Jay Mattson's Comic Reviews

Reviewer For: The Comic Book Revue, PopMatters, Infinite Comix, Comics Bulletin, DC Comics News, AiPT! Reviews: 480
7.6Avg. Review Rating

5.0
Action Comics (2011) #0

Sep 8, 2012

I don't want to detract from the emotional significane of stories like these. I truly do not wish that. Unfortunately, when tales like these are done poorly, or half-assed, it's more disrespectful than not. In the case of Action Comics #0, Morrison simply tries to hard to strain a story from an emotional core. He wants us to connect with the young boy, reading in awe as he himself is in awe over the awesome power of Superman's cape. Instead, we get a lot of pieces that don't quite add up to anything.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Action Comics (2011) #5

Jan 7, 2012

nyway, most of the issue is dedicated to showing Krypton esplodin'. That's about it. So unless you've enjoyed reading the scientific jargon and every Kryptonian ever saying "Oh, Jor-El, you silly coot!" every other time Superman's origins have been retold, you can mostly skip about 26 of the pages of the entire issue. The parts about the Kents are necessary and respectably done. Unfortunately, the same can't be said about the back-up story about the history of Jonathan and Martha Kent, one that goes the extra distance to make their relationship hinge all the more on some 'miracle' that come in the form of a space baby. Why can't the Kents be simple? Why does their life have to include various hints at some biblical connection to something greater? Ugh. It's exhausting.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Action Comics (2011) #6

Feb 5, 2012

Overall, I was much more impressed with this issue than the last. Simply put, I'm excited to read the next issue, which is one of the main goals a single issue should achieve.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Action Comics (2011) #7

Mar 10, 2012

The only complaint I can give Action Comicsat this juncture, is that it's moving too slow. After two months of (technically) side stories, I was ready for some bigaction and instead, got the build up to said big action.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Action Comics (2011) #8

Apr 5, 2012

Next month brings Superman of Earth-23, President Superman! And it's based on Obama! AWESOME!

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Action Comics (2011) #11

Jul 4, 2012

Things start to get a bit murky near the end of the issue, when a new villain shows up to assume control of the planet. He goes on a (psychic) rant about his supreme intellect and how little Superman's brawn can stand up to an attack on the mind. Within moments, this mysterious new player is able to defeat a  Metalek monster similar to the one Superman was fighting at the beginning of the issue. He uses his psychic powers to take control of the nearby civilians and siks them on Superman as Lois Lane lays on the hood of a car, possibly dead. Morrison, if nothing else, has a flair for the dramatic and leaving the issue is one hell of a cliffhanger.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Action Comics (2011) #12

Aug 2, 2012

Morrison is not one to leave loose ends untied (as evidenced by the inexplicable resurrection of Batman Incorporated), so the Oort-Kind's machinations will surely be made more clear in the coming months.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Action Comics (2011) #13

Oct 4, 2012

Action Comics #13 is a perfect example of how to make a single issue a story in its own right, while still contributing to the larger character history and narrative.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Action Comics (2011) #16

Jan 21, 2013

Expecting anything less than totally weird and surreal from Grant Morrison would be like believing the rumors about Oasis getting back together that surface roughly once a year. For Batman, the enemy needed to be something he couldn't manipulate with fear, hence Leviathan. For Superman, the enemy is something that can't be punched or thrown into orbit or heat-visioned into ashes. Vyndktvx reflects all of Superman's weaknesses"there's going to be a good old-fashioned reckoning next month and I cannot wait.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Action Comics (2011) #17

Feb 24, 2013

Action #17 is the penultimate chapter of Grant Morrison's sprawling tale that chronicles Superman's early days. It's a simple premise that has turned out to be one of the most insightful and pragmatic visions of the Man of Steel since All-Star Superman, which also happened to be written by Morrison. In a way many other writers can only dream of coming close to achieving, Morrison is able to break open characters and find truth under the mask, both narratively and philosophically. For Clark Kent, that truth lies in Superman being the cause of his life's tragedies"his own actions caused the tragedies that shape him into the hero he becomes.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Action Comics (2011) #18

Mar 25, 2013

Grant Morrison's Action has been comicbook quality of the very highest caliber. The man's awe-inspiring narrative structure and storytelling style have as much or as little affect as he wants them to. All-Star Superman was set outside DC continuity so Morrison could play around with the Man of Steel more than ever before, while the first two acts of his expansive Batman saga were firmly planted in DC's main continuity. Morrison's work on Action is a gem because it's the combination of the two ends of the spectrum"it had to exist securely within the New 52, but since this was a new origin story, Morrison was allowed to take things to the extreme and redefine the Man of Steel for the 21st century. Superman has always be a symbol of truth, justice, and good triumphing over evil. Now, there's real meaning behind those ideals, which makes Superman a better character than he's ever been before.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Action Comics (2011) #19

Apr 7, 2013

In the end, all we can do is appreciate Action Comics #19 for what it has become: a sign of amazing potential that won't be fulfilled. 

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Action Comics (2011) Annual #1

Oct 31, 2012

Action Comics Annual #1 is an example of how 'Annual' issues should play out; a fun story, great character writing, and fantastic cultural insight. 

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Age of Ultron #1

Mar 6, 2013

By the end of Age of Ultron #1, I was sold. Bendis has mentioned in more than one interview how this crossover event was his swan song to the Avengers, a franchise he helmed for over eight years. It shows throughout this issue, and Bryan Hitch's superb artwork was the perfect choice for a story with this level of emotional and narrative bearing. It seems as though Bendis also foresaw Clint Barton's recent meteoric rise of popularity from his solo series by Matt Fraction enough to make him the main player throughout this issue. While not a whole lot is revealed, Age of Ultron #1 paves the way for an epic tale that's sure to have lasting effects on the Marvel universe.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Age of Ultron #2

Mar 13, 2013

Age of Ultron #2 isn't as strong as the first issue, and that's mainly because necessary exposition is rarely ever as exciting as the drama and terror that comes from seeing a post-apocalyptic world for the first time. Bendis delivers as much as he can while still bringing readers up to speed on the current standings, piece by piece. In a way, it's a self-defeating notion to sacrifice story development for the sake of explaining the backstory of the current status quo. Fortunately, Bendis pulls it off, more or less, and gets things prepped for the next issue. At ten issues, Age of Ultron is going to need a lot of twists and turns to keep readers interested; I'm confident Bendis is up to the task.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Age of Ultron #4

Apr 5, 2013

Of course I'm going to keep reading Age of Ultron, it's just this particular issue isn't particularly interesting.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Age of Ultron #6

Apr 17, 2013

It's going to be hard for Bendis to dig his way out of this one -- even if Wolverine recognizes his mistake, the fact still remains that he did it. In the years he's been featured in Marvel comic books, Wolverine has never crossed the line unless he needed to, unless there was no other option. It's a shame that such a popular and revered character is being used so flippantly.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Age of Ultron #8

May 15, 2013

On the surface, Age of Ultron feels like Brian Michael Bendis just going through the time travel motions and jacking up the action level to compensate for the level of timey whimey talk. But under the initial layer of fun time-space disruption, there's a message about the cost of rewriting history when the going gets rough.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Age of Ultron #10

Jun 19, 2013

Bendis threw the biggest players in the Marvel universe through the ringer for no reason. The characters don't truly grow because they haven't learned from their mistakes, which makes it all the more obvious that the true endgame of Age of Ultronwas to allow Marvel to dig into it's plethora of fan-favorite characters with far more ease. This might sound harmless at first, but it means the characters were simply props throughout this event. All the tie-ins, all the deaths; none of it technically matters. And that's a problem.As an event, Age of Ultronwas mediocre. As the final issue Age of Ultron #10was completely lackluster.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Age of Ultron #10AI

Jun 26, 2013

Mark Waid's look into Hank Pym's history is intriguing and gives a lot of context for the character's decisions and actions over the years. Pym feels like a more fleshed out hero now, and that's always a good thing. If Marvel had published this in a better fashion, it would have been a home run. As a final send-off for Age of Ultron, if feels cheap and overbearing, preachy and depressing. In the end, it's worth reading for Waid's writing alone.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Airboy #4

Nov 13, 2015

Airboy is not meant to inspire pity for James Robinson; in fact, the opposite is true. This series is a gem in Robinson's portfolio, but it's hardly the only one. Airboy is therapy as a comic book without the presumption, self-indulgent narrative that makes sense in context, and Chekhovian storytelling through a superhero lens. James Robinson and Greg Hinkle have crafted one of the finest comic books of 2015, and the only shame about Airboy #4 is that it's the final issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
All-New All-Different Avengers #2

Dec 4, 2015

With only two issues (and last May's Free Comic Book Day preview), All-New, All-Different Avengers is a weird attempt at shock value that doesn't hold up to scrutiny.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
All-New All-Different Avengers #4

Jan 31, 2016

FINALLY Mahmud Asrar gets to shine as the interior artist for All-New, All-Different Avengers, which was one of the main reasons I decided to read this book in the first place. That said, Asrar's artwork can only carry this title so far, as All-New, All-Different Avengers #4 does a poor job of properly setting up this team as a team, instead favoring Mark Waid's affinity for witty banter.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
All-New Hawkeye (2015) #1

Nov 14, 2015

After Matt Fraction and David Aja's visually-stunning look at Hawkeye's life from arm's length, it's nice to see Lemire and Perez tackling emotionally-driven narratives in All-New Hawkeye.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
All-New Inhumans #1

Dec 4, 2015

The name is different, but the overall concept of a super-human minority scared of and hated by humans at large is tired and worn ground that writers Charles Soule and James Asmus disappointingly tread with nothing new or inventive to make All-New Inhumans worth the read.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
All-New Wolverine #1

Nov 14, 2015

Writer Tom Taylor finds a fitting emotional center for Laura as the new Wolverine, while artists David Lopez and David Navarrot are a perfect fit for the action-oriented yet character-driven story.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
All-New X-Men #1

Nov 14, 2012

All-New X-Men #1 is a double-edged sword. On one hand, I'm completely taken by Brian Michael Bendis' stellar writing and potential for this series, but on the other hand, I'm largely disappointed in how this issue was structured and executed. There must have been a more gracious, elegant way to introduce all the plot that's stuffed into this issue, but Bendis and Marvel managed to publish one of the least straightforward versions of that plot.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
All-New X-Men #5

Jan 4, 2013

Bendis and Stuart Immonen have a very good thing going here and it's just poised to get better. Kitty Pride decides to be the team's supervisior, Wolverine seemingly doesn't want anything to do with the younger X-Men, Angel has yet to learn what's become of his adult self, the Beasts and the Icemen start going through the motions of existing side by side with one another, all while Jean Grey has to come to terms with all the pain and suffering associated with her older self. All-New X-Men #5 concludes this opening arc extremely well while also moving pieces around on the board in preparation for the future of the series. 

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
All-New X-Men #7

Feb 10, 2013

All-New X-Men #7 is another fantastic chapter in this fantastic series. Brian Bendis is bringing his unique brand of interpersonal relationships to the X-Men franchise, and it feels like such a natural fit that it's a wonder Marvel didn't do this sooner. In many ways, this sentiment is how I feel about 'Marvel NOW!' as a whole -- most of the creative team/title pairings now feel far more organic than in the past.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
All-New X-Men #14

Jul 31, 2013

One of my biggest concerns with All-New X-Men was that it seemed gimmicky. While my initial skepticism was dashed as Bendis wove an emotionally-driven tale of culture shock and self-actualization, these more recent issues have felt lacking in their drive and direction.X-Men: Battle of the Atom is a new crossover event for the X-Men titles coming this fall, and knowing that somewhat putsAll-New X-Men #14 in perspective as a build-up to this large mutant conflict. Unfortunately, it's unfair to judge an issue by the series' future potentials, so I have to look at this issue as it stands. With that in mind, All-New X-Men #14 is lackluster. Also, I have a major pet peeve about misleading covers, and even though the original Mastermind has been alluded to in the past, he does not show up in this issue and that is irksome.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Amazing Forest #2

Feb 5, 2016

Anthology series can often be hit or miss, depending on the creators crafting each individual story in the collection. Amazing Forest #2 technically sidesteps that tendency by keeping the writers consistent across each story, but it ends up coming out on the wrong side of that dichotomy.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Amazing Spider-Man #700

Dec 27, 2012

The forest is burning and Slott is only focused on one tree at a time.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Animal Man #11

Jul 15, 2012

Overall, Lemire and Ponticelli have really stepped it up with Animal Man, turning the book into one of the most critically acclaimed titles of DC's relaunch. At the end of this month's Swamp Thing, Buddy and his family show up to enter the "Rotworld" arc with Alec. Both Buddy and his family and the Swamp Thing will stand up to the decay and defeat it. Lemire and Snyder have been working together to make this coming arc one of the best, and it already looks promising. "Rotworld" might not only exceed expectations, it even exceed the high standards already set by Snyder's magnificent crossover event "Night of Owls".

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Aquaman (2011) #5

Jan 26, 2012

This issue has solidified Aquaman as one of the premier titles of the 'New 52.' Letting the first four issues set up Aquaman's world before diving into the origins of Atlantis was a fantastic strategy and it's allowed for Arthur Curry to develop at a pace more fitting in this new era of comic books. Where once readers needed only a few pages and a narrative exposition to give them characterization, it now takes whole arcs to flesh out characters, as well it should. Johns understands the craftsmanship behind developing a character beyond their most prevalent elements. Of course Superman can fly, but how does he feel about the national debt crisis? Wonder Woman flies an invisible jet, so does she have a license? These anecdotes might seem trite, but they serve as examples for the kind of ideas Johns is using to create a deeper, richer character experience. And Aquaman is all the better for it.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Aquaman (2011) #6

Feb 24, 2012

All in all, it was still a great issue. Mera's show of force is so much fun to read, and Ivan Reis' artwork is fantastic in conveying the action. The water looks like it's moving and has more density than normal, facial expressions are rich and textured, while the lanscapes are subtly shaded and colored. Unfortunately, exceptional art can't save the story from being a tad boring. I'll wait patiently to get back to Atlantis' origins...until next month.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Aquaman (2011) #7

Apr 1, 2012

Geoff Johns is a master storyteller who can give readers just enough information to make them think without giving too much away. Where writers like Brian Michael Bendis have a knack for creating stories more suited for graphic novels, Johns' talent lies in month-to-month, episode-style writing. Shin's photograph on the last page shows Arthur working with a group of warriors (at least that's what it looks like) teases readers by revealing a new chapter in Arthur's life without telling us anything about it! Anticipation counts for a lot when it comes to monthly series', and Johns does it so, so well.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Aquaman (2011) #8

Apr 27, 2012

My only gripes with Aquaman #8 would be the a general lack of real movement in plot. While we get a lot of backstory, the present-day panels and flashbacks didn't flow as well as they could have, and Ivan Reis' art this issue seemed a bit sloppy, a bit rushed. But like I've said many a-time, Aquaman is still one of my favorite series of the 'New 52' and issue eight still impresses beyond most of the other top-tier books in DC's lineup.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Aquaman (2011) #9

Jun 1, 2012

Johns has fundamentally changed the game between Aquaman and Black Manta. While their histories still intertwine significantly, Arthur's former golden-boy status is gone and Manta's evil ways are no longer as arbitrary. Everything is better than the pre-'New 52' Aquaman and it shows no signs of slowing down soon.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Aquaman (2011) #10

Jun 29, 2012

Instead of a conflict of pure vengeance and rage, the relationship between Aquaman and Black Manta in the 'New 52' is based on deep-seeded emotional issues and the transfer of blame tied to the death of their respective fathers. Family stands as a core element of Aquaman, and Johns' reimagining of the Aquaman/Black Manta feud is astonishingly good, especially when coupled with Arthur's past secrets being unearthed one person at a time.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Aquaman (2011) #11

Jul 25, 2012

"The Others" continues to be dynamite. Johns is weaving an intricate melodrama that's less about the sinking of Atlantis and more about Arthur Curry's relationship with his past. While Black Manta represents the worst of Aquaman's history, the Others represent the best of his younger days. Unfortunately, Arthur is only focused on defeating Black Manta, forsaking the help of his allies and opting to rush in by himself. Black Manta's big find at issue's end also promises big things for the next issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Aquaman (2011) #13

Oct 31, 2012

In the end, Johns reveals that Black Manta's entire mission was simply building up to the upcoming "Throne of Atlantis" crossover with Justice League. Manta answers to someone, but we don't yet know who. It's most likely Arthur's half-brother, Orm (more popularly known as Ocean Master), but knowing Geoff Johns and his penchant for throwing curve balls, it may be someone even more sinister. Aquaman #13 is as perfect a conclusion issue as one can get. It neatly (but not too easily) wraps up "The Others", shows how the protagonist has learned and grown because of the events that transpired, and it deftly makes readers excited for the next story.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Aquaman (2011) #16

Jan 31, 2013

Even though everything is coming together, Johns keeps us guessing to the end with the big twist at the end of Aquaman #16. The reveal makes a lot of sense and it points to how and why the events of "Throne of Atlantis" have taken place, but it also leaves things open for a solid resolution in Justice League #17.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Aquaman (2011) #22

Jul 31, 2013

Aquaman #22 is fun because the Ice Wizard Numero Uno is a villain steeped in platitudes about destiny, rightful places, and dishonor. In many ways, Icy McFreezePants is the epitome of classic villains of the DC universe who don't have much to say beyond “I'm right and you're wrong”. It's catty, and it's a bit like Ice Cakes is a twelve-year-old girl whose friends are hanging out with the new girl.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Avengers (2012) #5

Feb 8, 2013

Pushing the Avengers beyond Earth means pushing the definition of the team as Earth's Mightiest Heroes. Avengers #5 introduces a new female Smasher to the Marvel universe that already shows a lot of promise. She's got major leadership potential, and her ascension in the ranks of the Shi'ar Imperial Guard is another example of human influence reaching farther into space. Avengers #5 succeeds as a stand alone issue because of it's self-contained focus on Smasher, but also serves Jonathan Hickman's greater narrative that spans Avengers and New Avengers and the greater Marvel universe.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Avengers (2012) #7

Mar 8, 2013

Avengers #7 is the true beginning of something new. Hickman is pushing the concept of the Avengers into brand new territory and it's utterly fascinating.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Avengers A.I. #2

Aug 10, 2013

Avengers A.I. #2 is another great issue from Humphries and Araujo that pushes the storyline forward without feeling forced. What started as a concept that a lot of people doubted would be effective has turned into one of the most poignant series Marvel currently produces. I know that's a big claim for a series will only two issues under it's belt, but it's justified when you actually see what Humphries and Araujo deliver.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Avengers Arena #1

Dec 13, 2012

Much like Cable and X-Force #1, there isn't much to like about Avengers Arena #1. The characters are cardboard cutouts of their former selves from Avengers Academy or the ill-fated and consistently neglected by Marvel Runaways, Arcade just seems ridiculous without any real motivation beyond wanting to see some murders. Plus, the entire series doesn't really have a place in the Marvel universe--the only connection it has to anything else is that the characters used to be more integral to what was going on. Now, they're literally on a different planet and totally separate from anything else going on. Why? In what way does that add to the greater Marvel narrative at all? Is this series going to end once everyone is dead? I can't imagine reading Avengers Arena #75 in a few years because it's quite obvious this series won't be around that long.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Avengers Assemble #9

Nov 14, 2012

DeConnick is similar to her husband in her ability to write amazingly grounded dialogue. There's no Shakespearean flair here or flowery vernacular. Even Thor's natural high dialect is toned down under DeConnick's hand. And I'll reiterate how refreshing it is to read these characters in a light that's not completely blood-soaked and desperate. Steve Rogers? I can't remember the last time I saw him in an issue out of costume. I was not expecting to like the 'Marvel NOW!' imprinted Avengers Assemble as much as I have. DeConnick's work on Captain Marvel has been phenomenal, but I was worried that her witty reparte would be lost in a team-based series. Fortunately, I stand corrected.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Avengers Assemble #10

Jan 6, 2013

Crazy, weird, insane superhero fiction is fun. But superpowers and mad scientists only go so far. Kelly Sue DeConnick's career has been a slow burn that's been building to her current status as one of Marvel's top writers, and Avengers Assemble #10 is a fantastic exhibition of her talent. Having a good mix of relatability and action goes a long way in terms of making a comicbook interesting, and DeConnick is a master at finding that groove. It feels like Tony Stark is really nervous, and that Carol Danvers is actually worried for Steve Rogers' safety. It's not hard to write the words saying these things are true. Making those ideas feel authentic through the narrative is a whole different ball game, and DeConnick hits home runs every time.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Avengers Assemble Annual #1

Feb 7, 2013

The last work I read by Christos Gage was The First X-Men, a series I started reading and stopped after the second issue. I found the entire concept to be completely unnecessary. On the flip side, Gage's story in Avengers Assemble Annual #1 is a stunning example of how the writer can handle a story with a little more significance under its wings. The Vision is a fan-favorite character that's been absent for too long, and Gage brings him back in style while also forging an exciting new path for the android who has served everyone but himself since he was first switched on.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Avengers Vs. X-Men #0

Mar 30, 2012

For fans who regularly follow Marvel's titles, Avengers Vs. X-Men #0 is probably an integral issue that offers payoff for months of build-up, but as a jumping-in point for new readers, it fails to give enough backstory to create a narrative understandable enough to continue reading.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Avengers Vs. X-Men #1

Apr 4, 2012

Being disappointed by Marvel events has left a sour taste in my mouth. Last year's Fear Itself was so lackluster I stopped reading after two months. Even 2010's Siege was half-baked at a measly four-issue main series. Apparently, Marvel took note with Avengers Vs. X-Men, giving readers a perfect-sized 12-issue main run, a six-issue VS. series dedicated to fights, fights, and more fights, as well as multiple tie-ins throughout the imprint.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Avengers Vs. X-Men #2

Apr 19, 2012

Knowing about VS going into this event makes the scant storyline all the more obvious. I couldn't help feeling like a lot of the fighting in the main series could have been relegated to the pages of VS with little consequence. But then Marvel couldn't stretch this (somewhat inane) conflict between these teams out for a exhaustive 12 issues AND sell us the companion series, so...there's that. Hopefully the third issue can make up some time in the narrative department.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Avengers Vs. X-Men #3

May 2, 2012

So far, it seems like Brubaker has the best hold on the plot of this series. It's difficult to express discord between friends in a comic in a meaningful way. Fortunately, Avengers Vs. X-Men #3 made up for a lot of the pitfalls I saw in the first two issues. If Marvel can keep the narrative moving as smoothly as the giant, orchestrated fight sequences, this series might just be amazing yet!

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Avengers Vs. X-Men #4

May 16, 2012

The showdown between the Avengers and the X-Men is staged on the moon's surface as Wolverine informed the Avengers to Hope's whereabouts as soon as they met in Antarctica, and Emma was able to find Hope using Toad and Cerebra. Like most situations in this series thus far, this face-off feels forced. On the moon? Seriously? Then Thor crashes down and the Phoenix shows up. Like I said, this issue finally gets some plot going, but it takes us to the moon and that just seems silly.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Avengers Vs. X-Men #6

Jun 20, 2012

And of course, Cyclops declares, "No more Avengers" on the last page, which is what we've been waiting for since Act II's announcement. Here goes nothin'!

