George Marston's Comic Reviews

Reviewer For: Newsarama, IGN Reviews: 162
7.6Avg. Review Rating

9
100th Anniversary: Fantastic Four #1

Jul 2, 2014

The best versions of the Fantastic Four take the reader on an adventure. They don't simply allow us to watch their lives, they invite us to become adventurers, begging questions, seeking deeper answers, and finding some small truth about our own nature along with their high-concepts and cosmic questions. There's nothing as disappointing as finally getting that feeling, of brushing the fingertips of that outstretched hand that's beckoning you to an adventure, only to realize there's no time to fully grab hold. If we're lucky, the characters and concepts in Fantastic Four 100th Anniversary #1 won't end with these pages, and if Marvel is smart, they'll give Jen Van Meter and Joanna Estep more time with the Richards family and their friends.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Age of Ultron #1

Mar 4, 2013

Coupled with the thoroughly downcast plot, Age of Ultron #1 leaves the reader wanting more, both from the story, and from the world in which these versions of the characters live.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Age of Ultron #2

Mar 13, 2013

This is Marvel attempting The Walking Dead, and while there are enough tropes to support a meandering journey through The Walking Dead's dying world, Age of Ultron will need a little more flash to show why it's different than any other major Marvel event.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
Age of Ultron #3

Mar 27, 2013

Three issues doesn't seem like a lot by which to judge a comic, but these days, when long-term, decompressed stories are becoming more and more frowned upon by critics and fans alike, and readers want to know not just that what they're reading is important, but why, waiting til over a third of a title's life span has come and gone before even approaching an actual plot is borderline unreadable. Bendis and Hitch have enough good will based on Bendis's keen knack for building relationships and Hitch's epic, widescreen eye for detail that this isn't a lost cause, but Age of Ultron is starting to sink more like a stone than an anchor. It's time to start reeling it in.

View Issue       View Full Review
4
Age of Ultron #6

Apr 17, 2013

Age of Ultron seems less like a story that had to be told, and more like one that exists simply because it can, relying on the long held conceit that Ultron will someday try to kill everyone, and skirting tense moral issues instead of confronting them. There is more than enough space for the kind of wordy examinations that Bendis loves to employ in this issue, but what should have been the moment at the crux of this series is instead given no room to breathe, let along foster any kind of dialogue or character development. Instead, Bendis somehow finds a way to contract the one scene worthy of expansion in the entire six issues that have been published into a grisly throwaway moment undercut by an utter lack of dramatic tension and an abundance of spoilers and ruined surprises. It's emblematic of Age of Ultron as a whole.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
Age of Ultron #8

May 15, 2013

As it stands, Age of Ultron is less a story and more a morass of good ideas bogged down by an almost utter lack of pacing, plotting, or time management. While Age of Ultron #8 is something of a bright spot of the series so far, it only serves to remind readers how good Brian Bendis can be when he's excited about an idea, and how misguided his writing can be when it feels more like an obligation than a story.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Age of Ultron #10AI

Jun 26, 2013

It's a new thing to see a Hank Pym who, instead of blaming himself for all the world's ills, instead spends his time considering his triumphs and reveling in his role as a scientific swashbuckler. There's something about the inherent darkness now associated with Pym that makes his bounding, dynamic crime fighting persona all the more poignant, like finally seeing an old friend free from the shackles of depression. Reinventing and reinvigorating Hank Pym, Marvel's oldest loose end, has been tried a time or two, but few have taken him down a road not of penance, but of reverie. Mark Waid has done a dynamite job setting the stage for Sam Humphries to take over when Avengers AI launches. Let's just hope Humphries can keep up the pace, and keep the new and improved Hank Pym around for a while.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
All-New Ghost Rider #1

Mar 25, 2014

This is nothing like any Ghost Rider book that's ever hit the stands. And that is definitely as mixed bag for Marvel. There's a component of Marvel's readership that will be repelled by this new take on the character - it really isn't like anything in mainstream American comics right now - but there are also those who will be drawn to the book for its odd-duck style. The bottom line is, Ghost Rider #1 is a book that wears its influence on its sleeve, along with its emotional core, and its sense of subtlety. But there's something incredibly gripping about its raw, unbridled energy that will make readers who are willing to go along for the ride clamor for the next issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
All-New Ghost Rider #2

Apr 11, 2014

Ghost Rider is fast and furious, speed lines and blood splatters, and it's unlike anything else Marvel is doing right now, and it's quickly becoming a must-read.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
All-New X-Men #2

Nov 27, 2012

All-New X-Men's time travel gimmick isn't sustainable. It's not even the first time a group of young X-Men has met their future selves. What it is, though, is an emotionally charged take on the paradox of learning the future, and knowing you're doomed to live it out. While it's unlikely that there won't be some changes as a result of All-New X-Men, perhaps the strength of this book will not be the ways in which it alters the status quo, but the ways in which it holds it together, forcing the younger X-Men to confront their darkest selves. It's a dizzying prospect, but one Brian Bendis seems well-equipped to handle.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
All-New X-Men #3

Dec 4, 2012

So far, All-New X-Men looks to be earning its place as the flasghip title of Marvel NOW!'s X-Men line. This issue ends with a crucial moment that will undoubtedly set the tone for the rest of the series. It's a make or break moment in a book that has been full of make or break moments in only three issues. While this issue isn't a complete success - Emma Frost really doesn't work under Bendis's pen right now - there's so much to love about the way All-New X-Men has blended the ongoing mutant soap opera with an implausibly entertaining premise that, if Bendis can continue to stick the landing, he may have a definitive X-Men run on his hands.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
All-New X-Men #9

Mar 21, 2013

Bendis's excellent twist on Ms. Grey, coupled with Stuart Immonen's razor sharp artwork make All-New X-Men the best X book on the stands.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
All-New X-Men #10

Apr 3, 2013

Despite a few issues that don't live up to the rest of the series, All-New X-Men is still one of the strongest, most gratifying reads coming out of Marvel NOW!. This is what the brand should be all about; a return to the core ideas of classic characters, portrayed with a new twist by reinvigorated creators. Don't let the sub-par All-New X-Men #10 fool you. There's plenty to love about this title even when it misses a step.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Amazing Spider-Man (1999) #678

Jan 19, 2012

The energy in the pencils is bounding and bright, however, and suits the book like a glove. We'll have to wait for the next issue to see how things turn out, but if these are the kind of fun, small arc stories that Slott and Ramos are gonna be telling for a while, then I'll be there with bells on.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Amazing Spider-Man (1999) #680

Feb 29, 2012

It may not be the most earth-shaking story, but it's exactly the kind of Spider-Man comic I want to read. It's not just a great issue of Amazing Spider-Man, it's one of the best comics I've read this year.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Amazing Spider-Man (1999) #682

Mar 26, 2012

There are still plenty of issues left for "Ends of the Earth," after all, this is only the first part of the story, but if they are all as good as this issue was, we may be looking at the pinnacle of Slott's run.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Amazing Spider-Man (1999) #690

Jul 26, 2012

There aren't a whole lot of ways for this story to go, but I'm having a hell of a time enjoying the ride.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Amazing Spider-Man (1999) #700

Dec 26, 2012

Dan Slott has walked a very fine tightrope for these last few issues, and the way this story is perceived in the long run will depend greatly on what happens in Superior Spider-Man, but on its own legs, Amazing Spider-Man #700 stands as Slott's masterpiece.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #1

Apr 30, 2014

It's good to have Peter Parker back, and there are moments of true joy in this script, like when Peter slaps on his mask, and, careening across the New York skyline, says "This is what being Spider-Man is all about!" But there's no big moment, no revelation that shows why killing Peter and replacing him with Doc Ock was all worth it. And without something to tie the last several years together, this relaunch feels joyous only because we lost Peter to begin with, like the reader is being made to feel excited about Peter's return simply by his absence, not because of any larger lesson about Peter's value, or the true nature of Spider-Man. Maybe I expected too much, but while it's good to have Peter back, his return only makes me question why he had to be gone in the first place.

View Issue       View Full Review
4
Amazing X-Men #8

Jun 4, 2014

Amazing X-Men has a real opportunity to offer a glimpse at the numerous popular X-characters that don't quite fit with the franchise's main storyline right now. Unfortunately, this issue breezes straight past moments that should have been worth the price of admission alone - like Kurt and Piotr's reunion - in favor of more screentime for the only X-Man that matters, Wolverine. Compounded with art that would be sub-par from anyone, let alone a powerhouse like Ed McGuinness, and a script that jumps too many times without sticking a landing, and Amazing X-Men #8 totals out to a disappointing issue from a title and creators that have traditionally been much more successful.

View Issue       View Full Review
4
Avengers & X-Men: Axis #1

Oct 7, 2014

It is very hard to feel optimistic about any major crossover these days, especially one that comes so hot on the heels of another remarkably lackluster event, and Axis does very little to relieve anyone's event fatigue. The problem is, we all know the inevitable return to status quo that will follow, and while superhero comics these days are far more about the journey than the destination, even the window dressing in Axis feels like gears simply grinding to the next stop, with no care for how the story arrives at its foreordained objective so long as no one falls off the cart on the way there.

