiasm.

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8.4
Black Bolt #1

May 8, 2017

here are a lot of jokey running gags pointed at The Inhumans since they've been thrust to the forefront of the Marvel Universe ("His full name is Blackagar Boltagon") and many of them are justified, but this book does a service to Black Bolt by treating him as a distinct character and not a stand-in for the X-Men. Black Bolt #1 hits a sweet spot for me, combining a strong, complex narrative with unique visuals and a main character who is more than the sum of his parts, making for an excellent read.

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8.0
Black Canary (2015) #1

Jun 17, 2015

An interesting premise, with a well-drawn cast and lovely art. Could be the start of something big…

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7.0
Black Canary (2015) #6

Jan 2, 2016

A literal battle of the bands and some killer art, offsetting some confusing plotting…

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7.0
Black Dynamite #2

May 10, 2014

As someone who hasn't seen the Black Dynamite movie, I read this entire book hearing a George Clinton funk bassline and the voice of Kevin Michael Richardson, all of which led to a positive reading experience. The story beats are successful, but might feel a bit simple to some readers, especially if you're not into the whole retro-70s vibe, and the joke that he's the baddest of all the bad cats and one bad motha(SHUT YO MOUTH) will probably be the deciding factor for me. If you find that to be fun, as I do, then this may be the book for you. Black Dynamite #2 hits a sweet spot for me, with intriguing modern visuals in a retro style, and a main character that's both funny and funky, earning 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. I can, indeed, dig that…

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6.0
Black Hammer #2

Aug 13, 2016

In short, Black Hammer #2 does a wonderful job of balancing familiar heroes in a Dark Horse Heroes Mignolaverse-style world, and does so with some truly impressive art and characters that you care about.

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7.0
Black Kiss 2 #1

Aug 5, 2012

I expect that many people will dismiss this one out of hand due to it's sexual/quasi-pornographic nature, but I'd say that would be a mistake for some. There's a lot to like in this issue, if you're not bothered by graphic sex acts of all flavors, and I'm at least interested enough to see what this prequel has to offer, but I cannot stress enough the level of violence, weird mystical mojo and unusual carnal acts we're probably in for. This issue works for me on the strength of it's art and narrative, but even that is a qualified success, as I found myself surprised by the point where the issue ended. Black Kiss II #1 was tasked with setting up the world and the expectations of this prequel, and did so intriguingly, with attractively quirky art but an awkward chapter break worked against the issue, earning 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. Those of appropriate age and mindset will find enjoyable stuff here, but it ain't for the squeamish...

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8.4
Black Panther & the Crew #1

Apr 22, 2017

In short, Black Panther And The Crew #1 hits a lot of strong notes, the art is well-crafted, and it's compelling enough to get past the fact that the title character doesn't appear, nor do most of the heroes mentioned on the opening "What Has Come Before" page.

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8.0
Black Panther (2016) #6

Sep 19, 2016

Chris Sprouse and Karl Story provide incredible visuals this issue, as always, giving each character their own body language and presence on the page, as well as providing incredible range of expression and a really great take on the Black Panther's deceptively difficult uniform. (Sometimes, simple is the hardest of all.) Black Panther #6 continues the streak of excellence with important plot-reveals, great character work on the main character, and a last-page "HELL, YEAH!" moment that might be worth the price of admission on its own, earning a very impressive 4 out of 5 stars overall. I don't know how long this arc will be, but I can't help but wonder what T'Challa and Wakanda will be like when it's all over"

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4.0
Black Summer #7

Aug 14, 2008

Juan Jose Ryp's art is, as always, inhumanly detailed, but Warren Ellis' script lets it down.

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7.0
Black Widow (2014) #1

Jan 12, 2014

Of course, this is only the first issue, and any and all of my complaints could be taken care of in an issue or three, so I'm inclined to give this book a little bit of leeway (especially given that I love the character, Scarlett Johansson and the idea of solo female comic book stories), especially given that the parts that don't quite work are still skillfully done. All in all, Black Widow #1 comes out of the gate pretty strong, even with an idiosyncratic art style and some familiarity to the lone-assassin-tough-character tropes, delivering an interesting start to Natasha's renewed solo career and earning 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. I'm willing to give this one at least four issues to get its feet underneath it, based on the strengths of this issue…

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8.0
Black Widow (2014) #6

May 13, 2014

Black Widow #6 is a straight-forward action-adventure that looks good, reads well and reminds us how awesome our protagonist can be.

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8.7
Black Widow (2016) #3

May 8, 2016

Tense and excellent, with a look into Natasha's dark past and a truly surprising final page...

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9.0
Black Widow (2016) #4

Jun 20, 2016

Old friends, old foes, but precious few answers. Still a great journey, though...

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10
Black Widow (2016) #6

Oct 23, 2016

It's not a comic book for the squeamish, nor is it a traditional tale of heroics, but Black Widow #6 is perfect single issue, delivering in terms of story, of art and of dialogue, and setting in motion plot points that are clearly going to come back around in future issues.

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5.0
Black Widow Strikes #3

Jun 8, 2012

This issue does well with the concepts in play, and I'm certainly not annoyed or disappointed by it, but there's nothing here that makes it feel like a crucial story to understanding the Black Widow. As with so many adaptations, it's the little touches that the actor brings to her role that make the cinematic Widow fun, and it's hard to translate those intangibles into comic art. They do an admirable job in making sure that this DOESN'T feel like an Avengers inventory story that they repurposed as a tie-in, which is nice, but it's a relatively run on the mill spy tale with a personal grudge subplot tacked on to it. The Avengers Prelude: Black Widow Strikes #3 has to serve more than one master, and ends up being neither fish nor fowl in a very inoffensive way, earning 2.5 out of 5 stars overall. In many ways, it's the ultimate example of a movie tie-in, designed to please fans of both the graphic and live-action Widow without irritation or unwanted questions...

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8.0
Blackest Night #1

Jul 16, 2009

The promotional Black Lantern ring that came with this issue, depending on your location and availability. Even my status as store back-issue monkey didn't guarantee me one, but manager Jim still had some left when I picked up my comics, and I got the freebie with my issue. I'm old enough to remember when they gave away Green Lantern rings and Eclipso diamonds back in the day, but this piece is MUCH superior. First, it's natural circumference is such that it fits comfortably on even my chunky-style hands, and I can wear it without discomfort (meaning no "plastic pinch") on the middle finger where such power trinkets belong. Most of all, it's a tough little piece of plastic, unlikely to break immediately like so many comic premiums. Overall, the experience of this issue was a pleasant one, taking me on a decently handled horror thrill-ride and giving me another unique piece to keep in my collection of esoteric junk. Blackest Night #1 (andit's accompanyingcollectible Blac

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9.0
Blackest Night #2

Aug 13, 2009

This issue is as effective as #1 was in creating an air of menace and horror, and captures the whole "Monkey's Paw" moment of a dead loved one returning to rip out your heart perfectly. The scene with the Atom (who, by the way, doesn't appear with the League at the end, making me wonder if they ate him or something) is skin-crawling, and even the bravado of Green Lantern can't overcome the feeling of oppression and impending doom created here. I was slightly less enchanted with the art this issue, but it's still a good job, and the moment where Black Lantern Aquaman raises the dead sharks is purely shocking. I wasn't expecting the body count to continue rising with this issue, and I'm a little concerned over what happens after the series is over. I hope it's not one of those "Kill the head vampire" moments where Garth, Hawkman and company just revert to normal because of the Worcestershire sauce helpline. Either way, this issue is once again an example of event writing done r

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10
Blackest Night #3

Sep 18, 2009

I've never been a fan of the big giant crossover, but once again, I am surprised at how well this one sticks together. The official debut of the last colorof the emotional spectrum comes at the perfect dramatic moment, and their revelations about the weaknesses and the origins of the Black Lanterns are obviously at the heart of the Blackest Night saga. The characterization throughout this issue is note-perfect, including a creepy turn by the Hawks and the Dibnys, whose corrupt Black Lantern essences make every word out of their mouth a skin-crawling moment of disgust. Hal Jordan is forced to play it safe, Barry Allen is forced to slow it down, and Jason Rusch gets a character-defining moment that makes me look forward to a real showdown between him and Ronnie Raymond. Even the seemingly-silly concept of thesuper-morgue in the basement of the Hall of Justice delivers a moment of true horror, as the bodies of Max Lord, Alexander Luthor, Killer Frost, Copperhead and others lurch and shamb

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10
Blackest Night #4

Oct 28, 2009

It's been public for some time now that the big bad behind all of this was, indeed, the Lord of the Dead his own bad self, Nekron. For those of you NOT conversant in his history, it has always been said that if he enters our reality, bad things are going to happen. We're talking 'Don't cross the streams' bad here, "Zombie Apocalypse" bad, maybe even "Jim Carrey Is Ebenezer Scrooge" bad. (Okay, maybe not that bad, but lord, it ain't good.) Even knowing who was behind it all didn't lessen the goosebumps and enjoyment that I felt as Nekron showed up in this issue, thanks partly to some very suspenseful dialogue and pacing, and partly to a beautiful redesign of the character by Reis and company. Having his Black Lantern as part of a Grim Reaper scythe is truly inspired, and even if you don't know who he is (as most of today's readers seem not to) you can tell that he's bad news. The horror of previous issues isn't as oppressive this time around, but there's still some gruesome moments here

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10
Blackest Night #5

Nov 25, 2009

In my very first Blackest Night review, I took a moment to show off my souvenir authentic space-zombie ring, and this issue of Blackest Night came packaged with a Red Lantern ring, completing my set of rainbow Lantern baubles. My overall assessment of the rings is highly positive, as each one is shinier and more fun that the last. My daughter was thrilled to complete HER own set, but it's nice to have a collectible that, first of all, FITS on my rather chunky fingers, and doesn't make me feel like I'm a nine-year-old giant nerd. Though I prefer the version of the Green Lantern ring that looks like an actual lantern, these are a nice piece of ephemera, and even managed to help DC sell a couple of struggling titles (REBELS and Doom Patrol come to mind.) It's a win-win, as the rings drove business to the store, we sold out of even the most esoteric of titles, and it was a fun little treasure hunt over the course of the last few months. I'm going to wear my Red Lantern ring to work, allowi

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10
Blackest Night #6

Dec 30, 2009

This series has yet to disappoint me, though I'm once again surprised at the outcome. I expected this issue to be more about the faux-dead, but instead, it became about hope and how to counter the Black Lantern Corps. Turns out that the theory of rainbow power Captain-Planet-style is sound, they just don't have enough light-bringers yet. It's interesting how this book is most fascinating when dealing with characters who don't always get first-tier adoration and love: Ray Palmer, Mera, John Stewart and even Deadman have key roles here. I'm liking where this issue leaves us, with our first glimpse of hope, and the choices for ring-bearers make perfect sense, especially Saint Barry joining Saint Walker in the Blue Lantern Corps. (Maybe they should call him Saint Runner?) Geoff Johns gives us new sides of characters we've been able to read about for decades without undermining their essence, and Ivan Reis and Oclair Albert deliver on the art side, with a neat "Sword of The Atom" looking Ra

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8.0
Blackest Night: Atom & Hawkman #46

Mar 6, 2010

The Atom doesn't have to be torturing people's sinus cavities to be interesting.

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4.0
Blackest Night: Tales of the Corps #1

Aug 8, 2009

The art is well-handled, but ultimately there isn't enough going on here to justify the cover price, offering little more than two flashbacks and a mysterious vignette for 4 bucks.

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6.0
Blackest Night: The Flash #1

Jan 2, 2010

MyNew Year's Resolution for The Flash is more moments that SHOW his awesome and fewer characters just talking about it.

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3.0
Blackest Night: The Flash #3

Mar 6, 2010

You don't read this, you ain't missing anything much.

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7.0
Blackest Night: The Question #37

Mar 6, 2010

It's a good way to answer both Questions.

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2.7
Bloodlines #2

May 7, 2016

Unattractive art combines with haphazard plotting and dumb dialogue for an issue that's truly unpleasant to read...

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7.0
Bloodshot & H.A.R.D. Corps #22

May 14, 2014

Deon's recommendation was right on the ball: This issue proved to be an excellent chapter in a story that feels compelling and broad enough in scope that I want to read more. Bloodshot And H.A.R.D. Corps #22 makes for good reading, and has me considering adding the book to my pull list, balancing superheroic shenanigans, back-stabbing intrigue and some nicely handled character work into a solid piece of entertainment, earning 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. I'll be back next issue, and may be ready to add this one to my pull list in the near future…

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6.0
Blue Beetle (2011) #1

Sep 21, 2011

Overall, Blue Beetle #1 has a few missteps, and I would have liked a little more Jaime Reyes while the book introduced it's supporting cast, but it's a likeable little book.

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5.0
Blue Beetle (2011) #9

May 22, 2012

Blue Beetle #9 isn't a bad book, just one that doesn't quite get it's act together, feeling like a middle chapter and earning 2.5 out of 5 stars overall. The art is okay throughout, and Jamie's embarrassed blurting that he's "not aroused, it's just the armor" were cute, but there's not quite enough "meat" to the proceedings to get the book much higher than an average grade.

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7.0
Blue Beetle (2016) #6

Feb 27, 2017

In short, the adventures of Beetle and Beetle (featuring flashbacks to Beetle) are still compelling, and the interplay of impetuous Jaime with more mature Ted makes for good story. Blue Beetle #6 had me with the revelation that Kord still has his bug-goggles, but kept me hooked with interesting story and very good art.

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5.0
Bomb Queen VII #2

Jan 19, 2012

Bomb Queen VII #2 has an interesting concept, and a rare example of a villain who still gets to be hardcore as the protagonist of the story, but the levels of squick, near-porn and the old ultra-violence are a bit high for me.

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9.0
Boo! Halloween Stories 2014 #1

Oct 30, 2014

It's the mark of the truly superior anthology that, even with so many creative hands in the mix, there aren't any major missteps anywhere in these pages...

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8.0
Booster Gold #12

Oct 1, 2008

This was a nice issue, sort of a change of pace from the usual dark and significant Booster/Rip arguments, and the life or death consequences of the last few issues. The moments with Booster in action with Elvis jumpsuit and flight ring are a lot of fun, and Goldstar out-thinking big brother is a running gag throughout the issue. Dan Jurgens' art, which I've mentioned in the past is sometimes an acquired taste, really does it's work here (though it's probably significant to note that he is the creator of B.G. and thus Booster's costume and antics are perfectly suited to his pencilling chops) and Chuck Dixon's story moves at quite a clip. It's an entertaining package overall, and proves that losing Johns doesn't have to be the death knell for this title. Booster Gold #12 ranks 4 out 5 stars, and a clear recommendation for those who like their comic books to still have that long-lost essence of fun.

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5.0
Booster Gold #22

Jul 18, 2009

How embarassing is that? Combined score for both stories:2.

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7.0
Booster Gold #24

Sep 27, 2009

The first half of the book is meh, the second half is shocking and well done, for a composite score of3.

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4.0
Booster Gold #25

Nov 8, 2009

In a word:Conflicted.