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Avengers Vs. X-Men #7

Jul 4, 2012

Avengers vs. X-Men #7 does a fine job as a bridge issue between more important narrative aspects. Last issue, it was the reintroduction to the world under the leadership of the Phoenix Five and in two weeks, it will be the invasion of Wakanda by Namor and the Atlanteans. For an issue with little substance to spread out over 22 pages, Matt Fraction does the best job be can with the content he's given. It's unfortunate that Olivier Coipel's fantastic penciling couldn't be more readily employed, but even his 'neutral' faces for characters have so much more life in them than some artists' most emotionally charged heroes.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Avengers Vs. X-Men #9

Aug 1, 2012

The Avengers now have more support than ever. Unfortunately, Cyclops rips through time and space to get to K'un Lun and take Hope away from Earth's Mightiest Heroes. While most of these issues have ended with cliffhangers, this one seems especially haunting because the writers can't jump forward in time next issue; this is the very moment before a giant brawl that promises to lead into the epic climax.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Avengers Vs. X-Men #10

Aug 20, 2012

At the end of the day, this is issue ten. It's not the first issue, and it's not the halfway point. It's not even an act change. Very much so, Avengers vs. X-Men #10 is like the prelude to the end. With only two issues left, we know there's got to be a big reveal, a big death, and some choice words for a few of our favorite characters that will leave them reeling in disbelief. Unfortunately, none of those things happened this week.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Avengers Vs. X-Men #11

Sep 12, 2012

A lot of this issue's merits come from the emotional ramifications of the one of Marvel's Golden Children falling into darkness.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Avengers Vs. X-Men #12

Oct 3, 2012

If Marvel had made more of an effort to include layered meanings throughout Avengers vs. X-Men, the entire event would have been damn near perfect. In reality, it's still one of the best crossovers of the past decade, but without more than surface-layer meanings and forced misunderstandings, everything just seems silly in the end. But I try not to think like this. I try to see this story for what it was; a narrative intended to bring years of resentment and anger to a close with a conflict that tore them apart, both literally and symbolically.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
AVX: VS #1

Apr 25, 2012

It very much feels like Marvel and it's writers are trying to throw audiences curveballs with this series. It's very, very obvious that Magneto should defeat Iron Man and that Namor should defeat Thing when fighting underwater, yet Jason Aaron and Kathryn Immonen (respectively) feel like giving the underdogs the victories makes more sense. Instead, it simply comes off as ridiculous and a slap in the face to readers who supposedly know these characters. I mean, how can Marvel justify making Namor lose a fight underwater? I simply don't know.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
AVX: VS #3

Jun 14, 2012

In the first totally enjoyable issue of AvX: VS, Colossus takes on the Thing while Black Widow and Magik take the fight to the demons in Limbo. While I previously lamented about how both Coloss-onaut and Thing have already been featured in VS, their fight was actually quite enjoyable. Similarly, Black Widow and Magik are generally evenly matched.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Batgirl (2011) #9

May 14, 2012

It's sooooooooooooo melodramatic. Gail Simone seems to think this sappy ridiculousness is good and it's not. I wish I had better words to use, but it's trite and this issue doesn't do anything to inspire a desire to read any more of Batgirl.The art was decent.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batgirl (2011) #14

Nov 19, 2012

The final sequence is a bit confusing and disturbing at the same time. Honestly, it doesn't make much sense in it's own context, but after getting totally sucked in by Barbara's attempt at rescuing her mother. I'm confident Batgirl #15 next month will explain the Joker's actions. And really, on some weird level, I almost like being totally in the dark about where this tie-in arc is going.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman (2011) #0

Sep 13, 2012

Batman #0 does a fantastic job giving readers a history without being boring or unimportant. Batman-related books could have suffered terrible setbacks with these "Zero Month" issues. Instead, Snyder is leading the pack in terms of quality and type of story that should be told. Us readers already know how Bruce's parents died and how he becomes Batman, so these issues should be more about building up a world that leads into the present day, and Scott Snyder has done this in spades.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Batman (2011) #4

Jan 1, 2012

Part of what makes Snyder's Court of Owls so cool is that it is so steeped in myth. Bruce is convinced the Court can't exist, but the signs are all around him and he really doesn't know what to do. And as always, Greg Capullo's artwork is damn near perfect for the Dark Knight (unlike David Finch's weird renditions of Gothamites.) Without spoiling the last pages, this arc is set to get even more engrossing in the coming months.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Batman (2011) #5

Jan 19, 2012

Seeing Bruce confront hallucinations, his own mortality and the (apparent) potential loss of his 'story', or, his memories, his history as a Wayne and as a hero. While everything stays in the 'generally vague' category of explanation in this issue, next month's issue looks like it will give us some answers to the Court of Owls' motives and maybe their members!

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Batman (2011) #6

Feb 16, 2012

This was one of the best issues of any Batman-related books I've ever read, and it's one of the best issues I've read ever. Keep up the good work, boys.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman (2011) #7

Mar 21, 2012

Next month's Batman and Nightwing both act as prelude issues to May's giant "Night of the Owls" event, and from the looks of the last few pages of issue seven, things are about to get a lot more messy for Batman.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Batman (2011) #8

Apr 18, 2012

With fantastic art by Greg Capullo, a completely engaging narrative that ropes you in and never lets go, and a great lead-in to the main events in Gotham next month, Batman #8 is the best issue of the series to date, something Scott Snyder better stop doing soon before he can't outdo himself anymore!

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Batman (2011) #9

May 10, 2012

Of course, the Talons finally freeze and Bruce makes his escape to go and save Jeremiah Arkham - a plot point added at the eleventh hour - before going after March. Bruce's visit to Arkham Asylum is depicted in the pages of last week's Detective Comics in rather dull detail. Fortunately, March's panels at the end of the issue are superb, and while his time in the Batman universe has been brief, he was such a good foil to Bruce that I still felt upset when he died. His last words are about how great Gotham can be, telling Batman to make sure Bruce Wayne knows that the dream shouldn't die. It's probably one of the best emotional moments in the series so far, and it simply pushes Bruce past the edge.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Batman (2011) #10

Jun 13, 2012

It was a pretty bold decision to not only introduce Bruce's brother, but also to revamp him as Owlman, a character that has traditionally been an evil, alternate version of Batman from the parallel Earth-3. I'm not sure how much I like these decisions yet, but they're HUGE nonetheless.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman (2011) #11

Jul 11, 2012

The Court of Owls is poised to be a major part of the DC universe moving forward. Scott Snyder has done what many writers only dream of doing - making a significant impact on a character and their universe. If all comic books were this good, there would be a whole new mainstream appreciation for this form.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Batman (2011) #12

Aug 9, 2012

The fate of Harper Row is still to be determined. Though she's just been introduced, she already has a (somewhat) direct line to Batman, something not many people can claim. It's almost as if Snyder is setting the stage for Harper to put on a cape and become another ally in Batman's army against crime. In interviews, Snyder has hinted that Harper will be a big part of Batman in the coming months along with the "true" debut of the Joker in the 'New 52' universe.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman (2011) #13

Oct 10, 2012

One of the best things about Batman #13 is how much Snyder is able to stuff into one issue without coming across as detail-obsessed (William Faulkner, anyone?) The murder of a man on live television and the claim that Mayor Hady would be dead at midnight all connects back to the Joker's first appearance (according to Batman) and must have some importance in the present. Then there's the Harley sequence! Yes, Harley Quinn adorns the original Red Hood outfit - worn by Joker before he was Joker - to confront Batman, hoping to catch him off-guard and get him away from his cave. That's all I want to give away because the final pages are just so damn amazing.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman (2011) #14

Nov 14, 2012

Batman #14 is a stellar issue from beginning to end. Never before has Bruce's 'extended family' been such a focal point of a Batman story to such a degree. Obviously, Alfred Pennyworth was taken from Wayne Manor at the end of Batman #13, and Jim Gordon gets hit his month with a blood-thinning poison. Even without the big reveal at the end, I would highly recommend this issue. The final pages, though, change everything for Batman and the Joker. Scott Snyder is leading the march on a new era for Batman and his allies, and it's going to be a frightening, sadistic, horrifying, absolutely entertaining road.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman (2011) #15

Dec 12, 2012

This month, Bruce reveals a shocking secret about his history with the Joker than sends Nightwing, Red Robin, Batgirl, Red Hood, and Robin into a hissy fit. The actual information isn't so important as the fact that Bruce kept a major secret from his allies. Bruce attempts to convince the others that Joker doesn't actually know anyone's identity and that it's all just a twisted mind game. The revelations from the past make Bruce's words somewhat hollow in the eyes of the others, and they start to question Bruce's ability to keep a clear head in the midst of this chaos. It very much feels like a turning point for Batman and his allies, that they might never fully trust each other ever again, that this is how the family falls apart.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman (2011) #16

Jan 17, 2013

I won't tell you to not read this issue, because it's one of the main issues of "Death of the Family", but if you're wondering whether it stands on it's own as a good issue, that's up for debate. Sure, it's a penultimate issue to a five-issue-long storyline, but that means there should be a whole lot more going into the end of the issue to ramp up readers for the grand finale! Instead, we get a contrived situation that Batman will obviously escape from because it's Batman. Which is a shame because Scott Snyder truly understands that the Joker's terror doesn't come from his physical prowess, but rather from his mental acuity. Even though the man is a psychopathic, murderous criminal, he's probably the most intelligent, psychopathic, murderous criminal Batman has ever faced.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman (2011) #18

Mar 14, 2013

While I'm excited for the upcoming "Year Zero" arc, Harper Row is what truly interests me now about Scott Snyder's Batman. Since the 'New 52' launched, Harper has been around and that's no coincidence. I'd be shocked if Snyder killed her off. I'd be even more shocked if she didn't become the next Robin because who else is there? Seriously, it's the next logical step. But it's a good next logical step.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman (2011) #19

Apr 11, 2013

Greg Capullo's artwork looks cleaner here than it usually does -- more crisp and less hurried-looking. I've always loved the artwork in Batman, but it really feels like Capullo drew things less rounded and more utilitarian in an effort to mirror Batman: TAS's art style like Snyder was mimicking the narrative style. If not, the art is still fantastic. If so, that's just a whole new level to the way Snyder and Capullo produce this book and work together.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman (2011) #20

May 13, 2013

Thus, Batman #20 isn't the most memorable issue of the series, but it's still a great comic book. And really, that's what ongoing series are all about. Even when the story isn't world-shattering or life-changing, it can still be high quality and have meaning beyond it's plot. Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo understand this and work the principle into "Nowhere Man" seamlessly.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Batman (2011) #21

Jun 14, 2013

Batman: Year Onewas bout Batman's relationship with Jim Gordon. "Zero Year" is about Bruce Wayne becoming Batman. It's a simple concept that bears a lot of weight because with the condensed nature of the 'New 52', this is the year of Batman's career when he establishes his rogues gallery. Yes, there seems to be a central antagonist here at the starting point, but it would be folly to assume Snyder will only stick to one villain for eleven issues that spans a year of Batman's life.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman (2011) #22

Jul 31, 2013

Everyone should be reading “Zero Year”. Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo have been doing amazing work onBatman since the first issue, but this newest arc has a depth and suspense to it like nothing I've read from this team. It's intuitive about Bruce Wayne's formative years in the same wayThe Dark Knight Returns is intuitive about the future of Gotham City and it's Batman.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman (2011) #23

Aug 18, 2013

Batman #23 starts to focus more on supporting characters. We get to see Alfred Pennyworth before he became used to seeing his employer beaten inches from death on a fairly regular basis. Edward Nigma makes another move in his grand scheme to command the highest powers of Gotham City, the Red Hood Gang continues to be the wrench in the gears, and we discover just how much Thomas and Martha Wayne's memory stayed alive long after their deaths.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Batman (2011) #23.1

Sep 10, 2013

Batman #23.1: Jokeris a missed opportunity to give the Joker more depth. Introducing the character Jackanapes may have sounded good on paper, but by the end of the issue, it didn't feel like a Joker comic book much at all. Mostly, it felt like DC wanted to introduce Jackanapes and didn't know how else to do it, which is not a good enough reason.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Batman (2011) #23.2

Sep 12, 2013

Batman #23.2: The Riddler ties for my favorite Villains Month title so far (next to Green Lantern #23.1: Relic). Scott Snyder's story written out by Ray Fawkes is surprisingly minimal with a big punch at the end that actually gives the Riddler more depth.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Batman (2011) #49

Feb 14, 2016

Most of what's covered this month was already acknowledged and processed better in previous issues, there's the artwork of Yannick Paquette that usually stuns the audience and digs out clarity through controlled surreality but feels completely out of place in this issue, and the general feeling that "Superheavy" is being stretched out unnecessarily.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Batman (2011) Annual #1

May 30, 2012

Along with his newfound neuroses, Snyder and Tynion have given Freeze more than just a biological condition and an ice gun. His skin now exudes cold and he can spit ice from his mout. While Greg Capullo's artwork in Batmanhas been fantastic thus far, Jason Fabok does a ridiculously good job conveying the sub-zero temperatures and all the insane new ways Freeze has at his disposal to kill people. All around, Batman Annual #1is great - Mr. Freeze is not firmly established, not only in the 'New 52', but as a reimagined horror that has been part of Bruce Wayne's life for years.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman (2011) Annual #2

Aug 2, 2013

Batman Annual #2 is a phenomenal issue. The epic nature of Scott Snyder's Batman run is palpable throughout this issue simply because Anchoress is such a compelling and important character. Batman knows a lot; he's the most intelligent tactician on the planet and he's versed in nearly every form of martial arts there is, he can go head-to-head with some of the most vicious and deranged criminals in the entire world. But there are still some things he cannot do. He can't predict scenarios playing out years later, he can't make up for past mistakes, and he can't be anything other than Batman. The Anchoress forces Bruce to confront these truths and ask himself how he could let someone slip through the cracks of his mission to eradicate crime from Gotham City. In the end, Batman recognizes his own weaknesses are the ones he doesn't even know about. Every Batman fan should read this issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman (2016) #7

Sep 24, 2016

Batman #7 is a fantastic first chapter in "Night of the Monster Men" that pulls plot strings Tom King planted in his first arc, "I Am Gotham", pays homage to a classic Batman story, and finds two of DC's most talented writers producing a clear and distinct crossover than actually benefits the titles involved instead of taking away from their narrative flow.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #5

Jan 13, 2012

Patrick Gleason is an excellent artist for the Dark Knight, whose minimal style effortlessly conveys the darkness and tone of Gotham City. I'm a fan of artistic consistency and DC has done a great job of keeping their artists on lock.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Batman and Robin (2011) #6

Feb 9, 2012

By the end of the issue, Damian reveals that he's been playing bothBruce and Ducard! Using his past to solidify the believability of his leaving Wayne Manor, and using his shaky relationship with Bruce to leverage Ducard's trust. It's a brilliant plot twist, one that could have been written much more lazily. Tomasi has done a great job keeping the story engaging while not burning out readers with constant action or pages of expository dumps.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Batman and Robin (2011) #7

Mar 15, 2012

The final pages, in which Damian murders Morgan - even after Bruce stopped himself from doing the same thing - are a terrific build-up for the next arc. My only complaint: Damian getting all religious with the "Forgive me, Father, for I have sinned," shtick. It's annoying and grating. Other than that small snafu, Batman and Robin #7 sits at the top, in terms of quality, for this series thus far.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #8

Apr 13, 2012

The issue starts dipping into cheesy territory when Damian explains, "I don't want to end up like Ducard...without a moral compass...I don't want to turn into a nobody. I want to be like you. I've always wanted to be like you." After all this time, Damian sheds his hardened skin after one close call with death. Knowing that Batman and his Robin had a relationship before the relaunch is almost necessary, or this scene loses most of it's meaning.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #9

May 9, 2012

This connection between the Talon and Burrows would make a whole lot more sense if Burrows still owned the land, or anything like that. In the flashback, the Talon even says that the Court eventually took control of the land, so why does he care so much about killing Burrows? It doesn't make much sense and pulls down a book that was pretty damn good up to that point.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Batman and Robin (2011) #10

Jun 16, 2012

I really do tend to enjoy superhero stories where the heroes are in-fighting, and the "War of the Robins" portion of Batman and Robin #10 is totally awesome. My psychoanalytical critique aside, these characters are all awesome and now, they've got an arc slowly building that will pit them all against one another in a variety of circumstances. FANTASTIC. Terminus will probably continue to be a boring sub-plot that will eventually slip it's way into the main story, pulling the entire arc down as a result, but we'll cross that bridge when we get to it. For now, awesomeness.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #11

Jul 16, 2012

With two plot lines running simultaneously, Tomasi should be focusing on "War of the Robins", a narrative that actually has a purpose and can give real insight to Batman's various sidekicks throughout the years - it's a character-driven plot that has a lot more potential. Terminus' plot to make the city his own is one that has been done to death for the last sixty years of Batman's history, and it feels like more of a support story that's getting too much limelight.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #12

Aug 10, 2012

Now that "Terminus" is in the past, we have Batman and Robin #0 to look forward to next month, hopefully shedding some light onto the formative years of Damian's life in the League of Assassins. Because really, I just want to forget Terminus was even a villain. Tomasi even had to throw in a biochemical warhead for Batman to stop to make Termy more that just another faceless threat. But even that didn't work.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Batman and Robin (2011) #15

Dec 14, 2012

Batman and Robin #15 is by and far the best "Death of the Family" tie-in issue yet, and is simply one of the best issues of the series overall. Damian Wayne is brash and confident to a fault, and it comes to a head when he faces the Joker, a villain who feeds on traits like overconfidence and uses it to his advantage. This series went through a bit of a rough patch for a few months in the late summer/early fall, but these past few issues have been fantastic. Peter J. Tomasi comes in at a close second for best interpretation of the Joker. And really, the only reason for that is because Scott Snyder developed the Joker's 'New 52' persona, so he's kind of got the best hold on him. If you're looking for a good "Death of the Family" tie-in, but you don't want to go overboard with issues, stick with Batman and Robin.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #20

May 8, 2013

The past two issues of Batman and... have been designed to show how both personas of Bruce Wayne and Batman are coming apart at the seams. His family is crumbling around him into the pit where Damian used to be, and his borderline-psychotic actions are doing nothing to help the situation. I understand why Tomasi is doing this, and he's doing a fantastic job writing it, but he's also slowly turning Batman into an emotionless obsessive whose singular mindset will be his own downfall. Honestly, I don't know how to feel about it and that excites me.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman and Robin (2011) #23

Aug 22, 2013

I teared up for Damian Wayne when I got to the end ofBatman and Nightwing #23. Seeing Alfred torture himself by trying to change an unchangeable past is heartbreaking. These “Requiem” issues following Damian's death have been haunting, intense, emotionally challenging, and generally fantastic reading. It's not often one death can provide so much material without it feeling like overkill.Batman and Robin has been one of my absolute favorite series since I started reading the ‘New 52′, and it continues to impress me each and every month.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman And Robin Eternal #7

Nov 21, 2015

Genevieve Valentine's script is fantastic, with witty and organic dialogue between the different players, while Alvaro Martinez and Raul Fernandez's artwork "comic book" " this should be the new DC House Style because it blends Mikel Janin's realism with Paul Pelletier or Eddy Barrows' physicality and action work.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman Incorporated #0

Sep 30, 2012

It's becoming more and more clear that Batman's international army may not be essential to the story, acting more as lieutenants in this 'behind the scenes' war against the very essence of evil. In this sense, Batman Incorporated #0is a letdown and a success. It let me down by offering very little in the way of story advancement - or even really any information about it at all - and with the staccato nature of the narrative. It was a success because Morrison does an amazing job focusing on the characters he's presenting, giving them developed, clear-cut personalities even if they only get a few panels of page time. So even though they probably aren't all that important in the grand scheme of Morrison's plans, the origins of Batman's soliders around the world is captivating, nuanced, and drawn incredibly well.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Batman Incorporated #1

May 24, 2012

The final pages are dedicated to the assassin who's been hunting Damien the entire issue. He's been brought in by the mysterious Leviathan and made to explain how he shot Batman and killed Robin! And that's where the issue ends! It's a very satisfying cliffhanger.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Batman Incorporated #2

Jun 29, 2012

As a competent Batman story incorporating multiple elements from the Caped Crusader's past, Batman Incorporated is doing a fantastic job building up to a greater goal, but as a title aimed at making comic books easier to pick up for new readers, it fails. Giving character history isn't a crime, but doing so in the second issue of an already complex series isn't the right way to go about it. Granted, this issue as a history lesson does give readers some context as to who exactly Damian Wayne is, but I really feel like changing the tone and focus of the series so soon after beginning the series will throw new readers off before they're willing to take the time to commit a rather obscure character's history to their comic knowledge.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman Incorporated #4

Oct 28, 2012

Batman Incorporated has been a victim of circumstance since it began, and though that was partly Morrison's own fault, it's now growing into it's own as a solid title in the 'New 52' lineup. I'm skeptical it'll continue after Morrison steps down, as that would open up a spot for a new title in the roster while also trimming down the already massive number of Batman-related titles. That being said, if DC were to get someone like China Mieville to take over, the series might just stand a chance of continuing.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Batman Incorporated #10

Apr 26, 2013

It's unfortunate, but Batman Incorporated #10 feels very much like the filler issue it is instead of being a stepping stone toward Morrison's endgame. It is, technically, but there's a lot of exposition, a lot of waxing poetic about the idea of crime and the concept of justice. In a way, it almost feels derivative of Morrison himself. These are ideals and themes he's used in Batman stories in the past, and instead of feeling conclusive by nature, it seems repetitive. I'm not saying I didn't enjoy the issue, because I seriously enjoy Morrison's work. It's just not the strongest issue of the series.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Batman Incorporated #13

Jul 31, 2013

Whether you subscribe to Grant Morrison's wacky narrative style, his Batman saga has been a landmark of DC comics over the past seven years. Throughout his runs onBatman, Batman and Robin, and finallyBatman Incorporated, Vol. 1and Vol. 2, Morrison rewrote the book on Batman. He gave us Batman's son, then took him away. He killed Bruce Wayne and let Dick Grayson wear the cowl before Bruce came back. He made Batman go global, and the implications were mesmerizing. There have been many great Batman stories, and many great Batman arcs, but a Batmansaga; that's all Morrison.Batman Incorporated #13is the end of Morrison's Batman story, but it's not the end for his characters or his various plot points. The final pages of this book bring up a whole slew of unresolved issues that leave things open for the future. Damian Wayne and Talia al Ghul may be dead, but what does that mean for Batman, Leviathan, and the League of Assassins? We'll all just have to keep reading.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Batman/Superman (2013) #1

Jun 26, 2013

Batman/Superman #1 is a triumph. This is the right book at the right time with the right creative team. Though Ben Oliver hands the artwork for the last seven pages, Lee's influence on the tone throughout is evident. Greg Pak has such a handle on both characters, their inspirations, their passions, their fears, and their impulses as young men. This is the series that I didn't even know I wanted, and now I would write a strongly worded letter to DC if they said I couldn't have it anymore.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Batman/Superman (2013) #7

Jan 12, 2014

Though Batman/Superman #7 ends the current arc well enough, the reason for Monguls defeat is paper-thin and uses a comic book trope to explain away logic and realism. Granted, a story about a video game where people take control of actual individuals isnt that realistic, the idea that Superman could change the rules of the game at the last minute is kind of lazy and drags the entire arc down.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Batman/Superman (2013) #10

May 13, 2014

Batman/Superman #10 is the best issue of the series. Though Greg Pak has been doing a great job so far, Jeff Lemire's single-issue homage to Silver Age stories is pure gold. Though Pak will return next month, Lemire has laid a lot of groundwork with Dr. Ray Palmer (who does indeed come up with "The Atom" as a codename at the end of the issue) and the…shady…S.H.A.D.E. keeping tabs on Batman and Superman. Here's hoping Lemire gets another crack at Batman/Superman in the near future.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Batman/Superman (2013) #12

Jul 9, 2014

Unless Batman/Superman can get back on track, it's destined to take over the spot of "worst Superman family title" that the eponymous series just recently vacated.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #9

May 25, 2012

So not a bad beginning for a title I am surprised to be buying. The friction between Vibe and ARGUS's goals is going to be the big draw for me. The possibility of classic inter-dimensional characters showing up is some nice spice. And Gates' sensibilities on a young hero along with Woods' slick art.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Batman: The Dark Knight (2011) #12

Aug 22, 2012

And that's the real tragedy: that Batman's void can really never be filled because he will never be able to conquer his own fear and ascend to a greater cause.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Before Watchmen: Comedian #1

Jun 23, 2012

Alan Moore strongly hints that the Comedian assassinated JFK through a cruel turn of events that made the weak-looking Kennedy a liability in the eyes of the US government. Zak Snyder's 2009 film adaptation explicitly shows Eddie Blake shooting the President before finishing his giant cigar. But none of this matters to a Brian Azzarello who probably said, "But what if the Comedian was framed???Huh, guys? What if?" to an unresponsive audience. It's a stupid idea. With one page, Azzarello has managed to deconstruct the history of Watchmen while simultaneously proving the critics' point and pissing off millions of fans. And why does he do this? I guess I'll have to read Comedian #2and see if Azzarello is intent on fucking up one of the greatest characters in comic book history. I'm also scared for theRorschachmini-series now, knowing that Azzarello might turn our favorite detective into a news reporter or something...