View Issue       View Full Review
5
Avengers (2010) Annual #1

Jan 5, 2012

The only thing that saves this book is a golden moment towards the end, where a captive Wonder Man muses to his former teammates whether he even exists at all, or is simply a construct of the Scarlet Witch's imagination built out of grief all those years past.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Avengers (2012) #2

Dec 18, 2012

There's still a long way to go to make Avengers the title it ought to be. While Jonathan Hickman seems to have a grasp on where he wants to take the team, these first two issues have seemed more like a means to an end, rather than a blockbuster opening volley. Issue three will be a crucial point; now that the Avengers are assembled, it's time to see them in action. Avengers #2 continued the previous issue's build up. Now, let's see Earth's Mightiest Heroes really earn that mantle.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
Avengers (2012) #7

Mar 7, 2013

Avengers should be about Earth's Mightiest Heroes, not trying to repurpose every character Marvel is underusing.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Avengers (2012) #29

May 14, 2014

With a solid lead-in, and pitch perfect art, it may be hard to see exactly what the problem is with Avengers #29. When you boil it down, the issue is that this is the culmination of dozens of comics over the last two years that spent more time breaking the Avengers into groups to talk about how hard it is to be a hero than in actually having them do anything heroic.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Avengers Academy #38

Oct 4, 2012

It's lighthearted, hilarious, and full of everything that's made Avengers Academy great. Christos Gage nails it again, and Tom Grummet turns in one of his best issues on the book. I'll miss Avengers Academy.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Avengers Arena #17

Nov 21, 2013

Kev Walker makes Avengers Arena look good, even if this issue feels like too much flash and not enough substance.

View Issue       View Full Review
0
Avengers Assemble #1

Mar 19, 2012

Whatever the cause, Avengers Assemble is not only a missed opportunity, but also a simple failure.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Avengers Assemble #9

Nov 19, 2012

With this issue's ending leading into some more action-driven scenarios, that will hopefully signal a move into a more energetic tone. As it stands, the story itself seems like an afterthought, an element designed only to glue together the scenes of the characters getting along (or not), rather than a scenario into which the characters have been placed. DeConnick has the chops for a book like Avengers Assemble, she just needs to flex a few more muscles than those she's used here.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Avengers Vs. X-Men #0

Mar 28, 2012

Overall, Avengers Vs. X-Men #0 does less to set up the impending crossover than to introduce the players involved, showcasing Scarlet Witch, whose return in the pages of Children's Crusade was touted as tying directly into the event, and Hope Summers, whose manifestation of the Phoenix Effect at the end of X-Sanction seems to be the ultimate precursor to what's coming. While some fans may be disappointed that some of the content has been seen before, and that this isn't really the kick-off of the event, the quality and entertainment value of the two parts of this issue set it apart from other such teasers that have shown up in the past. There's no real judgment that can be made about the upcoming mini-series based off of this single issue, but if the level of quality is anything similar, we're in for a hell of a ride.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Avengers Vs. X-Men #2

Apr 18, 2012

It's a rare thing for a much-hyped event book to get so much right, and while there's still time for the balloon to deflate, this issue is a prime example of the kind of payoff that the anticipation inherent in the lead up to a book like this demands.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Avengers Vs. X-Men #6

Jun 20, 2012

Avengers Vs. X-Men is really shaping up to be about "choice;" the choice to take responsibility for your actions, the choice to do what you think is right, and what happens when that choice is taken away for what seem like the right reasons. As these choices are made, and lines are drawn, crossed, and drawn again, it's hard to find sympathy for anyone but characters like Beast and Hope, who, more than anything, have become caught in the crossfire. Unlike AvX's obvious forebear Civil War, it's a lot more difficult to pick a side in the conflict. The world is a grey area, and only becomes black and white based on the choices made by the people who inhabit it, and it's those choices that are driving AvX towards something potentially world altering.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Avengers Vs. X-Men #11

Sep 12, 2012

Still, the book reads well, and when it's doing what it does right, it does it spot on. There's a lot to love about Avengers Vs. X-Men #11, even if some of the window dressing doesn't exactly spruce anything up. With Marvel NOW! on the horizon, and the end of the event just weeks away, it's a natural time to start setting the stage for the inevitable outcome of AvX, but it seems that better choices could be made when it comes to serving the headline rather than the story.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
AVX: VS #4

Jul 14, 2012

It's hard to compare two stories that are so disparate; on one hand, you've got Remender and Peterson delivering a fairly straightforward, but high-energy, well executed superhero throwdown. On the other, you've got Kaare Andrews bending the conventions of mainstream superhero comics almost to the breaking point. It's kind of a beautiful treatise on the potential of superhero comics in the hands of people who love what they're doing, and have the chops to back it up. The overall story of AvX is almost inconsequential compared to the potential of that kind of single issue. Andrews's story alone could be enough to justify the entire six issue series. I almost can't recommend this issue enough.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
AVX: VS #6

Oct 3, 2012

Overall, AvX: Vs was not the most essential component of Marvel's 2012 event. Its focus solely on fights that couldn't quite make it into the main title ensured that, often, the book would be primarily style rather than substance. Surprisingly, however, the creative minds behind various portions of the mini-series found freedom to create profoundly different and interesting glimpses at these characters without the shackles of continuity heavy exposition, or editorially mandated story drivers. Even if you didn't read the other five issues of AvX: Vs., even if you didn't read any of AvX at all, the talent on display in this issue is more than worth the purchase price.

View Issue       View Full Review
5
Axis: Carnage #1

Oct 30, 2014

There's not much to get excited about, unless you like wordy, uninteresting dialogue and cheap character gimmicks.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
Batgirl (2011) #38

Jan 14, 2015

The bottom line is, Batgirl is still loaded with promise, but the creative team needs to right the ship and start building a bigger picture very soon. All the potential in the world does no good without a strong direction. The soap opera elements are in place, with Barbara's relationships with Dinah, Liam, and Qadir providing a solid foundation. It's the capes 'n' cowls aspects that need to fall in line for Batgirl to feel like a must-read.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Batman (2011) #5

Jan 18, 2011

Batman #5 is one of those rare books that kind of made me step back for a second, take a breath, and re-read it immediately. Truly breathtaking; a masterpiece.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Batman (2011) #22

Jul 9, 2013

Bolstered by snippets of Bruce's formative travels prior to his return to Gotham provided by James Tynion IV and Rafael Albuquerque, "Zero Year" isn't just retelling Batman's origin, it's transforming Bruce Wayne into the man he'll one day become. Along the way, it's bringing his city and its inhabitants down the same dark path, creating a cycle that, like Nygma's Egyptian board game, feeds itself, ensuring it's own existence even as its main catalyst works to stop it. Snyder is onto something here, and it seems like DC is letting its faith in its creators guide their story. Good move.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Batman and Robin (2011) #5

Jan 12, 2012

I love this book, and you should, too.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) Annual #1

May 29, 2013

Despite a distinct lack of actual Batman in this annual until the funnily downbeat denouement. Batman: The Dark Knight Annual #1 could rank among the best Batman one-and-done stories in recent memory. It's easier to compare it to some of the more beloved episodes of "Batman: The Animated Series" than anything that's happened in a New 52 Batman comic heretofore. While the timing is a little odd - the story is meant to take place on Halloween - that's less of put-off, and more of an invitation to revisit this comic when the appropriate time of year finally rolls around. Any comic that begs a re-read, especially nowadays, is a welcome change of pace from the fleeting pleasures of most DC comics these days.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
Black Widow (2014) #1

Jan 7, 2014

Edmondson's first Black Widow story is called "Raison D'Etre," which is fitting since that seems to be all it's willing to establish for its main character. As a pilot, this issue works to establish Black Widow's function and her modus operandi, but there's nothing on the page to make readers anxiously await what happens next. In fact, there don't seem to be many long term seeds sown at all. Undoubtedly, this issue will have its supporters in spite of its flaws, and ultimately, that may be a good thing. Nathan Edmondson and Phil Noto clearly have a grasp on the surface elements that make Black Widow a fan favorite character, so it's hopeful that with time, they'll be able to better pry back the veneer of the aloof super-spy and find the compelling character inside.