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7.0
Booster Gold #26

Nov 26, 2009

This book makes me thankful for the JLI, for Bwah-ha-ha, for Kooey Kooey Kooey, and for the remembrance of times past.

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6.0
Booster Gold #30

Apr 3, 2010

Last week, Kyle took a bullet for me, causing this book to have to rock for 3 stars.

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5.0
Booster Gold #31

May 1, 2010

The death of Blue Beetle didn't break the timestream, why would Bruce Wayne? Bygones.

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8.0
Booster Gold #32

May 31, 2010

Chris Batista's art is pretty much second only to Kevin Maguire himself, and overallI'm really thrilled to see where this book goes in coming months.

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5.0
Booster Gold #33

Jul 3, 2010

Seeking out proof of Maxwell Lord's existence, Booster ends up stealing a videotape from his past self, only to find that it wouldn't make it back through the timestream.

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4.0
Booster Gold #39

Dec 13, 2010

Overall, even excellent art cant do much for an overblown emotional armageddon, and Im hoping that next issue gets us moving again (and maybe even goes into the plot points promised, but not delivered, for this issue as they sound kind of cool.) Booster Gold #39 earns a slightly disapointed 2 out of 5 stars overall, though not for lack of charm and skill on the creators part. Hopefully next month will be more to my liking

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8.0
Brain Boy #2

Oct 21, 2013

As the issue wraps up, I immediately find myself wanting to read more of this book, as the main character is interesting and fun without being a traditional superhero, and it feels like Van Lente is having a great deal of fun playing with the character. Brain Boy #2 surprised me, even as I enjoyed the original incarnation, delivering a one-two punch of spycraft and psionics that hits the spot, earning 4 out of 5 stars overall. If you like realistic superheroics, you definitely want to check this one out...

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6.0
Brightest Day #0

Apr 14, 2010

Based entirely upon its own merits, though, its a strong piece, and Brightest Day #0 earns 3 out of 5 stars overall, providing intriguing kickoff points for a dozen stories, and none of the various art teams can be easily singled out as the weakest link I am a bit Sinestroed out, though.

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8.0
Brilliant #2

Jan 14, 2012

Brilliant #2 is a fun ride for me, worth the addition dollar or so that the creator-owned status makes it cost.

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7.0
Bruce Lee: The Dragon Rises #2

May 9, 2016

Developing the underlying mystery and adding layers to the story, while keeping the solid art and clever dialogue. The premise may seem weird, but the story is working...

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7.0
Buck Rogers #0

Apr 29, 2009

Some solid art completes the package, as Dynamite againrevamps and revives a character I didn'tknow I wanted to like.

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8.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 10 #11

Jan 21, 2015

I know that I read issue #1 of season 10, but now I'm on the lookout for the other 8, as this creative team has made Buffy's life and cast of characters fresh and fun in ways that I had forgotten they could be, and I really want to read more from this creative team. Buffy The Vampire Slayer Season 10 #11 is well-drawn, well-written, familiar and new all at once, earning a very impressive 4 out of 5 stars overall. If you tuned out like I had, it's a great place to jump back into the Buffy fold!

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9.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #15

Jun 10, 2008

This issue moves from the first second, but unlike many last chapters, it manages to satisfy during it's non-stop action. The murder of Renee is a huge shock, but not nearly as much as Dracula's Bad Motha #*$@er moment later in the issue. Willow and Buffy's conversation about "experimenting" is beautiful and funny, and even Xander gets a tough-guy moment within. George Jeanty once again rocks the art, giving us some way cool battle sequences and a mecha-Dawn who looks hysterically like Michelle Trachtenberg. Drew Goddard nails the Buffy-isms, gives Xander steel without negating his humor, and ends the Buffy/Satsu love affair with style and evena bit of dignity. The best part of this issue is the feeling that it's both a pretty damn great comic and a well-done episode of Buffy at the same time. I give it 4.5 out of 5 stars, with the only disappointment coming in the fact that the promising Renee/Xander relationship died when she did... Still, and all, if that's my worst

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2.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #16

Jul 23, 2008

For those of you keeping track at home, that actually means this issue ends BEFORE it began, moments before the Slayers fight off the building. I like that. Karl Moline rocks the art this issue, with a Buffy that looks more like Sarah Michelle Gellar than even Georges Jeanty, while Joss Whedon returns to the story with a vengeance, even though the interim arcs didn't suffer for clever dialogue and tight plotting. This issue sets up a "Who'd Win?" that BtVS fans have been quietly wondering about for a while, though, as the experienced comic veteran, I'll wager they have a short fight due to misunderstanding before combining forces to take out the real threat. Either way, I am really looking forward to things to come, and I think that Kennedy's return to the main storyline is a welcome addition. Even when it disappoints, this book doesn't hit many false notes, and this particular issue does the equivalent of nailing the solo from "Knights of Cydonia" on Hard... BuffyThe Vam

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8.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #17

Aug 25, 2008

Holy. Crap. Kinda didn't see that one coming, I can tell you. This issue's art is handled by Fray's co-creator, Karl Moline, and he does pretty impressive work here, aside from having issues making Willow look like Alysyn Hannygyn (or however one spells it.) The action sequences really worked for me, and Dawn & Xander's facial expressions during the "You'll have to ride me" scene are hysterical. Buffy looks enough like Sarah Michelle that you can hear her speaking the dialogue, while Fray (who doesn't have an actress archetype, at least that I'm aware of) looks as much like a real woman as Buffy. Joss plays with the Buffy conventions here, having Ms. Summers flummoxed by FRay's language, which is essentially an extension of her own verbal fluidity, while noting that future Manhattan is more like Buffy's idea of it that the current edition. It's a very good issue, with a VERY surprising ending (though, I suppose I ain't the first to spoilers it online) and now I'm real

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9.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #18

Sep 12, 2008

This is an interesting issue, filled with twists and turns that I wasn't expecting (the vampires in the water was a particularly breath-taking swerve) and ending on a pretty shocking cliff-hanger overall. I suspect that next issue will wrap everything up, and I hope that it gives us some explanation of what's going on with Willow... Still, Joss Whedon does here what Joss Whedon does best, with crisp dialogue, and characters that have their own agendas, even within the bounds of the story. Karl Moline's art works perfectly with this style, giving us nice contrasts between the shiny aspects of the future, it's dark underbelly, and the woods of Scotland. The questions of "Who is Twilight?," "What's up with Dawn?," "What is happening with Willow?" aren't the main focus, but none of them are allowed to fade away while the main character has her big crossover, something I really liked. This issue didn't really hit any false notes for me, giving me all the value my three bucks could

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7.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #19

Dec 13, 2008

This issue finally explains the whys and wherefores of what Evil Willow was up to, having fallen prey to the immortal's curse. There's some cute moments (Kennedy telling Buffy and Willow to watch their hands in the climactic hug is cute as hell) a couple of bombshells (assuming that it *IS* Riley, mind you) and some nice brainwork by Ms. Summers, not usually known for the grey matter. Overall, the effect is nice... The artwork (by Karl Moline, co-creator of Fray) is nicely done, but not as photo-realistic as one might have hoped for a book like this, making for some confusion in certain situations, but handling the fight scenes awesomely. The pacing felt a bit strange for some of the issue, but overall, it's a nice piece of work from Joss Whedon and company. Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Season 8 #19 earns 3.5 out of 5 stars, an very nice issue overall. I am not sure how long this particular "season" is going to last, but at the very least, it's nice to see that we've got ideas

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8.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #20

Dec 31, 2008

This is an entertaining issue from a couple of viewpoints, as Georges Jeanty returns to Buffy for the framing sequence, delivering a detailed and photo-realistic Buffy and Xander before handing off to Eric Wight, Ethan Beavers and Adam Van Wyk, who deliver an animated Buffy tale that really manages to show what such a series might have been like. All the characters are still recognizable, even Principal Snyder ("Maybe he'll get eaten by a giant worm," sez Buffy. Heh.) and the action sequences are pretty amazing. The only real failing of the art is that it's NOT animation, that is, it doesn't give us the motion, but it's still amazingly detailed and awesome. Jeph Loeb (of Heroes and Long Halloween fame) delivers a Whedon-esque script, right down the Buffy-Angel dynamic, and brings a tear to your eye with Buffy's realization that her mom is calling her to wake up. The seamless transition between dream and reality is handled well, and the overall effect is both wistful and hopef

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8.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #23

Mar 9, 2009

This is a really interesting issue, giving some depth to a character who is often used for sheer comic relief, and even making him an almost tragic figure without undermining his super-geek mystique. If we were to look at this series as a season of television episodes, we're hitting that point in mid February where we get some depth before the overarching plotlines kick into gear and we head out for the big finale in May. It's a well-done series, and the geek cred is tangible (since I followed a great deal of the ephemera that Andrew was yammering about for a page and a half) and gives us a nice little sword battle and some tension to boot. Georges Jeanty does an impressive art job this issue (it helps that Andrew is one of the characters who is drawn closest to his real life actor model)and Buffy series writer Drew Greenberg has a real ear for the dialogue that makes this series tick. Buffy the Vampire Slayer #23 is a good 'un, earning 4 out of 5 stars, adding another notch in

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8.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #24

Apr 4, 2009

Review: Buffy The Vampire Slayer #24By: Matthew Peterson | April 4th, 2009Or - "Sigh... Faaaaith. Mi Querida, Mi Amor... What Do You Mean 'Restraining Order'?"

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8.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #25

May 13, 2009

Heh... With the exception of her horrifying swath of teenage petulance during Season Six, Dawn has always been a phenomenal character, and I really like this issue and the focus on her dilemma. For over two years, we've been getting bits and pieces of the story, because she didn't want Big Sister to have to sweep in and save her from the unknown. This issue teases that, then gives us the swerve, allowing Dawn to save herself (and unintentionally allow Kenny to redeem himself) and letting her stand alone as a young adult. The recent arc of Buffy with it's more loosely connected storyline has been a bit up and down, but original series producer Doug Petrie has a strong handle on the character voices, and Georges Jeanty delivers his usual excellence with the art chores. Buffy The Vampire Slayer: Season 8 #25 earns a strong "mid-season loose ends" episode rating of 4 out of 5 stars overall. In an industry teeming with mega-events, it's good to see a strong character piece done

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7.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #26

Jul 6, 2009

Thisserieswas created to actas the equivalent of a television season, and as such, we're at the point where things look very dark and we know they're gonna get darker before the dawn... It's interesting to see Oz back, though I wish it hadn't been spoilered in Previews months in advance. (Granted, given the name of the website where this is seeing print, I suppose I have very little room to complain.) This issue is one of those transitional episodes, where we are brought up to speed on "The Story So Far," some complications thrown in, and the next phase set up, and in that it succeeds well. The art is Georges Jeanty doing his usual superlative job, with likenesses that are clear enough without being overly static and photo-referenced. Jane Espenson will have you in the "I Can't Believe It's Not Joss Whedon" frame of mind, and overall it's a nicely handled issue. There are some plotting/pacing issues for me (the coincidental timing of everyone's arrival, and what feels

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5.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #27

Aug 12, 2009

Oooh... Ominous. The menace of Twilight aside, this issue is problematic for me in that it returns one of the more annoying portions of the original Buffy television show, the whole "magic as drug" aspect. It's troubling in that we have characters whose lives have been forever changed by magic in relatively positive ways (Buffy no longer a slave to fashion, Willow no longer a wallflower to be ignored) and then have them trying to fight against that nature, which is kind of counter to the whole point of the show. I'm happy to see Oz again and I like the fact that he has built himself a life separate from the craziness that has enveloped the rest of the cast, but unless this arc ends with the characters able to mask their usage of strange powers, I will probably still be annoyed. The book maintains it's usual art quality, and the story of Oz overcoming his own (and others') inner wolf natures is a well-told one, but I'm still left with a vague dissatisfaction. Maybe it's just

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6.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #28

Sep 7, 2009

I'm still unhappy with the whole "addiction to magic" plot point being resurrected, though, and not sure where it's supposed to go from here.

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6.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #29

Oct 9, 2009

It's easy to look at someone else's strategy in retrospect and poke holes in it, but this one seems to be pretty transparent: the magic is the only thing that gave them a shot in Hades of facing their foes with anything approaching a defensible position. Giving it up completely was a terrible idea, a longshot that proved to be it's own downfall. I have never understood, nor have I enjoyed any of the ridiculous nonsense regarding Willow's "magic addiction," even when she tried to destroy the entire universe in a fit of pique. But, I admit that it makes for good drama, and even I have to say that this has made for an interesting storyline. This issue is half setup and half battle, focusing on the overall conflict, which makes it feel a bit remote for most of our sprawling cast. Willow's screen-time is well handled though, and the realization that she shouldn't have given up her magic because she ISN'T going to have given up her magic in the far-flung future is heart-breaking... The overa

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6.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #31

Jan 16, 2010

The last arc of this series was an atypical one, filled with odd moments and stupid decisions on the part of Buffy and her slayerettes, so it was nice to have a return to more traditional characterization and dialogue here (coinciding, strangely or not, with the return of Joss Whedon to scripting duties this month.) Buffy's new comic-book super-powers are odd for me, and feel like a meta-statement about the change in presentation venue from TV to comics, but the sight of both Buffy and Willow flying about the mountains attacking three giant glowing thingamas is a little bit awesome overall. The Buffy/Xander talk is wonderful, especially given that Joss has long said that the long-term plan was once to put the two of them together. His level-headed explanation of things (You came THROUGH gay to get to me.") is both wonderful and tragic for Buffy, and overall I love the way the whole thing is handled, not too much movie-of-the-week while maintaining a feeling that this was really a serio

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8.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #32

Mar 6, 2010

It's a pretty issue, though.

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5.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #34

Apr 8, 2010

Rating Buffy The Vampire Slayer Season 8 #34 serves as exposition and a sense of the shape of things to come, and while its not a bad issue, per se, its puzzlingly laid out:

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7.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #35

May 8, 2010

Rating:As the climax of the big reveal arc, this issue needed to deliver more than just warmed-over come-ons and vague notions of impending doom. As Buffy Season 8 winds down, though, the overall effect is still a positive one for me, and Buffy The Vampire Slayer Season 8 #35 still earns a better than average 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. The art and the stunning cover by Jo Chen (who draws a fine Eliza Dushku, by the way) do a lot to make up for the weaknesses of the writer

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7.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #39

Dec 5, 2010

All in all, I enjoyed this issue, but it would have carried a bit more weight in another franchise, especially one that had such a well-recieved finale episode.

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8.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 8 #40

Jan 20, 2011

I had thought about this issue and the end of this series as a good jumping-off point for Buffy, but I am encouraged to see the creators moving back towards what makes the character awesome in my mind. Buffy The Vampire Slayer: Season 8 #40 is a bittersweet ending with a hopeful note, leading the character into her new status quo ably, and setting up the seeds for next seasons events, and earning a well-crafted 4 out of 5 stars overall. Id say that, for all the good issues of this book (and there have been quite a few) its well past time to move on to what comes next

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7.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 9 #6

Feb 10, 2012

You're welcome.