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Before Watchmen: Comedian #2

Jul 28, 2012

While this shift in Eddie's behavior definitely gives this issue a whole lot more credence than the previous, Azzarello still can't figure out how to fix this series biggest problem: it's necessity. Did anyone really want a six-issue series detailing the horrid actions of the Comedian during the 1960s and 70s? Wasn't it enough to know he was a huge dick? Wasn't that part of what made the character so great? If Azzarello continues to change retcon - like he did last month when it was 'revealed' that Eddie never shot JFK - and take us down a path of pointless darkness and machination, this series is going to burn out much faster than it's release schedule.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Before Watchmen: Nite Owl #1

Jul 1, 2012

It's hard to reflect too much on an event that's only really getting started. 35 weeks is a lot longer than is sounds before you think of it as six solid months of weekly content. There's a whole lot more story coming that will weave into all the titles already begun. While last week's Comediandid an absolutely awful job creating a satisfying character history, Straczyinski and the Kuberts do a awesome job giving Dan Dreiberg and Hollis Mason meaningful development. It's also interesting to note that the seeds of Silk Spectre and Doctor Manhattan's relationship are planted within the pages of this issue, an element that's probably going to be a common one throughout this event.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Blue Beetle (2011) #0

Sep 22, 2012

I'm not exactly sure where Blue Beetle #0should fit in chronologically amongst other issues. Even though a majority of the story is dedicated to the years before Jaime bonds with the scarab, the final few pages recap Jaime's journey so far, and we eventually get to the current day with Jaime stuck in Reachworld space after being abruptly transported there by O.M.A.C. in the pages of Justice League International Annual #1. So, one could place it before issue one purely for it's historical content, or it could go right after Blue Beetle #12. It's a conundrum for chronological perfectionists like myself. That one nitpick-y criticism aside, Blue Beetle #0does a fantastic job giving readers a fleshed out, meaningful history of the scarab Khaji-Da, as well as placing the building blocks for future stories. And really, what more could you ask for from this series?

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Blue Beetle (2011) #10

Jun 21, 2012

This is what excited me most about this issue. Blue Beetle and Booster Gold have a long history together - when the Blue Beetle was Ted Kord, albeit - so it's fantastic that DC is building that relationship once again. In the 'New 52', Ted Kord is only a memory (I assume), so it will be interesting to see how a dead character will affect events throughout DC's imprint.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Blue Beetle (2011) #11

Jul 23, 2012

Booster Gold knows about the Reach and is convinced Jaime is under it's control, yet is forced to stand down when the surrounding crowd, and Jaime's grandmother in particular, starts chastising the adult hero for beating up a kid. Lying through his teeth, Booster covers his tracks by claiming it was all a test to be a member of the JLI and giving Jaime a more open-minded chance to prove himself.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Blue Beetle (2011) #12

Aug 19, 2012

The ability to make a generally lesser-known character more popular is an under-appreciated skill these days. Characters like Wolverine, Batman, and Superman have a built-in fan base. Now, that's not to say that writing these characters doesn't present their own challenges, but starting from scratch can be a daunting task for any writer. Tony Bedard aptly handles the teenaged Blue Beetle, offering up a narrative flow that keeps the series grounded enough to be relatable, but includes enough weirdness to keep it interesting. If you haven't read Blue Beetle, you should.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Book Of Death: Legends Of The Geomancer #4

Oct 26, 2015

Fred Van Lente, Juan Jose Ryp, and Jordie Bellaire deliver a fantastic conclusion to an already phenomenal series that gives a sincere and meaningful backstory to some of the most interesting mysteries of the Valiant U.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Cable and X-Force #1

Dec 12, 2012

Cable and X-Force is now the second 'Marvel NOW!' series that has seriously let me down (I'm looking at you, Deadpool). In general, everything Hopeless strives for falls flat and it's extremely disconcerting. Not very often do I find myself pausing while reading to reflect on how bad something is. Instead of giving readers a fun, intense, action-packed book with awesome characters, Dennis Hopeless wrote a first chapter completely shrouded in thick, unnecessary plot that's metaphorically giving readers a snarky smile to show that it knows more than we do. What a jackass.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Captain America (2012) #1

Nov 21, 2012

Rick Remender has a lot of ideas for Captain America. In one issue, he's taken Steve Rogers out of the gritty darkness of the spy game, thrown readers some integral and telling character history, and introduced a whole new chapter in the Captain's life. He's stuck in an alternate dimension that's populated by Arnim Zola's mutated creatures and he's got no way to get back home. John Romita Jr's pencilling gets mixed reviews, usually, but here, it's spot on and works perfectly with Remender's more cheeky style. I've never read Captain America on a regular basis. Captain America #1 by Rick Remender is going to change that.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Captain America (2012) #2

Dec 19, 2012

It's difficult to say how Rick Remender's run with Captain America will pan out. With most other 'Marvel NOW!' titles, I've found myself either raucously sold or defiantly opposed. Remender's Captain America is different from most other titles Marvel is currently offering: it sits outside the general Marvel turn of events due to it's setting in Dimension Z, Captain America is completely out of his element (something we haven't seen in ages), yet the fate of a whole universe hangs in the balance.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Captain America (2012) #3

Jan 19, 2013

It makes sense that many people are finding Remender and Romita's vision for Captain America a little off-putting. The most common complaint I've found has been the arguably unnecessary inclusion of the flashbacks to Steve's childhood. As I mentioned earlier, these flashbacks serve not only to shed some light onto a part of Steve Rogers' life that hasn't ever been delved into much, but also to show that even though the world and the circumstances may change, the pain and the struggle remains the same. Captain America #3 comes to an end with a pretty big shocker that's going to have lasting consequences (at least as far as Marvel's solicitations are concerned) that will affect not only the rest of Steve's time in Dimension Z, but also quite possibly for the rest of his life!

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Captain America (2012) #4

Feb 21, 2013

Captain America #4 isn't what I expected, but it's everything I wanted. Rick Remender's trademark long-form approach to storytelling means Steve Roger's sojourn to Zolandia isn't going to end any time soon. The first four issues of this series have been a marathon of steadily building up the emotional investment, creating a psycho-weird (a term I just created because no other seemed to describe Dimension Z well enough) reality that tests Cap at every turn, and raises the stakes for Steve and Ian in terms of their relationship and their mission to escape the influence of Zola. Yes, this Captain America is completely different than anything Ed Brubaker wrote in his seminal run. But if you step away from the continuity and just read Remender's Cap as-is, it's one of the most exhilarating, powerful titles to come out of the 'Marvel NOW!' initiative.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Captain America (2012) #9

Jul 31, 2013

Rick Remender does a phenomenal job conveying Captain America's emotions. Death in comic books is too often understated, but Steve's total emotional breakdown over the death of his son is a dramatic triumph. It would feel cheap had it been done any less well. In the end, it doesn't matter if Steve's relationship with Ian was real or not because the emotional fallout is very, very real and it has shattered the spirit of the United States of America. Even though Steve kills him, Zola still won because he took what made Captain America who he is and broke it, simple as that.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Captain America: Living Legend #1

Oct 6, 2013

And let's not forget the logistical inaccuracies. Isn't Sharon Carter dead? I know ‘continuity be damned' and al

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Captain America: Sam Wilson #1

Oct 20, 2015

What could have simply been a continuation of Rick Remender's All-New Captain America " featuring Sam Wilson in the titular role for a whopping six issues " is in fact an important stepping stone for both the title of Captain America as well as Sam Wilson as a character.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Captain Marvel (2012) #3

Sep 12, 2012

Captain Marvel succeeds in providing Marvel with its biggest female-led title, and also in doing so with integrity. DeConnick and Soy have found a groove that works for them, allowing Carol Danvers to grow naturally and organically instead of being put through the ringer every year or so with a new event tie-in arc that only serves the greater Marvel universe. For the first time in years, Carol Danvers is receiving the excellent treatment she deserves, and it's fantastic.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Captain Marvel (2016) #8

Aug 27, 2016

More than nearly any other moment in Civil War II, Carol feels like a real persona again in Captain Marvel #8 instead of just the figurehead for the "Ulysses Initiative". She has real fears and real insecurities about what she's doing, and there's no one with whom she can vent without causing emotional distraction. That said, does Carol's slip of faith in her own actions make her stance weaker? Tony is absolutely sure of where he stands, so what does an indecisive Captain Marvel mean for the end of Civil War II? For better or worse, we'll find out soon.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Civil War (2015) #4

Sep 11, 2015

Charles Soule captures the essence of the original Civil War " the fear, mistrust, and bitter anger " but shows how that essence becomes shrouded in political sabotage and shadow manipulations.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Constantine #1

Mar 20, 2013

The final pages of Constantine #1 prove that, in a very real way, Jeff Lemire and Ray Fawkes have a firm grasp on John Constantine. There's a lot to love, not only regarding the story and the characters, but also about the story structure and openness to future potentials. I love the ideas presented in this issue, I just struggle with the presentation itself and how the writing feels like it's vibrating at a frequency only slightly off from our own.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Constantine: The Hellblazer #6

Nov 21, 2015

Tynion, Doyle, and Rossmo (who is in top form this month) are truly earning back some goodwill for Constantine after the travesty of Ray Fawkes' dismal 'New 52' volume.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Convergence: Green Lantern/Parallax #1

Apr 21, 2015

Convergence: Green Lantern/Parallax #1 is a compelling and emotional visit to a time when the Green Lanterns were gone; the dynamic between the Corps' greatest failure and their last remaining hope is absolutely palpable.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
DC Universe Presents #0

Sep 20, 2012

As a whole, DC Universe Presents #0 is a good read. As individual stories, the tales about O.M.A.C., Mister Terrific, and Deadman are considerably better than those about the Blackhawks and Hawk and Dove. Read them all, or just read the ones you want. It's kind of up to you when it comes to an anthology format such as this. I only read one issue of the "Challengers of the Unknown" arc because it just wasn't my cup of tea. But I jumped right back in with "Savage", then regrettably "Kid Flash". DC Universe Presents #0 is definitely worth the buy, if only for the fact that you get five stories from five different creative teams at a whopping 48 pages.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
DC Universe Presents #5

Jan 23, 2012

While Brand knows he can't "win", in as much as being free of Rama's grip, but at least he can alleviate some of the pressure before giving in to her control. Through a mildly complex series of connected ideas, Brand explains that gods feel no humility which means they could never think to ask one of the most simple, yet most important, questions mortals feel every day of their lives: "Why me?" Everyone has, at some point in their lives, felt victimized and that shared sentiment cannot be felt by those with no true humility. In a true 'thinker' piece, Jenkins crafts a damn near-perfect origin story for Deadman before letting him go to exist between the pages of other books until DC sees fit to give Brand his own ongoing.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
DC Universe Presents #6

Feb 21, 2012

The story features Nanda Parbat - the mystical place where the revamped Jason Todd trained - as well as a giant ice monster that attacks the team as they attempt to escape the icy mountains via helicopter. It's action-packed and fun to read, both qualities of which have been exemplified by Didio over on O.M.A.C. The only problem with this introduction to the Challs is that we get very little actual background information of any character. Of course, Didio and Jerry Ordway have months ahead of them to establish this team as a part of the new DC universe.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
DC Universe Presents #10

Jun 25, 2012

This second part of "Savage" would be hard to read as a stand-alone issue, seeing as elements from DC Universe Presents #9 come into play throughout the issue, and the ramifications of this month's events will be concluded next month. Then again, I guess the same could be said about most any comic book series, but in this case, it would be like watching The Godfather, Part II without having seen The Godfather or knowing anything about it. I'm sure it would be enjoyable, but you wouldn't have a frame of reference for these characters or their motivations.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
DC Universe Presents #11

Jul 20, 2012

DC Universe Presents exists to give lesser-known characters a bigger spotlight. And though Vandal Savage is hardly "lesser known", beyond this arc, he's only featured in the pages of Demon Knights, a title set centuries in the past. Robinson's fun romp into the arena of psychological thriller is just fun. It's not too original, hardly unique in it's narrative structure, and Savage is presented as a stereotypically remorseless killer (who believes he's been) gifted with immortality. Really, it comes down to Robinson's handling of each character and the relationships between them that really sell "Savage" as an excellent part of DC's 'New 52' universe.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
DC Universe Presents #12

Aug 20, 2012

In interviews, Nicieza outlined his idea for this Kid Flash story, how it would begin as a back-up story in Teen Titans #11, continue on into DC Universe Presents #12 with a bulk of the story and a lot more revealed about Kid Flash's origins, and end in a back-up in Teen Titans #12. While in theory this sounds interesting, in reality, it's utter silliness. The five-page 'opening act' is so bare-bones on story that it's completely not worth reading, and the fact that you're forced to buy Teen Titans #12 just to get the finale is money-grubbing. I really was looking forward to this odd little three-part experiment. And perhaps in better hands, it could have been pulled off. But trying to convey a story in such odd increments seems almost backwards, so unconventional that it actually doesn't work. If this story is the model for the technique, it will be quite some time before anyone tries it a second time.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
DC Universe Presents #13

Oct 19, 2012

With DC's January solicits out, we learned that Andreyko's take on Blue Devil and Black Lightning was cut from five down to four issues for some reason. It could mean that Andreyko overextended his outline, it could be that DC has something planned for the title in February, or it could mean, unfortunately, that DC Universe Presents might get cancelled. I don't want to wildly speculate, but this new arc might just be what the series needs to pull itself out of the low rankings if it is indeed on the chopping block.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Deadpool (2012) #1

Nov 7, 2012

Deadpool #1 is seriously underwhelming. Already, I've seen multiple 5-star reviews for this issue and for the life of me, I can't understand why. The only explanation I can imagine is that Posehn's position on the title preceded itself -- everyone expected it to be really funny, so it just is really funny. And unlike other series, Deadpool suffers so much more because it fails at providing the one thing it's supposed to offer that other titles can't -- humor.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Deadpool (2012) #2

Dec 3, 2012

I really wanted to like Deadpool, I really did. I'm a huge fan of Brian Posehn's stand-up comedy, and I kept hearing good things about Gerry Duggan's past work. Pairing two proven funnymen with an erratically humorous character like Deadpool seemed like a slam-dunk, at least theoretically. In reality, Deadpool is one of the worst new titles I've read this year. Any attempt at humor falls flat, all uses of extreme blood and gore is unnecessary, and the narrative itself is as flimsy as the paper it's printed upon. Save your $2.99 and stay away from this book.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Demon Knights #0

Sep 19, 2012

This is the kind of issue that exemplifies the aim of the New 52 as a cultural project"Paul Cornell has taken a character who had become a bit long in the tooth pre-reboot, and written a fresh take on said character that's similar to the original, but takes enough liberties that the story becomes its own. Demon Knights #0 says what it needs to say without becoming overdeveloped or annoyingly bogged down in it's own mythology, something that Cornell could have easily succumbed to in a tale of magic, demons, and betrayal.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Demon Knights #11

Jul 23, 2012

Now allied with the “knights of the demon”, Arthur Pendragon plans to lead them into Avalon to resurrect the greatest wizard of all time, Merlin. It's an outward adventure, and an inward quest. Exactly like the original Arthurian romances.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Demon Knights #17

Feb 17, 2013

As the 'New 52' moves forward, cohesion amongst titles has become an extremely important aspect of the storytelling process. Seeing Cain and his vampire horde traveling through Medieval Europe adds more credence and meaning to the events of I, Vampire, and we've already seen Etrigan pop up in Stormwatch. Robert Vendetti has stated that he's got a long-term game plan in place for the series, and Demon Knights #17 is another great example of how the setting for this title allows for fantastic storytelling because of it's distance from the rest of the DCnU.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Dial H #1

May 5, 2012

But that's what comics should be! Why spend $3.99 for a single issue you'll read once then look at for the art? It seems absurd and Miville is making an excellent case for a step up in the level of narrative quality among mainstream comic books.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Drive #1

Aug 28, 2015

Drive #1 is a fun issue if you're a fan of the film. Otherwise, it's mostly forgettable.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Earth 2 #0

Sep 5, 2012

The 'New 52' is still young, and this new continuity needs time to come into it's own as an established universe with diverse, interesting, developed characters in a rich, vibrant world. Robinson's venture in Earth 2 is fantastic, but the introduction of a new multiverse is really, really annoying.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Earth 2 #1

May 2, 2012

The final pages of the issue are dedicated to giving readers a bit of the retooled backstories for both Alan Scott, who is the owner and CEO of G.B.C. Media, and Jay Garrick, a recent college graduate with no plans for the future and a girlfriend who dumps him for a better life. Already, it's quite obvious that the Justice Society is going to be a parallel to the Justice League instead of their forefathers.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Earth 2 #3

Jul 5, 2012

Nicola and Trevor Scott's art this week is a bit mixed. The Flash/Hawkgirl panels are fantastic, while the Green Lantern pages look like Alan is wearing Hollywood makeup and talking to a green screen, which I don't even know how they could pull off. Overall, I'm still very invested in Earth 2. Green Lantern, Flash, and Hawkgirl are enough to entice me to keep reading, and the promise of the Atom and more of Earth 2's (Solomon?) Grundy is too much to resist. Robinson gets a 'pass' this month on the character dialogue simply because the first two issues were so good, this may just be a hiccup.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Earth 2 #4

Aug 3, 2012

Robinson recently promised Wildcat coming soon to the pages of Earth 2, along with Doctor Fate and a slew of others. In such a unique position, Robinson is doing everything he can to make the heroes of Earth 2 just as epic and amazing as their New Earth counterparts. In most ways, he's succeeding (I'm looking at you, Hal Jordan).

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Earth 2 #6

Nov 7, 2012

Seriously, though, Earth 2 #6 is one of the best issues of the series to date. While that's not a huge catalog of issues with which to compare, it's still an a success. In interviews, Robinson has stated that the series is titled purposefully so that he would be free to build his second Earth without being forced to focus exclusively on the forming Justice Society. Sure, most of it will be about them, but the potential for world-building is huge. Earth 2 #6 points to how much Robinson is committed to those ideals going forward. It's a fantastic issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Earth 2 #7

Dec 6, 2012

James Robinson is seriously making the stuff of legends here, with believable, relatable characters and world building that's slowly becoming on-par with the entirety of Earth 1. Whether you like the costume redesigns or not, Robinson has done a deft job re-imagining these Golden Age heroes for a new generation.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Earth 2 #9

Feb 8, 2013

The opening pages of Earth 2 #9 reveal that this new story arc is called "The Tower of Fate", implying we'll be getting at least three issues to flesh out Khalid's new gig as the hand of destiny. James Robinson is building up his version of the Justice Society very slowly, though he's mentioned that the team proper won't be together until the title's second year, which is approaching rather quickly. It will be interesting to see how Robinson puts all the pieces together in coming months, especially since a little over half of the classic roster of the JSA works for the World Army and is actively hunting the rest of the new Wonders.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Earth 2 #11

Apr 4, 2013

It's fun to see Mister Miracle and Big Barda show up for that one panel, and in the grand scheme of things, these two were bound to be introduced sooner or later. I bring this up again because DC's mandate to make every April cover some shocking revelation just doesn't work for every title, Earth 2 being one of them. It very much feels like Robinson was forced into jamming the New Gods connections into Earth 2 #11 that could have easily been in the next issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Earth 2 #12

May 2, 2013

One of the best aspects of Earth 2 is the how easy James Robinson makes creating a world look. This isn't just a team book -- this title is about an entire separate universe. The changes and differences between the main DCnU and Earth 2 are important because they are there and the moer Robinson shows us, the better this series becomes.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Earth 2 #13

Jun 6, 2013

I am very sad that James Robinson is leaving Earth 2 because we're now getting to the point in the series where all the various bits and pieces we've been getting over the past year will finally start coming together. He's taking old ideas and totally revamping them in a way that even the rest of the 'New 52' can't top.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Earth 2 #15

Aug 10, 2013

There's just too much going on inEarth 2 #15. So many characters and so many plots are continued, established, or expanded upon that it's jarring when Robinson switches gears. Plus, each sequence is small, so a lot of info is packed into a small amount of space making it feel claustrophobic and stuffy to read. I really likeEarth 2, but this issue is a total bust.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Earth 2 Annual #1

May 30, 2013

I like Earth 2 Annual #1. It's a fun read. Regular readers of the series will appreciate how much James Robinson is pouring into Earth 2 from all angles. That being said, it's really only for regular readers.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Extraordinary X-Men #1

Nov 6, 2015

Boring, disappointing, and frustrating: three words to perfectly sum up Extraordinary X-Men #1.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Fantastic Four (2012) #1

Nov 15, 2012

After reading Marvel NOW! Point One, I was mainly just interested in reading Fraction's FF, but after this debut issue of Fantastic Four, I will most certainly be following the adventures of Marvel's first family as they steal away through the multiverse in search of adventure and knowledge. If nothing else, 'Marvel NOW!' is most assuredly bucking my usual preferences, which was kind of the point in the first place, right?

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Fantastic Four (2012) #5AU

Mar 28, 2013

My only real problem with the Fantastic Four being involved with events on Earth is that up until now, there's been absolutely no way of contacting the team while on their journey. Now, seemingly out of nowhere, Black Panther has some deus ex machina communication device that can broadcast through all space and time. What?

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
FF (2012) #1

Nov 28, 2012

Fraction and Allred have struck some gold with this series. Fraction's relatable, grounded writing coupled with Allred's signature art style is a match made in heaven and this first issue is the evidence. There's a lot to love about FF #1, but unfortunately, a lot of that comes from knowing who these characters are and what's happened to them. Fraction does an apt job covering his bases when it comes to integral backstory, but it's still FF, which is named after the Future Foundation, which is an offshoot of the Fantastic Four, who wont actually be in the series at all in an issue or two -- it's a bit wonky. Other than that, FF #1 is a fantastic issue that has left me wanting more...now...seriously.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
FF (2012) #1

Jan 7, 2013

I mentioned earlier that this issue isn't about being a spectacle. It's a comicbook that you get more out of each time you read it—you discover nuances in the writing, or subtle images that weren't obvious during your first read through. Matt Fraction and Mike Allred are endeavoring to create a series that can stand on it's own while seamlessly integrate to the greater Marvel universe, and it's those qualities that will make this a timeless, classic series.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.7
FF (2012) #2

Dec 21, 2012

If you're not reading FF, you should. Fraction and Allred have crafted a series with a near-perfect balance of plot-based, superhero action and organic, character-driven story. Potential is the name of the game here because a new Fantastic Four means a whole new way to tell Fantastic Four stories. 