View Issue       View Full Review
5
Captain America (2012) #7

May 29, 2013

The problem with Captain America #7 is the same one that's plaguing the series et al. There are some really great moments, written with skill and depth, but they're surrounded by what comes across as filler, material designed to eat pages and expand the story rather than tell it. At the heart of Remender's Captain America is a story about a man learning what it means to be a father, and seeing in himself a way to right the wrongs he felt as a child. Unfortunately, on the surface, it's still about Cap plodding his way through Zola's world without much real direction and without enough consistency in the storytelling to justify the razor-thin plot.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Captain America (2012) #10

Aug 28, 2013

Now that Remender's Captain America has moved into a new chapter, here's hoping that it gains a little expedience. The Dimension Z arc lasted a few issues too long, seemingly to cultivate the impact that some of the more trying story beats had. Still, that doesn't undersell the cathartic nature of Captain America #10, and may have actually better served the profound nature of this issue's epilogue, which is sure to make many readers await a return to Dimension Z. For now, I'm anxious to see how Cap deals with the ramifications of this story now that he's home.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Captain America: Steve Rogers #1

Aug 23, 2016

Captain America: Steve Rogers got off the ground by relying on a shocking premise, though it faltered in its first issues for a lack of actual propulsion. Now that the pieces are all in place, and it's moving full steam ahead, this story is starting to build up to something that could fulfill the promise of Cap's drama-laden "Hail Hydra!" moment. There are still seams showing, like a lack of room to show both sides of Steve's life, but we're getting there. And, at only four issues in, there's still plenty of time to really build a massive deluge that could flood the Marvel Universe when the levee finally breaks.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Captain Marvel (2012) #1

Jul 17, 2012

Though this issue's art is a major drawback, there's enough at play in DeConnick's script to keep me coming back for more, if only for the character moments as Carol finds new ways to push herself, to find risk and reward, and to truly own the mantle of Captain Marvel. Marvel is in a unique position with this title to capitalize on a contingent of readers who feel alienated by a lack of strong female superheroes creators, as Captain Marvel can certainly boast both, but they're gonna have to work a little harder to make this book all it can be with an improved art team to match the already solid direction and writing.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Captain Marvel (2014) #1

Mar 11, 2014

When it comes to Captain Marvel, the bottom line is, she deserves to be not just Marvel's premiere female hero, but one of its biggest names in general. Kelly Sue DeConnick definitely has a firm grasp on Carol's personality and what she wants out of the character, and taking her into space where she can really display Carol's humanity and juxtapose it with her cosmic power is a great step. Unfortunately, this relaunch hesitates too much on its first step to really soar, focusing a little too much on what Carol is losing by leaving Earth and not enough on what she gains by taking to the stars. Still, with a strong script from DeConnick, and tremendous art from David Lopez, it's too early yet to call Captain Marvel #1 a failure to launch so much as a brief pause before take off.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
Cyclops (2014) #5

Sep 25, 2014

There isn't anything particularly wrong with the issue - the pacing is solid, and the "father and son learning from each other" vibe is in place. It just feels a little ho-hum, like a filler episode of a great TV show, all moral and no real conflict.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Daredevil (2011) #8

Jan 19, 2012

Count this as another dynamite issue for one of the most consistently excellent titles on the stands.

View Issue       View Full Review
5
Daredevil (2011) #33

Nov 21, 2013

Sometimes even the most steady heart skips a beat. So it is with Waid and Samnee's Daredevil. Though it's usually a joy to read even on its off days, this issue felt more like a stop gap on the way to Daredevil forthcoming conclusion.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Daredevil (2014) #1

Mar 24, 2014

Mark Waid and Chris Samnee have already proven themselves the shepherds of one of Daredevil's classic runs. And while a relaunch with the same creative team can occasionally feel like a bit of a waste of that apparently still important "#1" on the cover, Waid and Samnee are already proving that, not only is Marvel's "season" format working for Daredevil, but ol' Hornhead's storytellers still have new ground to break as well. Daredevil #1 may not be a groundbreaking reboot, but it is a new direction, a new city, and a new style for the swashbuckler in scarlet, and one that fits damn well.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Dark Avengers #175

Jun 6, 2012

It's hard to see yet why this title needed to be re-branded, but with the title change aside, the direction still feels organic, relying on the same tension and intrigue that have made Parker's "Thunderbolts" a success. There's still plenty of time for the time-displaced former T-Bolts to show up, and with their story left open-ended, it seems likely that they'll be seen sooner rather than later. Meanwhile, it's time to focus on those characters still in the present, with Abe Jenkins and Songbird also staying on board. This issue is definitely a speed-bump when compared to the racing action of the last several, but as the beginning of a new chapter, it works, propped up largely by the quality of the creative team.

View Issue       View Full Review
5
Deadpool (2012) #1

Nov 7, 2012

What could have been the start of a brilliant re-focusing of Deadpool as a character, and as a title, has instead started out as a way to rehash the same kind of draggy, uninspired silliness for its own sake that causes characters like Wade Wilson to collapse. Without a solid foundation, all the one-liners and goofy dialogue in the world won't make a book work, and unfortunately, it seems that writers Duggan and Posehn are focusing too much on making sure every panel contains a joke, and less on telling much of a story. Posehn should be well aware, comedy is all about the set up, and the timing. He's mastered it on stage, but on the page he's clearly still finding his footing. There's still potential here, but this is an inauspicious start.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Death Of Wolverine #2

Sep 10, 2014

Despite all its flaws, there is still something primally engaging about Death of Wolverine. It's hard to grasp what such a lofty title will mean in the landscape of the Marvel universe - especially knowing Marvel's track record with high profile deaths in recent years. But taken on its own, as the final chapter in the story of a character with a stronger narrative than most with Wolverine's history can hope for, it's easier to judge for its actual merits and flaws. While this second issue fails to feel as contained as the first, the revelations in its final pages leave hope that the epic conclusion Wolverine's story deserves is still on the horizon, even if the way there is paved with particularly rocky ground.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
Deathlok (2014) #1

Oct 30, 2014

Nathan Edmondson's takeover of the espionage thriller corner of the Marvel universe continues with Deathlok #1, a guns-n-glory adventure with all the merits and flaws of an '80's action movie.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Defenders (2011) #2

Jan 4, 2012

As of right now, I can't say that this book is a must read. It's definitely got a great recipe for success; there's a lot of Grant Morrison's JLA in the mix, as veteran teammates are thrown together with new blood additions to face increasingly bizarre and supernatural threats. The art of the Dodsons and Sonia Oback is compelling and engaging. There's something still lacking, though, and it seems to be personality.

View Issue       View Full Review
4
Detective Comics (2011) #30

Apr 2, 2014

I want to believe in the team of Francis Manapul and Brian Buccellato, and they are not without their strengths. As visual artists, they are at the top of DC's current stable, but as writers, they lack a strong point of view, or a vision outside of simply presenting a typical, expected version of the characters in their care. Detective Comics #30 may have a lot of the right moves, but in the end, it's just going through the motions. There's no voice to match the book's gorgeous looks, and its script cannot match the personality of its visual identity.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Elektra (2014) #1

Apr 23, 2014

If there's one real flaw in Elektra, it's that not enough focus is paid to the title character. In exploring the minds and voices of her rotating narrators, Blackman leaves Elektra exactly where she started at the story's beginning, a cipher almost as unknown to herself as she is to the reader. While the opening scroll showcased the big moments in Elektra's history, little effort is made to truly codify her as more than the various, self-described roles she has played. On the other hand, Elektra #1 represents the start of a journey by the title character to discover exactly those things, so there is time yet for Blackman to provide something more to grasp onto than a compelling aesthetic and well-appointed script.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Fantastic Four (2012) #2

Dec 11, 2012

While Fantastic Four #2 isn't quite the slam-dunk that the first issue was, Matt Fraction's momentum is undeniable. In a way, Fantastic Four feels far more emblematic of the Marvel NOW! mission statement than any of its supposed flagship titles; appropriate, considering the team's history and traditional role with the publisher, but in a way disheartening that some of the other titles haven't been able to capture the spark of re-focusing, re-establishing, and, in some ways, re-introducing the titles and characters we all know and love. Coming off a landmark run by Jonathan Hickman means that Fantastic Four has a high bar to reach. Fortunately, Matt Fraction seems to be headed, like the F4, up, up, and away.

View Issue       View Full Review
3
Fantastic Four (2014) #2

Mar 12, 2014

The thing that makes James Robinson and Leonard Kirk's Fantastic Four so disappointing is that, by all rights, they could be doing so much better. Robinson's old-meets-new sensibilities seem like a natural fit for Marvel's first family, and Kirk's grasp of bombastic, big action lends itself perfect to a comic that often finds itself far afield in alternate dimensions, other planets, and exotic locales. But what works on paper is often less successful in practice. By forcing the FF into a more grounded mold, and trying to go darker to keep the book interesting, Robinson is ignoring the big, bright future that Fantastic Four has always promised. Fantastic Four needs actual innovation, not the illusion of momentum.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
FF #22

Sep 27, 2012

FF#22 highlights many things that are great about Jonathan Hickman's run on the Fantastic Four, particularly his knack for characterization and his grasp of the FF's larger mythos.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
FF (2012) #1

Nov 26, 2012

While it isn't quite the treatise on first issues that Fraction's Fantastic Four #1 proved to be, FF#1 offers an immensely promising start, showcasing, again, Fraction's take on each member of this admittedly large and bizarre cast. The real test of this title will come as these characters start moving into the larger world, having adventures, interacting with each other instead of, ostensibly, the reader, and finding their own dynamic. This issue more than proves that Fraction and Allred have the chops to make this the kind of book that, like Fraction's Hawkeye, can push its expectations to the limit, they just need to quickly start doing so, lest FF become a sit-com instead of pop-art sci-fi.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
FF (2012) #2

Dec 20, 2012

Beyond the on-the-money characterization, FF #2 is where this title's actual plot starts to materialize, promising something maybe even a little dark to go with all the funny and feely bits that make this book sing. Fraction and Allred are having all of the fun with FF, and it's contagious.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Flash (2011) #0

Sep 27, 2012

This may be the first truly perfect issue of Manapul and Buccellato's Flash. After a year of learning new things about the Flash and his world, we're finally learning about Barry Allen.