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3.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 9 #11

Jul 23, 2012

This issue left me pretty cold, sadly, with the character in overly familiar territory doing everything she can to keep from evolving or being an adult, even though she's got to be in her mid-20′s by now. (Wanna feel old? Think about this: Sarah Michelle Gellar is 35.) Buffy The Vampire Slayer Season 9 #11 meanders through a recycled plot, and while it's well-drawn, as always, nothing really happens in this issue, earning 1.5 out of 5 stars overall. I'm hoping that next issue will recover, and that this was just a one-issue slump, but I'm just not feeling this one...

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4.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 9 #15

Nov 17, 2012

Buffy The Vampire Slayer " Season 9 #15 doesn't ever grow out of it's awkward stage, and never fully gels in terms of storytelling (though the art is mostly acceptable), earning 2 out of 5 stars overall. Given the number of characters in the mythos who might have tied Billy's coming-of-age into the continuity (including the main character, who has flirted with bisexuality in the comics) and it just feels like an opportunity was missed here"

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7.0
Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 9 #25

Sep 15, 2013

It's a good solid hit from the creators to put Season 9 in the history books, but there's still a quiet voice in the back of my head that wonders if these characters are ever going to get an ending. Not a happy ending, not even an on-screen death (though the latter seems much more likely than the former), but just an ending, where they get to go off an have lives and such. It's an odd worry to have, but writer Chambliss has successfully captured the Joss Whedon mystique enough that I still feel like these are my old TV Buffy friends, and that maybe, after more than a decade of rushing about getting picked off, they could go and have a Diet Coke on the veranda. Still, Buffy The Vampire Slayer - Season 9 #25 is a solid ending to a somewhat shaky season, and has me wondering what might be up next (especially given hints that the return of magic has all-new rules).

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8.6
Bug: The Adventures of Forager #1

May 10, 2017

Some would say I'm not the target audience for the Young Animal titles, but I have yet to find one that I don't enjoy, and this issue is no exception. Bug! The Adventures Of The Forager #1 just feels like a Jack Kirby book, full of wild ideas, exclamation points, strange occurrences and dynamic art, and the Allreds nail the Bronze Age origins of both these characters.

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10
Bug: The Adventures of Forager #2

Jun 19, 2017

In short, Bug! The Adventures Of Forager #2 is the kind of comic book that makes you sad it's only a limited series, featuring excellent art, a fun story and a ton of entertaining doodads and nabobs and such.

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5.0
Cable (2017) #3

Jul 31, 2017

In short, as a middle chapter, this may work, but as a stand-alone comic book, the combined problems of script and storytelling make it unsatisfying. Cable #3 has some pretty great character interactions between time-traveler and Mayan priest, but just feels somehow off, and too many sequences require rereading for visual clarity or plotting reasons.

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6.0
Cap'n Dinosaur One Shot #1

Jul 18, 2014

Cap'n Dinosaur #1 isn't for everyone, certainly, but has its charms in story and art, with a keen ear for replicating and amplifying the madness of comic books past.

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7.0
Captain Action #4

Nov 8, 2009

In a word: Surprising.

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7.0
Captain Action #5

Sep 7, 2009

Father and son conspiracy-busting earns3.

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4.0
Captain Action: First Mission, Last Day #1

Aug 14, 2008

This issue has a lot of potential, evenfalling a bit short of it's goal.

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2.0
Captain America (2004) #39

Jul 5, 2008

The tension in this issue was palpable, with the plotting and dialogue really giving us the full Monty for suspense, delivering a taut little tale that I greatly enjoyed. Unfortunately, Brubaker's script was let down (just a little bit, mind you) by some overly muddy art by De La Torre. The promised battle between Caps has me looking forward to next issue, and hoping that, by some miracle, Jack Monroe might return from his seeming death to confront HIS ex-partner. Not gonna happen, I know, but a man can dream. Even with the letdown on the art side, Captain America #39 is a solid issue, earning a very respectable 3 out of 5 stars. In either case, the pacing on this tale has been excellent, and next issue promises to give us resolution to at least some of the threads brought up in the death issue, seemingly a million years ago.

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6.0
Captain America (2004) #40

Jul 31, 2008

This issue is a pleasant return to form in the art department, as Steve Epting returns to picturating, and really makes the battle between the Cap-personators looks nice. His Sharon Carter is the picture of determination, even if I am upset at how quickly Der Schadel Kinder took her down in combat. The story has slowed a bit, with mostly emotional resonances, even in the dual fight scenes, and the ongoing implications that the allicance between Fat, Headless, and Arrogant may not be as seamless as one might have thought. All in all, Brubaker still delivers the goods, even if it's not my favorite chapter of the serial so far... With the rather upsetting impalement at the end implying the probable death of Steve and Sharon's baby, I'm left with a slight bad taste in my mouth which mitigates the star rating a bit. Still, Captain America #40 is a strong issue, earning an above average 3 out of 5 stars and bringing us that much closer to the Skull's ultimate goal... whatever it ma

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9.0
Captain America (2004) #41

Sep 7, 2008

It's a good ending, a good scene, and really the first point where I believe that Bucky is mentally up to the task that has fallen to him. This issue is taut, and suspenseful, and I was amazed how easily Brubaker made me feel for Doctor Faustus, even like him, just a little bit, while maintaining his manipulative aura. It's a well-done bit, and his "gift" to Sharon, shows that the fat man has a surprising level of compassion. Steve Epting is back on art, and it shows, as this issue was very well done, from the clear distrust on the face of Sharon Carter while speaking with the Doc, to the obviously exhausted Lukin, to some spectacular action sequences. Thankfully, we don't have a chance to focus on the loss of Steve and Sharon's baby (another annoying example of endangering a child to up the stakes) for long, but I'm still wondering what evil doings the Skull is up to with his final endgame. It's a pretty awesome issue, not perfect, but very well done, and earns a mighty fine

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8.0
Captain America (2004) #42

Oct 13, 2008

This is a very good way to cap (no pun intended) the story of the death of Captain America. We see the beginnings of the new Captain America (no more Bucky-Cap for me, folks) some just desserts for the Red Skull, the beginnings of a new romance, a new career, and a promising new era for the Marvel Universe. Even Sharon gets something of a fresh start, as the James Barnes era is officially underway. Lots of excitement and stuff blowing up, and quite a few plto threads in action. Overall, this was a very effective arc, and this a very effective issue from all perspectives. There were some issues of clarity with exactly what was happening to Sharon in the Skull's machine, and I had to reread the moments just before Sharon's shooting of Lukin to figure out that Zola had transferred the Skull consciousness out of his body while we weren't looking, but overall it's a very strong piece of work. Captain America #42 rates a nicely-done 4 out of 5 stars, and I'm looking forward to wh

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6.0
Captain America (2004) #43

Nov 3, 2008

The visuals this issue were stunning, a fascinating job from Luke Ross, whom I think has replaced Steve Epting on the book. (The pencillers tend to rotate on Cap, so I'm not entirely sure." Ross delivers the goods, with a tortured James Barnes, a formidable Batroc, and a dead sexy Black Widow, both in and out of costume, and his technology is first-rate. Brubaker again shows the good stuff in his dialogue, with Bucky trying to come to grips with going from kid sidekick to contract killer to patriotic icon of millions. Overall, it's a nicely done issue, with some fun moments sprinkled throughout, and I'm glad to finally see James Barnes starting to make his way out of the shadow of his predecessor. Captain America #43 earns 3 out of 5 stars, an intriguing start to a new storyarc for Marvel's newest Captain America.

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8.0
Captain America (2004) #44

Dec 8, 2008

This was a really nicely done issue, and this arc feels a lot like Bucky-Cap finally getting to tread his own ground with the shield and winged helmet. The villain of the flashbacks looks familiar to me, and during the issue I realized that he appeared on an Invaders cover back in the day, and I have absolutely no idea what his name is... A quick web-search yields no clues, thus I shall dub him "The Fandom Strangers." In any case, it's an interesting plot, and it's well-crafted, as always, by Ed Brubaker. It's kind of funny to think that Bucky might have people looking to get revenge on him, but the tale takes it deadly serious, despite any odd connotations that might crop up from such an odd premise. Captain America #44 earns a nicely done 4 out of 5 stars, and shows that this book has life well after Steve Rogers' ghost has been (even just temporarily) exorcised.

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6.0
Captain America (2004) #45

Jan 27, 2009

This issue has a lot going for it, but one thing really irritated the hell out of me when I was done. The title page identified this as "Part 3 of 3." The last page ends with "To Be Continued." Seriously? I don't mind longer arcs, or even interrelated arcs like this, but the ending of this issue isn't really an ending at all. When they gave us Part 1 of 3 a couple months ago, I was stoked to have a short arc to follow up the 16 issue "Death of Captain America" storyline. This is pure bait-and-switch, and it's really annoying to boot. Still, though, the quality of the issue isn't bad, with penciller Luke Ross growing on me, especially in any scene involving Batroc. The Man With No Face seems to be kind of a one-trick pony (grab the throat, phase through the heart, lather, rinse, repeat) but it's interesting to see them growing a Rogue's Gallery all James' own, and the interplay between Captain and Widow keeps its bite (pun probably intended.) Overall, though, this issu

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8.0
Captain America (2004) #46

Feb 9, 2009

As always, Ed Brubaker delivers a gripping tale, without any of the strangeness that last issue left me with. Seeing Namor in action is always nice (when he doesn't look like a drunken porn star, mind you) and the nods to the years of camradery between the former Invaders is very well done. Subby doesn't consider the fact that Bucky was a kid when they fought together to make him any less of a warrior, nor any less worthy of his word, which is a nice touch. I'm still wondering what in the hell is going on with Zhang Chin, as well as what plans are ahead for Jim Hammond (though I hope to see him returning to action, as I've always been a fan.) Overall, this is a nicely done issue, with the usual excellence from Steve Epting, and great moments for several Marvel characters. Captain America has been excellent for several years now, and this issue is one that upholds that honor. Captain America #46 earns 4 out of 5 stars, leaving me impressed with both the quality of the book

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9.0
Captain America (2004) #48

Mar 30, 2009

This is another excellent issue from Brubaker, giving us a Captain America story that almost completely avoids the long shadow of Steve Rogers, and still plays upon the history of the character in ways that none of the other candidates for the shield could have. Namor is played brilliantly here, The Black Widow is smarter than anyone else in the book ("I am a spy, James," she says after not only figuring out his plan, but tracking him down and saving his ass), and Captain America's characterization is flawless. Butch Guice turns in an impressive art job (which, honestly, looks more like the regular art team of Epting and Ross than like anything I've seen from Guice before) and the issue goes down smooth like a pint of Guiness. Captain America #48 continues the build toward 50 in stellar fashion, and delivers the goods on all fronts, earning an impressive 4.5 out of 5 stars. It's hard to avoid comparison to the previous Cap, but issues like these make it unecessary to worry abou

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8.0
Captain America (2004) #49

Apr 22, 2009

For an issue in which not that much happens, this one works very well, giving us strong character bits with Sam and Sharon, the welcome return of Peggy Carter, and following up on the mystery of what the Red Skull was really up to that night in Washington. There's a palpable sense of foreboding on every page, and Sharon's recognition that her memory loss and Aunt Peggy's memory loss are very similar provides some touching moments. The art is beautiful throughout, as Luke Ross and Rick Magyar easily portray every emotion Sharon feels with a facility that makes me extrememly jealous. There's no trace of the main character in this issue, but it still works well across the board, and sets up next issue's #50 extravaganza, which will be followed almost immediately by #600, both of which could be an interesting point to possibly make my post headers for the past two years lies. Either way, I'm enjoying the book overall, and this issue is a nice change of pace well-written, well-drawn

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7.0
Captain America (2004) #50

May 20, 2009

With issue #600 in the wings, it's obvious that this book couldn't be the big giant anniversary extravaganza of Captain America. Instead, it ends up be a big giant pean to James Barnes, something I like a bit better anyway. The struggle of Bucky to live up to Steve's reputation is one that really resonates, especially in the new topsy turvy Marvel Universe, and it's good to see Brubaker focusing on the man behind the mask. With rumors of "The Return" flying fast and furious, this is the perfect time for a little Bucky-centrism, and the story goes down smooth like good barbeque sauce. Captain America #50 earns a well-deserved 3.5 out of 5 stars, giving fans new and old something to get excited about...

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8.0
Captain America (2004) #600

Jun 18, 2009

I believe that there is a perception that I don't like big event comics (not without evidence) and that I prefer DCs over Marvels (again, a case for which evidence exists) but I have to say I liked this issue. I'm not a fan of the renumbering phenomenon that Marvel has beenengaging in lately, but it at least works as lip service to a more historically respectful era of Marvel. This issue worked for me on many levels, with stellar art from many fave-raves, an advancing of the overall plot for the new Captain America, and some nice story work from other authors as well. If I have to pay $4.99 for a comic book, I at least want it to be packed with features, and this issue delivers some entertainment for your five-spot. Captain America #600 may not have lived up to it's media hype, and I may not know how I feel about the seeming resurrection hovering in the near future, but at least the book was a fun read, and a 4 out of 5 star experience overall. I expect that things are goin

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6.0
Captain America (2004) #601

Jul 29, 2009

My first impression of this issue: Why did they ruin Gene's art with such garish coloring? It's as if somebody decided that moody and compelling art isn't enough to make a vampire tale eerie, they needed to Photoshop the crap out of it. Granted, Colan's work has grown more difficult to color as his craft grows more complex, but somebody really needed to reign in the computer guy on this issue. The cover identifiedthis bookas "A Very Special Issue" (albeit not one where Blossom loses her virginity) and it comes across as such, but it's an odd sort of choice in both timing and content. The WWII purview is neat, and the flashback story is well done, but the Civil War behind-the-scenes makes me wary that we're going to see another situation like "Avengers Flashback Theatre," where the stories in the titles were halted, and the monthly issues used as DVD extras for the huge summer crossover. If they do that with the regular Cap title during the run of "Rebornded," I'm going

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4.0
Captain America (2004) #603

Mar 6, 2010

Take a deep breath, and come back in a month or three, and all will be well.

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4.0
Captain America (2004) #603

Mar 6, 2010

Take a deep breath, and come back in a month or three, and all will be well.

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8.0
Captain America (2004) #604

Mar 29, 2010

This arc has had a lot of political fallout and high-profile, but it feels oddly isolated from the overall Marvel Universe, virtually all of which is embroiled in the events in Oklahoma. The addition of some racial diversity (something that I, honestly, hadnt been thinking about in previous issues) makes the Watchdogs at once less crazy and more threatening, but their overall plot leaves me mostly in the dark.

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8.0
Captain America (2004) #605

Apr 29, 2010

Overall, this issue does some good things with the ending of the Two Americas arc, never truly condemning what BadCap and his Watchdogs are upset about, just their wacked out methods. The fight sequences are nice, The Falcon has a couple of serious badass moments (his wrist-claw grapping hook still works, in case you were wondering) and the climactic decision that Cap has to make has a different ending than it would had Steve Rogers been on the book, which is a good thing for me.