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
FF (2012) #9

Jul 31, 2013

Over the previous eight issues, Fraction was positioning pieces on the board, andFF #9is the first move toward an even bigger story. I truly love this series, not only because it features one of my favorite regular creative teams — Matt Fraction and Mike Allred — but also because Fraction has taken a wholly unique approach toFF that pays homage to the past while moving the concept of the Future Foundation forward into new territory.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Figment 2 #1

Sep 5, 2015

Where "belief" was the focal point of Figment, "doubt" becomes the central theme for Figment 2 as Blarion and Figment find that the 21st century isn't as imaginative as the time they come from.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Flash (2011) #12

Aug 23, 2012

Manapul and Buccelatto's frantic script this month feels clustered at first, but eventually straightens out and packs about four big punches in a row before moving directly into the 'reeling in awe' stage. Rogues start coming out of the woodwork left and right, Glider takes steps to murder her brother and steal a monorail full of civilians, Flash confronts Dr. Darwin Elias about his accusations and slandering against the Scarlet Speedster, while Cold seeks revenge against his mutinous sister. There's a lot more to everything than what I just outlined, but that's the gist of things. Really, The Flash comes down to the details. Manapul and Buccelatto have mastered the art of subtle development and are now ready to tackle a full-scale super war starting in October, and I couldn't be more excited.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Flash (2011) #13

Oct 26, 2012

Grodd is insane, through and through. Trickster approaches the looming ape king and offers his services as a credible citizen of Central City, as well as a villain who knows how to find Flash. In the most graphic sequence of the issue, Grodd literally tears the Trickster's arm off before claiming that he needs no man's help in his conquest. It's a powerful scene and one that shows just how much for violent and ruthless Grodd is under Manapul and Buccellato's direction.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Flash (2011) Annual #2

Aug 2, 2013

The rest ofThe Flash Annual #2 is a testament to how well Buccellato knows Barry Allen and also how well he's able to write Hal Jordan without making the characters sound like a complete dick. Barry scolds Hal for not telling him about the deal and Hal gets angry at Barry for not appreciating that he saved all those kids. Barry thinks Hal is irresponsible. Hal thinks Barry is uptight. It's classic Flash and Green Lantern. And it's classic for a reason: it works. Hal and Barry are the least morose members of the Justice League. Superman and Wonder Woman have their whole stoic thing going on. Batman is Batman. Aquaman is a King, which is bound to make a guy grumpy. And Cyborg just doesn't do much else than monitor the planet and join in the fighting (at least, for now). There have been a lot of team-ups in the ‘New 52′, but not many feel as natural as Hal and Barry's.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Forever Evil #1

Sep 5, 2013

We don't get to see the Crime Syndicate much inForever Evil #1, nor do we get to see the actual battle between the Syndicate and the three Justice Leagues that results in the disappearance of nearly every superhero. I do wish there had been more information about how the Leagues fell. Most likely, we'll get the full story starting next month when various DC titles start tying-in toForever Evil,but that's a full month without any real answers, which is a 6/10 on the frustration scale. I don't know why DC is content with everything being so vague right now, but it seems to be an ongoing problem for many titles: not enough information to keep readers interested.I will be reading the rest ofForever Evil because I'm extremely interested in what comes next, but for the casual reader interested in the villains of the DCnU, this crossover event could be too much too fast without context.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Forever Evil: A.R.G.U.S. #1

Nov 1, 2013

Forever Evil: A.R.G.U.S. #1 is a necessary, but tedious read. Steve Trevor and A.R.G.U.S.s activities in the wake of the Crime Syndicates invasion prove to be the most interesting aspect of the story, but the entire issue is weighed down by unneeded backstory concerning Steve and Wonder Woman.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Forever Evil: A.R.G.U.S. #2

Dec 1, 2013

At this point in the New 52, Steve Trevor is somewhat synonymous with A.R.G.U.S. because he was the original liaison to the Justice League, and the organization was created with his leadership in mind. Unfortunately, this is not an excuse to make a series supposedly about A.R.G.U.S. focus solely on one man. The problem is that most of what happens in Forever Evil: A.R.G.U.S. #2 either isnt important, or could be conveyed in the main series.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Frankenstein, Agent of S.H.A.D.E. #13

Oct 16, 2012

This all might sound overly-harsh and like just so much nitpicking from a self-professed lover of this series. But it's because I've enjoyed Frankenstein: Agent of S.H.A.D.E. so much in the past that it makes me sad to see the easier road being taken on a crossover with such potential. I'm confident Kindt will make something of the current chaos, it'll just be hard to wait another month for some plot advancement.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Giant Days #11

Feb 5, 2016

As fun as Giant Days continues to be, the intimate moment between Susan and McGraw feels rushed, truncated when it should have been decompressed.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Gotham By Midnight #8

Aug 30, 2015

Each month, James Tynion IV's Gotham By Midnight continues to get better.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Gotham By Midnight #11

Dec 4, 2015

Everything about this issue is incredible.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Grayson #16

Jan 31, 2016

The return of a certain controversial character and his deceptively dark competing spy organization bodes well for the future of Grayson, with Tom King and Tim Seeley's spy war kicking into high gear.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Green Arrow (2011) #14

Nov 13, 2012

At the end of the issue, there was no reason to include Ollie's support team, there was really no consequence in the battle with the Warhawks, and the direction of the story is surface-level intentions at best. I've heard "Hawkman: Wanted" is supposed to somewhat add to the upcoming Justice League of America by making Hawkman and Green Arrow work together. In reality, the two characters barely interact outside barking their strategic plans to each other in the middle of battle. I'm confident JLA will be good, but I'm also confident that "Hawkman: Wanted" is a big waste of time.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Green Arrow (2011) #17

Feb 10, 2013

Green Arrow #17 fulfills all of these expectations. Lemire's steady plotting paired with Andrea Sorrentino's equally organic artwork result in the best issue of Green Arrow yet, by leaps and bounds. New villain Komodo is as fun to read as he is a danger to Ollie. And stripping Ollie of all his previous amenities"like friends, money, a reputation, fame, technology"will force him to prove that it's the person behind the mask that makes the hero. "The Kill Machine" starts off in an excellent way and only points to better character development for Oliver Queen going forward. It's been said that one does not really know what one is capable of until one is desperate enough. Ollie understood this once, and Jeff Lemire is now in a position to teach the Emerald Archer this lesson all over again. Sign me up for that class!

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Green Arrow (2011) #18

Mar 10, 2013

After an extremely long and rough start, Jeff Lemire's reworking of Green Arrow has been a rousing success. In just two issues, the entitled, arrogant Oliver Queen has been wiped away and replaced with an Ollie that understands his place more than he ever has in the past. Everything he had is gone, and everything he now has he's building from nothing. In a way, Lemire is proving to readers that Oliver Queen is worth our reading. Trying to enjoy the expensive hobbies of rich jerks isn't as much fun as seeing those same jerks get knocked down a few pegs. Lemire recognizes this and wants to make Ollie a character with real depth instead of just another playboy with superhero aspirations.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
Green Arrow (2011) #21

Jun 10, 2013

This just doesn't feel fun anymore. It feels forced. Not everything in a comic book universe has to be tied to fate, destiny, or past events. Sometimes, heroes arise because they need to and not because their great-great-grand uncle was cursed by an evil warlock for generations or somesuch like that. I like Lemire's dialogue; it's quality work and the all characters feel organic. I also love Andrea Sorrentino's artwork. It's honestly just the story that's turning me off of Green Arrow now.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Green Lantern (2011) #0

Sep 5, 2012

Already, Johns has established Simon Baz as one of the coolest new characters to hit DC's 'New 52' since it began. Some might say that the newest Green Lantern hasn't had enough page time to warrant a decision on his fate. But seriously, he's freaking awesome.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Green Lantern (2011) #5

Jan 15, 2012

In the final pages, Sinestro gives Hal's construct ring enough power only to get him back to Earth. With no battery to recharge, Hal becomes panicked and realizes that he only cares about the power of being a Green Lantern. It's a welcome bit of character growth for one that hasn't had much since his resurrection in 2004. Hal sees a little more clearly that he wants to be with Carol Ferris and makes the first steps toward making that a reality. While it may come off as cheesy to newer readers, GL fans will know this is a monumental moment for Jordan. With a sixth issue left to complete the 'Sinestro' arc, I'm interested to see how Johns will segue into the next adventure for Sinestro and Hal.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Green Lantern (2011) #6

Feb 10, 2012

And just like that, Geoff Johns starts reeling me back in! If these premonitions are a window into future Green Lanternarcs, it's going to be an exciting road for Green Lantern fans.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Green Lantern (2011) #7

Mar 16, 2012

Basically, Sinestro read the Book of Black and saw the end of the Green Lantern Corps - an idea that's been seeded throughout Green Lanternsince the relaunch - and now he needs Hal's help to stop it from happening. In true Green Lantern style, the Indigo Tribe shows up to corral Sinestro for themselves. Over on Oa, the Guardians are getting pretty hardcore, talking about murdering a Corpsman. It's a little uncomfortable, but I'm sure that's exactly what Johns wants.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Green Lantern (2011) #8

Apr 12, 2012

However it unfolds, Johns (like always) does a fantastic job of keeping readers on the edge of their seats. The final page of Green Lantern #8 reveals Sinestro's conversion to the Indigo Tribe, a development that will most likely be reversed, but it's still nice to see Johns having fun with one of Green Lantern's most notorious villains.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Green Lantern (2011) #9

May 12, 2012

Fortunately, the final pages are so epic, the quick lead-in soon turns from a curse to a blessing. Apparently, Abin Sur knew pretty much goddamn everything, as he's the one - we are now constantly being reminded - who knew the Guardians were bad news from the get-go. As Natromo hears of Abin Sur's death, he decides to destroy the indigo battery and end the Indigo Tribe project he started with Abin Sur all those years ago. The good news is that Sinestro is freed and becomes a Green Lantern once again, the bad news is that the worst criminals in the universe are now all in one place, with two giant green targets with which to play.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Green Lantern (2011) #10

Jun 15, 2012

But haven't we already done the whole Black Lantern thing? (Snore)

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Green Lantern (2011) #11

Jul 25, 2012

One of Geoff Johns' strongest points as a writer is his ability to create huge, cosmic events that change the landscape of the world he molds. Unfortunately, DC seems to be shying away from imprint-wide events, sticking to family series crossovers (like Batman's "Night of the Owls", or Young Justice's "The Culling") in order to make each part of DC's line stronger on it's own before deconstructing it down the road, which we all know is a question of 'when?' rather than 'if'. The teaser promo for "Rise of the Third Army" doesn't include Hal or Sinestro anywhere in the image, a startling fact seeing as both Hal Jordan and Thaal Sinestro are two of the franchise's most recognizable characters. I'm sure Black Hand will fit into the scheme of things somehow, which will Bring Hal and Sinestro into the fight as well.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Green Lantern (2011) #12

Aug 16, 2012

The big reveal at the end of the issue leads up to the new Green Lantern, the Islamic one we've been seeing in promo shots and that appeared on the final page spread of The New 52 #1 this year for 'Free Comic Book Day'. A few months ago, nobody understood how this new GL fit into things, but as we get closer to October's "Rise of the Third Army", everything is starting to become clearer. Hopefully, this crossover can inject some life into this series, which has slowly been on the decline since last September.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Green Lantern (2011) #13

Oct 10, 2012

Green Lantern #13 may not be the first chapter in “Rise of the Third Army” that we were all expecting, but it's an issue that deftly navigates a new character through a crucial time in his experience being a superhero. The manual for this situation has been thrown out the window, so it's up to Baz to figure things out for himself, and that's leading to engrossing, truly interesting stories about a man given a ring and no helping hands. At every turn, Baz is betrayed or hurt, and it's starting to become apparent that his Green Lantern career may be based on this drive to make a stand against the betrayal.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Green Lantern (2011) #14

Nov 12, 2012

Johns also takes some time to build mythology through sequences featuring the Guardians conversing with the still-mysterious First Lantern, Black Hand's imprisonment in the Chamber of Shadows, and the Third Army ravaging the universe in the name of peace and order. I'm enjoying Simon Baz's personal voyage as he comes to terms with being a Green Lantern and what that means in the greater scheme of his life. And while there hasn't been a lot of crossover with the Third Army proper, Johns is obviously building to something that will test Simon as a GL and as a person.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Green Lantern (2011) #15

Dec 21, 2012

Green Lantern #15 is simply exceptional. Geoff Johns is literally building Simon Baz's character--his moral, his ethics, his personality--from the ground up as he deals with his personal issues while simultaneously trying to learn why he's received a Green Lantern ring and is being approached by a talking squirrel (for those who watched Robot Chicken: DC Comics Special, B'dg's inclusion in this storyline is just awesome.) "Rise of the Third Army" finally feels real, like something ominous and terrible is getting ready to devastate the entire universe.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Green Lantern (2011) #16

Jan 25, 2013

The final pages of Green Lantern #16 prove that Simon Baz is no temporary replacement; for a while, I was worried that Baz was more of an experiment that could be ended as quickly as it was started. Of course, that could still be the case, but Simon's inclusion in the upcoming Justice League of America coupled with the fact that the Green Lantern Corps really hasn't ever had a problem with there being an inordinate number of Lanterns from Earth points to his being around for a while. With "Rise of the Third Army" coming to a close next week, and "Wrath of the First Lantern" coming next month, I'm sure the Corps will be needing all the firepower it can get.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Green Lantern (2011) #18

Mar 10, 2013

Green Lantern #18 is a great issue when it's focused on Hal, Sinestro, and Simon. While Johns does take some minor detours that feel underwhelming, the overall experience is pleasant. Szymon Kudranski's art is spectacular and fits with the Dead Zone backdrop perfectly. Is it a coincidence that Hal seems to look a lot like Geoff Johns himself? "Wrath of the First Lantern" is a mixed bag when it comes to quality. I wasn't impressed with the first four issues of the crossover and GL #18 doesn't even feature the eponymous Lantern. As an actual story, it's nothing to shake a stick at, but the effects of the First Lantern's existence are causing all sorts of indirect results that are far more interesting than yet another emotional spectrum conflict.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Green Lantern (2011) #21

Jun 5, 2013

Now that the terrible secrets of the original Guardians have all been revealed and all the awful prophecies have played out, it's time for a new direction for Green Lantern. Robert Vendetti is just the man to do it, and Green Lantern #21 is stellar.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Green Lantern (2011) #27

Jan 12, 2014

The final sequence of Green Lantern #27 is the catalyst to a much larger story in Robert Vendittis run. The Green Lanterns are now at the mercy of every being in the universe with the ability to confront them. The GLC was already on thin ice from basically ignoring the chaos of the universe to deal with their own problems for so long, and now that everyone knows that using an energy ring causes the universe to deteriorate, theres no turning back. Venditti has changed the game for the Green Lanterns, turning them form universal protectors to the source of its chaos, and its astounding to read.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Green Lantern (2011) #28

Feb 10, 2014

Green Lantern #28 is a fun issue, if only a bit awkward in the story's placement in the middle of a giant universal war against the Green Lanterns. It leads directly into Red Lanterns #28, and Robert Venditti does an excellent job focusing on character development in place of advancing the Durlan storyline.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Green Lantern (2011) #30

Apr 9, 2014

Green Lantern #30 isn't terrible, but it's also not terribly interesting. The funeral to honor the fallen Lanterns comes months too late, and the conflict on Oasis Bay seems contrived and far to small for a series about to embark on a universe-spanning war.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Green Lantern (2011) #31

May 13, 2014

Green Lantern #31 feels like filler issue, which just seems wrong when it's actually the first part of a crossover event.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Green Lantern (2011) #32

Jun 9, 2014

Green Lantern #32 is a fun issue, but it's also a prime example of why the Green Lantern name isn't as powerful as it once was. The more time spent questioning the actions of the Green Lantern Corps in-story will eventually lead to readers questioning the same thing about their monthly pull lists. Yes, it's exciting to read about the Corps getting into a pickle, but when something like "Uprising" is just normal episode for Green Lantern, it starts to become boring.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Green Lantern (2011) #33

Jul 9, 2014

The fifth chapter of "Uprising" is one of the best issues of Green Lantern in the past six months. It progresses the story and makes a lot of good choices, right up until the end. The late-in-the-game faux pas means Green Lantern #33 is not perfect, but the art alone makes up quite a bit. The only glaring problem with the title now is the utter dominance of story over characterization.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Green Lantern (2011) Annual #1

Aug 30, 2012

Next month's Green Lantern #0 focuses on new GL, Baz. Up until now, I'd been confused as to how DC was going to shoehorn a new Green Lantern into the mythos, but after reader Green Lantern Annual #1, things are starting to make a lot more sense. Already, some have criticized this issue - and Johns' direction with the GLU in general - for being a rehash of previously tread ground. To that, I say what isn't? This year's amazing "Court of Owls" is based on any secret society trope, but that doesn't mean it can't be interesting and fresh. "Rise of the Third Army" promises to be a huge (if not long) event that will change the landscape of the Green Lantern books and the DCU at-large for a long time to come.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Green Lantern Corps (2011) #5

Jan 20, 2012

In one stroke, Tomasi has not only given the Green Lanterns a formidable foe without resorting to a crisis-level villain, but also provided another great piece of the Guardian's history of fucking everything up. I've read (and thought myself) that blaming the Guardians for everything has become a crutch for writers over the past five years. To many, it seems as if the Guardians apparently acted more like the CIA, killing, cheating and lying to claw they way to the top, rather that behave like the benevolent beings presented over nearly seven decades of comic continuity. But that's the beauty of a race that's as old as time itself; they've had a lot of time to screw things up, and a lot of universe in which to do it.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Green Lantern Corps (2011) #6

Feb 18, 2012

As I mentioned earlier, it's been great learning about Green Lanterns other than Guy Gardner, John Stewart and Kilowog. Bringing in the 'Mean Machine' and including some of the better characters from past series - such as Sheriff Mardin, Hannu, and Brik - has been Green Lantern Corps'saving grace. I'm excited to see where Tomasi takes the series after next month's issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Green Lantern Corps (2011) #7

Mar 24, 2012

An excellent 'epilogue' issue if there ever was one, if a little light on the plot advancement.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Green Lantern Corps (2011) #8

Apr 22, 2012

The real point of this issue (outside Guy's promotion) is the final page; the Alpha Lanterns descend to arrest John for the murder of Green Lantern Kirrt, an action that will surely lead to this "Alpha War".

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Green Lantern Corps (2011) #9

May 18, 2012

Peter J. Tomasi needs to step up his game. Green Lantern Corps was doing great, but mucking it up with legal drama is murdering it's reputation.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Green Lantern Corps (2011) #10

Jun 21, 2012

Green Lantern Corps #10 is easily the most enjoyable issue of the "Alpha War" so far. The first two entries into this arc were mired with legal jargon and judiciary proceedings - not things you want (or expect) from an action-based comic book. And while the best part of this month's issue is actually a debate over an issue of hypocrisy, the fights come out in spades.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Green Lantern Corps (2011) #14

Nov 20, 2012

Guy and John have been going down their separate, yet intertwining paths for months now -- it would be nice to see them side by side to take on the Third Army, but the events at this issue's end have me worried for the future of the Corps. 

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Green Lantern Corps (2011) #19

Apr 13, 2013

Green Lantern Corps #19 is as much a filler issue as you can get. It involves contrived character development based on a continued 'deus ex machina' device. Nothing about the plot is really advanced at all. It's only worth it if you're a completionist.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Green Lantern Corps (2011) #22

Jul 31, 2013

Green Lantern Corps #22 is Jensen's second issue on the title and it's the first where his writing style starts to meld with the franchise. New recruits on Oa means readers get a first-hand glimpse at the life of a brand new Green Lantern. While rebuilding, Stewart arrives on Oa to lend a hand and some helpful advice to the tenderfoots still reeling from being inducted into the Corps while simultaneously being ordered to rebuild their new home from the ground up. There's a lot of uncertainty flowing through the Green Lantern Corps, and Jensen captures that feeling almost perfectly. More so even than inGreen Lantern, Jensen manages to show how the Corps works and why it works despite it's corrupt masters and arguably unqualified new leaders.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Green Lantern Corps (2011) Annual #1

Jan 30, 2013

Green Lantern Corps Annual #1 does a great job finishing up one story arc and starting another. While the entire "Rise of the Third Army" event was less fast-paced as I had originally expected it to be, the conclusion makes it worth the build-up because we've been able to slowly integrate the idea of a hive-minded army of locust soldiers assimilating sentience into the basic setting of Green Lantern series. Instead of "Rise" being a one-month blitzkrieg (like, say, "Night of the Owls"), Johns and Company opted for pacing that made the threat of the Third Army all the more real and disturbing.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Green Lantern/New Gods: Godhead #1

Oct 8, 2014

Though just an opening chapter, Green Lantern/New Gods: Godhead #1 could actually still be read as a self-contained story about elitist culture believing they hold all the answers, only to fail by way of their own egos. The next three months of Green Lantern family titles — Green Lantern, Green Lantern Corps, Green Lantern: New Guardians, Red Lanterns, and Sinestro — are devoted to fleshing out the conflict between those who think they know everything and those trying their hardest to prove their worth to a universe that hates them. It's going to be an emotionally-charged, character-driven event, and Godhead #1 is a near-perfect start.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Green Lantern: New Guardians #5

Jan 27, 2012

I want to like this book. I love Green Lantern and Kyle is my all-time favorite GL, so I keep reading, sticking it out hoping that things will get better. Fortunately, this month's Blue Beetle promised a pretty awesome new arc starting with issue #10. Here's hoping things get better by June.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Green Lantern: New Guardians #7

Mar 29, 2012

The story of the Angels of Vega points to Larfleeze as the culprit behind the creation of the New Guardians. In a somewhat annoying info dump, Kyle Rayner explains how Larfleeze was the one who stole the various-colored rings and sent the team on their mission to kill Invictus. The manic-depressive Invictus finally shows some restraint and decides to not replace the current Vega system with his copy. How nice! Instead, he wants Kyle to kill Larfleeze. Who's ready for next month's issue? This guy.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Green Lantern: New Guardians #9

May 25, 2012

It's hard to make beetle-men seem intimidating, but Tony Bedard does a fantastic job of keeping the pace steady and giving more information on a need-to-know basis. Tyler Kirkham's art is spectacular in conveying the hopelessness of the Blue Lanterns' defense against the Reach. This GL: NG / Blue Beetle semi-crossover looks to be very interesting, not only from a narrative standpoint, but also for it's ramifications on the DC universe in general!