View Issue       View Full Review
5
Flash (2011) #4

Dec 29, 2011

I keep hoping that the writing on this book will turn around, but it has yet to find even one iota of the personality that simply oozes from the art. I'd recommend skipping this book entirely, if the art weren't so damned amazing.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Flash (2011) #5

Jan 30, 2012

It makes me more than a little frustrated that a book can look this good yet read this poorly, but there are strong glimmers of hope for the future of this title. To be fair, Manapul and Buccellato are still finding their feet when it comes to writing at this level, and while it's clear that five issues haven't gotten them where they need to be, they're very much on the right track conceptually. The key will be balancing the concepts with the storytelling, and finding a way to make their writing collaboration as concise and engaging as their artistic efforts. Flash #5 has a lot of truly powerful elements, but the ideas have yet to gel with the output.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Flash (2011) #11

Jul 26, 2012

I don't know what happened this month, but Brian Buccellatto and Frances Manapul have finally found their footing as storytellers.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Flash (2011) #12

Aug 22, 2012

I feel like this arc is the creative team proving they know The Flash, showing their chops and drawing in old fans, while showing the new ones what this book is all about. I know that, from here, I'll be much more open to seeing the ways in which Manapul and Buccelatto can take my expectations and turn them upside down, introducing new concepts and ideas while holding on to the core of these characters. I only wish they had made that move their opening volley, rather than playing the long game and almost losing me in the first year.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Flash (2011) #20

May 22, 2013

Flash #20 continues the steady rise in the quality of this title. With a solid mystery afoot and the promise of finally caching in on some questions that have been dangling since DC's relaunch almost two years ago on the horizon, forward movement " the right way " seems to finally be in Flash's purview. It's just a shame that Barry Allen isn't really coming along for the ride, allowing himself to be swept along by his stories, rather than setting the pace for them. If Manapul and Buccellato can wrap their heads around making Barry Allen as compelling as the world he lives in, the last piece of this puzzle will finally fall into place.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Grayson #4

Nov 5, 2014

Still, by and large, Grayson remains one of DC's better offerings, if not one that feels like a must-read. Seeley's savvy use of Dick as eye candy pits him as a kind of boy next door/everyman type among vicious career spies whose sensibilities are as mysterious to him as they are to readers. Despite its strong lead, however, Grayson is still plagued with issues that drag down its overall readability. Not nearly enough tension has mounted in the preceding issues to feel like Grayson #4's trip back to St. Hadrian's is essential, and yet Seeley seems to have more fun, and find more compelling conflict on the grounds of his school than he does in any of Grayson's more exotic locales. If Seeley can harness his mastery of theme, and his keen eye for the zeitgeist of modern comics to build a more compelling narrative, Grayson could rise to the top of the stack.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #0.1

Feb 27, 2013

Really, judging Guardians of the Galaxy by this preview issue is like judging a film by its trailer. But the purpose of a trailer is to provide a hook, or a compelling reason to see a film. And to that purpose, Guardians of the Galaxy #0.1 doesn't accomplish much. The strength of the art, and the potential of one of Marvel's dream teams is still the real selling point, but once the series actually launches, Bendis and McNiven will have to move quickly to make a case for Guardians of the Galaxy as a necessary component of Marvel's future.

View Issue       View Full Review
3
Harley Quinn (2013) Annual #1

Oct 30, 2014

With a plot centered entirely around forcing the smells of suntan lotion, pizza, and yes, marijuana into the narrative, and jokes so unfunny as to seem purposefully tone-deaf, Harley Quinn Annual #1 is a gimmick at best, and at worst, a sad excuse to get Joe Quinones and Ben Caldwell's art in the same comic.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #3

Oct 17, 2012

This is one of those rare books that transcends the superhero medium, at once perfecting it, and eschewing it almost entirely, resulting in something with the personality of a Marvel comic, but the attitude and feel of an indie. This is Matt Fraction doing what he loves, and it's obvious on the page. He's definitely a writer that works best when he can focus on a character that really appeals to him, and let his voice come through, and fortunately, Marvel seems smart enough to be letting him do just that with Hawkeye. I can't recommend this book enough.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Hawkeye Vol. 2 Annual #1

Jul 24, 2013

While I hope that Fraction doesn't keep Kate and Clint separate for long, as their dynamic is one of the driving factors of the book's success, it is really exciting to see Kate striking out on her own, and truly living up to everything the Hawkeye name embodies. Gifted with her own shortcomings, and her own wild luck, Kate is the kind of female hero you rarely see, who dares to be feminine and girly, but is also uncomposed and rough around the edges at all the right times. As much as Clint Barton is the focus of Hawkeye, Kate Bishop is definitely the book's break out star.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Indestructible Hulk #1

Nov 19, 2012

This first issue has a lot going for it, and there's a distinct place in the market for a smart, action-oriented Hulk book, and Indestructible Hulk looks like a safe bet to fill that niche. Waid's usually brilliant writing takes center stage here, and the fact that he wisely focuses on making Bruce Banner as interesting and exciting as his big, green counterpart goes a long way to making this a book that should appeal to longtime Hulk fans, as well as those who have only recently been captivated by the possibilities of a character with this type of duality. Indestructible Hulk is a winner all the way.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Infinity #1

Aug 13, 2013

There's a lot to like about Infinity. With almost a year of stories in various titles shoring up its launch, it doesn't have the abrupt, forced tempo of events like AvX. On the other hand, there are some striking similarities to Marvel's last cosmic epic, something that Infinity will need to distance itself from. Still, there is plenty of fodder for a much richer tale than Marvel has told in its last few crossovers, and Jonathan Hickman is Marvel's premiere author of these kind of stories. With fan-favorite characters returning in its pages and one of the best mainstream superhero artists in the world on board, Infinity has nothing but possibilities ahead.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Infinity #6

Nov 26, 2013

In the end, Infinity #6 is a strong issue weighed down more by the failings of the series it concluded than any of its own flaws. Infinity at large isn't served by this ending, however, as it feels more like a single closed thread in a mass of tangled ones left dangling. Given the nature of Marvel's event cycle for the last few years, that is likely intentional, though it hardly makes for a satisfying story in its own right.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Inhumanity: The Awakening #1

Dec 12, 2013

Inhumanity: The Awakening begins the case for "Attilans" as another branch of Marvel's superheroes, but shows little to distinguish them just yet.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Invincible Iron Man #513

Feb 15, 2012

With a scene as climactic as the one at the end of this issue, with nearly every notable enemy of the Invincible Iron Man gathered together under the guidance of the Mandarin and Ezekiel Stane, the building blocks that have been carefully lain throughout this series are finally starting to take shape. There may have been some stretches where the wheels seemed more like they were spinning aimlessly rather than building up speed, but as of this issue, Matt Fraction and Salvador Larroca look to be firing on all cylinders, leading to what can only wind up being one of the most iconic clashes between Iron Man and the Mandarin of all time. The premise is a long time coming, and hard-earned. I'm hoping that the destination will live up to the ride.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Invincible Iron Man #527

Oct 24, 2012

There's a sense of calm and excitement that accompanies the end of Fraction and Larroca's Invincible Iron Man. On one hand, I will miss the consistency, and the ingenuity of this creative team, but on the other hand, it was becoming more and more clear that Fraction at least was ready to move on, and like Tony Stark, when something gets to be old hat, Fraction languishes somewhat, leading to a definite perception that the book was reaching its logical creative endpoint. Still, its more than remarkable that a team of this caliber got to do what they did with this title, seeing it from start to finish, and aside from a strange hiccup here or there (like the Fear Itself tie-in issues), tell a complete and compelling story of a man who can invent the world trying to understand himself.

View Issue       View Full Review
5
Iron Man (2012) #4

Dec 11, 2012

What should be an essential component of the post Marvel NOW! landscape is rapidly becoming inessential. For as bleeding edge as his tech seems to be, Tony Stark is having a desperately difficult time finding a way to feel modern and exciting. Gillen and Land seem like a dream team for this title, and indeed, their introduction of a new threat and a new toy for Iron Man in every issue shows they've got ideas to spare, but right now it seems less like they're painting a picture, and more like they're just slapping colors onto a canvas, trying to find the element that's going to tie it all together. Maybe there's a long game in place for Iron Man, but waiting for a credible theme to crop up through all of the rapid fire story beats and missed opportunities is seeming less and less like a worthy pastime.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Iron Man (2012) #14

Aug 7, 2013

With the ending of "The Secret Origin of Tony Stark" on the horizon, Kieron Gillen needs to stick the landing. By raising the stakes, he's set an obvious course of action for Tony Stark, but what of Recorder 451? If their relationship is reduced to a simple hero/villain paradigm, Gillen is in danger of losing the more innovative elements of the story he's crafting. There's still room for the story to end with a twist - it certainly began with one - but the fewer dimensions to 451's mission, his relationship to Tony, and his role in the grand scheme of things, the more the story stands to lose. If Gillen brings everything together, Tony stands to gain a lot of depth, and a whole new panoply of story possibilities outside of the constantly repeated tropes he's suffered in recent years. On the other hand, if everything winds up back at square one, Tony has gained nothing, and by extension, the readers are also left bereft.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Iron Man (2012) #17

Oct 23, 2013

What impact Iron Man #17's big revelation will have in the long term is hard to tell. There are obvious implications of the twin secrets uncovered in this issue at the character level, but the story possibilities feel frighteningly limited compared to the weight of the secrets being revealed. Kieron Gillen's track record with Iron Man has, so far, been hit or miss, but Gillen is well-versed in wringing the humanity from the larger-than-life characters he writes. Perhaps with the catalyst presented here, he can finally start focusing more on the "man" than the "iron."