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4.0
Captain America (2004) #607

Jul 2, 2010

Overall, its interesting to see into Buckys head, and nice to have Steve Rogers as a supporting character in this title, but the effect of this issue is more of a Hmm, this could get good rather than a Wow, this is AWESOME! kind of experience. There might be some fallout effects from the Heroic Age going on, but the Cold War espionage of this title feels somehow out of sorts with the rest of the Marvel Universe, and I think this is affecting my overall enjoyment of the book.

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8.0
Captain America (2004) #611

Nov 1, 2010

Captain America #611 is a complex issue, using the main character sparingly, but making it all about him in the long run, earning 4 out of 5 stars overall. I sincerely hope that this doesnt end with Steve simply picking up his shield again Thats far too easy, and a cheap copout move to boot.

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8.0
Captain America (2004) #612

Nov 28, 2010

Brubaker is working his magnum opus here, and its fascinating to watch a master craftsman at work in an extended narrative.

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9.0
Captain America (2004) #633

Jun 30, 2012

This issue is well-written, well-drawn, and features two old friends doing the things they're good at: showing off and fighting, though not necessarily in that order. I don't even mind that Captain America has a new lady in his life, though I wonder what Sharon Carter might have to say about it. Captain America and Iron Man #633 is a surprise, a book that might make it back onto my pull list with regular performance like this, earning 4.5 out of 5 stars overall. I have been hearing good things about Cullen Bunn as a writer, but this issue makes all the good press make sense...

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9.0
Captain America (2004) #635

Aug 11, 2012

Captain America & Iron Man #635 is a remarkable achievement, a book that I didn't even expect to pick up that has made itself a must-read, and I hope this creative team will be back next issue, as this one earns 4.5 out of 5 stars overall. I just wish that Captain America's current solo title was anywhere near this good.

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7.0
Captain America (2011) #9

Mar 15, 2012

The biggest problem with this issue is that it keeps EVERYONE in the dark too much, with Cap, Tony Stark, The Falcon, Sharon and the reader all flailing to figure out what's going on with the plot. It's a gorgeously drawn issue, but there just wasn't enough meat to it justify $2.99, much less the $3.99 that Marvel inexplicably charges for this book, among others. Captain America #9 suffers from a bad case of "middle chapter" syndrome, but gets by on its charm and good looking art, earning 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. It will probably read better in trade, but, sadly, Bravo will still suck...

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3.0
Captain America (2011) #12

May 26, 2012

Captain America #12 is a disappointment for me, with sizable problems in both the art and story.

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7.0
Captain America (2012) #23

Aug 19, 2014

Captain America #23 raises a few questions, a few red flags, and looks good, but doesn't back away from the most problematic aspects of this arc (re: Jet Black) but makes for an entertaining and complete single-issue read that makes me want to come back next time around.

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4.0
Captain America: Reborn #1

Jul 2, 2009

There are a number of interesting things going on in this issue. The continuation of Sharon Carter's character arc is nicely handled, as we're once again shown what made her SHIELD's finest. The art is well-handled throughout, and Bryan Hitch delivers. Zola and Osborn have a long conversation that explains how Marvel's claims that Cap was really, most sincerely dead, even though this loophole to resurrect him exists that almost works for me. It's the almost that ends up being the downfall. I'm reminded of the moment after "The Other" where Peter Parker and Tony Stark have a pointed on-panel conversation explaining a seeming plot inconsistency after which they both look at the reader as if to say "So stop complaining about it already..." My gravest reservation, though, comes from the previous fifty issues of the Captain America title. Brubaker has gone to great lengths to give us a Captain America story that is set in the shared universe, but keeps the characters on a more

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7.0
Captain America: Reborn #2

Aug 6, 2009

My greatest complaint about this issue (and indeed about last issue as well) is that Bryan Hitch drawing Captain America cannot help but evoke images of ULTIMATE Captain America, who I consider to be a less interesting character. Sure, it makes perfect sense that he wouldn't go into battle wearing a cowl and wings on his head, but the helmet and belt pouches motif is similar enough that one can't help but make comparisons. The story here is interesting enough, but it's been set up for the better part of 2 years in Cap's regular title, giving me kind of a sense of "Okay, I remember this, let's go." Still, the characterization is strong throughout, and Steve's attempts to control his situation make me think that he's going to be an active part in his own rescue, rather than a living macguffin throughout this mini, so that's nice. It's well drawn, and well-written, with a clever if not really shocking twist at the end, as the media goes into feeding frenzy mode at the release of t

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9.0
Captain America: Reborn #3

Sep 20, 2009

The art on this issue is fan-freakin'-tastic, with Bryan Hitch reminding me of why I liked him waaay back when he took over She-Hulk from John Byrne. The awkwardness that made his Fantastic Four so difficult to read is gone here, leaving behind the epic scale and clear storytelling that made Ultimates fun. Ed Brubaker seems to be having fun here, weaving together plot-threads and hints from the last three years of Cap and related side-stories. There's still two issues to go here, so I imagine a few twists are still in store before we deal with the actual revelations and/or resurrections. My major disappointment here is in how much I like James Barnes as Captain America, and (much as with Barry Allen) how bringing back the old guy feels a little bit too much like the return of the status quo. Still and all, this issue is the first where Steve actually gets to DO something heroic, which is nice, and the story isn't sagging the way some five issue stories with 'Rebirth' in the title seeme

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5.0
Captain America: Reborn #4

Nov 4, 2009

Ed Brubaker is a very, very good writer. His story of the events leading up to the return of Bucky, the conspiracy, the death of Rogers, the ascension of former sidekick to center stage was riveting, and even when it sagged, you desperately wanted to know what came next. This story, for a number of reasons, is denied that sense of uncertainty, that confusion over whether it's real or not. I suspect that this return is what Marvel really wanted to tell when this whole thing was put together, but they did their job TOO well. They involved me so much in what Steve meant, how he died, how his friends mourned, that the revival itself just falls a bit flat. Bryan Hitch and Butch Guice provide some good art in the issue, although I felt again that Hitch was falling back too much on his design work for Ultimate Cap in Ultimates. All in all, this issue is well-done, but for some reason, I just couldn't get engaged bythe story. The announcement that we're going another issue of this series befor

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7.0
Captain America: Reborn #5

Dec 18, 2009

This issue is a good one from an action perspective, with an all out battle between robot monsters and the Avengers, the fight between Cap and Red Skull in Steve's mind, and the fighty-fighty of battlin' Caps against a backdrop that represents liberty itself. That said, there's not a lot OTHER than the action going on here, as Steve's participation is kind of tangental to the action. Bryan Hitch's art is always good, but here he reaches heights that I haven't seen since The Ultimates Version 1 a few years ago. I can certainly see why they chose to expand this series, though, as finishing everything up in this issue could easily have made it all cramped. This issue, like Flash Rebirth #5, features a battle between resurrected hero and their definitive villain, but here it works better for a couple of reasons. Brubaker doesn't spend a lot of time analyzing WHY Steve Rogers would stand against the Red Skull, it just has him do it, and more importantly, has him do it definitively. We're in

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6.0
Captain America: Reborn #6

Jan 29, 2010

So, the real question here isn't necessarily the quality of the tale within, but instead whether it was worth the wait and the time anomalies that accompanied the additional issue. Let's be honest here, when this series was launched, the TITLE made it quite clear that Steve Rogers wasn't as dead as my headlines would have made one believe. This didn't change the fact that the issues thatcame AFTER the events of this one having Steve in them bothered people, maybe even enraged a few... And the intent of the additional issue was to give this story more room to breathe. Problem I have with that is, this issue is mostly fight scene. Sure, it's an interesting fight scene, full of MODOKS and giants and GLAYVIN, but... it's a fight scene. The most interesting parts of the battle between Steve and Johann was in the last issue, and if you just take this issue on it's own merits, the psychic battle is too short, and ends abruptly. Bryan Hitch always does good things with art, but this issue take

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5.3
Captain America: Sam Wilson #6

Feb 8, 2016

Nice character work, a nice reveal of the new Falcon, but the story is *incredibly* heavy-handed and awkward in it's political commentary…

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6.3
Captain America: Sam Wilson #7

Apr 4, 2016

Some lovely short stories and a nice look into what it means to be Captain America, sadly overshadowed by a massive line-wide Avengers Crossover.

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7.3
Captain America: Sam Wilson #11

Jul 10, 2016

Difficult topics, handled better than I worried they would be, with excellent art. Still can't wait til Civil War II is over...

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6.0
Captain America: Steve Rogers #4

Aug 28, 2016

Captain America, Steve Rogers #4 is a beautifully drawn collection of drawn-out dialogues that ends up feeling like 20 pages of lecture punctuated by blood.

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8.0
Captain America: Who Will Wield the Shield? #1

Jan 3, 2010

Oooh, that's ominous. Kinda makes you wonder about what that thing could be, doesn't it? I don't suppose it would have anything to do with a former gobliny guy rapidly going right around the bend, would it? Either way, I'm happy that Marvel gave me a swerve in this issue. I expected (as I'm sure many of you did) a Steve Rogers' Greatest Hits compilation, ending with him returning to the Avengers in glory, and they managed to give me something intriguing instead. The art shifts throughout the issue, mimicking classic Captain America art teams as we go. The Colan pastiche in particular was incredibly good, making me wonder if Gene didn't actually participate in the art himself. As interstitial stories go, this is a good one, giving both Captain America IX and Captain America I their due, and even deepening their friendship, nice work by writer Ed Brubaker here. They also make the point that Cap and Bucky worked together for only FIVE YEARS during the war before going their separate froze

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3.0
Captain America: Who Won't Wield The Shield #1

Apr 23, 2010

Is it funny? Occasionally, in a I hadnt thought of that sense, or if the thought of Brian Bendis getting killed and Matt Fraction replying I guess Im writing a dozen more books! makes you giggle. It is pretty, though Captain America Who Wont Wield The Shield #1 is pretty much a mess, earning 1.5 out 5 stars overall. The real joke is probably on the folks who pay $3.99 to own it.

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3.0
Captain Atom #1

Sep 22, 2011

Captain Atom #1 leaves me both confused and visually overwhelmed.

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3.0
Captain Atom #12

Aug 18, 2012

It's one thing to be influenced by a character, but this rendition of Captain Atom is pretty much a straight adaptation of Doctor Manhattan without the visible genitalia, and this issue does little to make the character stand out for me. This issue is the first of the wrap-ups to feel really rushed in it's exit, ending on a strange unresolved note (which I kind of hope will leave the character in play for another creative team.) Captain Atom #12 doesn't quite get it right with either story OR art, coming across as rather unfocused and not particularly engaging, even for an old fan of the Captain Atom character in both previous incarnations, earning a disappointed 1.5 out of 5 stars overall. As the Third Wave of the New 52 kicks off in the coming months, I just hope that the potential that Captain Atom has isn't forever lost in the shuffle...

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6.0
Captain Britain and MI:13 #5

Oct 12, 2008

THEN STAKES HER THROUGH THE HEART.

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6.0
Captain Britain and MI:13 #6

Nov 20, 2008

"I believe that's your wife?" Some of the characterization is pretty opaque, notably the Blade/Spitfire interactions, but overall, it's a strong issue.

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6.0
Captain Britain and MI:13 #7

Nov 25, 2008

This series reminds me of the recently-departed Checkmate, in that it has a lot of characters who have played relatively minor roles in other series, working together with a common goal. Writer Paul Cornell does make it a very British book, which is a definite plus for Marvel. Too often, their heroes all seem to be stuck in New York together. The art, by Leonard Kirk, is very well done, though I'm not too keen on the Black Knight's t-shirt, jeans, leather jacket and giant heraldic helmet combo. Faiza Hussain is turning into an interesting P.O.V. character, but this issue, while interesting, feels a bit rushed. Perhaps it's just a matter of the pacing, but I might have wanted more "Heart's Desire" scenes interwoven in, and more time devoted to Blade and Spitfire. Over all, though, it's an interesing issue of one of Marvel's more eclectic titles, and keeps me interested in coming back next month. Captain Britain and MI:13 #7 earns 3 out of 5 stars, with the hope that they m

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7.0
Captain Britain and MI:13 #12

Apr 29, 2009

Good read, with good characters, andthe art ain't bad either.

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5.0
Captain Britain and MI:13 #13

Jun 6, 2009

Blade (whom I haven't liked this much inyears) is the real star here, but the overall issue is a bit flat.

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7.0
Captain Britain and MI:13 #15

Aug 8, 2009

It's a strong ending that makes me sad we couldn't get another 10 issues out of this premise and the team.

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8.0
Captain Canuck #7

Mar 21, 2016

An interesting update of a character that many might not remember, with strong art and a compelling story...

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7.0
Captain Marvel (2012) #2

Aug 17, 2012

The biggest complaint about this issue that's NOT related to the choice of cover artists is the sudden way that the timeskip is sprung on the reader. We're watching Carol crash her plane, in a life or death struggle with gravity, when suddenly, BANG! It's 1943, and nothing we know is right. Did she crash? Is she hallucinating? Has there been an external force in play? We don't know, and while the rest of the issue is interesting, but the questions of what in the blue hell is going on never really leaves my mind. Still, Captain Marvel #2 looks great and makes the character appealing and approachable even in a strange land, earning 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. I'm happy to see Captain Marvel getting a good start, even as I'm leery of the cover-versus-interiors problem...

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6.0
Captain Marvel (2012) #12

Apr 20, 2013

The problem with this character is, for me, the same problem that plagues Hal Jordan since his resurrection: It's hard to deliver the "Maverick" that you want without dipping into "Iceman" territory, and too often both characters are written as utterly cavalier and obnoxious in an attempt to make them seem edgy and cocky. Still, DeConnick delivers with plotting and dialogue that makes us Carol's invisible confidante, seeing her weaknesses and making her relatable while staying heroic. Captain Marvel #12 wasn't a giant revelation, but it was a solid issue creatively, and went a long way towards rehabbing my recurring dislike of Carol Danvers when written poorly.

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9.0
Captain Marvel (2014) #3

May 20, 2014

There's political intrigue with the Spartax, a difficult moral problem that parallels real-world refugees and the historical plight of the American Indian, and our hero is faced with the realization that her pre-judgements of a situation may have been entirely wrong and Captain Marvel coming face-to-face with at least three situations that she can't solve with photon bursts and raw power, making for a really interesting read. In short, Captain Marvel #3 looks great, provides a fascinating and nuanced story, and finally fully convinces me that editorial is serious about Captain Marvel standing alongside Thor, Iron Man and the rest at the top of the superhero heap, earning 4.5 out of 5 stars overall. Heck, even the “Mohawk space-helmet” works here! I recommend that you check this book out…

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7.0
Captain Marvel (2014) #7

Sep 16, 2014

I'm a little bit surprised to say that I'm enjoying Carol's space-travel story, as I was worried that we'd covered the star-faring superhero territory a bit too well in the past. If the secret of Captain Marvel's kitty is what it seems to be, we may be in for a hell of a ride over the next couple of issues, but it's a ride I'm nonetheless looking forward to. Captain Marvel #7 is an issue with a lot of charm and quiet development before the weird stuff kicks in, with a surprising turn halfway through, and some really lovely art (which is a theme in this title over the last couple of years).