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Green Lantern: New Guardians #10

Jun 27, 2012

By the end, Saint Walker recognizes the source of all the New Guardians' troubles; the person who led the Reach to Odym, a world that's virtually undetectable; the one whose actions have ripple awful consequences for the entire universe: Larfleeze. Agent Orange went from being a monster to comic relief, and now - it seems - criminal mastermind, manipulating those around him to get what he wants.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Green Lantern: New Guardians #12

Aug 22, 2012

These days, Green Lantern books are all about the future, which makes sense with "Rise of the Third Army" coming in October and November, but it can be off-putting to continually buy issues that are only leading to something else. I'm all for proper build-up and development, but when actual plot is sacrificed to create a trumped-up prelude, things start getting annoying.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Green Lantern: New Guardians #13

Oct 17, 2012

I have to say, Kyle's Red Lantern getup is probably the coolest costume he's worn in his many years wielding a green ring - it's that helmet that really dredges up thoughts of horror movies, y'know? Tony Bedard, in one single issue, has managed to reel me back in and take Green Lantern: New Guardians seriously again. I'm a bit miffed that Carol Ferris is taking Fatality's place as the team's Star Sapphire, but it makes sense in terms of GL family cohesion. Other than that, I really don't have a lot bad to say about this issue. Bedard knocks it out of the park, Andrei Bressan and Amilcar Pinna have a refreshing art style, and the new, clear direction for the book makes me want to continue reading it even more.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Green Lantern: New Guardians #14

Nov 24, 2012

Tony Bedard is losing his grip on Green Lantern: New Guardians issue by issue. Maybe he's putting more effort into his other series, but Kyle Rayner and his Rainbow Brigade have suffered for it exponentially. Each month now, I feel like the series is getting worse, and that's upsetting. Kyle Rayner has always been my favorite Green Lantern. I've come to accept that fans and editors alike don't seem to want Kyle in the spotlight, but to reduce him to some confused epic hero who's journey isn't all that hard is just depressing.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Green Lantern: New Guardians #19

Apr 18, 2013

Kyle Rayner is such an interesting character that Tony Bedard has just begun to understand more fully. Green Lantern: New Guardians #19 doesn't do much to progress the "Wrath of the First Lantern" plot, but it's got fantastic character development for Kyle, Carol Ferris, Sinestro, and even Simon Baz.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Green Lantern: New Guardians #21

Jun 19, 2013

Justin Jordan has an amazing hold on any character he gets his hands on. Just look at The Strange Tale ofand TheLegend of Luther Strode, as well as his recent work on Superboy, a series he saved from the deep pit of darkness it found itself within. Green Lantern: New Guardians #21provides an excellent introduction to the Justin Jordan era of the title, and it's going to be epic. Not to mention that the title 'New Guardians' now finally makes sense.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Green Lantern: New Guardians #22

Jul 31, 2013

I'm really enjoying Justin Jordan's run onGL: New Guardians because he's finally given the title a direction that makes sense and a voice that feels more organic than the first 20 issues combined. I don't want to discount Tony Bedard's work, but his concept of teaming up the various colored Lanterns was a novelty that wore off rather quickly. Jordan, on the other hand, is using the title to explore less specific ideas. Instead, we get to see Kyle back at his prime helping the literal New Guardians understand the universe they've inherited.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Green Lantern: New Guardians #23

Aug 23, 2013

Green Lantern: New Guardians #23 is my favorite issue of the entire series, hands down. Justin Jordan has set up an amazing prelude to “Lights Out” that can stand on it's own as well as serve as a jumping-off point for future stories. It was painful reading Warth's death, but in the end, it shows how much Jordan cares for these characters that he's not simply forgetting about them on Elpis just to use them when the story deems it necessary. Though he killed off Warth, Jordan shows he respects the character much more than previous writers.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Green Lantern: New Guardians #29

Mar 24, 2014

Green Lantern: New Guardians #29 is a fun issue. After all the Relic shenanigans (maybe a harsher word than shenanigans), New Guardians hasn't been tied into what's going on in the main two GL titles, which frees Kyle to be a better character than he's been in a long time. Justin Jordan deserves a lot of the credit for bringing Kyle from being a Hal Jordan sidekick, back to his roots as a Lantern that carves his own path.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Green Lantern: New Guardians Annual #1

Jan 10, 2013

Green Lanterns: New Guardians has a second-stringer title since it began due to a lack of direction and overall cohesiveness. I understand that this Annual was intended to be a lead-in to Threshold, but why? Why can't that series stand on it's own? Why make an already struggling title break focus and lose it's momentum in the process? Last month's issue was a great step forward, but Green Lantern: New Guardians Annual #1 is like taking two steps back.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #1

Mar 27, 2013

Though I enjoyed it, Guardians of the Galaxy #0.1 was less than satisfactory because it was all backstory and it somewhat diluted the effect of a premier issue that hadn't even come out yet. That being said, after reading Guardians of the Galaxy #1, most of my skepticism has been washed away. It's now clear that Bendis wanted to put out a prelude issue to set up Peter Quill's character enough to carry the first issue -- readers are familiar enough with Quill to not be lost going into the issue, but also get vital information on the actual rest of the team. Guardians of the Galaxy #1 is a triumph for Bendis and Steve McNiven, pointing to a bright future in the stars for Marvel.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #3

Jun 15, 2013

Other than that, the narrative is exciting and fast-paced without feeling rushed. Bendis is at his best writing teams. His work on the Avengers franchise is more than enough evidence to this fact. Guardians of the Galaxy #3 really conveys just how legendary this team of heroes is, though many consider them menaces and pirates. Basically, this series allows for Bendis to use all his favorite tropes in one place: pomp and grandeur, deriving conflict and character development from emotional resonance, the proverbial "David vs. Goliath", divisive interpretations of consequential happenings. All of this stuff can be seen in Guardians of the Galaxy #3. Bendis graduated from the Earth's Mightiest Heroes to the defenders of the entire galaxy.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Guardians of the Galaxy (2013) #5

Aug 1, 2013

Guardians of the Galaxy has suffered from delays which causes any momentum it gains with each issue to severely drop once the next issue doesn't show up for a over a month. That much aside, Bendis is still telling a superb tale of intergalactic politics that play directly into Earth going-ons.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Guardians of the Galaxy (2015) #11

Sep 3, 2016

Guardians of the Galaxy #11 connects to Civil War II about as tangentially as it can while still being relatively necessary (not necessarily good) reading. The Guardians show up as surprise backup at the end of Civil War II #4, so knowing how they got there could be construed as important. But really, this issue is filler with a shoehorned sub-plot about Thanos that probably won't go anywhere.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #1

Aug 8, 2012

Hawkeye is shaping up to be an incredible series. Matt Fraction's natural, organic writing partnered with David Aja's minimally gorgeous artwork proves that you can write a superhero comicbook that's not all mad scientists (which, as a side note, I find there is a lack of these days), alien overlords, or mystical threats. Sometimes, the best stories are the human ones, the tales that deal with real people overcoming real situations. For Matt Fraction's Hawkeye, that means standing up to what is wrong, no matter how convoluted and messy it gets. The real Ollie Queen would be proud.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #2

Sep 6, 2012

While there are only these two issues of this series from which to judge, Hawkeye is turning into one of the best series Marvel releases each month. Matt Fraction is a volatile writer whose work either flourishes, as is the case here, or flounders terribly, as was the case with last year's Fear Itself crossover event. What makes Hawkeye so great, fortunately, is it's ability to mine emotion without taking advantage of the medium. At every turn, this series becomes more and more relatable and grounded, while still keeping the high-concept idea "Robin Hood" idea intact and - I'm assuming - a future with at least a few super-villains thrown in for good measure.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.7
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #3

Oct 18, 2012

This is a comic book. This is one of the more polished, meaningful examples of good comics I've read in a while. Matt Fraction has a complete understanding of his intentions and how he wants to write Hawkeye. This is a Marvel ongoing series that doesn't feature alien invasions, mutant menaces, evil masterminds, or brainwashed superheroes - this is a series about life's real problems being dealt with in way less based in reality. Acid-tipped arrows? We're not supposed to believe it's real, just that it could be, and that's awesome.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #4

Nov 21, 2012

The final pages of Hawkeye #4 include some epic foreshadowing to next month's conclusion of "The Tape", including the contents of the tape, those bidding for it in Madripoor, and a scheme to secure the information no matter what. It's thrilling. It's action-packed. It's Matt Fraction's Hawkeye, and you should be reading it. Even if this issue was a bit weaker than the others.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #5

Dec 8, 2012

But in true Matt Fraction fashion, things aren't always what the seem and the final few pages of Hawkeye #5 will remind you how good Fraction is at writing street-level heroes. Clint and Kate Bishop have been in a few pickles before "The Tape", but this is really the first time we get to see the two Hawkeyes in their natural state together, kicking ass and taking names. Hawkeye is one of the best comic book series currently being published and you're doing a diservice to yourself if you read comics and aren't keeping up with this book. As evidenced by most everything he's writing at the moment, Fraction is incredibly gifted at making comics easy and fun to read instead of a chore in backstory and line-wide events. This is the series to read.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #6

Dec 19, 2012

Some people have favorite holiday moveis they watch every year. I feel like this will be an issue I read each and every December. Hawkeye #6 is how a holiday-themed comic should be--inclusive, fun, relatable, grounded, visually appealing, and thematic to the season. Throughout the issue, Clint is pushed to be something he's not. In the end, he comes to terms with being himself and liking that person. It's a feeling most of us go through at one point or another, and the backdrop of snowy New York City nights is just so awesome. Fraction and Aja deliver with Hawkeye #6.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #8

Mar 4, 2013

The final pages of Hawkeye #8 point to a future direction for the series. Clint waxes poetic about the scolding he receives from Captain America and Iron Man about the moral and ethical guidelines to being an Avenger, we get to see Penny's true colors when Clint becomes expendable, and a meeting of New York City's most powerful criminals results from Clint's unique brand of urban justice cutting into their illegitimate business plans. The ongoing development of Clint Barton isn't really about making him grow or change"it's about defining what's already there and discovering truth behind the definition.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Hawkeye Vol. 2 #10

May 7, 2013

For regular readers of the series, this specific plot might start to feel a bit long in the tooth by issue's end, and new readers wont understand what's happening and why a book called Hawkeye is focusing so intently on a man not named Hawkeye. All that being said, Hawkeye #10 is still one of the best single comic book issues you can buy this month.  Francesco Francavilla's artwork alone is worth the cover price, and Matt Fraction's writing is still leagues better than most.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
House Of M (2015) #2

Sep 5, 2015

This is the "What If? House of M" that should have been, and now is. House of M #2 is the calm before the storm, the pieces being set up to soon be knocked over.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Illuminati #1

Nov 14, 2015

The artwork by Shawn Crystal is amazing but does not fit this narrative in any way, shape, or form. Crystal's talents would be much better served on a title like Ms. Marvel, New Avengers, or even a new volume of Young Avengers.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Indestructible Hulk #1

Nov 21, 2012

Mark Waid's Bruce Banner is far more reasonable and responsible than previous iterations. Even at his calmest, Bruce used to only have a one track mind. Under Waid's hand, Bruce is more relatable and makes more sense on a logistical level -- it always bothered me how a man of staunch science could work for decades to no avail without accepting a certain truth of things. Waid understands this principle, applies it liberally, and it works. Like Matt Fraction, Mark Waid is a phenomenal emotional writer. For scientists, though, emotion can often be expressed through their work, and Bruce hasn't done any work outside himself for a long time. For too long, Bruce has been a tormented soul searching for something that isn't there. That's been done. In the 'Marvel NOW!' era, he's is going to be a force of good, and a darn good one at that.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Indestructible Hulk #6

Apr 8, 2013

Overall, Indestructible Hulk #6 is the introductory chapter of this story, which means there are some big questions that are left unanswered at issue's end, but the big revelation teased on the cover is somewhat overshadowed by other mysteries Waid planted along the way. There's nothing wrong with that, but it dulls the excitement of the final page, for sure.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Infinity #1

Aug 14, 2013

I doubt if I'll event continue to readInfinity as a true crossover event. Marvel can market this mini series however it wants, but as it stands right now,Infinity is just a major point in Jonathan Hickman's grand Avengers design. That's not a bad thing, but when looking at the logistics of this being the second major crossover event of 2013 — and starting only two months after the previous one ended — it's hard to justify jumping in when the learning curve is so freaking steep. If you read Hickman's Avengers series, you'll want to readInfinity because if you don't, you'll be lost after it's over. Otherwise, this event may not be for you.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Invincible Iron Man (2015) #3

Nov 6, 2015

Brian Michael Bendis and David Marquez's Invincible Iron Man continues to be a delight well into the third issue. Bendis brings his trademark style steeped in decompression to Marvel's shell head with aplomb; the dialogue is witty without feeling snarky, the artwork is just polished enough, and the narrative is actually interesting without resorting to flashbacks or constant references to immediately post-Secret Wars.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Invincible Iron Man (2015) #4

Dec 4, 2015

The metacontextual parables to Ultimate Spider-Man are uncanny and make this one of Marvel's best new series even if it's popular to dislike both Brian Michael Bendis and Iron Man.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Iron Man (2012) #1

Nov 7, 2012

Both Iron Man and Deadpool debuted this week as part of 'Marvel NOW!', and many buyers are considering purchasing just one of these issues. Do yourself a favor and get Iron Man #1. Kieron Gillen has, in one issue, built a fascinating situation for Tony Stark, as well as a clear direction for the character himself. This was not a title I thought I would be buying each month. In fact, I had no plans on even reviewing this initial issue outside the 'Extra! Extra!' section. But as always (and I should have guessed), Kieron Gillen blew me away with his masterful grasp of comic book writing.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Iron Man (2012) #9

May 4, 2013

Simply put, Iron Man #9 is a triumph. Rarely does a single issue so intuitively cater to both the dedicated fan and the new reader. We need more writing like this in the comic book industry. Sure, it's still about Iron Man zipping around the galaxy with a giant robotic bounty hunter looking for another robot who orchestrated genocide, but somehow, it feels incredibly relatable and down to earth.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Iron Man (2012) #10

May 17, 2013

Overall, I found Iron Man #10 to be intriguing. It's the first official part of "Secret Origin", and it reveals quite a bit about the story leading up to Tony's birth, but nothing is intersecting yet. It's like one of those new puzzles without edges that are just that much harder to start piecing together, but are so much more satisfying when completed.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Jem and the Holograms #5

Aug 2, 2015

That might sound cheesy, the but the fact is that comic books appropriate for children and also enjoyable for adults is in short supply. Jem and The Holograms is helping to change that.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Jem and the Holograms #6

Sep 5, 2015

Writer Kelly Thompson and artist Sophie Campbell approach a real-life situation with realistic consequences as the Holograms are kicked out of the battle of the bands; having a science fairy that imbues confidence and performing power doesn't help against bylaws and contracts.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Jem and the Holograms #7

Sep 19, 2015

Both in visual aesthetic and narrative, "Viral!" isn't as strong as any of the preceding six issues of Jem.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Jem and the Holograms #8

Oct 20, 2015

After a mediocre first chapter for "Viral!", Kelly Thompson and artist Emma Vieceli " whose work greatly improves over last month " Jem and The Holograms #8 brings back the awesome.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Justice League #0

Sep 19, 2012

Justice League #0 was a gamble. For a general public that doesn't read a lot of comic books, making this "Issue Zero" a Shazam-only story could be bad for the bottom line. Literally nowhere in theses pages are the actual Leaguers featured. Johns and Frank dedicate this issue to Shazam, giving him a damn fine introduction as he gets ready to join the League proper starting in 2013. Before the reboot last year, Captain Marvel was always the boy scout, more so even than Superman. He never erred, rarely faltered, and was liked by all. He was a bit more sickeningly perfect than Superman, which was hard to do. Now, we have a dynamic character who actually has depth, who really does have a reason for acting beyond a surface-level desire to uphold truth, justice, and the American way. Now, we have a real Shazam.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Justice League #5

Jan 29, 2012

I still really enjoyed this issue, despite all my whining. It was filled with action from Darkseid, Flash, Green Lantern and Batman with a great last page of the whole team heading out to take down their first villain as a team.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Justice League #7

Mar 24, 2012

Unfortunately, we still get almost no team time or deeper understanding of the characters outside of Steve Trevor who isn't a League member anyway. The first six issues did little to give these six individuals reason to come together (really, Darkseid's appearance was way too convenient), and this issue gives nothing more by way of meaning. Again, the 'New 52' was supposed to be about bringing in new readers. Without giving context, Johns is stripping away the Justice League of everything that makes them awesome. The Avengers - at least in the comics these days - are getting super lame because Marvel keeps adding new spinoff teams (and ongoing series'), switching members and not providing emotional connections. Johns needs to step up the quality on Justice League before readers begin losing interest.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Justice League #9

May 17, 2012

What's actually interesting about this new arc of Justice League is that Graves is a villain who has (supposedly, or at least seemingly) been wronged by the Justice League directly and wants to take his revenge. This is interesting because it's been quite a long while since there was a JLA story that actually connected to the League. More often than not, the League is called upon to handle situations like alien invasions, criminal masterminds, and worldwide catastrophes, all of which have no meaningful connection to the League. Mostly, the League is reserved for massive threats. Giving the team a more personal villain might be a fantastic way to give a little more characterization and depth to a crew that readers haven't yet received.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Justice League #10

Jun 30, 2012

And speaking of the wizard, Doctor Sivana continues his archaeological dig, now complete with a fancy magic-seeing eye that helps him see the mystical spells placed on the door to a greater prize than any gold or gems. As he utters a single, "Shazam", Black Adam emerges from the tomb demanding to see the wizard! The final, double-wide pullout pages of The New 52 #1 revealed what looked like Black Adam fighting Vibe, though many posited that it was just the 'New 52' version of Captain Marvel, as Billy Batson is much more mean-spirited than his former self. Obviously, Black Adam is here, which spells trouble for our little trouble maker.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.7
Justice League #11

Jul 18, 2012

I like Justice League. You get to see a different side of your favorite heroes and, more often than not, it's exciting and fun to read, which is the real goal of all comic books. "The Villain's Journey" started out strong, with a path that had the potential to produce an awesome new nemesis for the League. Instead, we got Graves, a whiney writer who has deluded himself into believing the Justice League is responsible for his family's eventual death.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Justice League #12

Aug 29, 2012

Justice League #12 does an excellent job capping off a first year that saw the team come together and face more than just villains. Geoff Johns is slowly figuring out the team's voice and how they honestly fit into the greater DC universe. It's a difficult task, no doubt, but Johns has a long history with Teen Titans, and his pre-'New 52' work on Green Lantern included some of the characters best stories in years. Now, after taking the time to give us readers the basic stuff, it's time to go into new territory. Obviously, Superman and Wonder Woman's relationship is leading this trend, and coupled with Hal Jordan's resignation, we're sure to be in for an exciting 2013.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Justice League #13

Oct 22, 2012

Justice League #13 proves that Geoff Johns can write a character-driven story. For so long his focus has been providing the grand schemes that shape the fate of a great number of characters. It's nice to see him spend more time with the more specific details of these characters' lives. Since Wonder Woman takes place in the present day, a lot of Diana's history hasn't yet been revealed, so it's nice to see a villain like Cheetah not only being used, but being used in an effective and prominent manner.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Justice League #13

Oct 17, 2012

And while DC's website claimed that Johns' "Shazam" back up was still happening, in actuality, it's a story penned by Geoff Johns and Jeff Lemire about Steve Trevor and Oliver Queen. Trevor is done working for A.R.G.U.S., and decides to drink himself into a stupor when Ollie Queen shows up to deliver some bad news that looks to be of some importance in the upcoming Justice League of America starting next year.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.8
Justice League #14

Nov 23, 2012

Instead of making this story arc a bit more fluid and organic -- perhaps with a full issue of cheetah-controlled Superman hunting the League members -- "The Secret of the Cheetah" feels rushed and compressed. Promotional material form DC states that the "road to 'Trinity War' is paved through Justice League #14'. With nothing else to go on, I can't really say what that connection might be. Then again, Johns is a master as subtle build-up to explosive results, so there's a big possibility I'll be reading "Trinity War" next year, and I'll come back to JL#14 only to see something I'll tell myself should have been obvious.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Justice League #15

Dec 28, 2012

The good outweighs the bad, in the end. Justice League #15 has some glaring weaknesses in terms of basic premise, but Geoff Johns' solid character work makes up for it. Additionally, bringing on the stellar Aquaman artistic team of Ivan Reis and Joe Prado was a dynamite choice on DC's part. While Jim Lee's pencils are good, I've always liked Ivan Reis' facial expressions and Joe Prado's depth in shading. I'm excited for "Throne of Atlantis" because I really like stories like this, and I'm confident Johns will do it justice.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Justice League #16

Jan 25, 2013

Justice League #16 is a fun issue full of intense action, plot-advancing story, and an ending that will get most any DC fan excited for the future of the series and the 'New 52'. Already, a tidal wave has destroyed the east coast of the United States. That's going to last for a while, and a war with Atlantis is going to change the landscape even more. Since last Free Comic Book Day, we've known that 2013 would bring "Trinity War", the first major 'New 52' crossover that would effect the entire line. "Throne of Atlantis" may or may not be a prelude to this massive event, but it's setting the standard for 2013 being about big ideas and big changes.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Justice League #18

Mar 20, 2013

There's no escaping the fact that Justice League #18 is a good old-fashioned prelude issue. There's so much being set up from beginning to end that it's hard to squeeze a story-proper out of an issue like this. Fortunately, Geoff Johns stands up to the task and makes the entire affair feel completely fluid and natural. My bias for the structure of character development aside, JL #18 hits all the right marks. At the end of the day, it's really hard not to like seeing so many familiar (and some unfamiliar) faces in one issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Justice League #20

May 24, 2013

Justice League #20 is a fun, fun issue. Desperos attack, while not entirely explained, is a great way to not only introduce the villain, but also give the new blood their first taste of life in the League. Its hard being a literal keystone for the New 52 and telling a satisfying, quality story, but Johns pulls it off month after month. This issue is no exception. Trinity War, here I come.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Justice League #22

Jul 12, 2013

While Justice League #22 does a fine job setting up Trinity War, there are a few big missteps that pull the issue down. Its obviously too early to make a call on the overall quality of Trinity War as a crossover event, but as a single issue, Chapter 1 isnt the awe-inspiring, jaw-dropping opening act many were hoping to read.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Justice League #23.1

Sep 5, 2013

Justice League #23.1 is half-baked, which is unfortunate because Darkseid should be one of the most prominent and awe-inspiring villains in DCs roster and as of right now, hes not. Marvel has gone above and beyond to make Thanos a character to be feared. DC, on the other hand, seems content with letting Darkseid slip into B-list villain territory at a dangerous speed. We dont even get to see Darkseid when he first uses his eye beams; its just Uxas one panel, then full-blown despot Darkseid the next, while more mundane details (like anything before he starts murdering gods) are dragged out to unnecessary lengths.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Justice League #24

Oct 26, 2013

Justice League #24 is not an integral issue to Forever Evil because it was designed that way. Geoff Johns made sure to include enough information and backstory to make it a compelling buy for those interested in knowing everything about Ultraman, but the financially discerning reader more focused on the main series doesnt necessarily have to own this issue. While this is an odd phenomenon, this suggestion shouldnt detract from how well this issue is written.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Justice League #26

Dec 25, 2013

Justice League #26 is a misleading, bore of an issue. Its a necessary evil to flesh out the Crime Syndicate, but the presentation and pacing is just totally off.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Justice League #28

Feb 24, 2014

Justice League #28 is one of the best issues of the series. Unlike other elements of the pre-New 52 universe that Geoff Johns has recently introduced into continuity, the Metal Men don't feel shoehorned or obtrusive. This comes from their story having true emotion; Will Magnus finally feels a human connection with robots shouldn't have as much mental independence as they do. The Metal Men sacrifice themselves to save innocent lives, and it breaks Magnus' heart. In one issue, Johns achieves a level of emotional resonance that he's struggled to find since Justice League started tying-in with Forever Evil. Justice League #28 is a breathtaking issue that sets the bar for how the Metal Men will be portrayed going forward.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Justice League #29

Apr 19, 2014

Justice League #29 is a fantastically enjoyable read. Cyborg finally gets his due and becomes a fully-developed character, the Metal Men rise to the occasion (literally and figuratively), and Grid's technological stranglehold on the planet is broken. While it's not, by definition, a "must read", it's one of the best Forever Evil tie-in issues and definitely worth the buy.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Justice League #30

May 27, 2014

Justice League #30 is the beginning of a new era for the Justice League. Though the "Forever Evil" banner still hangs at the top of the cover, it's more of an aftermath issue that starts the story of how the League deals with the fallout of a worldwide catastrophe unlike anyone has ever seen. It's another stunning issue in a series that Geoff Johns has used as a world-building title since the beginning of the New 52.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Justice League #31

Jul 1, 2014

Justice League #31 is a ton of fun, simple as that. Instead of jumping in to a Justice League that includes Lex Luthor and Captain Cold (who also gets a fantastic sequence in this issue), Johns is taking the time to flesh out the events that lead to these unorthodox new alliances. Some readers take issue with Johns' decompressive style of storytelling, but for this "Injustice League" arc, it's a fitting flow that makes sense. If this is going to be the status quo for the Justice League for a while, it's important to make sure the foundation is laid well, and Johns is doing just that.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Justice League Dark #9

May 26, 2012

Well, it turns out that in defeating Felix Faust, the JLD would also be able to retrieve a mystical artifact lost to the government before it turned up in Faust's hands. After a cunning sleight-of-hand maneuver, Faust is defeated and the team takes a look at the real focus of their trip: the map to the ancient Books of Magic.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Justice League Dark #10

Jun 28, 2012

The segue into the next issue begins when the team attempts to open the map to the Books of Magic, tripping a mystical lock on the map set by Felix Faust! Soon, the team is attacked by the Demons Three who are indentured slaves under Faust's command. The demons attack quickly before teleporting into an A.R.G.U.S. facility where Steve Trevor is interrogating Faust. This 'ah-ha' moment comes when the team realizes that Faust wanted to be in A.R.G.U.S. so his demons could help him break into the Black Room, the warehouse filled with all the mystical artifacts collected by the US government over the years.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Justice League Dark #12

Aug 29, 2012

Jeff Lemire really has turned Justice League Dark around from a book on the verge of losing itself after only six issues, to one of the best titles DC offers right now. The multiple-plotline nature of the book doesn't feel overcrowded, and the paced character development gives meaning to these heroes and how they come to know each other instead of just assuming they'll talk about themselves off-panel. JLD's similarities in flow and structure to popular supernatural television shows is no coincidence, and in this case, it works. Bringing an episodic edge to an industry currently wrapped up in serial arcs is no small task, but each month Justice League Dark gets better. People will, I am very certain, start noticing.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Justice League Dark #13

Oct 25, 2012

Basically, Justice League Dark #13 is the prelude to the conclusion of "War for the Books of Magic". Nick Necro is putting his final plans together to find the Books, part of which includes Felix Faust retrieving Timothy Hunter, the boy who is supposedly the key to finding the books and unlocking their power. Fortunately, Madame Xanadu is on site and whisks Timothy away before Faust can take him. Meanwhile, the rest of the team takes on the combined power of Nick Necro - recently returned from Hell with a cadre of new powers and abilities - and Doctor Mist. This isn't the final battle. Mostly, Lemire uses this issue to put all the pieces into place for the coming showdown. Yes, there's a lot of magic being thrown around, but it's the personal relationships that take the heaviest beating this month. Constantine, Zatanna, and Necro have a past and it comes back to bite them. And we only have to wait one week for Justice League Dark Annual #1 for the final chapter!

