Green Lantern #3

Writer: Geoffrey Thorne Artist: Tom Raney, Marco Santucci Publisher: DC Comics Release Date: June 2, 2021 Cover Price: $4.99 Critic Reviews: 15 User Reviews: 28
7.3Critic Rating
6.1User Rating

+ Pull List

Stranded in a Dark Sector with no rings and no backup, John Stewart is out of options, his back against the wall. After the Central Power Battery dies, John must live long enough to gather the surviving Green Lanterns and find a way home, while one of the newest Green Lanterns, Far Sector's Jo Mullein navigates a host of unknown dangers on the Green Lanterns’ homeworld of Oa, as she works to uncover the cause of the battery’s collapse and who was behind it.

  • 10
    Black Nerd Problems - Morgan Hampton Jun 4, 2021

    And on top of all of that, this issue receives extra credit for focusing on its two main Black characters. I know that that's what this book essentially will be from here on out, but this issue was just really successful at displaying their agency. If you read this site, you know how important it is to see ourselves in these characters and behind the scenes. It's truly a joy.  Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    But Why Tho? - Collier "CJ" Jennings Jun 1, 2021

    Green Lantern #3 sets up a mystery that inches the Green Lanterns closer to their Future State status and puts the spotlight on lesser-known Lanterns. This is shaping up to be the Green Lanternbook of my dreams and the fresh take the series needed. I highly recommend it for sci-fi and superhero fans alike. Read Full Review

  • 9.0
    DC Comics News - Matthew Lloyd Jun 1, 2021

    Green Lantern #3 is a fun, interesting issue that echoes some well-loved science fiction, borrowing obliquely if not liberally. Thorne is focusing on two characters that have very different challenges, but their particular stories seem to suit them. Additionally, it's a creative solution to addressing a concept and story that have such a grand scope. This is a different direction for Green Lantern, but it's interesting and feels both new and familiar all at the same time. Read Full Review

  • 8.5
    Lyles Movie Files - Jeffrey Lyles Jun 1, 2021

    Thorne keeps serving up some fun cliffhangers showing a special talent for keeping readers on edge. Read Full Review

  • 8.5
    Geek Dad - Ray Goldfield Jun 1, 2021

    It's a fun story that shows us a different side of John and humanizes him more than many recent stories. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    AIPT - Franco Giacomarra Jun 1, 2021

    Geoffrey Thorne and company have proven that they are more than up to the task of creating a new Green Lantern tale that balances the historical grandeur of the lore with novel concepts and interesting new directions. This issue doesn't have quite the scope or expert pacing of the previous two, but the plot developments and character moments are enough to keep patient readers sticking around to find out what comes next. Read Full Review

  • 8.0
    ComicBook.com - Matthew Aguilar Jun 2, 2021

    Green Lantern is spinning a captivating mystery on a wide scale, but it's the stories of the Corps finding a way through all the chaos that powers all of it, and that doesn't appear to be changing anytime soon. Read Full Review

  • 7.6
    The Super Powered Fancast - Deron Generally Jun 1, 2021

    Raney and Santucci delivers some good art in this issue. One side of the art has more detail then the other, but both sides are done well. Read Full Review

  • 7.5
    Weird Science - Eric Shea Jun 1, 2021

    While I was anxious about what the outcome of last issue's cliffhanger would be, I have to say that I love what we got out of that aspect in this book, I just wish we spent more time dealing with the characters who are trying to get to the bottom of Oa's attack and a little less with John Stewart getting acclimated to a world that he's stuck on. Yeah, that part was still enjoyable but I didn't care about it as much as the other aspects of this book. Thankfully though, the art in this issue looked amazing and the plot advancements we did get make me want to come back for more. Read Full Review

  • 7.5
    The Comicbook Dispatch - ozwoods Jun 2, 2021

    Green Lantern #3 is well-written but very light on action. This story arc is directly diving into material from the Future State storyline, which may turn some readers off. We see John Stewart and the rest of the Green Lantern Corps in the aftermath of the last issue. We see where most of them are, and what some of them are planning to do. The comic takes its time to explore John Stewart, showing what he's doing during all of this. Sadly, nothing exciting happens in this comic. However, it looks like the next issue will be bringing more suspense. Read Full Review

  • 7.5
    Multiversity Comics - Alexander Jones Jun 7, 2021

    "Green Lantern" #3 is a solid issue that takes risks to push the series closer to greatness. Read Full Review

  • 7.0
    Razorfine - Alan Rapp Jun 10, 2021

    The storyline looks to take advantage of these unique circumstances to provide and intriguing collection of Lanterns, while also offering stories of other Lanterns making due without their rings. I'm also happy to see Sojourner finally make it into a core Green Lantern title. Read Full Review

  • 5.0
    Blog Of Oa - Myron Rumsey Jun 1, 2021

    The back half of Green Lantern #3 is definitely the stronger part of this issue in my opinion, but the sum of the parts isn't enough to justify the cover price. From an unengaging front half to some very shaky art, this one's a skip. Five out of ten lanterns. Read Full Review

  • 4.0
    Forces Of Geek - Lenny Schwartz Jun 2, 2021

    This feels like a weak moment in the Green Lantern characters history. I wish it had more going on to it than this. Read Full Review

  • 3.0
    BGCP - Michael Lennox Jun 4, 2021

    When you rely on kooky gimmicks (Teen Lantern), great artwork and covers but have a complicated Phantom Menace style half baked story you are on shaky ground. I think that this storyline is officially boring. one star only for the story and 2 for artwork (because of that cover.) Read Full Review

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