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10
Captain Marvel (2014) #15

May 16, 2015

Incredibly touching, very personal, and emotionally powerful. Highly recommended.

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8.0
Captain Marvel (2016) #1

Jan 25, 2016

A new role and some new faces, but the same awesome Carol Danvers, making for an impressive debut issue…

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7.0
Captain Marvel (2016) #4

Apr 24, 2016

Captain Marvel with her back against the wall is great fun, and the supporting cast does great things. A nice overall issue...

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7.0
Captain Marvel And The Carol Corps #1

Jun 12, 2015

A strange new world, but a familiar Carol Danvers, even if the Secret Wars trappings are kind of inscrutable…

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5.0
Cars: The Rookie #1

Apr 6, 2009

It's kinda cute in it's "Say one thing, show something different" bits, though, and overall I suspect it will hit well enough for the target audience.

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10
Casanova: Gula #1

Jan 14, 2011

Im honestly going to be picking up the rest of this series to see where it ends up going, the most successful sign of a good #1 issue. Casanova: Gula #1 earns a very impressive 5 out of 5 stars overall, making me wish Id been onboard with this title since day one To the back issue bins!

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7.0
Catwoman (2011) #51

Apr 18, 2016

Building both mystery and in-universe mythology with skill, and being pretty scary doing so... Good stuff!

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4.0
Catwoman (2011) Annual #1

Jun 1, 2013

All in all, this issue feels very routine, a standard outing for a bat-book, with some good art on board, and very little that makes me want to love the current Catwoman direction. Selena has some interesting moments confronting the Penguin (honestly, if there were more such scenes in the issue, would have merited a higher score) but spends entirely too much time openly stating her beliefs and plans rather than acting on them. Catwoman Annual #1 isn't a bad issue, but it doesn't stand out as unique in either art or script, falling entirely within the dotted lines of a standard Gotham City tale.

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8.6
Cave Carson Has A Cybernetic Eye #1

Oct 19, 2016

Fortunately, this issue doesn't suck, so I don't have to worry about such frippery, as Cave Carson Has A Cybernetic Eye #1 ends up being a great first issue in both art and story, making me wonder how hard it is to track down the character's previous appearances.

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8.0
Cave Carson Has A Cybernetic Eye #2

Nov 17, 2016

Of all the Young Animal books, this is the one I picked as the weirdest and the one I had the least expectations of, but Way, Rivera and Oeming have put that all to shame with a story that reminds me of an Indiana Jones tale, only set in the DC Universe. With explosions. I do like the explosions. Cave Carson Has A Cybernetic Eye #2 is even better than the strong first issue, with wonderful art, expertly paced action and well-written, fun story from cover to cover.

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8.6
Cave Carson Has A Cybernetic Eye #4

Jan 19, 2017

Once again, Cave Carson Has A Cybernetic Eye #4 brings the quality, with an excellent art job and some nicely tense plotting, as well as a few surprising moments.

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7.0
Cave Carson Has A Cybernetic Eye #5

Feb 15, 2017

In short, my love for the Young Animal books and their off-beat humor still persists, and this issue gives us a little more plot and a killer cliffhanger to make us all wonder what happens next and who will survive. Cave Carson Has A Cybernetic Eye #5 is exciting, well-drawn and fun, with even the moments of conversation staying visually exciting and providing a solid framework on which to hide the weird bits.

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7.6
Champions #4

Jan 8, 2017

A lot of great interaction and character moments with some real tension and a nice "working together" ending sequence. It's a good book.

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8.0
Champions #9

Jun 11, 2017

If I have my way, we've just seen the debut of the new hotness, the next Squirrel Girl, the next Deadpool in Fernanda, and I would love to see her join the team in a permanent manner. Of course, with the Secret Empire crossover going on, there's no telling when this book will return to stories that aren't about terrible dystopian hellscapes, so I'm keeping my fingers crossed, but Champions #9 is a wonderful spotlight issue for a Champion who deserves it, featuring lovely writing and dialogue.

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8.0
Chaos War #1

Oct 7, 2010

Chaos War #1 earns a mighty 4 out of 5 stars overall, setting up our conflict without ever pulling plot points out of thin air, and giving the latest crossover madness a strong takeoff (with some turbulance for our heroes.) Its good to have Hercules back again Now, where in the heck is my Iron Fist?

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2.0
Checkmate #30

Oct 12, 2008

I wish I could say that I'll miss this book, but honestly, the Checkmate I enjoyed ended when Jones took over.

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2.0
Checkmate #31

Nov 23, 2008

I have to say, I really didn't like this issue that much. Bruce Jones delivered an okay plot, but the issue was bogged down by some cliche dialogue, and some pretty terrible characterization. I quite disliked the moment when Crimson Fox flashed the embodiment of evil, and the whole "I Am Legion" litany of names was just silly and distracting in the middle of what was meant to be a compelling battle sequence. Manuel Garcia's art is pretty good, though, and his take on female characters Gloss, Jet, and Fire is particularly welcome. Of course, Chimera's deus ex machina powers and awful gray character design don't do his work any favors, either. The wrap-up is one of those moments where you can literally hear the writer saying, "Crap! Only two pages left!" and the ham-fisted metaphorical imagery in the denoument is inexcusable. Overall, I'd have to say that I'm upset that this arc killed a book that I really liked, and doubly annoyed at the overt Mary Sue-ism thatChimera re

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9.0
Chew #30

Dec 1, 2012

Chew is one of those books that I drift in and out of from month to month, a pattern that I also follow with Fables and The Walking Dead, and I always get a great deal of pleasure out of each. (I also end up going back and re-reading all three books in order, though at the risk of being outed as a 'trade-waiter.') Chew #30 changes the game in a very heavy-duty way, pulling off a double-twist, and closing out the book with the secret origin of Caesar, done in a way that evokes Charles Schultz without undermining the sheer eye-popping horror of the central third of the book, earning 4.5 out of 5 stars overall. I've you're a lapsed Chew reader, pick up the last couple of issues with this one, and try to avoid spoilers before you do it. It'll be worth the trip...

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8.0
Cinderella: Fables are Forever #6

Jul 23, 2011

I love the art in this series, with Shawn McManus delivering a recognizable version of both Dorothy and Cindy, while making sure that their faces are ridiculously expressive. Every single thought she has is written large across Dorothy's face, while Cinderella keeps her secrets, and the effect is the same as watching two excellent actresses duel it out on screen. Even a seeming conflict with the established Fables continuity is deftly dealt with, adding another layer of intrigue to these events. It's really hard not to love the Fabletown regulars, and it's a shame that I don't get to check in with them as often as I'd like... Cinderella: Fables Are Forever #6 hits the spot in a very personal way, avoiding talkiness with sheer energy and momentum, earning 4 out of 5 stars overall. It's good stuff.

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6.3
Civil War II #1

Jun 3, 2016

Beautifully drawn, awkwardly plotted, seriously over-priced...

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6.0
Civil War II #6

Oct 31, 2016

There is much drama and changing of sides here, but it's all presented as conversation and stalking away, which makes it feel like the issue is light on story. (It's actually not, quite a few characters make important decisions in this issue which change the nature of the conflict, but the way it is presented makes it easy to miss a lot of that.) Civil War II #6 is the story of the bottom falling out for Captain Marvel, featuring lovely art and a story that dwells much on the talky-talky but misses the importance of the conversations.

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4.0
Civil War II: The Accused #1

Aug 14, 2016

The biggest question of this issue, of course, is why it doesn't take place within the actual Civil War II series, since it's a big part of the main storyline for the entire crossover, but I suppose that's a battle you can't help but lose, as Marvel's one-shot strategy has been in place for decades now. All in all, Civil War II: The Accused #1 delivers some okay art with a really obvious and awkward plot, featuring page after page of courtroom scenes that feel like broad parody.

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8.0
Civil War II: The Fallen #1

Aug 22, 2016

I won't say that this lovely celebration makes the Hulk's death worth it, but it goes a long way towards proving that Marvel really understands what they're doing when they kill off their big names in the massive company crossover messes. The quiet moments of friendship and family (the surviving founding Defenders come to pay their regards to their old compatriot, as does frequent sparring partner Hercules) are well-done and the final page leads me to think that there are more serious consequences coming.

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9.0
Clean Room #1

Oct 23, 2015

Something very unsettling is happening with this book, and the measured approach to the plotting heightens the tension with every page. Plus: The art is lovely throughout.

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9.0
Clean Room #17

Mar 29, 2017

As always, with a title like this you can't be too careful: This is not for the under 18 set or those who dislike body horror and the occasional act of senseless violence. But, for those who care to partake, Clean Room #17 manages the difficult task of balancing psychological horror bits with a more visceral approach, with excellent art and writing and a stellar cast of characters.

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8.0
Constantine: Futures End #1

Sep 14, 2014

While I'm still not entirely convinced on the necessity of the Futures End gimmick month (or, indeed, even the underlying point thereof), there have been a few strong stories being told in the midst of the chaos, and this is one of them. There are a few references to the greater world, but it's mostly just the main character in a battle of wills in a locked room, and it's glorious in its simplicity. Constantine: Futures End #1 is a character study done very well, moody and fraught with mystery, with some excellent art and a nice twist ending.

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7.3
Constantine: The Hellblazer #1

Jun 11, 2015

Well-written and moody, with effective (if oddly crude) art… A nice return for the Hellblazer.

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5.3
Contest Of Champions #1

Oct 12, 2015

It feels weird coming out at the same time as the Secret Wars does similar tricks, but it's pretty strong for a video game adaptation…

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3.2
Convergence: Action Comics #2

May 30, 2015

Stilted dialogue, strangely bulbous and inconsistent art, and a big unanswered question… (Also: It ties into Convergence #6, which came out two weeks ago, making it feel out of date already.)

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7.7
Convergence: Batman and the Outsiders #1

Apr 24, 2015

Solid character-building, but not much actually happens.

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7.3
Convergence: Batman and the Outsiders #2

May 25, 2015

A well-drawn issue, with nice character work, that ends abruptly (but at least it gets an ending.)

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6.3
Convergence: Green Arrow #2

May 18, 2015

Two Green Arrow and two Black Canaries fighting a battle that, for all the interesting character bits, turns out to be utterly moot.

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6.3
Convergence: Green Lantern/Parallax #2

May 18, 2015

A good-looking issue that revisits the rivalry/friendship of Earth's greatest Green Lanterns (but nobody tell Gardner I said that.)

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5.7
Convergence: Harley Quinn #1

Apr 10, 2015

Again, fun character work in a setting that seems to actively fight the story being told, but an okay issue for Harley-philes.

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5.7
Convergence: Harley Quinn #2

May 11, 2015

A strange setup, structural issues with the story, but some fun art, rounding out to a puzzling whole.

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5.0
Convergence: Infinity Inc. #1

Apr 30, 2015

A puzzling book on a number of levels, with lovely art in places…

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5.0
Convergence: Infinity Inc. #2

May 31, 2015

Oddly inconsistent, tonally and artistically…

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5.0
Convergence: Justice League #1

Apr 9, 2015

An odd-but-charismatic team of heroes, with some bumpy storytelling and odd artistic choices. Pretty much only for the fans of the Robinson JLA era…

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4.3
Convergence: Justice League International #2

May 17, 2015

A satisfying focus on Ted Kord(s), but otherwise pretty dry and uninspired.

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6.7
Convergence: Justice League Of America #1

Apr 25, 2015

Another book where not much goes on, and some occasionally wild, out there art, but overall a pleasant read.

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7.0
Convergence: Justice League Of America #2

May 24, 2015

Not a darn thing to do with Convergence, really, but a nice issue featuring maligned heroes past…

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5.7
Convergence: Justice Society Of America #2

May 30, 2015

Solid enough story, with an ending undermined by the way the main Convergence title ended, and some nice art. Still feels oddly inessential…

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7.3
Convergence: New Teen Titans #2

May 25, 2015

Wolfman picks up right where he left off, and Nicola Scott's art is phenomenal. I want Disco Nightwing back!

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9.0
Convergence: Nightwing / Oracle #1

Apr 14, 2015

A very solid story that finally provides an emotional grounding for a year of hell, and looks really great. (Plus: An utterly terrifying Hawkwoman.)

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7.3
Convergence: Nightwing / Oracle #2

May 9, 2015

A nice wrap-up for the characters, without a whole lot of actual Convergence going on (though that's sort of fine with me.)

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9.0
Convergence: Shazam #1

Apr 29, 2015

The gang's all here, and they're in rare form in an issue that looks UM-MAY-ZING!

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8.0
Convergence: Shazam #2

May 29, 2015

Enjoyable adventure in a classical comic style, scoring high in both story and in art.

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6.3
Convergence: Superboy #2

May 16, 2015

Strong character work, a nice celebration of Kon-El, with an abrupt and terrible ending.

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4.3
Convergence: Superboy & The Legion of Super-Heroes #1

Apr 23, 2015

Very wonky art, and an odd tone makes for a mostly unsatisfying reading experience… Interesting balance of characters, though.

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7.8
Convergence: Supergirl - Matrix #2

May 19, 2015

Completely chucks Convergence in favor of much-appreciated lunacy, as the Bug takes center stage. Plus: Matter-Eater Lad!

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6.7
Convergence: Superman #2

May 9, 2015

Excellent art, some clunky dialogue, but a big happy ending that helps make it workable.

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6.7
Convergence: The Adventures of Superman #1

Apr 27, 2015

Wolfman's script is strong, and the art is okay, but having the heroes actually proactively *doing* things probably shouldn't feel this exciting.

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4.3
Convergence: The Atom #1

Apr 11, 2015

A troubling story that doesn't really do Ray Palmer justice, but at least has an upbeat cliffhanger ending…

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6.0
Convergence: The Flash #1

Apr 26, 2015

Feels more like CW Flash than Pre-Crisis, but still not a bad issue, with the promise of an interesting clash next time…

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9.0
Convergence: The Question #2

May 10, 2015

A reminder of how good a story featuring lost characters can be, with wonderful art…

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5.0
Convergence: Titans #2

May 11, 2015

A little bit wobbly, but okay art and nice character stuff for Arsenal, torpedoed by a maddening ending…

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6.7
Convergence: Wonder Woman #1

Apr 28, 2015

Reminiscent of the powerless mod 70s Wonder Woman, with some utterly terrifying villains in play…

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6.0
Convergence: Wonder Woman #2

May 26, 2015

A strange setting for the Amazing Amazon, but still a creepy and effective tale.