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Justice League Dark #14

Nov 30, 2012

Overall, Justice League Dark #14 is a bridge issue that suffers only because it's the starting point for a lot of plot going forward, meaning it's an issue filled with questions with positively no answers. And even then, there's something exciting about being given a whole load of new mysteries to ponder as we wait for the next issue. Jeff Lemire is writing one hell of a series and I'll be sad to see him leave once he takes on Green Arrow in a few months.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Justice League Dark #15

Jan 5, 2013

Justice League Dark #15 does an excellent job of setting up "The Death of Magic". Lemire is playing around with the idea of magic in the DC universe, something that's only ever been lightly done, due to the ingrained nature of continuity-based comic book mythology. As long as I can remember, magic has always been regarded as a more 'powerful' or 'enigmatic' force than science in comic books. With the 'New 52', all bets are off, so making magic and science more equivalent doesn't seem like such a far-fetched idea.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Justice League Dark #16

Feb 2, 2013

Justice League Dark #16 is another excellent chapter in "The Death of Magic" and the series in general. Jeff Lemire and Ray Fawkes have such a knack for fantasy writing it's uncanny. There are so many different elements that affect the story at any given time, and each of them is handled with care and precision to create one of the most entertaining and fun books DC currently publishes.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Justice League Dark #20

May 26, 2013

If you're not reading Justice League Dark, you should be. I know that's a cliche thing to say in comic book reviews, but hear me out. It checks off a lot of boxes on the "who would like this?" list. It's a supernatural series (1). It includes well-known heroes like Constantine, Deadman, and Zatanna (2). It's consistently one of the best titles DC publishes each month (3). It's an integral part of this summer's "Trinity War" crossover (4). Mikel Janin's artwork is superb (5). That's five good reasons to read this book.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Justice League Dark #22

Jul 31, 2013

Justice League Dark #22 is the best chapter of “Trinity War” yet. It closes out the first act of the event with a grace and elegance not seen in the first two chapters, and the artwork alone makes this issue worth the buy. Every issue of “Trinity War” introduces new ideas that complicate the situation further, butJLD #22 is the first instance where these new concepts felt organic and made sense during the first read-through. I couldn't recommend this issue more highly.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Justice League Dark #23

Aug 21, 2013

Justice League Dark #23is the only issue of “Trinity War” I could imagine someone reading without wondering what was going on the entire time. Jeff Lemire is able to make the issue function as a self-sustainable issue that is enjoyable whether you're reading “Trinity War” or not. Now, I can't say for certain it would be a fun read if you haven't read the previous four chapters because I have read every issue of the event so far. That being said, Lemire makes sure to include a quick overview at the beginning of the issue, the three plot lines makes sense in their placement and how they connect to one another, and the battle against Dark Shazam is contained enough to entice almost any DC fan to pick up a copy just to marvel at all the characters involved in one brawl.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Justice League International #6

Feb 5, 2012

This sixth issue has been my favorite yet. Heavy on dialogue, most of the issue focuses on Booster convincing the UN Security Council that the JLI is worth it, that they have worth and value to the world. By the end, Booster is ready to solider on as team leader, with or without the UN behind them. It's a pretty great couple of pages with some great character development for Booster Gold. I've always liked Booster (and Blue Beetle Ted Kord) because they're the underdogs. They try so hard and fall so much harder each time. Fortunately, Jurgens is able to somewhat 're-invent' Booster in the pages of Justice League International, giving him a bit more selflessness and making him less silly.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Justice League International #7

Mar 12, 2012

The fight between Booster and Lightweaver was fun, but ultimately just the set up to introduce Batwing into series and onto the team in upcoming issues. It makes perfect sense, now that there's a Batman in Africa, but it still seems weird. I'm not a fan of Batwing, and I hope Jurgens keeps his panel time to a minimum in the tradition of the real Batman.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Justice League International #8

Apr 7, 2012

I understand that Jurgens is building towards something. It's obvious that this issue is a 'filler' issue meant to introduce some characters and little else. The story doesn't advance at all from last month, and the only real exciting part about this issue is the arrival of Batwing, which itself is pretty lackluster. I've been extremely happy with Justice League International every month, and one hiccup isn't enough to turn me off of a great, great book.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Justice League International #11

Jul 5, 2012

Dan Jurgens loves the JLI. He's nurtured this book since day one, and it's been a slowly evolving tale that just gets better and more cohesive with each issue. It really is a shame that such an excellent series is ending so soon.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Justice League International #12

Aug 1, 2012

Batwing resigns from the team for no other reason than he was barely on it to begin with; he cites "too many duties elsewhere", but he was never really all that interesting anyway. Batman's reasons for leaving are a bit more poignant. Bruce takes the time to explain that he's no longer needed, that Booster Gold is more than qualified to lead the team, and that their old headquarters and bankroll had been reinstated. Much in the vein of the JLI's history within the DCU, Batman sees the potential in this rag-tag group and gives them a chance - the chance no one else was willing to give them after a less-than-perfect inaugural outing.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Justice League International Annual #1

Aug 30, 2012

By the time we reach the final pages, the team is technically down to just Godiva and a heavily-injured August General in Iron. Rocket Red and Olympian are dead, Batwing and Guy Gardner have resigned Blue Beetle is on the other side of the galaxy, and Booster is deleted from time and space. Justice League International Annual #1 is not only the JLI's most exciting issue, but it sets up the next chapter of the collective 'Justice League' story very well. At the very end, Batman has a chilling conversation with his creation, Brother Eye: "Eye am home and eye will be waiting for my new programmer's signal. He is coming, Batman. And you will join him or die." recites Brother Eye as if from a script. The emotionless, yet highly sophisticated, Brother Eye looks to be the focal point of things to come. Perhaps in the same vein as Infinite Crisis, Batman's presumptuousness concerning other heroes became paranoia, resulting in some of the darkest days in DCU history.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Justice League of America (2013) #1

Feb 20, 2013

Justice League of America #1 is a joy to read. Geoff Johns has written on damn fine story that's already got me excited for the second issue. This series is the first one to grow organically out of the 'New 52'. Talon is similar for being a byproduct of the events in Batman, but Calvin Rose is a new character that readers are still getting to know, which makes it just as much an effort to invest in as any other 'New 52' title. JLA #1 features heroes and villains that have already made a name for themselves in the DCnU and now, we get to see them work together. Basically, if you like any of these characters, you're going to like Justice League of America #1.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Justice League of America (2013) #2

Mar 21, 2013

Even though JLA #2 doesn't have the same feel as the first issue, Geoff Johns is still stetting up something big. Perhaps the series is supposed to feel like it's not completely sure of itself, much like Steve Trevor and his grasp on the JLA situation in general. Last year's The New 52 #1, which came out on Free Comic Book Day, portended the coming of a Trinity War that pitted hero against hero. That reality is coming closer and closer to fruition with more characters and plot lines being introduced.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Justice League of America (2013) #3

May 8, 2013

Speaking of Catwoman, I read Catwoman #19 after Justice League of America #3 because it's supposed to be a look at Selina's 48 hours inside Arkham Asylum before she escapes at the end of JLA #3. I wouldn't recommend doing the same unless you're interested in reading a story that has nothing to do with anything at all. The whole plan was for Catwoman to get info about the Secret Society whilst inside Arkham. Instead, she antagonizes everyone and really doesn't get much in the process. 

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Justice League of America (2013) #4

May 30, 2013

I really, really like this series. I like Geoff Johns writing, I love the characters being used, and the spy thriller angle is different enough to warrant a separate Justice League title. Justice League of America #4 continues Worlds Most Dangerous on an emotional level more than a plot-advancing one. Pre-New 52 readers will appreciate the numerous new elements being integrated throughout the issue, which continues to show how the other League lives.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Justice League of America (2015) #7

Jan 31, 2016

Justice League of America #7 does indeed reveal new information, but so sparsely that it nearly feels inconsequential, which is not a good feeling to have about a comic featuring the world's greatest superhero team.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Larfleeze #5

Dec 1, 2013

Larfleeze has quickly become one of the best titles in the New 52. Even before it launched, many fans were critical of a humorous title focused on the most annoying of the various colored Lanterns, and with good reason. Never before has Larfleeze has this much characterization, and the revelations Giffen and DeMatteis bring in at the end of the issue will shake preconceptions about Larfleeze down to the core. This is a very good issue of a very good series and it shouldnt be missed, either for Green Lantern fans looking for more insight into Agent Orange, or for casual fans who just want something a little more lighthearted in their comics.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Lumberjanes #19

Oct 23, 2015

Shannon Watters and Kay Leyh present yet another fun, unabashedly delightful tale with Lumberjanes #19.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Marvel NOW! Point One #1

Oct 17, 2012

It's difficult to review a prologue anthology simply by it's definition. These stories and their format are unique. Unlike back-up stories of similar length, these aren't multi-part or even one-shot tales. Each of these small stories is like a "Zero Issue" of sorts. While DC made a whole month of it in September, Marvel NOW! Point One could be considered 'ground zero' for all six featured series. It's a fun issue - simple as that. Knowing that all six series are starting soon gives more weight to these six prologues, and that's part of the charm. If this were just another short story anthology, it would be a bit lacking. But it's not. And we know it. Get ready, because if the level of quality seen in NOW! Point One continues through the next five months of new launches and into the future, Marvel might just have the upper hand on DC.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Masks #3

Feb 5, 2013

The final pages of Masks #3 brings some insight to the Justice Party's intentions that raises a whole new set of questions for the series going forward because the Party's actions could have, up to now, been chalked up to pure financial gain. The end of Masks #3 confirms that this corruption is a lot more complicated than any of our heroes could have anticipated. The Justice Party is not something than can be punched, or tasered, or shot—this is an enemy that defies all previous conventions and is eating society from within, and there are still five issues left.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Mickey Mouse (2015) #1

Jul 3, 2015

An all-ages adventure that touches on historically societal issues is an incredibly rare find in the modern comic book landscape. The fact that the story comes from an issue of Mickey Mouse is even more astonishing.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Midnighter (2015) #7

Dec 4, 2015

Steve Orlando has merged aspects of Batman, Wolverine, and Daredevil into an enigma of a character that only gets better with each issue.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Mighty Avengers (2013) #1

Sep 11, 2013

There are a number of reasons to readMighty Avengers #1: it's technically a tie-in toInfinity, it features a mostly African-American cast of characters — if you're invested in diversity in comics — and it hearkens the return of Luke Cage to the ongoing happenings of the Marvel universe. But it's faults are big, and they might just be too big to ignore going forward. I'll give most any series three issues, but I'm not holding my breath.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
New Avengers (2013) #1

Jan 2, 2013

New Avengers #1 is exciting. It's subtle and underscored to juxtapose the grandiose and larger-than-life Avengers. Less is more with Jonathan Hickman. Instead of spreading himself thin by penning three, four, five Avengers titles, he's consolidated down to two series that are already show a whole world of promise Bendis could never achieve. This is how the Avengers should be, and Jonathan Hickman is providing it in spades.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
New Avengers (2015) #1

Oct 20, 2015

As good as this title should be, New Avengers #1 is a mess of oversaturated Avengers exposition, eye-numbing artwork, mishandled characters, and an inability to capture Squirrel Girl that all adds up to one convoluted mess of a comic book.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Nightwing (2011) #8

Apr 20, 2012

At the end of the issue, Kyle Higgins reveals that the Talon is actually William Cobb - rescued from the Batcave by a fellow Talon - who is hunting down his descendent because "[Dick's] betrayal takes everything I sacrificed and made it worthless." I'm sure Higgins will continue to delve into the history of William Cobb next month, but for now, it feels fragmented.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Nightwing (2011) #15

Dec 21, 2012

Nightwing #15 is one of the strongest tie-in issues for "Death of the Family" yet. Unlike the other Bat-allies, Dick's life is literally crumbling right before his eyes: everything he's spent the last year building is being destroyed in a succinct and straightforward way. This is what Joker's reign of terror needs to feel like across the board, in all the Bat-titles tying into "DotF"--full of terror, death, and lots of Joker's insanity.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Nightwing (2011) #18

Mar 25, 2013

While Kyle Higgins does a good job navigating Nightwing through his feelings of guilt and depression, it's kind of overkill. And not because of how it's written, but because most of Dick's emotional eureka moments happen twice. He talks about the destruction of Haly's Circus twice, he gets pissed at Bruce for lying twice, and he mentions how he and Damian were like brothers twice. It would have worked better if Higgins had perhaps worked his way from having Dick simply understand his situation to Nightwing accepting and processing Damian's death. Instead, the sentiments are played out by the middle of the issue, leaving Higgin's big reveal as the main focus of the second half. It's an interesting enough surprise, but already feels contrived. So, we'll see.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Nightwing (2011) #20

May 16, 2013

Nightwing is getting better and better the more it's not focused on Bat family issues. Kyle Higgins is proving that Dick Grayson can stand as his own hero without having to live in Batman's proverbial shadow. He's an anomalous character because, unlike Jason Todd, Tim Drake, or Damian Wayne, Dick was able to properly process Bruce's teachings and heroic lifestyle. While the other three Robins mostly retained the darkness and bitterness, Dick stayed positive and is still the most optimistic member of the Bat family.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Nova (2013) #1

Feb 24, 2013

Instead of pining for the old, why not try and embrace the new? Loeb has introduced a whole new, secret branch of the Nova Corps! That should be an exciting prospect for anyone interested in Marvel's cosmic line because it means new stories and new ideas.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Nova (2013) #2

Mar 21, 2013

As far as Sam goes, he's nothing special. I was hoping for some real emotional nuance with this series, but all Sam has going for him is generic teenage angst and a contrived situation that doesn't make much sense. His dad's only been missing for a matter of days and now he's supposedly dead? Wait, what? Where did that come from? Loeb isn't doing himself any favors by keeping readers in the dark; we've been waiting to learn who the new Nova is since Marvel Point One over a year ago. It's about damn time we got the story, and now Jeph Loeb wants to spend six issues outlining the character's origin. Bluuuuuhhhhh. 

View Issue       View Full Review
1.0
Nova (2015) #1

Nov 6, 2015

After an incredible 'Marvel NOW!' series that developed Sam Alexander into an engaging character, Sean Ryan's new Nova ongoing is about the blandest comic book of the month if not the year.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Onyx #1

Jul 3, 2015

Though interesting as a concept, Onyx #1 fails to be much more than a standard science-fiction tale about an errant space knight come to help Earth against some doomsday situation.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Phantom Stranger (2012) #0

Sep 6, 2012

I was honestly quite skeptical of DC's "Third Wave", as two of my favorite series (Justice League International and Resurrection Man) were cancelled to make room for new titles. But after reading The Phantom Stranger, I feel better about the other three upcoming series. Dan Didio knows what kind of writer he is, and he recognized that his full-blown style (as presented throughout O.M.A.C.) was too much. For The Phantom Stranger, Didio reels in his bombastic style just enough to make the series more accesible to a larger audience without sacrificing the pulp and charm that make his writing so good.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Phantom Stranger (2012) #5

Feb 11, 2013

The Phantom Stranger #5 is a perplexing issue if only because it's such a drastic shift from the slow-burn of the previous issues to the rapid-fire storytelling seen in these pages. It's quite clear this series is starting the long journey toward "Trinity War", but it's doing so clumsily at this point and that somehow makes the entire endeavor feel a little less special. I don't want to have a bias going into DC's first 'New 52' major crossover event, so I'll take this issue's events with a grain of salt.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Phantom Stranger (2012) #11

Aug 8, 2013

I very much enjoyed Trinity of Sin: The Phantom Stranger #11. Though it doesn't take the cake as 'Issue of the Year', it's still the best issue of the series, and one of the better "Trinity War" tie-in issues there's been so far. Matteis does misstep a bit when it comes to exposition about "Trinity War" itself, using Batman as a proxy to outlineexactlywhat's going on in the Justice League books: "Doctor Light isdead, Stranger.Killed"or so most people believe"by Superman. That single event triggered achain reactionthat's rippled across theworld. Brought three Justice Leagues towar"and then uneasy peace." It's all pretty much laid out right there, I guess. There's no real finesse to this method, but I guess it gets the job done and it's not overbearing.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Phonogram: The Immaterial Girl #1

Aug 19, 2015

The critical final sequence is as preordained as the title allows and launches The Immaterial Girl head-first into this new era of Phonogram that promises a different take on the idea of individuals who wield music like magic and affect people like songs. Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie are already industry heavyweights and The Immaterial Girl #1 is proof that they haven't lost their touch one bit.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Red Hood And The Outlaws #8

Apr 24, 2012

Next month, I'm sure I'll have a whole lot more to write about than a 'prelude' issue, so don't miss out on the coverage for "Night of the Owls".

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Red Lanterns #13

Oct 26, 2012

If you can't tell, I was seriously and pleasantly surprised by Red Lanterns #13. The main reason I've kept up with the series is because Green Lantern is my favorite character franchise, and I just wanted to collect all the GL Family titles. Simple as that. Now, I'm truly invested in Red Lanterns.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Resurrection Man (2011) #0

Sep 14, 2012

Resurrection Man #0also looks toward the (now nonexistent) future of the series. Who is the fishy-man who injects the first Mitch with tektites originally? How does Deathstroke's involvement with Mitch Shelley connect with his time with Team 7? How will Mitch make amends for the terrible crimes of his source material? Where does Kim Rebecki fit into all of this? And why is the Devil being set up to become a major character? Alas, it's highly unlikely any of these questions will ever be answered, unless Mitch joins the Justice League Dark or something. (Hint, hint, DC.)

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Resurrection Man (2011) #5

Jan 15, 2012

Dan Abnett throws a lot of plot into this issue and doesn't give many answers to raised questions. I'm sure there's an eventual conclusion that everything will lead to, but introducing some cybernetic-suited warrior in the last pages without so much as a name is kind of frustrating. It makes for a good cliffhanger, but not a solid single issue of work.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Resurrection Man (2011) #6

Feb 11, 2012

Fletcher, the aforementioned corrupt guard, incites a cell-break for Sumo, one of Batman's rogues, as a diversion to allow Sumo escape through the service tunnels. Before Fletcher or Sumo can escape, Shelley attacks and brings down the obese super villain. Seeing the man he's tortured for days finally displaying a semblance of power, Fletcher shoots Shelley through the temple even after Commissioner Gordon's expressed cease fire order. Deemed a hero, Fletcher takes medical leave. The final pages show Shelley going to take his revenge against the 'hero' who gambled Gotham's safety against a few bucks. It's a great, single-issue arc that really captures what the 'New 52' wanted to do; present easier-to-digest stories that could be accessible to new readers. Resurrection Mantends to hit this mark more times that not, and each month, Mitch Shelley's journey becomes more and more enigmatic.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Resurrection Man (2011) #7

Mar 18, 2012

Resurrection Manis consistently one of my favorite titles offered under the 'New 52' banner. Mitch Shelley's journey mirrors the narrative style of comic books in the 1960s, when characterization was shownnot toldand readers could make inferences themselves without needing to be led through cosmic event after cosmic event.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Resurrection Man (2011) #8

Apr 14, 2012

Next month, I'll be covering Suicide Squad #9 to see what happens between the team and the Resurrection Man.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Resurrection Man (2011) #11

Jul 16, 2012

What started out as one of my favorite series in DC's 'New 52' has quickly become stale, possibly a reason for it's cancellation. Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning have fantastic storytelling ability, but it feels like they don't know what to do with Mitch Shelley. There seemed to be a focus for the first six issues, but recent months have yielded a lot of fighting without much substance. And while nothing's wrong with a fight sequences every once in a while to break up the narrative, using confrontations as a means of plot advancement doesn't work if they don't advance anything!

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Resurrection Man (2011) #12

Aug 9, 2012

I'm not going to give a lot away about the plot of this issue, as it's the last and the surprises throughout the issue are awesome enough that they warrant secrecy. Suffice it to say, a lot of bombs are dropped. As I suspected, Abnett and Lanning really do pull out all the stops for this issue, bringing resolutions to a lot of loose ends while simultaneously raising a whole bunch of new questions that will hopefully be adressed in Issue Zero. A lot of what felt like filler throughout Resurrection Man's run now seems a bit more important now that we've reached an end. And really, the last page cliffhanger makes the entire issue and series worth the read.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Robin War #1

Dec 4, 2015

I'll be honest and admit I totally forgot Tom King was scripting this story, which was a welcome surprise, and his grasp on the different narrative styles of We Are"Robin!, Robin: Son of Batman, Red Hood/Arsenal, and, of course, Grayson, is astonishing. The crux of the "actual" Robins taking a stance is also fun, but feels a bit shoehorned.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Saga #1

Mar 16, 2012

Already I'm excited at the prospects for Saga. With such a wide open (literal) universe to work with, Vaughan and Staples have large shoes to fill with this series' second issue. I'll be covering the rest of Sagaas it continues, month to month.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Saga #2

Apr 16, 2012

While not as action-filled as the first issue, Saga #2 succeeds in pushing the narrative forward and dropping multiple clues about the future of this series. In a world as big and expansive as the one Vaughan has built for this series, taking time to flesh out the characters and their surroundings is important. So far, I feel like I've known these characters all my life.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Saga #4

Jun 24, 2012

I'm continually impressed with the quality of Saga. Vaughan has expressed that the series is heavily influences by Star Wars, and it shows; from the character-driven romance to the look into the seedy underbelly that exists all around the galaxy. Vaughan and Staples are creating one of the best comic book series I've ever read and it just gets better every month. If you're not reading Saga, you should. It's as simple as that.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Saga #5

Jul 22, 2012

It's not entirely clear how all of these plot lines will eventually intersect. The most obvious confrontation will be Marko and Alana's meeting with Robot IV somewhere down the line. The Will started off as a clear-cut enough character who's slowly changing into the wild card that doesn't really have a horse in this race yet, per se. However things pan out, it's sure to be amazing.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Savage Wolverine #1

Jan 16, 2013

In the end, Savage Wolverine #1 really only serves to highlight Cho's talent as an artist. The visual element of this issue is astounding and vibrant, if not overly-sexualized by an overuse and focus on Shanna's body. Otherwise, Cho fails at delivering a cohesive narrative that captures the attention. In fact, by drawing the reader's attention to Shanna's boobs, the S.H.I.E.L.D. team's conundrum, and Wolverine's violent rampages, Cho is left little space for a true plot. There's a mystery on the island of some sort? Maybe?