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Journey Into Mystery (2011) #636

Apr 16, 2012

Kieron Gillen and Richard Elson have crafted something great with this story " that rare bird that can appeal to both longtime readers and those who are just getting started, simply by virtue of the talent involved, and attention to detail, and the ability to tell a story without forcing it to be more important that it probably should. Journey Into Mystery is a must-read.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Journey Into Mystery (2011) #647

Dec 20, 2012

Kathryn Immonen had a hard act to follow on Journey Into Mystery, and while her Sif story isn't as playful as L'il Loki's tale, there's still an abundance of depth and density in Marvel's Asgardian ensemble title.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Justice League Dark #12

Aug 27, 2012

With all of that going for Justice League Dark there's almost got to be a downside, but I can't see it. With Lemire at the helm, this book has joined the upper tier of DC's titles as a book to watch.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Justice League Dark Annual #1

Oct 31, 2012

While this book represents some of Lemire's first missteps with his run on JL Dark, they're greatly outweighed by the gorgeous artwork, the spot on characterization, and the twisting, turning plot. Lemire has done his best to establish the DC Universe's magical universe as a place not defined by light or dark - despite the title's implications - but as the grey area that exists away from the world of conventional heroes and villains, and the culmination of his first arc has put a fine point on that concept, showing that it's not the tools you have, it's what you do with them. Jeff Lemire and Mikel Janin are using theirs to redefine their own corner of the DCU, and it's pure magic.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
Justice League United Annual #1

Oct 30, 2014

Jeff Lemire's Justice League United captures the spirit of humanity and cosmic action pioneered by JLI, but an inability to balance those elements hurts more than it helps.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Lobster Johnson: Caput Mortuum #1

Sep 18, 2012

While the story may not be the best place to enter the world of Hellboy and the BPRD " there's little of Lobster Johnson's personality, or the supernatural world these characters inhabit " those looking for a high-octane, beautifully told story that compromises a little bit of substance in the name of style will find exactly what they're looking for in Lobster Johnson: Caput Mortuum.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
Loki: Agent of Asgard #1

Feb 3, 2014

Loki: Agent of Asgard is a no-brainer for Marvel right now. People want Loki, so who could begrudge them for giving it to them? Still, this issue feels like working backwards; less like someone said, "Wouldn't it be great if this happened to Loki?" and more like someone posited, "We need a Loki book. What can we put together?" While that's not an invalid approach, it does result in something that feels like a product more than a story. There are chestnuts of vision in Al Ewing's script, but Loki: Agent of Asgard has a long way to go before it's required reading, even for fans of the character.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Magneto (2014) #1

Mar 3, 2014

As first issues go, Bunn and Walta's Magneto is a knock out. Magneto has been depicted in many ways, often suiting whatever storyline he's a part of, and this issue starts the journey of reconciling the many facets of his personality. Magneto says at one point, "Unless I'm wearing the helmet, I'm rarely recognized," and in a way, that seems to be the issue at stake with Bunn's characterization. An emphasis is placed on depicting a Magneto who is aware of what he means as a symbol, who has purposefully worn many masks to accomplish his ends, and who, deep down, knows who he really is, and is coming to grips with that. It's a lot to say in a single issue, but Bunn and Walta have set the stage for a defining character piece with the Master of Magnetism.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Marvel Knights X-Men #1

Nov 13, 2013

Honestly, Brahm Revel tackling Marvel's merry mutants is enough of a draw for Marvel Knights: X-Men on its own, and indeed Revel's jagged, moody art, classic small town mystery plot, and over-arching themes of accepting oneself do not disappoint. Still, it seems like even in this first issue, there is room for more of Revel's own voice to come through. While it is well constructed and finely crafted, Marvel Knights: X-Men #1 feels more like the first issue of a fill-in arc on Wolverine and the X-Men than the start of a standalone tale. Fortunately, there's still time for Revel to bring more of his voice into this title, and in the mean time, Revel's art and storytelling may make up the difference.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Moon Knight (2014) #1

Mar 5, 2014

Moon Knight #1 isn't perfect. It sacrifices setting up a compelling plot in favor of working some triage on a character that's been through the wringer more than a few times, and in doing so, almost forgets to add any soul to go with its mind and body. There's a lot to like about Ellis and Shalvey's Moon Knight - if nothing else, it looks spectacular " but there's a long road to walk to make Mark Spector and his cadre of aliases and costumed identities an essential part of the Marvel oeuvre. Moon Knight #1 is a good first step.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Ms. Marvel (2014) #1

Feb 3, 2014

Ms. Marvel is a solid debut issue, and that in itself should be a victory not just for G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona, but for Marvel Comics itself. It is no secret that there has been some controversy over Kalama Khan's faith and her identity in the lead-up to this launch, but Ms. Marvel succeeds on its own strengths. It's not exactly edgy, and Kamala Khan is not exactly the first reluctant teen hero in Marvel's long history, but Ms. Marvel is one of the strongest debuts for a new character that Marvel has had in a long time. Here's hoping she sticks around for the long haul.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Ms. Marvel (2014) #6

Jul 16, 2014

It's hard to call a comic perfect - even when a title is consistently great, there's almost always somewhere for it to go. So instead, I will simply say that Ms. Marvel is incredibly timely. In a time when the face of fandom is changing, and readers are clamoring for books and heroes that more accurately reflect the world's diversity, Ms. Marvel is aiming for the bullseye of the zeitgeist, and coming pretty damn close to the mark. It's hard to find a book that is as energetic and upbeat as Ms. Marvel, let alone one starring a female person of color that bucks the stereotypes while staying true to culture being portrayed.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
New Avengers (2010) #20

Jan 12, 2012

Wow, I never thought I'd say this, but where has this Brian Bendis been for the last 10 years?

View Issue       View Full Review
9
New Avengers (2013) #2

Jan 16, 2013

As one of Marvel's rising stars, and the writer of what is arguably the company's flagship title, Jonathan Hickman has a lot of room to stretch out his inter-dimensional ideas, and the characters and canvas to convey them properly. If you're a fan of Hickman's previous Marvel work, especially his run on Fantastic Four, then you'll want to read this issue. There are clear threads that he's been building for some time coming to fruition here, and if Fantastic Four was proof of concept of the way this title will evolve, things are only going to get bigger, and more serious. And really, if the last, chilling panel doesn't hook you, nothing will.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
New Avengers (2013) #3

Feb 6, 2013

Comics these days often have a tendency to seem "unimportant," or "inessential" if the world isn't at stake, or the entire status quo of the universe isn't changing in their pages, and so many titles wind up feeling forced, or overblown and too dramatic. New Avengers is an example of a title getting it right. And of course, that's Jonathan Hickman's strength in general. New Avengers gracefully plays on the last several years of continuity without directly invoking them too often, and builds a set of stakes that almost couldn't be higher, or more entertaining, for the Marvel Universe.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
New Avengers (2013) #4

Mar 20, 2013

Though the vast, cosmically philosophical nature of Hickman's New Avengers may be intimidating to some, fans of his work on SHIELD and Fantastic Four will not be disappointed. This is Hickman's Gotterdamerung, a celestial morality play writ large across Marvel's entire tableau, where the demigods of the Avengers learn of their inevitable mortality. It's an intimidating prospect, but Hickman has handled stories on this scale before, and with great aplomb. With any luck, the intrigue and weight of this story will loom larger than it's inevitable result of combining many of Marvel's disparate timelines, such as the New Universe, with the one we know, as saddling a book this good with as shaky a result would be downright criminal.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
New Avengers (2013) #6

May 30, 2013

New Avengers is not afraid to get philosophical, asking questions of cosmic morality, and is all the better for it.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
New Avengers (2013) #24

Sep 25, 2014

While it may seem like Namor is the focus of this dense, philosophically explorative issue, the real star is Dr. Doom, probably the character in all of Marveldom that Hickman writes best. Doom's madness and majesty are in full effect, giving the ending of New Avengers #24 some much needed punch.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Operation S.I.N. #1

Jan 5, 2015

With Agent Carter on the immediate horizon, it makes perfect sense to stick that show's presumed breakout characters, the titular Peggy Carter and the debonair Howard Stark, into a book of their own. On the other hand, seems a little forced to tie that book in to a byzantine event comic that got middling reception rather than making it more accessible to nascent fans of the TV series. Either way, do yourself a favor, and don't pass Operation: SIN #1 up as an inessential tie-in book. Kathryn Immonen and Rich Ellis are cooking something special here, even if it needs a little more time to simmer.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Original Sin #1