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7.2
Convergence: World's Finest #1

Apr 30, 2015

Lovely art and a brand-new perspective on the Convergence, which is exciting even though it might cause a paradox or two"

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6.0
Convergence: World's Finest #2

May 28, 2015

Well-drawn, well-written, with an odd (but ultimately enjoyable) character focus, but a serious downer of an ending…

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2.0
Crossed #6

Jul 17, 2009

We've had some spirited discussion of whether or not The Boys is all shock and no substance, but Herogasm's most depraved sex scene doesn't quite stack up to what we see here. My issue has a wraparound cover taking place in a fast-food restaurant which features blood, beatings, and a man forcing another man's head towards the deep-fat fryer. There's some interesting character work in the issue, especially as regards Geoff's confession, but it ends up being covered in a thick layer of blood and gore and much of it's power thus lost. It's hard to assess this issue for me. Blood and gore, ala the 'Saw' movies isn't in itself a deal-breaker for me, and 'Night of The Living Dead' is a fave-rave, but there's just too much focus on the horrible things that the Crossed are doing, with this issue featuring the graphic on-panel murder of not one, but TWO children, a moment that just doesn't sit right with me. Yes, it doesunderline the reasons why Kitrick has had it bad, and why he's si

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6.0
Crossed: Badlands #25

Mar 15, 2013

This issue really hits the meat of what I hoped and expected Crossed would be about five years ago: The lives of semi-normal people in completely abnormal circumstances. While the shock factor is there, most of the gore is left on the covers, something for which I'm thankful. The quirky trademark Ennis tough-guy squad is fun, and the fact that there are still children still alive in this world kind of fills me with hope. Crossed - Badlands #25 is a good story, well-drawn, and given the world the creators are playing in, a relatively serene episode of horror, earning 3 out of 5 stars overall. I can't say that I'll read this book every month (I also occasionally pick up "My Little Pony" and "Archie," and don't want to be on the list that buying all those books together would put me on) but I don't regret reading this issue, save for the disgustingly organic and gorny close-up of that primary cover.

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10
Crosswind #2

Jul 29, 2017

The real magic of Image Comics comes when talented creators are able to deliver a story that you wouldn't be able to find anywhere else, and this book's premise, while containing that fantastic element of the mind-swap, wouldn't fly in a shared universe or a superhero world. But on its own, it makes for a riveting comic-book, one that I highly recommend on all levels.

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3.0
Cyber Force #5

Aug 11, 2013

The original Cyberforce series always felt very much like X-Men with bionics, and this new version does some interesting things to get away from that conceit. Unfortunately, there is a whole new string of story-telling tropes opened up here, none of which do a lot to distinguish these characters from any of the various terse badasses of the New 52 or Marvel's deep bench of X-titles. They did, however, lower the number of extra limbs that Stryker has, which seems positive, if only from a balance perspective. Cyberforce #5 falls apart in visually, which combines with the uninspiring story being told to deliver a very disappointing 1.5 out of 5 stars overall. Perhaps the long-term fan can find more that appeals to them, but this issue really does nothing for me...

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7.7
Cyborg #1

Jul 23, 2015

A nice new start for one of my favorite heroes, with lovely art by the JLA team of Reis and Prado.

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7.3
Cyborg #2

Aug 30, 2015

The human side that Cyborg has been missing lately, with lovely art and a looming techno-apocalypse…

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6.3
Cyborg #3

Oct 12, 2015

Finally throws us into the action sequences, after two slower issues, but the pacing quickly gets a little too breakneck…

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7.0
Cyborg: Rebirth #1

Sep 11, 2016

There are a lot of cool things to be done with the Cyborg character, and I like the idea of giving him a signature villain of his own (even with the limitations of such a gimmick), so I'm totally sold on seeing Victor Stone searching for the truth of his own humanity. Even with Pelletier's art not quite making the great, Cyborg: Rebirth #1 is a good read, an issue that reminds readers of how cool Cyborg is while setting him off onto his new adventures in style.

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6.0
Cyclops (2014) #11

Mar 23, 2015

A bit disjointed and coincidental, but has a decent emotional core and (mostly) excellent art.

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8.3
D4VE (IDW) #1

Feb 28, 2015

Witty, sharp and a little mean-spirited, but a really compelling read.

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4.0
Daken: Dark Wolverine #1

Sep 10, 2010

Overall, its a competent piece of work that seems to be supporting my theory that Marvel wants all of its heroes to be the head of a hero family, with versions of them for all demographics. Daken Dark Wolverine #1 is probably a better book for those that love Wolverine and his offspring, but still manages to pull of 2 out of 5 stars overall from me.

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6.0
Danger Girl/G.I. JOE #4

Nov 10, 2012

It's easy to dismiss a comic like Danger Girl as being nothing but inessential cheesecake, but to do so would be a huge disservice to a fun reading experience. The history of Danger Girl plays a part in this issue (though I don't know if it's in Abbey's "official" canon, presuming there even IS such a thing after her third publisher) as do bits and pieces of Joe lore, which makes the book fun for someone who is a casual fan of both Danger Girl's book and G.I. Joe's cartoon. (I'm a bit more hardcore about G.I. Joe comic continuity, but that's a very different beast, in most ways.) Danger Girl/G.I. Joe #4 sticks the landing, looks good and doesn't distract me with the female form (though mileage can certainly vary), earning 3 out of 5 stars overall. It's an above-average chapter of a book that wants only to entertain you, and what could be wrong with that?

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7.0
Daredevil (2011) #13

May 23, 2012

I was not terrifically interested in the Omega Effect, mostly because I don't have a lot of use for the Punisher in the Marvel Universe. (To my mind, he works best without supernatural elements, but that's probably just me.) Daredevil #13 sets up big conflicts for both Daredevil and Murdock, gives us a couple of surprises, and nails the landing with what I hope to be major consequences for DD, earning 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. The Omega Drive storyline seems to be ending, but it's leading into something that could be epic for Daredevil and for the Marvel Universe, and the Man Without Fear continues to deliver stories that excite me for the first time in YEARS...

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8.0
Daredevil (2011) #20

Nov 23, 2012

It's pretty simple by this point: Daredevil is on a list of monthly must-reads from Marvel, alongside Hawkeye and the late, lamented Defenders, and if you're not checking it out, I recommend it highly. Daredevil #20 takes a goofy old concept, turns it on its head and transforms it into something truly horrifying with seeming ease, earning a well-deserved 4 out of 5 stars overall.

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9.0
Daredevil (2014) #18

Sep 5, 2015

Bringing all of the players together, wrapping up all the loose ends, and doing it with style…

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7.0
Daredevil (2015) #6

Apr 29, 2016

Strong drama, well-delineated action sequences and a real shocker of a last page make for a solid issue...

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8.0
Daredevil: Reborn #1

Jan 12, 2011

All in all, its a well-done book with a character that I dont have a lot of attachment to showing why hes interesting. Daredevil Reborn #1 earns an impressive 4 out of 5 stars overall, looking and reading smoothly and hopefully leading the character into territory that isnt all about Bullseye, Elektra, Kingpin and the dead girlfriend of the week.

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8.0
Dark Avengers #1

Jan 29, 2009

Hmmm. Hmmmmmmm... I don't know what to make of this debut. On the one hand, it's a briliant piece of treachery on the part of Norman, and a very complex and nuanced situation to use a the premise for a new super-team. Unfortunately, it requires us to believe that Tony Stark, futurist, is a titanic window-licker, that the entire government can be duped as easily as a little blonde college girl can be coaxed out of her miniskirt, and, most importantly, that no one will be able to tell the difference between these knockoffs and their real counterparts. The last one, sadly, is most believable... Norman's character in this issue is the real star, trying to decode the complexity that is the superhero into something he can break down and amass personal power and cash from. The doppelganger situation makes Marvel's already tangled antecedents even more so, as Noh-Varr becomes (I think) the ninth Captain Marvel, Bullseye the third Hawkeye (with BOTH the other ones still active) as

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8.0
Dark Avengers #2

Feb 23, 2009

So, that went badly. For Doom and the Dark A's, that is. The issue itself was actually quite good, with Mike Deodato hitting his game, keeping the cheesecake AND the stunt-casting under control, and a strong script from Bendis, obviously having fun with Norman's new status quo. There's a lot of nice touches in this issue, from the young Doom, to Norman's tirades, to Moonstone having no idea who Daken is, and overall (a few silly magic words notwithstanding) it's a strong outing. Dark Reign, so far, has been an interesting exercise in villainy, with the characters acting like heroes (at least publicly) and a real smart turn from Osborn, as even he realizes that saving Doctor Doom is not an ideal first mission. Twists and turns and badness unbound, but it's quite fun. Dark Avengers #2 earns an impressive 4 out of 5 stars, making me think that not all event comics are entirely bad...

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7.0
Dark Avengers #3

Mar 25, 2009

This issue is really of two parts, the first being aheadgame of epic proprotions from Norman (which works well) and the second being a confusing mess of time-travel and fighty-fighty (which really doesn't, at least for me.) As with most of Bendis' big fight scenes, it seemsuncoordinated somehow, as though he told the artist"Draw a big cluster$&@$, I'll dialogue it later." The battle with the Iron Man armors in Mighty Avengers is another example of this syndrome. Norman and Doom working together really underscores how unlikeable our main cast is in this title, and while it's an interesting moment at the end, I'm not as keen on a "Hell, yeah, PAYBACK!" moment when it's Doctor Doom giving the payback. Still, Dark Avengers looks nice (Mike Deodato handles the art chores well) and the first half is amazing enough to carry my through some filler. Dark Avengers #3 earns a slightly-schizophrenic 3.5 out of 5 stars. If they can keep up the quality before the ineveitable ne

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6.0
Dark Avengers #4

May 18, 2009

Great ending tokinda iffy overall issue, but still compelling stuff in the Brave New Marvel U.

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9.0
Dark Avengers #5

Jun 8, 2009

Brian Bendis continues to mine the territory opened by Thunderbolts, to great effect, with the amorality of the characters providing a great deal of the fun here. Moonstone and Marvel Boy provide the most shocking moment this issue, while the Sentry manipulations have to come to a head soon enough (and I suspect that Norman and his team won't be nearly enough power to clean up that particular mess.) Mike Deodato does great work with an issue that is mostly closeups of Norman at a desk, providing incredible "acting" from the big guy throughout. Norman's retorts to the questions we've all been asking ACTUALLY SOUND PLAUSIBLE, and even believable (if you're not an omniscient reader, that is) which is an amazing achievement for writing. This is the best issue yet of a series that has been good from the get-go, and Dark Avengers #5 earns an impressive 4.5 out of 5 stars overall. To get this kind of drama out of what is essentially a monologue and three flashbacks is impressive ind

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6.0
Dark Avengers #6

Jul 4, 2009

Who wants to bet that Sentry and Noh-Varr are the keysto Norman's defeat? Well-drawn by Mike Deodato,even if the story seems a bit padded.

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7.0
Dark Avengers #7

Jul 30, 2009

There's a lot going on here. This book is an impressive one, giving Cyclops a moment in the sun, showcasing the growing mania and instability of Norman Osborn, adding depth and shading to the conflicts in San Francisco, and making me almost enjoy Daken's antics. What it DOESN'T do is show us much of the actual Dark Avengers, save for a few panels in which Bullseye dominates. As a Utopia/Dark Reign cross-em-over, obviously the book has a ton to do, but it reminds me a bit too much of the X-Factor crossover back in the day which showcased only Cable, Wolverine and Forge, none of whom were (or, at the time, had EVER BEEN) members of X-Factor. Overall, though, it's a good issue, with a nice art job by Luke Ross (invoking but not slavishly emulating Mike Deodato's art style, and even moving Dagger's "X" symbol up a chakra) and some good dialogue throughout. What we need is more Mimic and less Dark Wolverine, if you ask me, but overall it's an enjoyable book. Dark Avengers #7 ear

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8.0
Dark Avengers #8

Sep 9, 2009

I've been very happy with this crossover, showing as it does the heroes' first real response to Norman's Dark Reign, or at thevery least the first response that might actually ACHIEVE something. Cyclops instinctively plays the same game as the former GreenGoblin, using television and grandgestures to create goodwill among the public. Who knew that PR could be a super-power? Luke Ross does a good jobwith the art here, in a style that's somewhat different than his recent Captain America work. Rather than emulating Steve Epting (or emulating the Captain America house style WITH Steve Epting, whichever) Ross an altogether less angular look to his figures while maintaining a clear and pleasant line. Matt Fraction again shows why he's one of Marvel's best writers, delivering another fun chapter, and incorporating concepts and characters from ALL eras of the X-Men. If I were to register anything resembling a complaint, it would be the almost complete LACK of Dark Avengers in this Dark Avenger

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9.0
Dark Avengers #9

Sep 23, 2009

Oh, my... This issue totally makes up for the muddle of Mighty Avengers, as Brian Michael B. shows off his chops throughout. Taking a character like Ares and giving him an authentic voice is a real achievement, and the standoff between Fury and the goddawar is tense and fascinating, as two veteran soldiers size each other up. The tidbits about Osborn, Sentry, Noh-Varr and even a discussion about Spider-Man's sense of humor (Bullseye points out that the web-head is funny when you're in the mood, prompting Venom to snark, "then I'm NEVER in the mood." Heh...)are well-handled. There's nearly as much going on here as there was in Mighty, but the pacing and breakdown of events is much more controlled and greatly effective. Mike Deodato's art is excellent throughout this issue, and the transition from angry Ares shattering concrete to worried father is really an amazing bit of artwork. Dark Avengers #9 earns a very impressive 4.5 out of 5 stars overall, and really giving me a reason to antic

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4.0
Dark Avengers #10

Oct 22, 2009

This issue has it's nice touches. I like how the implication is that Moonstone/Ms. Marvel/Dr. Sofen seduces Bullseye not because she likes him (he's actually a reprehensible excuse for a human being) but because he's wearing a Hawkeye costume, a callback to old-school Thunderbolts. I like the opening sequence, which feels like a drive-in horror movie, leaving me yelling at the stupid girls to get back in the car. I liked the use of Venom here, showing the obvious consequences of Norman's shotgun approach to medication. But there are a lot of things that I can't quite figure out. Wasn't the Sentry left for dead at the end of last issue, his brains blown out? How long has it been since Captain Marvel/Marvel Boy/Noh-Varr disappeared, anyway? Why is the Man-Thing in Louisiana, and not his usual Nexus of Realities in Florida? And what about Naomi? My biggest complaint about this issue is the way it seems to exist as an island unto itself, not really tying in to anything else in the Marvel U

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6.0
Dark Avengers #11

Jan 2, 2010

The end of Dark Reign is coming, and my New Year's Resolution for this book is asuper-dramatic meltdown and resolution of some plot threads.

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4.0
Dark Avengers #14

Feb 17, 2010

Last issue was troubling in both its implications and its execution, but it was at least thorught-provoking. This month's issue boils down to two conversations and a light-show. With Siege in full swing, it's obviously that we're again relegating the related titles to background stories, bits of ephemera to fill in the gaps in the story-telling of the big crossover, the same way that New Avengers spent six months showing us flashbacks of Skrullian treachery. Problem is, I resented the hell out of that, and I'm not much more thrilled with it here. Mike Deodato gives us a breath-taking scene of Sentry hovering over Manhattan Island, but it's not much more than a pretty matte painting background for more Bendis dialogue, much of it rehashing previous Osborn/Sentry conversations. There are also some killer layouts in the first few pages, taking a nine-panel grid and turning it a few degrees off plum, for some wonderfully inventive visual storytelling... But still, having already seen the

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5.0
Dark Avengers #15

Apr 3, 2010

It's a search for Insipirado,but it never quite finds that elusive something,drowning it's sorrows in 2.