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Secret Avengers #31

Oct 1, 2012

There are many ways to tell a spy story, and Remender is picking and choosing the most action-oriented of those elements. While that sounds good in theory, it takes the 'secret' out of Secret Avengers and turns the story into a high-octane race against the clock. Again, nothing wrong with that, but for a title that's supposedly about fighting the hidden battles, this issue does not deliver.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Secret Avengers (2013) #1

Feb 17, 2013

Secret Avengers #1 is a solid read. Spencer keeps a good balance of action and information sequences that reveals only what the reader needs to know when he or she needs to know it, and that's the mark of any good spy thriller. S.H.I.E.L.D. is becoming something of a new entity as we deeper into the Marvel NOW! era, and Secret Avengers seems like the vehicle for that ongoing change.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Secret Wars #1

May 7, 2015

Secret Wars #1 is an adept and beautiful first chapter in this universe-shattering epic. Jonathan Hickman is a master of packing decompressed storytelling with as much plot as possible; he's been planning for this over years, and the quality of care shows in every page. Esad Ribic and Ive Svorcina complement Hickman's vision perfectly and capture a visual aesthetic fitting of an event of this magnitude. Secret Wars should be on every Marvel fan's pull list.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Secret Wars #2

May 14, 2015

In a recent interview, Hickman explained howSecret Wars #2 was the first issue to be completed so other Marvel writers would have an idea of how to flesh out Battleworld in their tie-in series. It makes sense, as this issue truly does feel like the proper start toSecret Wars and what it actually means.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Secret Wars #3

Jun 5, 2015

Thanos' words represent a growing faction of comic book fans less worried about continuity, canon, and history in favor of good storytelling and fun characters.Secret Wars, as a whole, represents a shift to a more inclusive comic book industry.Secret Wars #3 sets the stage for Doom's fall because the cracks are forming and the survivors of the old multiverse are bringing jackhammers.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Secret Wars #4

Jul 3, 2015

In Secret Wars, Hickman has created a narrative that truly deserves the title of crossover event. Tie-ins actually do justice to the main series a story so big and comprehensive that it already deserves the title of modern day classic. After three issues of world-building to focus on fleshing out Battleworld and its purpose, Secret Wars #4 turns the tides on God Doom's reality, literally and psychologically.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Secret Wars #5

Aug 13, 2015

Secret Wars #5 is the calm before the storm, the floodlights humming to life before the big game. The Future Foundation studies everything, and it doesn't add up. Doom allows fear into his heart and it is degrading his reality. Strange is gone and with him the only chance at a peaceful outcome. The war is coming and the secret shall be revealed. Doom Will Fall.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Secret Wars #6

Oct 11, 2015

Secret Wars #6 is another fantastic issue in Jonathan Hickman's story of a man playing god and the ones who won't be puppets. It's unfortunate that Marvel has steamrolled the ending of the event by launching 'All-New, All-Different Marvel' this week, but the final issues of Secret Wars will connect the dots between the Battleworld frontier and the new Marvel universe being born this very moment.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Secret Wars #9

Jan 15, 2016

When the 'All-New, All-Different Marvel' line launched in October, many saw it as yet another way for the publisher to cash in on a bevy of new debut issues to lure in new readers (and to an extent, it probably was), but the end of Secret Wars and the very real beginning of an entirely new but notMarvel universe commands respect on a level executives have given and critics couldn't have understood until now. Much like how DC shook the dust off the entire comic book industry with the 'New 52' in September 2011, Marvel now stands to benefit greatly from inspiring new readers with a digestible relaunch whilekeeping entrenched readers attached by not changing much. In retrospect, it's genius. Secret Wars #9 is the end of the event, but also the end of an entire era of Marvel comics. So long, Earth-616. Hello, Prime Earth. Goodbye Secret Wars. Hello, anything and everything else.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Siege (2015) #4

Oct 13, 2015

Kieron Gillen does the best with what he's given, but the initial excitement dies off quickly and leaves a bad taste in your mouth.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Silver Surfer (2014) #14

Sep 5, 2015

Slott and Allred slam another dunk with Silver Surfer #14, an issue just as enjoyable for readers abstaining from Secret Wars as those neck-deep.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Spider-Man (2016) #1

Feb 5, 2016

Yes, the snappy dialogue and colloquial nature of the character remains intact, but Spider-Man #1 feels less like a continuation of Miles' story and more like Bendis giggling over the young Spider-Man carrying Captain America's shield while standing over 'dead' Avengers for reasons unknown.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Spider-Men #1

Jun 13, 2012

And really, that is what irks me about Spider-Men #1: it's not really a crossover yet. If Bendis wanted to do a lead-in to their meeting, he should have done it in an issue of The Amazing or The Avenging Spider-Man instead of taking 1/5 of his narrative about TWO Spider-Men and only focusing on the one. I finished the issue thinking Well, maybe issue two will be in Miles' head, then immediately thought how boring and tedious THAT would be! Bendis is a great writer - one that seems to be a bit overworked these days - and I have faith that Spider-Men will get better, but based on this first issue alone, there's a lot left to want for.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Spider-Men #2

Jul 2, 2012

Spider-Men #2 is a huge step forward from the first issue, not only in terms of story progression, but also of narrative structure. The subtle hints at past events connecting to current dilemmas is near-perfect, and Sara Pichelli's art just fits so well with the tone of everything going on. Mysterio looks menacing, Peter looks dumbfounded, and Miles looks overwhelmed. There's got to be more to Mysterio's involvement in this situation, and Bendis seems to be taking the series in the right direction. I'm definitely looking forward to next month's issue!

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Spider-Woman (2015) #10

Aug 20, 2016

Spider-Woman #10 is another decent, if artistically flawed, issue that helps bring the conflict in Civil War II down to a more personal stage as Jess plays Devil's Advocate to Carol's bordering-on-fascist behavior. A vignette about an old Inhuman woman who gains reality-warping powers and inadvertently terrorizes her husband and cat through existential deconstruction brings some levity to a rather dour situation, and even though the art struggles to capture the tone, Hopeless manages to save the issue with excellent dialogue and emotional clarity.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Star Trek/Green Lantern: The Spectrum War #2

Aug 12, 2015

As summer blockbusters go, it's hard to top this sci-fi superhero crossover spectacular.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Star Trek/Green Lantern: The Spectrum War #3

Sep 11, 2015

ST/GL: The Spectrum War #3 is slow, but in this case, it's a welcome break before the inevitable epic battle coming in the next few issues.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Star Trek/Green Lantern: The Spectrum War #4

Oct 20, 2015

Overall, Star Trek/Green Lantern: The Spectrum War #4 is a disappointment. After three solid issues, this fourth chapter's missteps are big issues with only two issues left.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Stormwatch (2011) #19

Apr 5, 2013

I won't be reading Stormwatch any more. It's not for lack of interest. It's because at this point, continuing to read this series would be like getting abused and not getting out. Because in the end, it's disrespectful to readers who have spent their time and money investing in this series only to have it ripped out from under them. For shame, DC. For shame.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Suicide Squad (2011) #20

May 12, 2013

Suicide Squad #20 is an excellent comicbook. Recently, DC has been taking a note from Marvel's diary and hiring new, young writers who are bringing their unique visions to titles like this who have suffered from mediocrity since the New 52 relaunch. In one issue, Ales Kot has turned Suicide Squad into one of my must-read titles each month.

View Issue       View Full Review
0.8
Superboy (2011) #0

Sep 12, 2012

Good luck going forward, DeFalco.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Superboy (2011) #7

Mar 19, 2012

Even the cover looks unbecoming!

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Superboy (2011) #9

May 9, 2012

My opinions concerning origin stories and Lobdell's handling of the Titans and Superboy thus far set aside, if you're going to pump your titles full of fights, you better make them awesome and in the case of Superboy #9, they are. Basically, it boils down to Superboy vs. Warblade and Red Robin vs. Rose Wilson with a few other heroes helping out here and there. By the end of the issue, all the other Ravagers have been taken out, and Harvest descends to take on all the teenaged superheroes by himself. It's a pretty awesome moment to end on and leads directly into Legion: Lost #9.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Superboy (2011) #10

Jun 14, 2012

At the end of the issue, Superboy and Wonder Girl find a mysterious set of stairs leading into the earth, down below the surface. They end up coming out upside down? It's a pretty heady page and one that promises an awesome continuation in Teen Titans in a few weeks. Keep this up, Lobdell, for real. I was one more bad issue away from not reading Superboy anymore, but now I'm hooked. Kudos.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Superboy (2011) #11

Jul 12, 2012

Superboy's relative age becomes more and more apparent when new villain Detritus starts attacking the city. Kon feels like he's being taken advantage of - as the team's powerhouse player - whenever a "big bad" attacks. All he wants is a more normal life, something Bunker explains is "boring!" While this sentiment of normality might work for Peter Parker or Jaime Reyes, nothing up to this point has given readers the impression that Superboy wants to live a normal life. Why would he? He's a super-powerful telekinetic clone of Superman. Why be normal?

View Issue       View Full Review
1.6
Superboy (2011) #12

Aug 8, 2012

Really, this issue feels phoned in. Tom DeFalco's awful story is just boring and gratingly inane, while the artwork from Robson Rocha and Eduardo Pansica is plain ugly. There was only one panel I truly enjoyed and that's because it had hints of Darwyn Cooke's style nestled in there. Otherwise, the panels looked rushed and dated. I really did have high hopes for Superboy after it's last two issues. I even conceded that my issues with the series were due to the cumbersome N.O.W.H.E.R.E. arc. Unfortunately, I was wrong. Superboy is just bad.

View Issue       View Full Review
1.5
Superboy (2011) #13

Oct 14, 2012

Oh, and the cover features the special handcuffs designed to suppress Superboy's powers because that's definitely worth making prominent on the cover image of your comic booj.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Superboy (2011) #14

Nov 16, 2012

This is an issue of comics embroiled in the non-explained. That's a ridiculous, weird sentence because it's the only way I can think to express how terrible Superboy #14 was by the end. I keep holding out, hoping that Superboy will improve, that it will become something greater than a sad excuse for a story about a sad clone. 'Sad Clone' sounds like a witty, off-beat, and zany mini-series by Grant Morrison, not the theme to a series about Superboy.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Superboy (2011) #20

May 13, 2013

Scott Lobdell often fails at writing good comic books because he's trying to hard to make everything accessible/easy to read/pick-upable. It attempting to cater to everyone, he caters to no one because how he writers is condescending to readers. Justin Jordan's style is a breath of fresh air and a welcome change for Superboy, who still has one of the foggiest and least-memorable origins of any 'New 52' character. Now, I actually want to read Superboy.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Supergirl (2011) #0

Sep 21, 2012

Green and Johnson drop the ball here, and the entire sequence comes across and hollow and meaningless, mostly because we only know Zor-El as a nutjob now, and we don't know Alura at all. Sure, there are universal human stories at play here, and sometimes that's enough. Unfortunately, Supergirl #0 needed a bit more detail and characterization for a scene like this to work, and it just didn't. It's a painful end to an otherwise solid issue. I'm still looking forward to Supergirl in the future because we'll likely never have to deal with either Zor-El or Alura directly ever again, so it's of no consequence, HAHA!

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Supergirl (2011) #7

Mar 22, 2012

Unfortunately, there's not much in the way of a conclusion, with Green and Johnson instead opting to give those last few pages to Reign's "I will be back" speech. If the writing and artwork stay as consistent as they have through this point, Supergirl might just become one of the 'must read' books from the 'New 52.'

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Supergirl (2011) #8

Apr 23, 2012

Michael Green and Mike Johnson have created a whole new character for Supergirl, a way to make Silver Banshee more than a simple third-tier villain. Black Banshee arrives at the club, using his dark magic to stir up chaos in efforts to find his daughter, Silver Banshee, and in the confusion, Kara loses Siobhan. Of course, fans already knew who Siobhan was the moment she showed up earlier in the issue: Silver Banshee. Green and Johnson leave the issue on a cliffhanger for next month when it looks like Supergirl will team up with Silver Banshee, something I never thought I'd say.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Supergirl (2011) #10

Jun 20, 2012

Oh, and Siobhan reunites with her brother who was trapped inside Black Banshee for 15 years. That happens.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Supergirl (2011) #22

Jul 31, 2013

Supergirl #22 begins a new arc for Kara Zor-El as the Cyborg Superman (and his mysterious master you'll recognize if you read Grant Morrison'sAction Comics run) takes an increased interest in her. It's not often than strong skepticism about a character can be washed away in a single issue, but Michael Alan Nelson manages to do just that by delivering the most fun, most interesting, and most focused issue of this series in a long time.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Supergirl (2011) #28

Feb 25, 2014

Supergirl #28 is a fantastic issue that not only gives Kara some well-deserved character growth in the wake of nonstop conflict, but also starts to make the New 52 universe a little more inclusive. Some fans were disenchanted with the idea that a member of the Superman family would become a Red Lantern, but it makes sense and Tony Bedard does a great job explaining why. Having Kara submit to her rage is definitely a divisive decision, but it pays off in spades for a character who flounders around more often than not.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Supergirl (2011) #29

Mar 24, 2014

Supergirl #29 is a good issue because Siobhan is a fun character. Silver Banshee is a great part of the Supergirl narrative, and having a new issue focused on the Siobhan trying to control the demonic forces inside her is always fun to read. While the art isn't anything spectacular, it doesn't detract from the story.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Superior Spider-Man #1

Jan 9, 2013

The Superior Spider-Man #1 is a complete success. Even without the big twist at the end, Dan Slott has secured by readership for this book by delivering an awesome opening chapter to a series that shows a lot of promise for interesting, complex storytelling based on real human emotions and relatable feelings. It's a real shame that everyone already knows that Peter Parker will be back in the future. In the world of comic books, major players don't stay dead, so it's only a matter of time (or a matter of a new movie) before Peter gets back into his own head. And really, that's going to be disappointing when it does happen because we've read the same old song and dance for the last fifty years with Peter, and already I'm more invested in Otto Octavius' journey than I've been in Peter's for quite a while. Long live the Superior Spider-Man.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Superior Spider-Man #2

Jan 31, 2013

The Superior Spider-Man #2 continues Dan Slott's fantastic look at a villain turned hero. Otto Octavius has a chance to change his life completely (and for the better) without sacrificing who he is at the core, which is something many of us wish we could have done at some point in our lives. The addition of ghost Peter into the mix is risky, and the jury is still out on how that element of the storytelling will play out, but for now, it's enjoyable and provides the Peter Parker presence fans really want. Giving Otto the chance to make Spider-Man into a better hero was a stroke of genius for Slott because it allows Otto to transfer his mad scientist ideas into competent tech with practical uses. I mentioned it in my review of the first issue and I'll say it again here: for me, The Superior Spider-Man is a whole lot more fun and interesting than Spider-Man has been in a while.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Superior Spider-Man #6AU

Mar 29, 2013

Putting aside how ridiculous it is that Otto would go through to the trouble of "acting" like Peter to satisfy anyone's comfort, Spider-Man takes it upon himself to destroy Ultron simply because he's got a bit more experience with robots than anyone still living. But it's not about his plan or it's success or failure. It's about Otto's hubris and how it exceeds even the end of the world. This is what the Superior Spider-Man needs to be. This is what Otto's journey needs to represent because that's the kind of man he is, the kind that needs to be better than everyone else.

View Issue       View Full Review
0.8
Superman (2011) #0

Sep 27, 2012

I don't even want to keep writing about this issue. Such a fail.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Superman (2011) #5

Jan 30, 2012

The final pages really get things going again and definitely make me want to read the next issue, so we'll see how things pan out next month.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Superman (2011) #6

Feb 27, 2012

And while the last few pages sort-of just fizzle out with lengthy explanations, at least there's a Superman vs. Superman brawl to pad it out. The real value in this first Supermanarc is the lead-up to the Summoning arc that's been referred to in Stormwatch.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Superman (2011) #7

Mar 31, 2012

The new creative team of Keith Griffin, Dan Jurgens and Jesus Marino is fantastic. The artwork is solid, with some jagged edges that convey Helspont's authoritative presence, and the writing is still as solid as George Perez's work on the first six issues. The end of the issue sets up next month's the main event: Superman Vs. Helspont.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Superman (2011) #8

Apr 30, 2012

Unfortunately, our favorite Daemonite pretty much just disappears before the brawl can really get underway. Ol' Supes chalks it up to a strategical retreat, but it comes off as a lame way of ending this particular confrontation - nothing is answered and Clark simply goes back to his life. With a villain like Helspont making his debut in the DC universe, I expected a little more pomp and circumstance.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Superman (2011) #10

Jun 30, 2012

Superman may not be the flashiest series, or the most interesting book in DC's 'New 52' lineup, but it serves a greater purpose. While titles like Aquaman and Batman are creating major villains and story elements that will resonate for years, Jurgens is making sure Superman won't burn out; there will always be someone for Big Boy Blue to fight, they just might not be cosmic-level threats every month.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Superman (2011) #13

Oct 28, 2012

Scott Lobdell is a curious writer, for sure. Some of his work falls so terribly flat I want to go back and save the paper and ink used to make the issues he's written, and some of goes on my “Must Buy” list for the month. Superman #13 reads fantastic and looks fantastic thanks to Kenneth Rocafort and his chiseled-feature-heavy style that compliments Superman so well. I was starting to get annoyed by how frumpy Supes was looking as drawn by Jesus Merino and later Dan Jurgens. Not only does Lobdell start an excellent new chapter in Clark Kent's life, but he also builds directly up to next month's start of “H'el on Earth”, featuring the other last survivor of Krypton's death. Basically, if you were reading Superman and got disappointed each month, stick with it. If you haven't read this series up until now, start here.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Superman (2011) #13

Oct 30, 2012

Scott Lobdell is a curious writer, for sure. Some ofhis work falls so terribly flat I want to go back and save the paper and inkused to make the issues he's written, and some of goes on my “Must Buy” listfor the month. Superman #13 readsfantastic and looks fantastic thanks to Kenneth Rocafort and hischiseled feature-heavy style that compliments Superman so well. I was startingto get annoyed by how frumpy Supes was looking as drawn by Jesus Merino andlater Dan Jurgens. Not only does Lobdell start an excellent new chapter inClark Kent's life, but he also builds directly up to next month's start of“H'el on Earth”, featuring the otherlast survivor of Krypton's death. Basically, if you were reading Superman and got disappointed eachmonth, stick with it. If you haven't read this series up until now, start here.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Superman (2011) #15

Jan 3, 2013

Superman #15 is an interesting read if you're curious about Lex Luthor in the present day. Other than that, Superman and Superboy are not written as themselves, and it's very off-putting. As much as I disagree with how Kon-El has been handled up to this point, it's even more frustrating to see all the character development go out the window in the name of a shaky crossover. I usually like Kenneth Rocafort's artwork, but here, even his beautiful pencilling gets dragged down by the weight of the dialogue. For an event that's felt rushed and half-asked since it started, Superman #15 hits the brakes hard and provides more of an interlude than anything else. It's not terrible, but there's simply not a lot going on.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Superman (2011) #19

Apr 30, 2013

Superman #19 is another in a long list of examples of why not to read Scott Lobdell's work. Unlike, say, Batman or Justice League Dark or…really most of the other titles throughout the New 52, Superman doesn't feel like a cohesive series under Lobdell's hand. It's like there isn't any plan. Each issue feels like a separate story that just so happens to have connecting factors, instead of reading like an ongoing narrative, which is what comic books are supposed to do.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Superman (2011) #29

Mar 29, 2014

As with most issues of Superman in Scott Lobdell's run, Superman #29 is a major letdown. Even in his own series, Superman's characterization is at it's worst, while Starfire is an upsetting shadow of how she appears in almost every other issue of the New 52 in which she appears. The art being sub-par is just the sour icing on this dry, tasteless cake.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Superman (2011) #30

Apr 29, 2014

Superman #30 is another very, very sub-par issue in Scott Lobdell's rather terrible run on the title. The plot is paper thin, the characters are pale imitations of how they're written in other titles across the New 52, and the overuse of narration boxes sucks any fun out of reading the issue. Superman should be one of DC's flagship titles, but under Lobdell's hand, it's sunk to one of the worst in their lineup. Hopefully, the incoming new creative team and turn things around.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Superman (2011) #32

Jun 26, 2014

Superman #32 is a triumph for DC Comics. Not only is it the best issue of the series so far, it's also one of the single greatest issues in the New 52. Though it's mostly set-up for the "Men of Tomorrow" arc, it doesn't feel that way. Johns makes big strides in leaving all the bad parts of previous issues on the wayside, keeping the interesting elements that work, and building a Superman that can truly stand up to the name.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.5
Superman (2011) #35

Oct 30, 2014

Superman #35 is another exemplary example of how Geoff Johns is re-molding Superman to be a flagship character for DC Comics once again, instead of just in name alone. Grant Morrison did complex and fantastical with his run on Action Comics, Scott Lobdell put Superman through the narrative ringer with story after story of over-the-top plot, while Greg Pak and Charles Soule have focused on Superman's relationship with the women in his life. Here, Johns is finally writing a grounded, interesting, encompassing tale that speaks to a broad audience but doesn't sacrifice quality or responsibility to the character.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Superman Unchained #1

Jun 12, 2013

Superman Unchained #1 is what readers have been waiting for: a true flagship title for the Man of Steel. Scott Snyder so fantastically taps into what makes Superman great that I actually found myself disappointed that the issue was over and that there wasn't any more to read. If Snyder can do with Superman what he's done with Batman in terms of overall character development, Superman Unchained is set to be one of the best series of the 'New 52.'

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Superman/Wonder Woman #1

Oct 9, 2013

The story is captivating because, for the first time really, Superman and Wonder Woman's relationship is front and center. Not just their romantic relationship, but also their working relationship as heroes. In the past, Clark and Diana's actions have always reflected on the Justice League in some form or another. Whether or not their heroics inSuperman/Wonder Woman will have greater ramifications through the ‘New 52′ is yet to be seen, but for the time being, it's nice to read a story about these two titans working together without worrying about how the League will react on the next page.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Swamp Thing (2011) #12

Aug 15, 2012

Again, the only arguable flaw with this issue springs from the abrupt change in narrative style, from Snyder's more intricate and symbolic style to a more action-oriented, plot-driven one that takes us directly into “Rotworld”. It's becoming increasingly apparent how hard both Jeff Lemire and Scott Snyder have worked at making the Red/Green/Rot was so essential and epic. This crossover is going to define both Animal Man and Swamp Thing for years to come. It was risky, starting off both series in ways that led to an inevitable, multi-arc crossover extravaganza, but it's looking to be paying off.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Swamp Thing (2011) #19

Apr 7, 2013

Charles Soule is giving Swamp Thing a new new dynamic. While Scott Snyder focused on a few key elements of the character's mythos, he did so to a fault and it caused Swampy to suffer because of it. Here, Soule isn't going for high-concept storytelling or long-form narrative. Instead, he's treating Swamp Thing just like any other hero through Alec's journey of self-discovery and understanding. Plot-driven stories have their value, but Soule understands that after 18 issues of plot, it's time to sit down with the avatar of the Green and really figure out how he operates. There's no more impending Rot invasion to focus upon, there's only Swamp Thing and his place in the world.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Sword of Sorcery #0

Sep 21, 2012

Similarly, I was originally put off by the prospect of the "Beowulf" back-up story. Why, for goodness sake, do we need another Beowulf story? Hasn't this tale been done to death already in every medium imaginable? Again, I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed Tony Bedard's first chapter of this epic. And really, all that interest comes from the fact that Beowulf apparently exists in an advanced cryogenics chamber within an abandoned laboratory, while the world outside is seemingly dated somewhere in the Dark Ages. It's utterly fascinating. Seriously. All the Beowulf/Grendel stuff aside for now, the dichotomy of technology in a pre-pre-pre-industrial civilization is just so cool, I'm going to keep buying Sword of Sorcery if only for this back-up.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Talon #0

Sep 27, 2012

Talon #0does an adequate job introducing readers the Calvin Rose and the world we'll be following each month going forward, and while this series is technically tied to Batman (who I'm sure we'll be seeing at some point soon), it's already created it's own mood and tone that differs from the Dark Knight's - while Batman is about the pain and the fear, Talonseems to be about hope and moving forward. Calvin Rose is already interesting and already has my sympathies. With a traumatic (but not tootraumatic) childhood, a similar training regiment to Batman, and a conscience that beats out any Court of Owls brainwashing, Calvin might just be one of the more interesting characters in the 'New 52' so far.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.4
Teen Titans (2011) #0

Sep 27, 2012

All in all, Teen Titans #0is fantastic. Scott Lobdell's writing usually leaves a lot to be desired for me, as a reader and a critic. This month, though, he really stepped up his game and gave a solid origin story for Tim Drake that may not be what hardcore fans wanted, but manages to change the character enough to make him interesting again.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Teen Titans (2011) #5

Jan 30, 2012

While not the finest issue of the title thus far, it's definitely one of the better ones. While both Teen Titans and Superboy have taken the scenic route in their storytelling, those scenes are starting to make more sense and things are being brought together more and more. Lobdell has the chance to build an inter-title mythology and so far, he's succeeding.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Teen Titans (2011) #6

Feb 26, 2012

So, in conclusion, we get an issue that basically revolves around getting Kid Flash a new costume and putting the kids up against a foe that isn't Superboy. Unfortunately, the issues persistent over the past few months have stuck with Teen Titans, making it more of a chore to read than fun.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Teen Titans (2011) #7

Mar 28, 2012

It's unfortunate that a team as great as the Teen Titans is being dragged through this narrative mud. When a writer treats his audience with little regard to their intelligence, it's apparent and it's insulting. Scott Lobdell has managed to make me seriously rethink Teen Titans and Superboy as A-list titles from the 'New 52.'