May 5, 2014

In the grand scheme of things, events come and go. And even with a theoretically major inciting event like the death of Uatu driving it, Original Sin could fall into the seemingly endless cycle of Marvel crossovers. But it does carry an intimacy and attention to characterization that set it apart. Though much of its charm lies in its small picture elements, there's enough big cosmic craziness that, if Jason Aaron can maintain his handle on the cast and the buddy comedy-noir premise of his team ups, Original Sin may actually have something to say.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Punisher (2014) #1

Feb 6, 2014

The book's ending, tying Punisher into the larger Marvel universe, is the textbook definition of a solid hook. This is the best of what a character like Punisher can accomplish.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Rocket Raccoon #1

Jun 30, 2014

The bottom line is, Rocket Raccoon #1 is a near-perfect piece of cartoon fiction. It plays the most ridiculous elements of comic books and science fiction against each other without missing a beat, riding entirely on Skottie Young's shoulders the entire time. Very few creators in mainstream comics could pull off an issue like this without skipping a beat, especially featuring as many wacky and outlandish elements as Rocket Raccoon #1. That Skottie Young manages to play up those aspects without coming off as silly or repellent is laudable; that the book goes so far beyond those trappings to be as compelling as it is is transcendent.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Rocket Raccoon #2

Aug 6, 2014

While his star has certainly been on the rise for the last few years, Rocket Raccoon has never had a higher profile than at this exact moment. And for many fans, that's hard to believe. But with Skottie Young turning out comics like this, which capitalize effortlessly on Guardians of the Galaxy's box office pull, and the cantankerous charisma of its most unlikely star, it's easy to see why Rocket has stolen our hearts. Maybe he just wants them more than we do.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Savage Wolverine #1

Jan 14, 2013

Right now, there's enough joy in Savage Wolverine simply based on Frank Cho's fluid visual interpretation of that equation to make this book worthwhile, but he's gonna have to work hard not to crush himself under the weight of his own script.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Savage Wolverine #2

Feb 20, 2013

Despite its faults, such as action that moves faster than the plot and a shaky noir-ish style, Savage Wolverine remains one of Wolverine's most fun series in years. Frank Cho is moving closer to just the right balance in his art and writing, and Wolverine seems like an impossibly good fit for Cho's "apes & babes" aesthetic. It's only two issues in, so there's plenty of time for the pacing and story to catch up to each other. In the meantime, it's nothing but fun watching this book evolve.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Scarlet Spider #1

Jan 11, 2012

Honestly, if you told me that I would be this excited about anything to do with "The Clone Saga," or Kaine, or the Scarlet Spider, or any of that nonsense even yesterday, I probably would have punched you in the face for impugning my character. But now, I can't imagine it any other way. Don't be afraid of the connotations inherent in this type of spinoff, or the history of this character. This is a rare feat truly deserving of a first issue with as much hype as this one's had: a fresh start, both for Kaine, and for readers who are weary and wary of clones, hoodies, anti-heroes, and the rest of the things you'd expect in this title. Scarlet Spider was poetry in motion, and I'm not afraid to say I loved it.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
Secret Avengers #20

Dec 29, 2011

Warren Ellis and his bevy of artists have bottled a few bolts of lightning throughout his run, but this is more like a spark that fizzled out.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Secret Avengers #24

Apr 5, 2012

The story is compelling, the villains are strange, and the art from Gabriel Hardman and Bettie Breitweiser is basically flawless. This book hasn't stopped finding it's way to the top of the stack every month, and under Rick Remender's direction, it looks to be climbing there a little faster yet.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Secret Avengers #29

Jul 26, 2012

Secret Avengers is the best of the franchise.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
She-Hulk (2014) #1

Feb 11, 2014

There are some story short-cuts in this issue - everything is wrapped up in a bow that is a little too neat - but the seeds of possible long-term arcs are also sewn. Far more important is that Soule and Pulido have done a bang-up job of establishing exactly who their She-Hulk is, and where she fits in the larger Marvel Universe. She-Hulk #1 is reminiscent of Mark Waid's Daredevil, and not just because they both feature lawyers, but because they are both thoughtful character dramas played with a spotless sense of characterization and humor, and propped up by exciting and engaging art. She-Hulk is a winner on almost every level.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Shooters #1

Mar 20, 2012

Shooters is an important, resonant and timely graphic novel from two overlooked writers, and will leave even those with the strongest convictions questioning themselves in the way that only true art can inspire.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Spider-Men #2

Jul 2, 2012

It's not perfect " there's little weight to the story beyond the emotional "what if" of the two heroes crossing paths " but Spider-Men fills those holes by being fun to read and visually impressive.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
Storm #1

Jul 23, 2014

For all its potential, Storm #1 shows a book that has a long way to go. While the goal may be to define its heroine as an individual, the book itself also needs to capture an identity. Storm #1 feels more like a one-shot than the launch of a solo book, and while Marvel has recently focused on launching new titles - especially those featuring established characters - with done-in-one tales, Storm #1 feels like less of a mission statement than a half-hearted attempt. Storm fails to commit to its authority or its activism, finding itself caught between the two, and leaving one of Marvel's biggest untapped assets still wanting more.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Stray Bullets: Killers #1

Feb 11, 2014

Stray Bullets: Killers #1 may not be for everyone. It's a little chilling, a lot violent, and exactly in line with Lapham's previous incarnation of the title, though new readers will feel no learning curve. If there's any flaw, it's that Killers doesn't stray far enough from the colon-less Stray Bullets, though true to the title, it does focus more on the force majeure of crime and violence through the eyes of those perpetrating it at times. But when the work is this good, and this consistent with the vision of its creator, it's hard to argue with the results. Stray Bullets: Killers #1 is like coming back to a town that you know has dark secrets, but feels like home nonetheless.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Suicide Risk #1

Apr 30, 2013

Overall, Suicide Risk marks a much stronger debut than many superhero comics are lucky to get these days. While it has its share of flaws, mainly stemming from a lack of time building up the central characters before drastically changing their world, Suicide Risk packs in more intrigue and merit than disappointment. The biggest success for the big is that it presents an interesting enough world, and an engaging enough hook to make readers want to know more about the characters, to feel the impact that's missing from this issue's last few pages, to inhabit their world, and unravel the mysteries within it. And in today's superhero landscape, that's about as big a success as you can hope for in a brand new concept.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Supergirl (2011) #9

May 16, 2012

In past years, Supergirl has struggled off and on to hold an audience, and to differentiate it's titular character from her namesake enough to stand alone, while still keeping the sense of wonder and strength that has made Superman the most enduring and inspirational character of all time. While it's hard to say that Green, Johnson, and Asrar's Supergirl is the definitive take on a character with a storied a history as Kara Zor-El, the team has made great strides toward building the character a niche and corner of the DCU all her own. It's not quite solid gold just yet, but Supergirl is a great example of the reboot done right.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Supergirl (2011) #13

Oct 19, 2012

This book is remarkably consistent, but there's little charm in this issue's script. Sam Basri's art, as fun and readable as it is, doesn't match the level of regular artist Mahmud Asrar, though colorist Dave McCaig provides a nice throughline. Solid fun, but not electrifying.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Superior Foes of Spider-Man #1

Jul 3, 2013

Superior Foes of Spider-Man is something special, a new entry in a growing crop of Marvel comics like Hawkeye, FF, and Daredevil that focus on characters first, and use unmatched art and humor to do so. It's early yet, but Marvel hasn't had this strong a debut issue since Hawkeye, a comparison which bodes very well for Superior Foes of Spider-Man. If this is the new Marvel, I say keep 'em coming.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Superior Foes of Spider-Man #6

Dec 11, 2013

Superior Foes of Spider-Man is just one of a number of books at Marvel that are exploring the idea of the post-modern super-hero. More like a sitcom than a traditional super-hero book, Superior Foes combines humor and pathos with a sarcastic love letter to the history of Marvel's super-villains. With Boomerang, the book's leading man, receiving some fantastic characterization this issue, and his supporting cast providing some big thrills, Superior Foes of Spider-Man #6 is a strong issue from a book that, month in and month out, is one of Marvel's best.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
Superior Iron Man #2

Nov 26, 2014

Taylor's reputation says he'll find a way to end every issue on a soap-operatic moment whether it serves the book or not. Time will tell if he'll be able to balance his sense of urgency with keeping Tony likable, or at least compelling. Right now, Superior Iron Man is working a little too hard to feel as cutting-edge as its tech.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Superior Spider-Man #2

Jan 30, 2013

It's easy to see why so many fans were incensed by Slott's handling of Peter Parker's apparent demise, especially with Peter himself laying those feelings out so perfectly, but those fans that have chosen to stick with Superior Spider-Man may already be finding validation in their viewpoint. While it's true that Peter's presence in the book undercuts some of the dread that accompanied the change-over, it's almost necessary, if only to show that Slott and co. aren't quite as heartless as some would make them out to be. And, by turning Peter's relationship to Doc Ock into a kind of psychic Odd Couple situation instead of the traditional hero/villain dynamic, we're treated to insight into the minds of both men; what made one of them a hero, and the other a villain, and, in the end, what may make Peter Parker the Superior Spider-Man after all.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Superior Spider-Man #4