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5.0
Dark Avengers #177

Jul 17, 2012

There are two stories about two teams in this book, and only one of them really works for me, leaving me with the cumulative effect of channel-surfing on a Friday night.

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3.0
Dark Avengers Annual #1

Dec 4, 2009

That last panel may reveal what happens at the end of Captain America - Rebirth (or, more honestly, what happens at least briefly in the wake of Captain America - Rebirth) and serves as one of the best parts of this issue. Let's be honest here for a second... I paid FIVE DOLLARS for this issue. What I got was a pitch for a Captain Marvel Boy limited series, a preview of 'Siege' that I've already seen three or four times, and a cameo from two Captains America. That is NOT what I call a value. Chris Claremont used to run seven or ten different sub-plots simultaneously, with characters dancing in and out of the stories issue by issue, but Bendis seems to use a different tack, telling a story that is focused exclusively on the bits that he wants you to see and ignoring everything else so that we can have an issue like this every few months that gives us the bird's-eye lowdown on what has been happening. I have to say, I would prefer the subplot. If you had parsed this story out a bit at a

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8.0
Dark Days: The Casting #1

Jul 15, 2017

I know that I didn't get everything going on in these pages, but I absolutely want to read more, right now, to find out what I've missed. (I also wouldn't mind an annotated version of this story that would link me to the books that would help flesh it out.) Dark Days: The Casting #1 is that rarest of beasts, a prelude story that isn't just a series of trailers but a fleshed-out narrative in itself, with several different artists delivering strong work that comes together as a whole and makes you want to know the secret of the Metal.

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8.0
Dark Horse Presents (2014) #1

Aug 20, 2014

The original DHP title ran for 15 years and over 150 issues, and has some real star-making turns in it, even if it also gave us Sin City. (*rimshot*) This issue shows a lot of potential, and there are some really engaging moments to be had, as well as a great balance of stories and art-styles throughout the issue. I'm really wanting to read more of 'Resident Alien' and 'Dream Gang' after these cool first chapters, and even interested in more Kabuki, a title that has historically left me cold. In short, Dark Horse Presents #1 shows off Dark Horse's mastery of packaging and assembling these type of books, and reminds me how much I miss really good anthology titles

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3.0
Dark Reign: Lethal Legion #1

Jul 18, 2009

That, combined with the resemblance tosomething DC already publishes left me more than a little disappointed.

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4.0
Dark Reign: New Nation #1

Jan 8, 2009

Overall, it's not much more than a coming attractions book, and even if the moviesare good, I'm kind of irked at paying four bucks for the trailers.

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5.0
Dark Reign: The Cabal #1

May 12, 2009

The last story ends with a teaser to check out Thor #601 to find out more on what's going on. This annoys me in a number of ways, actually.. First, I dislike when a book like this is so blatantly designed to get me reading another title. Second, it's not really Thor #601. And Third, this Doom and the Doom from the first story don't seem to exist in the same reality, and I preferred that Doom characterization over this, even if it was all a dream. Our Joe Bob totals: Good story turns out to be imaginary; Okay story serves mostly as history lesson; Pretty good story undermined by main character; Okay story hampered by "Where does this take place and why do I suspect we'll never see this kid again?" syndrome; And finally, nice character bits used as bait to pull me into a new book. We're looking at some great art in this issue, from Adi Granov, Daniel Acuna and more, and some nice writing as well, but the overal effect is just above average. I like seeing more de

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5.0
Dark Reign: The List: Avengers #1

Sep 13, 2009

I gotta say, this issue is intense in ways that I didn't expect. Hawkeye's lethal attitude (however out of character it may be) at least doesn't pull any punches, taking a chance of killing both Bullseye and Venom during the attack. I'm bothered by a couple of things, though, including the stupidity of attacking a man who employes both Ares and the Sentry, as well as the fact that forcefields were used as plot points both for and against Ronin. If you stop to analyze what's actually going on here, it kind of falls apart, and makes Clint Barton look quite a bit stupider than I'm comfortable with him being. Norman Osborn is well used here, but his ubiquitousness is starting to lead to overexposure for me, and as engaging asClint's whole "Die Hard" schtick is, it still falls apart at the end. Overall, though, this issue balances itself out, with some very lovely art from Marko Djurdjevic, and cute dialogue almost (but not quite) covering up a fundamental lack of brains in the plot. The pr

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4.0
Dark Reign: Young Avengers #1

Jul 18, 2009

It's pretty much by-the-numbers, and Iam sad to say that I suspect this series will be completely forgotten in a year or two.

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3.0
Dark Reign: Young Avengers #3

Aug 8, 2009

And how, exactly,does this have anything to do with Dark Reign? 1.

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7.0
Dark X-Men: The Beginning #1

Jul 15, 2009

I know that Dark X-Men is just a gateway drug, and that it will eventually drag me into an undertow of the X-titles and the crossovers and the GLAYVIN! Frankly, I don't care. The Namor stuff in this issue is the best use of the King of Atlantis since J.M. DeMatteis stopped writing the Defenders 20 years ago, and the very PRESENCE of the Mimic has me on board. Don't ask me why, he's just one of the characters I insist on following. I even own the couple of issues of X-Force (UGH) in which he played villain during the naughty 90's. The Dark Avengers is an intriguing title, but this book is even more so, taking characters who are outcasts AMONG among outcasts and giving them a new high-profile gig. I've really got high hopes for this whole crossover, and this issue makes me think that I won't be completely disappointed. Dark X-Men: The Beginning #1 earns a bright-eyed-and-hopeful 3.5 out of 5 stars. I await the chess game between Slim Summers and the ex-Goblin with antic

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8.0
Dark X-Men: The Beginning #2

Aug 8, 2009

" That moment alone pushes this one higher than it probably would have been in and of itself, continuing a string of "Utopia" issues that hit the mark squarely.

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6.0
Dark X-Men: The Beginning #3

Sep 7, 2009

It's an awesome look at an underutilized Marvel superstar, and it's nice to see that evenNorman doesn't have all bases covered.

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8.0
Darkstar and the Winter Guard #1

Jul 3, 2010

There's some interesting character dynamics, a guy who turns into a bear, and it's all tied together on bits of ephemera from 15 years ago, soit's nice.

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8.0
DC Super Hero Girls: Hits and Myths #1

Oct 30, 2016

In short, this is a colorful, entertaining, inventive book, and the fact that there are activities and puzzles in the back makes me incredibly happy. DC Super Hero Girl Halloween Fest Special Edition #1 is good stuff, and I'd love to see more of this franchise in comics (or on TV), balancing clever with all-ages and looking beautiful.

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5.0
DC Universe Legacies #1

May 31, 2010

Great art, but better production values than story values for me.

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7.0
DC Universe Presents #0

Sep 22, 2012

This type of book is always difficult to review, simply because there are five different creative teams, featuring five different casts with five wildly different tones, one of which features the work of Rob Liefeld and Marat Mychaels. For our five tales, my individual assessments go like this:

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6.0
DC Universe Presents #1

Sep 23, 2011

DC Universe Presents #1 is a mixed affair, but is successful in positioning the character as a lead, and keeps me interested enough to want to come back next month.

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5.0
DC Universe Presents #14

Nov 24, 2012

All in all, I'm excited to see these two characters, but not entirely on-board with this incarnation. There are a great many clichd elements to be had here, from both the crime-drama and magical-adventure genres, with the seeming intention that mashing up both story types will cover for them. I'm happy to see Black Lightning back in action, but I'd really like to see him looking (and acting) more unique, and this Blue Devil doesn't really touch on either the iconic "weirdness-magnet" or "regular-feller-in-demon-ranks" versions pre-Flashpoint. DC Universe Presents #14 isn't a bad comic, but needs a little bit of extra zing (be it in terms of the art improving or a big story-twist that I didn't see coming) to really launch it to a successful ongoing series.

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3.0
DC Universe Presents #19

Apr 21, 2013

I haven't found all the issues of D-CUP fascinating (although Black Lightning/Blue Devil had some, mostly untapped, potential) but this one was a step down from even the dullest moment of Challengers of the Unknown. I have a sneaking suspicion that this story was written as another set of backups for Beowulf, but all in all, there is nothing here that makes me want to buy the issue, or makes it feel like a proper last ish, even for an anthology book. DC Universe Presents #19 feels like a sad inventory story, and while the art is pretty well-done throughout the book, it's never quite as solid or as inventive as the Jesus Saiz art from Beowulf's first New 52 outing, leading to a book that's both off-putting and unnecessary, earning a rather distressing 1.5 out of 5 stars overall. Sometimes, it's difficult not to fall into the expectation that DC editorial is flailing wildly around for a direction, with only the expectation that things be vicious and shocking as a touchstone...

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6.0
Deadly Hands of Kung Fu #1

May 18, 2014

All in all, this issue feels like nothing special, though the creative team clearly has a handle on Shang-Chi's character, and I'm hoping that the remainder of the series really picks up the pace. Deadly Hands Of Kung-Fu #1 has a tough row to hoe, with a main character who can come across as maddeningly passive and a difficult to accept opening, as well as inconsistent noodly art, but still nails 3 out of 5 stars overall. The sequence at Leiko's funeral was unusually respectful for a comic book though, and any time we see the Sons of The Tiger is a good time for me…

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9.0
Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love #2

Dec 7, 2016

This issue reminds me of nothing more than classic Vertigo, and bear in mind that I'm old and freaky, so that's a compliment. Deadman: Dark Mansion Of Forbidden Love #2 is a remarkable achievement, returning classic Deadman after his New 52 revamp a few years ago, delivering on the difficult promise of gothic romance in the DCU, with beautiful art.

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7.0
Deadpool & The Mercs For Money (2016) #1

Jul 24, 2016

In short, this story has a lot of layers to it (as does the main character, something I don't always get from his adventures), and it seems certain to end up in a bad place, even though Negasonic's future visions make it seem like Deadpool might get it right in the end. Deadpool And The Mercs For Money #1 doesn't do a lot to differentiate between the half-dozen members of the team, but does establish Deadpool as a character trying to do right, with mostly okay art and a serious bilingual bonus for the readers.

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6.0
Deadpool (2012) #8

Apr 27, 2013

Marvel NOW! may be strangely punctuated, but there's a lot to love, and a clear commitment to quality that shows in this issue. The writing is good, the adventure is adventurous, and the funny stuff is actually funny, but I also find myself appreciating and even understanding the Deadpool fans of the world. This book makes me want to read more Deadpool, and may even have launched him into my pull list, pending review of finances. Deadpool #8 rocks the house, mixing our hero up in something weird, but keeping it approachable, and most of all entertaining as hell, earning 4 out of 5 stars overall. If you've ever wondered what makes a good Deadpool book, I'd say you want to check this one out...

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4.0
Deadpool Team-Up #888

Nov 2, 2010

Deadpool Team-Up #888 has good intentions, and nearly hits the mark a time or two, but leaves me with an overall disappointed feeling, earning only 2 out of 5 stars overall. Its not terrible by any means, but theres definite room for improvement from these creators.

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8.0
Deadpool Team-Up #895

Mar 12, 2010

I am aware of the hate-face towards Deadpool for his current ubiquity, but frankly, I don't see the problem. Recent issues of both his solo series have been entertaining, and this book is a breezy, irreverent bit of fun every month. When you really look at it, the Marvel Universe is a lot like working for Vince McMahon. When there's money on the line, we go with what we know sells, and thus the oldest superstars get the hardest push. Guys like Ms. Marvel, Iron Fist, Luke Cage and other 70's rejects are just now getting their place in the sun, while 90's-era characters like the 'Pool are nearly invisible at the main-event level. (The only other major player from that era that I can think of might be Cable...) Add to that the fact that this book is actually FUNNY, and I'm not hating the fact that Deadpool is everywhere, much like Savior Faire. I am troubled by the fact that this series is sold with Humberto Ramos covers, and the interiors (by Dalibor Talajic) are a completely different s

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6.0
Deadpool: The Duck #5

Mar 25, 2017

In short, the whole point of this was "two characters have wacky adventures in one body", and they make good on that premise, and even the gross-out factor will appeal to a certain segment of Deadpool's regular reading audience. Deadpool The Duck #5 wraps it all up, with some wobbles in art and story but a lot of energy and drive.

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6.6
Death of Hawkman #2

Nov 2, 2016

The intertwining of Rannian and Thanagarian interests (and the endless warring between them) has been part of DC lore for over a decade now, and I find myself a little weary of yet another conflict between them. I will say that, if the subtle implications that something bigger is wrong, I could change my mind. Perhaps a New 52 version of Hyathis? Is there already one of those? Bygones" Death Of Hawkman #2 has a very ominous title, some strong art and a story that could perhaps be clearer, but still isn't complete opaque.

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6.0
Death Of Wolverine #1

Sep 4, 2014

The Death Of Wolverine #1 feels and reads like an important book, and while it's not the perfect single issue tale, it's still a well-written and well-drawn chunk of story that creates real tension for Wolverine.

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6.0
Death of X #4

Nov 27, 2016

All in all, it's a very successful book in terms of story, in terms of character interaction and in terms of pathos regarding the loss of a founding X-Man. Still, there's just something about this entire series that feels" off? Wrong? Destructive? Still, Death Of X #1 is what is it is, delivering a tense narrative about war, mortality and madness, with a couple of different brands of interesting art (one of which reminds me of a slightly bloopier Frank Quitely, which I love).

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2.0
Deathstroke #0

Sep 13, 2012

I don't want to be harsh or cruel, but this issue was absolutely unnecessary. The promise of Deathstroke's origin was fulfilled, but that fulfillment was pretty much a retelling of a story from 1984 with a few new barnacles thrown on to make it feel different. The art was sub-par from top to bottom, and the best lines of the issue were written by Marv Wolfman and not the current creative team. Deathstroke #0 doesn't get the job done in either story or art, and while it might be of interest to fans of the artist or diehard fans of the character, but I wouldn't want to pay 3 dollars for it, earning a disappointed by not at all unexpected 1 out of 5 stars overall.

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4.0
Deathstroke #15

Dec 18, 2012

The New DC has not been in any way shy about cancelling books that aren't quite gelling or selling, which makes me wonder about the continued publication of this title. This issue IS better than the #0 from a couple of months ago, but given that issue's gleeful recycling of 30 year old material traced from George Perez, that's only saying a little bit. All in all, though, it's not a train-wreck, as Koschei has some interesting aspects to his character, the Macguffin is at least believable, and Deathstroke, while pretty two-dimensional, is at least tolerable in this issue. Deathstroke #15 doesn't really hold up to heavy scrutiny, nor will it be held up as an example of shining storytelling circa the end of 2012 in the future, but it's better than I expected, earning a slightly-below-average 2 out of 5 stars overall. Given a compelling enough story, this creative team could probably deliver some good stuff, even with Deathstroke as the protagonist...