Feb 21, 2013

Superior Spider-Man gets better every issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
5
Superior Spider-Man #5

Mar 7, 2013

Superior Spider-Man #7 is going to upset people. It's very hard to judge this book by the quality of its storytelling, and not the turning point it represents for Otto Octavius as Spider-Man.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Superior Spider-Man #6

Mar 20, 2013

After last issue's tense, and ultimately gut-wrenching climax, it was very difficult to look forward to continuing this story, but at the same time, there's something almost reassuring about the way Dan Slott lets his villains be villains, and his heroes truly heroic. There is a defining line between a man like Otto Octavius and a man like Peter Parker, and Superior Spider-Man is all about exploring what that is. Hopefully, doing so won't come at too much more expense to poor Peter Parker.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Superior Spider-Man #9

May 2, 2013

Dan Slott has proved time and again that, if you're willing to go along for the ride, he'll take you not just to shattering lows, but to peaking, soaring highs as well. Superior Spider-Man #9 marks just about the lowest point for Peter Parker, maybe ever, in his 50 year history, but you've gotta go down to come back up, and with Slott at the helm, it's only a matter of time before he pulls back on the stick and sends readers back into the clouds. For now, we're left sitting in the dark, piecing together the clues he's left to find the way back into the light, and I for one am enjoying the mystery.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Superior Spider-Man #18

Sep 18, 2013

All in all, what Superior Spider-Man really suffers from, and Superior Spider-Man #18 really shows, is that there is a compelling case to be made for Otto Octavius as Peter Parker's true heir, but in proving it, Dan Slott is building a scenario where Otto will never get to live out that role without some serious plot noodling. Otto Octavius is being set up for a fall, and some of those threads need to start tying off sooner rather than later, lest Superior Spider-Man fall under its own weight.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Superior Spider-Man #19

Oct 16, 2013

Superior Spider-Man has undoubtedly been one of the most polarizing and controversial stories Marvel has ever told, taking Spider-Man and divesting him from his heart, taking away almost everything that readers have taken for granted and proving that while Doc Ock may be a superior Spider-Man, Peter Parker will always be the greater hero. Now that Slott's goals are coming into focus, Superior Spider-Man may also go down as one of Marvel's greatest tales. It's had it's issues with execution, but it's doubtless that Dan Slott will go down as one of Spider-Man's greatest shepherds, if not at least his greatest fan.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Superior Spider-Man #31

Apr 16, 2014

And with that, Superior Spider-Man ends much like it lived, in a space of well-crafted action and myriad emotional hooks without the follow-through to really live up to that potential. Given how many of the series' previous issues felt a lot like filler, it's disappointing that so much is left on the table. It almost seems like this ending was written nearly whole cloth before the previous 20-odd issues were planned, given the amount of space they had, and the claustrophobic nature of the past two issues. But despite its lack of emotional reward, Superior Spider-Man #31 has certainly set up a status quo familiar to long time webheads, and one that certainly justifies a return to the Amazing Spider-Man moniker. Given Dan Slott's history with Spider-Man, it's likely that he'll pick up many of the threads left dangling, and use them in weaving his new web for Amazing Spider-Man.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Superior Spider-Man Annual #1

Nov 21, 2013

Frequent Slott collaborator Christos Gage's script is engaging and fluid, capturing the energy the regular series has been lacking. However, the real star is Javier Rodriguez, whose economic lines and acrobatic characters are bolstered by Alvaro Lopez's clean inks, and Rodriguez's own moody colors, which create a perfect dynamic between Spider-Man and Blackout.

View Issue       View Full Review
4
Superman Unchained #1

Jun 11, 2013

Superman Unchained has so much promise. Lee and Snyder have the draw, the clout, and the creativity to tell a wonderful Superman story, but somewhere along the way to Superman Unchained, they left it all in their wake. Again, this book isn't terrible, it's just not good. It's not particularly fun to read, it's not visually impressive, and it does little to reel in or define the nebulous entity that is the New 52's Superman. Rather than adding anything to Superman's mythos or striving to be the title that makes Superman as relevant in 2013 as he was in 1938, Superman Unchained simply disappears into the other Superman titles already on the shelf, hoping that a strong opening hook, and an obvious but philosophically dramatic cliffhanger will outweigh a lack of power or excitement in the rest of title launch.

View Issue       View Full Review
3
Superman: Lois Lane #1

Feb 27, 2014

It's great that DC is trying with Lois, but it's sad they couldn't give her something more relevant to do.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Swamp Thing (2011) #4

Dec 7, 2011

With a story and an antagonist that plant this book firmly in the horror genre, it's truly great to read a worthy take on Swamp Thing. He's a character that's very easy to get wrong, but, in the right hands, can be a perfect vehicle for this type of genre storytelling. Scott Snyder and his art team are onto something big with this book, and it deserves recognition that I don't think it's getting. Swamp Thing stands out as a prime example of everything that the rest of DC's new line should've been: cutting edge, thematic, and gorgeous.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents Vol. 2 #3

Jan 18, 2012

Somehow this books seems like one of the most natural extensions of a long-dead, but much clamored-for Silver Age property. It's certainly one of the best books that DC's putting out these days.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Turtles in Time #1

Jun 17, 2014

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Turtles In Time #1 recaptures the fun and frenzy of its classic namesake, while still managing to forge an identity of its own. This book feels inspired by its predecessor without being beholden to it. It's almost a shame that the next issue will see the TMNT swept away yet again, to another horizon, given how expertly and energetically Allor, Campbell, and Crabtree captured the excitement of this prehistoric setting, but if this issue is any indication of their overall capabilities as storytellers, the Turtles' next jaunt through time will be just as exciting and endearing as this one proved to be.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
The Mighty Thor #8

Nov 28, 2011

Marvel's put themselves in a bit of an unenviable position, using the same trick three times in as many weeks. Fortunately, it's a gimmick that bears out in at least two of those cases, including The Mighty Thor. The process of death, rebirth, and death again, ad infinitum, is the basis for Norse mythology, and begrudging Matt Fraction and crew an exploration of that principle doesn't change the fact that his take on it is, so far, intriguing and in line with the Mighty Marvel tradition of telling a good story, and telling it well. The Mighty Thor will have its haters, but the fact remains that a good story is a good story, and this is a good story.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
The Sandman Overture #1

Oct 30, 2013

While it's hard to say that Overture's first issue is perfect, that it even comes close to living up to the impossibly high expectations set for it is almost miraculous. Sandman: Overture presents a new chapter to the story of Morpheus, one that feels at home with the rest of Sandman's canon, but not one that feels as much like the start of something new. Those already familiar with Morpheus, the Endless, Cain, Merv, and the rest of the many wonderful characters that populate this world will find much to love, if only for one more fleeting glimpse at a story that, for many, was a definitive literary experience. For the uninitiated, there is still the gorgeous art of Williams and Stewart to feast on, but Gaiman's magnum opus is still best begun like all stories - at the beginning.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Thor (2014) #1

Sep 29, 2014

Thor #1 may be too by-the-numbers to truly feel electric - indeed, the most innovative concepts it holds are relegated to the briefest of glimpses. However, there's a lot of potential here. Thor's feud with Roxxon continues, and the politics of Asgard are more interesting than they have been since Jason Aaron has been writing the title. More than that, Russell Dauterman is a perfect fit - Thor #1 would be worth the price of admission for his art alone. Aaron and Dauterman may not have captured their lightning in a bottle, but it has definitely struck. And where there is lightning, there is thunder, and that is what Thor is all about.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Thor (2014) #3

Dec 10, 2014

It's very hard to find flaws in Thor #3. The mystery surrounding its protagonist is growing organically, despite the hype surrounding the book's announcement, and with a conflict between Thor, and Odinson, as Mjolnir's previous wielder is now known on the horizon, it's hard to fault the point her arc has reached. On top of that, Jason Aaron is growing as a writer before our eyes, beautifully setting a stage for the new Thor that has ties to what's come before, but establishing a mood and style all her own. Russell Dauterman is perhaps the best fit for Aaron's Thor yet, flawlessly balancing the epic with the endearing. It's hard to call out an issue that isn't exactly monumental for its perfection, but Aaron and Dauterman's Thor #3 perfectly embodies what superhero comics should feel like.

View Issue       View Full Review
4
Thor: God of Thunder #2

Nov 27, 2012

There's just too much at stake for this title, and too little at stake for its characters to be making as many mistakes as Thor: God of Thunder continues to make. Aaron and Ribic are still loaded with potential, but they better start using it sooner instead of later, or Thor: God of Thunder could end up as dead in the water as the god Thor found floating in Issue #1.

View Issue       View Full Review
2
Thunderbolts (2012) #1

Dec 3, 2012

There's a place for a book like this take on Thunderbolts in the Marvel Universe. A series about a hero uniting cold-blooded killers to do the jobs that most heroes can't is a concept with a lot of room for deep characterization, harrowing action, and emotional paydirt, as shown in books like Uncanny X-Force. Unfortunately, all of that slips immediately away from Thunderbolts like so much sand through fingers. There's an element of moral quandary and looming threat that has to exist to justify a team like this existing, and to make them compelling, but there's not much more here than an excuse to bring together Marvel's "Expendables" and let them run wild in every panel. And unlike the kind of popcorn-gobbling, cheap thrill action flicks this book aims to emulate, it just isn't much fun.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Uncanny Avengers #3

Jan 23, 2013

It's rare that mainstream comics broach a level of art like Uncanny Avengers #3, and for that, it may turn some readers off. The '60's style script could easily be a hard pill to swallow for readers who don't latch on to what Remender is trying to accomplish, using nostalgia as a weapon in much the same way the Red Skull uses the fear of an unforgiving future to conquer New York, but if you can dig deep enough, and peel enough layers off the onion, Uncanny Avengers #3 becomes something of a masterpiece of the post-modern superhero comic.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Uncanny Avengers #6

Apr 10, 2013

Uncanny Avengers has been about juxtaposing two traditionally disparate corners of the Marvel universe, and finding new interactions for the characters that populate them. There is a lot of overlapping history between the Avengers and X-Men that has long gone ignored because those two franchises don't "go together," but like the ever-evolving present day Marvel universe, there's apparently still time for the past to grow as well. Finding those connections and building on them makes for a perfect canvas for a team that, on it's face, seems a little desperate. On the contrary, Rick Remender is carving out a whole new niche for his Uncanny Avengers, one where worlds collide, and things we've long taken for granted are challenged.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Uncanny Avengers #21

Jun 25, 2014

In this, the endgame of its biggest arc, Uncanny Avengers is proving that it is truly the Avengers title that best delivers the kind of thrills and stories the team really deserve. That it's almost also the best X-Men book on the stands speaks volumes as well. There are times throughout Uncanny Avengers #21 where it's easy to forget that there was ever a line between the two camps, and that is to the book's tremendous benefit. In many ways, Remender's self-contained saga of time and space is a better event than Marvel's big event books, and when it comes to Earth's Mightiest Heroes, that's exactly as it should be.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
Uncanny X-Force (2013) #1

Jan 22, 2013

There are a lot of good things about Uncanny X-Force #1. At the very least it's well-crafted, concise, and even entertaining, but it still lacks a certain je ne sais quoi that would set it apart from the host of other mutant-centric titles on the stands, including the other current X-Force ongoing. Decent writing and good art will earn you a lot of credit, though, and it's still early in the game for Uncanny X-Force. It's possible this book simply isn't baring its fangs just yet. But with a legacy like the one this title has, it should probably start sooner instead of later.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Uncanny X-Men (2011) #6

Feb 1, 2012

It's a thrill to read, not just because the adventure that's taking place is as elemental as an X-Men story can be, but because it's great to see creators actually improving and honing their craft rather than getting lazy and complacent with their success. There's a lot to be taken away from Uncanny X-Men, not just for readers, but for creators as well.

View Issue       View Full Review
2
Uncanny X-Men (2013) #18

Mar 6, 2014

Uncanny X-Men #18 is absolutely inessential filler.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Winter Soldier #3

Mar 8, 2012

I worry that a lot of people have avoided this title over their frustration with Marvel's rampant bait-and-switch style of storytelling that lead to the launch of this series, and while I won't say the false nature of the story that lead to this title was worth it, I will say that Winter Soldier is a much needed and well-deserving book that doesn't suffer from its inauspicious origins. There's a corner of the Marvel Universe for this type of super spy adventure, and Winter Soldier occupies it as well as any title in recent years.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
Winter Soldier #12

Nov 5, 2012

The real tragedy of Winter Soldier right now is that Brubaker seems, in many ways, to view this series as his final love letter to his Marvel days. The inclusion of Daredevil, a character Brubaker shepherded for years, belies an almost wistful air to Bucky's tour of the Marvel Universe's gritty streets, a place Brubaker has spent more time than most in the last decade. While the intent seems clear, the execution seems more and more like the work of someone who sees his time is at an end, and is ready to move on to the next big thing. While the individual issues of Winter Soldier are readable and visually stunning, the mega-story seems to be running out of steam.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
Wolverine (2013) #1

Mar 12, 2013

It's a bit of a shame that there's so much Wolverine missing from his flagship solo title. Paul Cornell has the chops to do so much more with the character, especially with an artist as competent as Alan Davis at his side, but chooses instead to start small and oblique. Here's hoping Cornell can find a way to fit some of the big ideas he crafts so well into Wolverine. There are too many sticks of dynamite in this pile for this book to fizzle so much.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Wolverine and the X-Men #5

Feb 8, 2012

Wolverine and the X-Men #6 is a step in the right direction for a book that's meant to anchor a franchise. Let's hope it stays on this track.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Wolverine and the X-Men #11

May 30, 2012

It's rare that a tie-in book to a major event feels as vital to the story as this one does without taking away from the core book, but Aaron and Bradshaw masterfully strike that balance, and deliver a generally great Wolverine comic, to boot.

View Issue       View Full Review
6
Wolverine and the X-Men #14

Jul 25, 2012

This issue leaves much to be desired. There's a lot of potential in exploring Colossus's shattered psyche, but it seems like Aaron is either shying away from the hard questions, or simply fumbling the ball in attempting to answer them. Still, there's groundwork here to show that the Phoenix Five maybe aren't as in control as they think. It's entirely possible that we'll see the conflicted Colossus as the lynchpin in defeating his allies.

View Issue       View Full Review
8
Wolverine and the X-Men: Alpha and Omega #1

Jan 5, 2012

It's a welcome chapter in the ongoing saga of Wolverine and The X-Men.

View Issue       View Full Review
7
X-Men: Legacy (2008) #261

Jan 30, 2012

Overall, the shift in tone between Mike Carey's work on the title and that of Christos Gage is certainly dramatic, if only for the difference in the nature of each writer's work. Gage works best when he's got a fun, energetic concept at hand, and he lets himself get comfortable with his characters. He's got a ways to go before he has the same familiarity with the students and faculty of the Jean Grey School that he does with those of the Avengers Academy, but even in two issues he's come a long way.

View Issue       View Full Review
3
X-Men: Legacy (2012) #1

Nov 13, 2012

It's hard to say where this book will go moving forward. With many its off beat ideas already established and quite probably dismissed by the end of this issue, there's a lot of room for an almost immediate change in direction. The problem is whether Spurrier will be able to balance out his weirdness with his storytelling. In a world of psychic phenomena and telepathic monsters, there is always room for Spurrier's brand of British eccentricity, but it requires a much defter hand with the details than he's shown in X-Men Legacy #1

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Young Avengers (2013) #1

Jan 22, 2013

Teenagers and superheroics go hand in hand, because the energy and pretense of youth so perfectly echo those of costumed crimefighting, and Gillen, McKelvie, Norton, and Wilson have truly captured something about that feeling without sacrificing either side of the coin. Make no mistake, this isn't Young Avengers a la Heinberg and Cheung, but it also shouldn't be. Teenagers grow and change, and like the rest of us, these ones are struggling to live up to the potential and trust that they earned when they were younger. There are almost too many parallels between that concept and Young Avengers, but let's just say it's a match made in heaven.

View Issue       View Full Review
9
Young Avengers (2013) #4

Apr 24, 2013

Young Avengers looks to be part of the movement at Marvel spearheaded by books like FF, Savage Wolverine, Daredevil, and Hawkeye to create books that poke holes in the expectations of readers with unconventional but gorgeous art, witty, rapid fire writing and storytelling, and a connection to, but a freedom from the larger Marvel Universe. It's more than refreshing, it's the shot in the arm Marvel has needed, and a formula more books should follow. Young Avengers has had some issues maintaining its energy early on, but if issue #4 is an indicator of the book's trajectory, Young Avengers will start living up to its great potential.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Young Avengers (2013) #7

Jul 10, 2013

Seven issues in, Young Avengers has gone through some hurdles, and had one or two issues that didn't quite match the book's promise, however issue #7 may be just about the best one since the first. It may be that Kieron Gillen simply excels at these kind of introductory or transitional issues, but more likely, now that the team is basically formed and the stage set, Young Avengers is really taking off.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Young Avengers (2013) #15

Jan 8, 2014

It's more than a little depressing to see Young Avengers come to an end, especially as it seems characters like Ms. America and Noh-Varr were just starting to come into their own. While Gillen won't be continuing this title with a new volume, there is always the possibility that he'll still follow some of these characters to where ever they land next. Young Avengersmay not have been perfect, but it absolutely captured the energy and uncertainty of youth better than almost any mainstream title in many years. It's fitting that the book should end with the members of this team, now more than simply allies, letting go of their regrets, embracing their own conflicted identities, and heading off in search of another breakfast adventure. These Young Avengers have grown up.

View Issue       View Full Review

Reviews for the Week of...

September

More