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6.0
Deep State #1

Nov 18, 2014

There's always a dangerous game to be played with first issues: Too much back story can alienate, too much action without establishing consequences and characters can have the same effect, and this issue takes a middle path that doesn't quite do the best service to either our build-up and introduction or the beginnings of our action. Even so, Deep State #1 has an intriguing story to tell, aided by really expressive art and a fun (if familiar) premise.

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10
Defenders (2011) #1

Dec 8, 2011

The Defenders #1 is a gem of an issue, bringing back the grandiose 70"s loopiness of the team and tying it to a new sensibility with great success.

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8.0
Defenders (2011) #2

Jan 4, 2012

This issue is a bit more plot-driven then last, where the character bits took center stage, but the explanation of what the Concordance Engine is is well tied into Marvel history, playing with both story elements and Jack Kirby's legendary designs. There's still a clear indication that these characters don't belong in ANY team, much less together (which is even funnier when you remember that everyone but the Surfer is part of another team in the Marvel U.) The ending comes a bit suddenly for me, but the overall issue is a winner. Defenders #2 is well-drawn, well-crafted and overall entertaining, earning 4 out of 5 stars overall.

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9.0
Defenders (2011) #6

May 5, 2012

The lineup of the Defenders is one of most fascinating in Marvel's current lineup (perhaps even in their history, although the New Fantastic Four had it's moments) and even though most of the heroes have decades behind them, there are still new moments to be had, as with this month's Iron Fist/Silver Surfer pairing. The art is on the money, while Fraction's story keeps the weird characters uniquely weird, doesn't neglect the characters' personal lives, but keeps the story moving. I know that Fat Cobra probably won't be joining the Defenders, but there's a tiny part of me that hopes he'll at least stay in the supporting cast, and I'm looking forward to seeing where this twisty-turny story goes. The Defenders #6 keeps bringing the good stuff, the weird stuff and the absolutely intriguing stuff, earning 4.5 out of 5 stars overall.

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8.0
Defenders (2011) #8

Jul 12, 2012

Fraction continues to play with form and function, as the bottom of page messages (designed to reference the 1970′s Marvel comics) interact with the narrative in a very meta way, providing call-backs and answers, while the character balance of our heroes is once again fun, with Strange as leader, Surfer as heavy hitter, Iron Fist as lancer and Red She-Hulk performing the important service of being the cabbage-head, allowing the other heroes to naturally deliver the expository dialogue. Whether the Black Cat sticks around (I honestly hope she doesn't, but not because I don't dig her), Defenders #8 does the trick for me, doing interesting things with some lovely art (Here's hoping McKelvie is the new regular artist) and earning 4 out of 5 stars overall. This book is really hitting a nice stride, and I hope that the Next Big Thing doesn't destroy it's peculiar charm with too much Marvel NOW!

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7.4
Defenders (2017) #1

Jun 19, 2017

On the one hand, I would have like to have had more of the setup actually shown in these pages (the opening pages of the issue feel like I missed a zero issue or a springboard from one of the other books, but I can't find it), and the plotting is traditionally loose in the Bendis style, but it all comes together reasonably well. Defenders #1 features lovely art by Marquez, likeable characters and a villain who raises the stakes admirably.

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7.0
Demon Knights #3

Nov 14, 2011

Overall, this issue wasn't quite as good as #1, but still a good comic, and I have to applaud any attempt to launch a non-hero title (even if this is still sorta kinda a hero title.) Swords and sorcery has as many limitations and tropes as the standard superhero story, but they haven't been plumbed as thoroughly in mainstream comics lately, and the group of characters assembled here is an intriguing one. I found it a bit entertaining that Madame Xanadu has symbols on the front of her gown that look like the letters "MX" and that many of the super-team cliches are toyed with here, but the story and setting keep things fresh for me. Demon Knights #3 is still keeping this book in the upper-tier of the New 52, and earns a solid 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. I'm looking forward to seeing everything bust open next issue, and awaiting some more clues about Al Jabr and the Horsewoman...

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10
Detective Comics #853

Apr 23, 2009

Wow... Unlike many comics fans, I don't consider Batman to be a favorite character. There are certainly good stories about him, and even some bad ones that I hold dear to my heart. Batman, for me, transcends character, existing more as almost a genre unto himself, a blank slate upon which so many stories, so many different takes can be done. I love Englehart and Rogers, and the laughing fish. I love O'Neil and Adams, and the love-god who Ras admired and Talia loved. I love the fun-loving, square-jawed big brother who slapped Robin heartily on the back as they leapt into their always-non-fatal adventure. I enjoy the old man who snarks that he wears a target because he can't armor his head. They're all good, they're all Batman, and, most of all, THEY'RE ALL VALID. Each is a perfectly legitimate take on the phenomenon of Batman, and each is somebody's favorite. So, when I say that I don't care for Batman comics, it doesn't mean that I don't love me some Batman, and fin

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9.0
Detective Comics #854

Jul 4, 2009

A great relaunch that I hope maintains it's intensity.

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8.0
Detective Comics #855

Aug 8, 2009

Still it's a well-done issue, and the art is phenomenal on both halves of the book.

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9.0
Detective Comics #856

Sep 7, 2009

Kate's tactical error and Renee's bullet wound earn4.

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9.0
Detective Comics #857

Sep 30, 2009

Still, this book delivers the crime-fiction, delivers the street-level vigilantes, and some excellent storytelling overall. Detective Comics #857 earns a very strong 4.5 out of 5 stars overall, and makes me happy to be reading a bat-title again.

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8.0
Detective Comics #858

Nov 5, 2009

There's been a strange sort of imbalance to previous issues of this title, wherein the Batwoman portion of the book seems to be a little more engaging than the Question portion, but that imbalance is somewhat correction with this issue. Montoya's quest and her actions are much more decisive than before, while Kate Kane is tied up with issues of her past, giving us an issue that's mostly flashback. That's not necessarily a bad thing, as it fleshes out the character in wonderful ways. Part of me wants to make a snide remark about the "evil twin" subplot, but as a whole this book works for me, and even though the revelation of Alice came out of left field, it served more as a "What DO we know about this character?" moment rather than an "Everything you know is WRONG!" situation. Batwoman's traumatic past has been referenced before, but this issue's chilling explanation (made even more horrifying by the fact that we never actually SEE what happens, only the aftermath) makes Batman's trauma

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7.0
Detective Comics (2011) #14

Nov 9, 2012

John Layman's writing is something I didn't expect from a Bat-book: It's fun. The little asides between Bruce and Damian, even in a sequence that I didn't think was necessary, were insightful and clever, while the whole book reads very smoothly. Jason Fabok's art is polished, but not showy, giving us a clear picture, solid storytelling, and a very attractive Poison Ivy without having to make her completely naked. (The transformation of Ivy into pin-up stripper has always bothered me, and it is something which I blame entirely on JIm Lee's circa 2004 redesign of the character.) In short, Detective Comics #14 reads well, is easy to step into, even without having read last ish, and uses Batman well, earning 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. If nothing else, Layman's take uses Batman's greatest weakness (his humanity) and makes it a strength without beating us over the head with his awesomeness or making him essentially superhuman himself, something I wholeheartedly appreciate.

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7.0
Doctor Solar: Man of the Atom Vol. 3 #2

Sep 13, 2010

Overall, though, Im intrigued and its a nice looking book, so Doctor Solar, Man Of The Atom #2 earns a hopeful 3.5 out of 5 stars overall. Its hardly perfect, but its certainly a good start for a new comic book world. Lets hope that we can hold off on Unity 2010 long enough to establish a decent fanbase

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6.0
Doctor Spektor: Master Of The Occult #1

May 28, 2014

All in all, though, it's an interesting first issue for the fourth of the Gold Key Heroes, even if it's the least interesting to me. Doctor Spektor has never been a major player, and has not (to my memory) been revamped before in the previous Solar/Magnus revamps, but that means that he has the most potential, and Mark Waid is the man to bring it such an odd concept to life. Unfortunately, Doctor Spektor: Master Of The Occult #1 is hurt by the odd coloring and some indistinct art, with a small enough sampling of story that I'm a little confused as to what the focus of the book is going to be, earning a slightly disappointed 3 out of 5 stars overall. I'm willing to stick with the book thanks to Waid, whom I trust implicitly, but I'm hoping that Adam Spektor turns the corner out of jerkassville sooner rather than later…

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7.0
Doctor Strange and the Sorcerers Supreme #1

Oct 29, 2016

I was pleasantly surprised by everything in this title, from the clear, exciting art to the concepts of the new characters, and this issue's shocking loss actually affected me in ways that many comic book death scenes don't. In short, Doctor Strange And The Sorcerers Supreme #1 hits a lot of right notes, even for someone who hasn't been reading Strange's previous series.

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7.0
Doctor Voodoo: Avenger of the Supernatural #1

Oct 8, 2009

Rick Remender is a name that I've heard a lot, in reference to his run on Fear Agent and over series, but I have only ever read his work as the new writer of the All-New Atom not so long ago. I have to say, though, he handles this character well, giving Jericho an interesting voice, allowing him to stand toe-to-toe with Doctors Doom and Strange and not immediately get taken down. His use of different magics gives Voodoo a new take on the post, as well as a built-in weakness down the line, and I enjoy the fact that he was able to stand against Doom, but NOT to easily defeat him. A new Sorcerer Supreme shouldn't immediately be the new baddest badass ever just to give the character an immediate rub to start his book. Overall, the art adds to the creepiness of the affair as well, with Jefte Palo creating a dark and sinister tone throughout, reminding me in places of Mike Mignola's early work. Although I liked the fact that someone like Doom wasn't so easily taken out, I wasn't entirely sur

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4.0
Doctor Voodoo: Avenger of the Supernatural #2

Nov 8, 2009

In a word: Disappointing.

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4.0
Doctor Voodoo: Avenger of the Supernatural #3

Jan 2, 2010

My New Year's Resolution for this book is a full-fledged"Hell, Yeah!" badass moment for Doctor V, and maybe even some time spent basking in the glory of being Supreme.

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10
Doctor Who - The Forgotten #1

Sep 10, 2008

This is a really good Doctor Who story. It's a really well-drawn comic book. It's a good story in general. I'd have to say, in fact, that Pia Guerra was born to draw Doctor Who, nailing both the hard-to-draw David Tennant (Doctor #10) cheekbones and the somewhat-hard-to-find-photo-reference-for First Doctor as well. I came in a fan, so my assessment will certainly be a bit biased, but this book is the total package, with tension, character interplay, a historical flashback, a compelling mystery in the plot, and even that most difficult of all portions: drawings that look like the real people from whom they're drawn. Doctor Who: The Forgotten #1 earns a well-deserved 5 out of 5 stars, giving us possibly the best-written Doctor Who comic book story to date. I highly recommend it (along with the DVD collections of the first three seasons of the new show) but I have to say I'm especially looking forward to the issue that gives me the Fifth Doctor (my favorite) in action...

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8.0
Doctor Who - The Forgotten #2

Nov 8, 2008

This is a fun little issue, just as #1 was, and has lots of nice little touches (reversing the polarity, the fact that the Second Doctor's flashback, like his episodes, is presented in black and white, Ace's Nitro-9) for the long-term fan, but still hangs together for the new kids. I expect that having the various lives of the Doctors playing out like this may actually add to the fun for those who are only familiar with the latest series. I'm not as thrilled with the art this time around, though Pia Guerra nails the Second, Third, and Tenth Doctors, her Martha Jones doesn't gel, and old-school companions Jamie and Jo don't look at all like themselves, at least to me. Still, the overall effect is impressive, the dialogue excellent, the plotting interesting, and the mysterious Curator's (who I think is designed to make us think that he is the Master, but I suspect is not) identity is still a compelling chunk of MacGuffin. We're looking at a fun book here, even if you don't alread

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8.0
Doctor Who - The Forgotten #3

Nov 27, 2008

Next issue promises the return of the ugliest coat ever known to man, and hopefully Pia Guerra, though this month's art was hardly inadequate. For a Whovian, the references are plentiful and entertaining, and it's nice to see the playfulness of Tom Baker's era return. The overall effect of this issue is one of painstaking love for the character and his adventures, and the art (while not capturing the character likenesses as well as Guerra) is still very well done, and gets the hard-to-draw face of David Tennant dead on. It's a really good issue of a really well done series, and probably my favorite read of the week. Doctor Who: The Forgotten #3 earns 4 out of5 stars. Since it is Thanksgiving day, I'd also like to thank y'all, the faithful Spoilerites for supporting whatever it is that we do here. We wouldn't be having this kind of fun without your support, your aid and abetment, and it's only because of the readers that we get to act the fool like this on a regular basis.

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9.0
Doctor Who - The Forgotten #5

Jan 18, 2009

I have to say, I'm really impressed with this series. It's hard enough to write a good Doctor Who story for comics, but one that captures the various voices of the eras in which the character existed is even tougher. This issue's climax is the only part that's confusing, as the duplicate Doc left Earth with Rose, ostensibly to be her boyfriend forever... Granted, the realization that this is taking place in the TARDIS means that it may be taking place entirely in his mind. Still, this issue gives us a tantalizing glimpse of what the Eighth Doctor's adventures could have been, and a tale that feels right for Christopher Eccleston's Ninth (though the artist doesn't ever quite get his likeness down) and the overall feeling is excitement and suspense. It's a nice tale, with lovely art by a returning Pia Guerra, and it's a nice placeholder to try and get me through to the next Doctor Who special. Doctor Who: The Forgotten #5 earns a "fantastic" 4.5 out of 5 stars, reminding me w

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8.0
Doctor Who - The Forgotten #6

Feb 1, 2009

I have to say, honestly that parts of this issue work for me, parts don't. The art works, mostly (although the Third Doctor never quite looks right) and the parts where it falls down on the job aren't deal-breakers. The story clips along, reveling in the history and characters of Doctor Who, even causing some almost-tears when the Doctor finally got to give Susan a proper goodbye. If there was any weakness to it all, it was in the conceptualization of the villain, and the fact that it's powers made the entire series a literal headgame. ("Ey, who set dis t'ing to Connect Four?") Still, the journey was enjoyable enough, and the little moments of character with the previous nine Doctors hit the mark, with Number One crochety and high-handed, Number Two congratulatory, Number Three taking a potshot at Four, who responds with a joke, Five pleasantly confused, Six self-important, Seven taking the starch out of Six, while Eight laments the previous lives, and Nine gets in the line o

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7.0
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #1

Jul 18, 2009

I have to say I liked this somewhat more than Rodrigo, but wonder if it might have beensomewhat more successful if theycould have just said "Charlie Chaplin.

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7.0
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #2

Sep 7, 2009

Theta Sigma's temporal lunacy earns3.

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6.0
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #3

Sep 27, 2009

I suspect that next issue is going to be a Dirty Dozen-inspired "ragtag group of somethings" coming together to overcome their captors and find common ground thing, but as with everything Doctor-related, it's all going to come down to the execution (no pun intended.

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8.0
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #4

Oct 19, 2009

David Tennant's portrayal of the Doctor is(as with most everyone who has everytaken on the role) a very personal sort of thing,deliveredphysically, vocally, and through facial expression, taking him from merry prankster to somber lonely godand backusing only his face and his bearing. It is to the credit of this b