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Teen Titans (2011) #8

Apr 27, 2012

Also, Superboy is on the cover, yet not in the issue. This is sooooooo aggravating I cannot tell you.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Teen Titans (2011) #9

May 23, 2012

If you look back at my review of Superboy #9 and even Teen Titans Annual #1, you'll see that I was actually enjoying this story more than I have for either series thus far. But this sloppy, uninteresting "conclusion" is so weak, it drags down the entire crossover.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Teen Titans (2011) #10

Jun 28, 2012

I began reading this issue groaning each time N.O.W.H.E.R.E. or the Culling was mentioned. I wasn't a fan of that storyline, and at first, it felt like Lobdell basically doesn't have any other ideas, so he's forced to keep reminding us about this big thing that happened in order to fill speech bubble space. After a while, though, I realized that this is Lobdell's transition period - soon, new enemies will show up (like Amanda Waller - all around bad-ass) and the convoluted tale of N.O.W.H.E.R.E. can be relegated to the "early mistakes" pile.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Teen Titans (2011) #11

Jul 26, 2012

The main focus of Teen Titans this month comes down to Wonder Girl and the mysterious Silent Armor she wears. After quickly defeating Loose Canon, Cassie seems to lose all control over the ancient armor "forged in the heart of the Sun..." Without much wanring, Wonder Girl attacks and defeats Solstice, Kid Flash, and Bunker before Red Robin and Superboy show up to find Cassie begging for death before she takes another life. Brett Booth makes the right decision to withhold showing the readers the full power of the Silent Armor until the final panel. Instead of revealing the blood-thirsty version of Wonder Girl mid-issue, Booth keeps her off-panel while using the Titans' reactions to convey the horror of their friend taken by a godly power.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Teen Titans (2011) #12

Aug 23, 2012

I spent a lot of time on this post, mostly because I feel that in the past, I may have lambasted Scott Lobdell without anything to back it up. Sure, I explained my general misgivings with his style, but I really wanted to find examples, evidence to my claims that the man just keeps tripping over one of the easiest character archetypes in the literary world: the awkward teenager. So while I'm admittedly impressed with this arc's mythological aspects, the Teen Titans themselves are still about as interesting as a plank of wood.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Teen Titans (2011) #13

Oct 25, 2012

It's unfortunate, but a lot of Scott Lobdell's missteps are not a result of the title he's working on, but rather a fundamental misunderstanding of how people read comics and how they stay interested and compelled in the contemporary marketplace. For Lobdell - a writer who came to prominence in the adjective-soaked weirdness of the 1990s - trying to write the Teen Titans effectively was not working. His tailored style didn't fit with today's teenagers, and it was systematically pulling the series into the dirt. I'm glad Fabian Nicieza is getting a chance to make the series good. Hopefully, he can keep this trend going and make Teen Titans one of the 'must have' titles of the 'New 52'.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.5
Teen Titans (2011) #14

Nov 30, 2012

The final pages of the issue lead directly into next month's "Death of the Family" tie-in issue. Teen Titans is slowly, but surely, getting better. N.O.W.H.E.R.E., Harvest, and "The Culling" were all meant to be factors that would add to the Teen Titans mythology and lend meaning to the creation of the team. Instead, Lobdell botched the entire storyline early on, never fixed it, and now has to dig his way up toward a better book. It's working, but each month I find myself worrying that the title will dip back to it's former platitudes.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.8
Teen Titans (2011) #15

Jan 3, 2013

Teen Titans #15 is a fun read, if not a strong tie-in to "Death of the Family". Yes, the Joker does indeed psychologically torture Red Robin, but he's been doing that to all the Bat-allies, and this meeting didn't seem to have much meaning to it besides informing Tim that his teammates would be responsible for genocide. Why is Joker going after Tim's teammates? Isn't the whole point of his rampage to get at Batman, not Red Robin? It seems like Lobdell and Nicieza are using the transitive property to justify an attack on the Teen Titans. Hopefully, Tim will get that pesky thought-projecting bug taken care of by next issue so Joker doesn't have as much to work with.

View Issue       View Full Review
0.5
Teen Titans (2011) #16

Jan 31, 2013

In conclusion, this issue was awful. Just awful.

View Issue       View Full Review
0.0
Teen Titans (2011) #18

Mar 28, 2013

I am counting the days until Justin Jordan's debut issue on the series because it seriously could not be any worse than this steaming pile Scott Lobdell calls his work.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Teen Titans (2011) #19

Apr 29, 2013

Oh, and Red Robin is still being a huge dick for no reason whatsoever.

View Issue       View Full Review
3.0
Teen Titans (2011) #20

May 26, 2013

Teen Titans #20 is a joke. It's just another issue in this series that depresses me. I think back to the days when Geoff Johns wrote Teen Titans, and I wonder what that Superboy and Wonder Girl would think of their aimless 'New 52' counterparts. Lobdell has eroded almost anything that made these characters likable, sacrificing any modicum of relatability in the name of ridiculous plot advancement.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #47

Jul 3, 2015

Mateus Santolouco is one of those unsung heroes of the comic book art world. His credits are extensive, and nearly every title he works on looks fantastic.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Thanos Rising #1

Apr 3, 2013

I'm already very impressed with Thanos: Rising. Jason Aaron only has four more issues to take Thanos from being an emotionally broken, yet stunningly intelligent boy to the scourge of the universe. Much like his work in Thor: God of Thunder, Aaron is giving us the story piecemeal, with details that will eventually come together to show the Son of Titan's fall from grace. I've never been a huge fan of Simone Bianchi's artwork in the past, but this entire issue just looks phenomenal -- a good artistic pairing. Much like in real life, it's the little things in Thanos' childhood that point toward a terrible future. And it's in those details that Aaron finds an emotional basis for this series.

View Issue       View Full Review
1.6
The First X-Men #1

Aug 5, 2012

Perhaps the most frustrating parts of this series - and there are obviously many - is that Erik Lensherr is going to join the team. Magneto. So, Christos Gage and Neal Adams are trying to claim that Wolverine and Magneto were on a Pre-X-Men team that helped mutant kids before Charles Xavier possessed his lifelong ethics (really????) and decided to try and guide the mutant race. The entire idea is just stupid. There is no way this is alright. Not by a long shot. What The First X-Men is comes down to one word: disappointing. Not only is this series totally unnecessary, it slaps comic book fans across the face with a whole new slew of (technically official) canon that's just depressing to think is now part of a comic book universe that still had some semblance of sense to it. I'm not even going to start into Neal Adams' completely dated and awful artwork because it will just depress me. I'll just say, it's mind-numbingly bad (Magneto's hair looks like Nite Owl II's cowl).

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
The Green Team #1

May 23, 2013

The Green Team: Teen Trillionaires #1is an awesome issue. It's fun, it's intriguing, it's solid. Baltazar and Franco have found an amazing way to tell this story without every single character sounding completely pretentious, which is a feat. Ig Guara's artwork is a welcome addition after his brief absence after the cancellation of Blue Beetle. This is a buy. Never thought I'd say it, but it's a buy.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
The Movement #1

May 1, 2013

I want to stress that I'm going to stick with The Movement. Per my interest in Young Avengers on the Marvel side of things, I enjoy teenaged superheroes sticking it to the man, and that's basically what's going on in this series. It's just unfortunate that The Movement #1 is so frazzled. I feel like it's going to be an excellent series going forward because Gail Simone writes incredible team books, and her experience on Batgirl gives The Movement a darkness that's befitting to the theme.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
The Multiversity #1

Aug 24, 2014

The Multiversity may or may not ever be considered the best comic book series of all time, but if this first issue is any indication, it will be one of the most important. Morrison effortlessly (it seems) weaves together a narrative structure that hoists itself up by it's own concepts, and that is an astounding accomplishment.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
The Multiversity: Pax Americana #1

Nov 25, 2014

The Multiversity: Pax Americana #1 is an absolute achievement. Grant Morrison's writing, Frank Quitely's penciling, and Nathan Fairbairns coloring all come together to offer one of the best comic book experiences of 2014, and probably of all time.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
The Multiversity: The Just #1

Oct 28, 2014

The final pages of The Multiversity: The Just #1 offer a fitting crisis of conscience for this young generation of heroes. Secrets are revealed, true intentions are realized, and in one swift stroke, their world begins to crumble around them, not because they're unprepared, but because they never could be. The ongoing, infectious narrative of The Multiversity is present, but it's a side note in The Just, a tool to facilitate the new question these heroes must answer: how can they save the world if they don't even know who they are?

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
The New 52: Futures End #2

May 22, 2014

Futures End #2 is not a bad comic book, but it's certainly boring. With less than a handful of issues under it's belt, this series can't afford to lose reader interest. As previously stated, many issues of Futures End will be filling gaps between larger events, and that's fine. What isn't fine is when those issues drag down the entire plot.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
The New 52: Futures End #8

Jul 2, 2014

Futures End #8 is just an "okay" chapter of the series. As mentioned before, there's sure to be some payoff in later issues, but unless there's more than just omens of a bleak future and groundwork, the readership of this series is going to drop off fast. DC is asking a lot of it's audience to buy an issue every week, only to deliver medium-quality work.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
The Ravagers #1

May 31, 2012

The Ravagers is just unnecessary, and that's a big weak point when it comes to a series that's supposed to be all-action all the time. The series is called The Ravagers, yet these MAIN CHARACTERS are not Ravagers! Rose Wilson and Warblade are Ravagers, and they appear and attack Fairchild & Co., but the entire title of this book is a total and complete misdirect. Who knows, maybe Mackie has amazing plans for this title down the line and I'll just need to sit it out and wait. Unfortunately for me, I have to endure characters like Ridge until DC gets it's shit together.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
The Savage Hawkman #13

Nov 5, 2012

While not one of the best series offered by DC, The Savage Hawkman has a lot ofpotential. Soon enough, Rob Liefeld's directives will finish up, and a newcreative team will have a chance to take Katar Hol in new, fascinatingdirections. The tools are there: the Nth metal armor is brimming withpossibilities, Hawkman will be featured in the upcoming Justice League of America, and the introduction of Hawkwoman pointsto a greater world that includes adventures to Thanagar (perhaps in a Hawkworld fashion?)

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
The Savage Hawkman #13

Nov 4, 2012

While not one of the best series offered by DC, The Savage Hawkman has a lot of potential. Soon enough, Rob Liefeld's directives will finish up, and a new creative team will have a chance to take Katar Hol in new, fascinating directions. The tools are there: the Nth metal armor is brimming with possibilities, Hawkman will be featured in the upcoming Justice League of America, and the introduction of Hawkwoman points to a greater world that includes adventures to Thanagar (perhaps in a Hawkworld fashion?)

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
The Sheriff Of Babylon #1

Dec 4, 2015

Whether you count yourself in support of American presence in the Middle East or stand against US imperialism, Sheriff of Babylon #1 offers a nuanced take on a ornate and insipid time full of uncertainty and frustration.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
The Shrinking Man #1

Aug 12, 2015

Richard Matheson's Shrinking Man is adapted for comics by Ted Adams and Mark Torres in all the right ways.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
The Shrinking Man #2

Aug 12, 2015

Shrinking Man #1 was an emotional ride that looked at a supernatural incident through the lens of ordinary people and how it affects their lives. This second issue takes readers further down the rabbit hole into Scott's life as a man literally and psychologically wasting away.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
The Wake #3

Aug 2, 2013

The Wake is quickly becoming one of my favorite current titles. Each issue ramps up the thrills and the scare tactics leaving you terrified, but wanting more. Scott Snyder and Sean Murphy have created something special here. The characters feel genuine, the plot is fascinating, and the pacing is simply perfect.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Thor: God of Thunder #1

Dec 1, 2012

Jason Aaron is deconstructing the concept of a pantheon of gods. A big part of that is the fact that gods can die in the Marvel universe, though this has been true for quite some time. The other major element of Aaron's tale is the diversity of gods across the cosmos and how they're all seen equally by each other and, most importantly, the God Butcher. Maybe it's social commentary on the relative nature of religious symbolism and how none is better or worse than the others. Perhaps it's a ploy to make gods more of a central idea in the Marvel universe. Or maybe it's just plain cool to see gods being assassinated like mere mortals. Whatever the reason, Aaron's somber take on the role of gods in the lives of mortal beings is phenomenal.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Thor: God of Thunder #5

Feb 22, 2013

Thor: God of Thunder #5 is an excellent conclusion to a great opening chapter for a character lost in his own world for far too long. Jason Aaron is bringing a storytelling style and creative direction that gives new life to Thor, making him a more relatable character while simultaneously taking him beyond anything he's encountered before. There are a lot of good series that resulted from the 'Marvel NOW!' creative team switch-ups. Jason Aaron and Thor is turning out to be one of the best.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Thor: God of Thunder #11

Aug 18, 2013

Fortunately, Jason Aaron does a phenomenal job with the dialogue in this issue to fill in the gaps before and after Dark Thor goes to town on the God Butcher. The conversations between the different versions of Thor are some of my favorite from the writer and the character. The three Thors represent the three aspects of Thor's internal struggles: he will always feel the the desire to please Odin (and the resentment that comes from it) of the young Thor, he will always have the kindness and compassion of Thor the Avenger even though these aspects make him weak in the eyes of his enemies, and he will always be reluctantly destined to be the greatest and most powerful god of all like King Thor. Jason Aaron just knows how to write Thor. Some black metal band from Sweden needs to write an album based on this storyline.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Thunderbolts (2012) #1

Dec 5, 2012

As I mentioned earlier, if Punisher were out of the picture, Thunderbolts could be an amazing series. As it stands, there's obviously going to be a lot of focus on Frank Castle and frankly, that's not very interesting. Plus, this should really have been Thunderbolts #0 due to the origin story-like feel of the narrative. I'm excited to see the rest of these anti-heroes hanging out together, but if Punisher gets an inordinate amount of panel space, I'm out.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Thunderbolts (2012) #2

Jan 14, 2013

Thunderbolts #2 more than makes up for a lackluster first showing. Daniel Way shows that he's got a real vision for this series, and it's an intriguing one that's got a lot of potential. And that's before considering how this team will interact with the rest of the Marvel universe. How secret is this operation? Does anyone else in the superhero community know Ross has put this team together? What happens when they cross paths with the Avengers or the FF? These are the kind of interesting possibilities that come with Thunderbolts and it will be exciting to see how they play out.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Time Warp #1

Apr 1, 2013

“R.I.P.” was surprisingly insightful and emotionally raw. I'll admit that I was skeptical of the time aspect when I began reading—time travel is a difficult story device to play with, especially when working within a framework of ‘everything affects everything' system. Fortunately, Damon Lindelof and Jeff Lemire do it as right as they can, and give Rip Hunter the emotional and narrative backing required for a story such as this. Time travel alone isn't enough.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Tom Strong and the Planet of Peril #1

Aug 3, 2013

Tom Strong and The Planet of Peril #1 is an excellent read. Perhaps it's my affinity for metafiction, or maybe it's that science heroes are just cool as hell. Whatever the reason, Tom Strong has a new fan. I've already started saving my money for the original Alan Moore run (which wasalso illustrated by Sprouse!) Seriously, I can't say enough how much fun this issue is; there's action, drama, thrills, and Peter Hogan doesn't condescend to his readers, an aspect I hold in very high regard. Hogan understands that not everyone knows who Tom Strong is in 2013, so he includes flashbacks and moments of exposition that aren't really exposition because they're hidden within the insanely good plot.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated #2

Aug 28, 2015

Fans of the show will undoubtedly enjoy this comic series, but otherwise, it's a pass.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Trinity of Sin: Pandora #1

Jul 31, 2013

Fortunately, Fawkes didn't decompress this origin, and later this month we get a “Trinity War” tie-in. As an origin story,Trinity of Sin: Pandora #1 is spot-on, but as an ongoing series based on a character readers have been invested in since the literal inception of the ‘New 52′ universe, the issue falls a little flat. Fawkes' solid dialog and narration saves the issue from being boring, but the fact that these pages basically just reaffirmed what we've already seen is frustrating.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Trinity of Sin: Pandora #2

Aug 1, 2013

I usually really like Ray Fawkes. His wok onJustice League Darkwith Jeff Lemire has been incredible. ButTrinity of Sin: Pandora gets two strikes for this second issue. There is nothing of value in this comic book because it's structured so poorly. All the relevant information going into this second issue is covered in another series, and all the new information we're given throughout these pages is either only applicable to Pandora herself, or is just boring. Pandora fights against the Secret Society, but we already knew that. She's immortal, but she's not a metahuman by contextual standards in the ‘New 52′, but we already knew that. She's trying to get the golden skull to open back up, but we already knew that. I just can't get over how uselessPandora #2 truly is. Don't buy it; don't waste your money.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Ultimates (2015) #1

Nov 14, 2015

The beautiful artwork by Kenneth Rocafort coupled with Ewing's more clear and concise narrative makes Ultimates #1 a fun read that brings super-science down to a digestible scale that informs a lot more about the Marvel universe than readers might expect.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Ultron #1AU

Apr 11, 2013

Ultron #1AU is still a fun read. Victor himself is generally characterized well -- self-doubt mixed with a self-imposed predisposition to help people. And while Kathryn Immonen does a great job fleshing out Victor's inner journey, she stumbles in conveying a sympathetic plot. It's fair to assume Victor will play a part in Age of Ultron going forward and possibly into the future. That being said, the main reason I'm thinking this is the case is simply because the kid got his own One-Shot, not because of Immonen's story. Without any deeper connection to the main series or further exploration of Victor's significance, Ultron #1AU misses a lot of potential and doesn't feel as integral to the event as it should.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Uncanny Avengers #1

Oct 10, 2012

I can't say enough good things about Uncanny Avengers #1. Rick Remender's plot and scripts are just magnificent - there's no deep connections to continuity, there's no huge revelations about characters we didn't already know (how many issues can depict Cyclops be transported to his cell?) and the characters used are either largely identifiable, or get amazingly organic profiling through character dialogue. All of these elements make Uncanny Avengers one hell of a read. Marvel is really striving to bring in new readers with 'Marvel NOW!', and if this first issue of concept is an example of the quality we'll be getting going forward, then it will be tremendously successful.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Uncanny Avengers #2

Nov 29, 2012

In the end, Uncanny Avengers #2 is a more compelling issue than the first, and that's extremely hard to do in the modern comic landscape. Red Skull has always been a rather menacing character, but it's usually at arms length -- he's generally reserved for flashback issues or as a totem for other villains. Fortunately, Rick Remender takes Red Skull to frightening new heights, making him not only one of the most formidable villains in years, but also one of the most powerful in the Marvel Universe. The team itself is slow to actually getting together, but that's what an opening arc is all about, right?

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Uncanny Avengers #3

Jan 26, 2013

Rick Remender and John Cassaday are creating something truly inspired with Uncanny Avengers. The narrative's underlying symbolism and lasting consequences give it the demeanor of Marvel's flagship 'Marvel NOW!' title. In many ways, Remender has taken the best parts of the Avengers and X-Men franchises and melded them together for stunning results. Uncanny Avengers #3 is the third chapter of "The Red Shadow", but unlike many middle issues, this one doesn't lull or rest on exposition to carry the story into a big conclusion.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Uncanny Avengers #5

Mar 29, 2013

Uncanny Avengers #5 is a fantastic issue of a fantastic series. Rick Remender knows how to write great comic books and now that we're getting to the point where his storylines from UXF are starting to connect, it's just going to get better and better.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Uncanny Avengers #6

Apr 11, 2013

Remender is a master of foreshadowing and long-form narratives, so it's kind of a given that all the events in Uncanny Avengers #6 will have some bearing on the present day, but it still removes readers from the current-day story and stops the momentum Remender was building.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Uncanny Avengers #9

Jun 20, 2013

Uncanny Avengers #9is an excellent issue. From a long-form perspective, Remender's casting choices have been truly excellent in bringing diversity and balance to the title's tone. It feels like human-mutant relations in the Marvel universe may never be completely peaceful, and the Avengers Unity Team is beginning to internalize this feeling more and more.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Uncanny Avengers (2015) #1

Oct 20, 2015

No one asked for a humorous take on the Avengers with Deadpool front-and-center, yet Marvel gives it to readers with Uncanny Avengers #1, one of the least interesting and un-nuanced Avengers titles Marvel has published in recent memory.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.0
Uncanny Inhumans #1

Oct 24, 2015

Charles Soule and Steve McNiven's Uncanny Inhumans #1 is frustrating. As a flagship title for Marvel in their process of turning Inhumans into the new X-Men, Uncanny Inhumans should be a bit more straightforward.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Uncanny X-Men (2013) #1

Feb 13, 2013

Uncanny X-Men #1 is another solid entry in the 'Marvel NOW!' lineup. Brian Michael Bendis started his tenure as head X-writer strong with All-New X-Men, and he keeps it going here with Cyclops and the Uncanny X-Men. Sure, there's already a traitor in their midst in the first issue, but that's the kind of thing the X-Men franchise needs to shake things up. The status quo has changed and Bendis is taking the opportunity to do amazing things with these characters. Uncanny X-Men by Brian Michael Bendis is going to be different than any incarnation of the series before it, and that's more exciting than anything else.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Uncanny X-Men (2013) #3

Mar 17, 2013

Much like Civil War, Bendis' Uncanny X-Men posits difficult moral questions that don't have a right or wrong answer, per se. There's merit to understanding both sides of the argument and elements of each set of ideals that can come together to provide a solution beneficial to both parties involved. Bendis understands that sci-fi villains or mad scientists are only a small part of the X-Men's world. Mostly, they have to deal with bigotry and hate that manifests as a threat to innocent lives, usually mutant. It's a wonder Bendis' unique narrative style wasn't tapped for the X-Men corner of the Marvel universe sooner; it's a perfect fit of interpersonal character drama with a writing style that exemplifies relationships and emotional subtly.

View Issue       View Full Review
5.0
Uncanny X-Men (2013) #4

Apr 12, 2013

At least Chris Bachalo's artwork is still awesome.

View Issue       View Full Review
6.5
Uncanny X-Men (2013) #8

Jul 31, 2013

Similarly, the other half of the issue is devoted to recruiting yet another new mutant. Again Bendis pulls focus away from the character that this series was supposedly supposed to deal with. Cyclops is such a major player in the Marvel universe and Bendis is, simply put, squandering a chance to truly take a look at what Scott Summers' life has become, what he's lost, what he's sacrificed, and what all that means to who he has become. This is the first time in years that Cyclops has been interesting and Bendis is ignoring his chance to make the character more than a martyr and a symbolic team leader.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Uncanny X-Men (2013) #10

Aug 19, 2013

Mostly,Uncanny X-Men #10truly brings home the idea that Cyclops is just a dick. Scott's ego got big when he became a symbol of mutant oppression. Whether he earned the label or not, he's hammed it up on more than one occasion like he's the true mutant leader. This month, media outlets are reporting a massive protest in support of Cyclops and his more aggressive agenda. Without thinking twice, he whisks his new students directly into the public eye which ends up not being the public eye at all, but rather a trap set to catch the egomaniacal Cyclops. It's obviously a trap. It's so damn obvious you want to smack Cyclops and tell him to get his thumb out of his butt and stop being a whiny little jerk.

View Issue       View Full Review
2.0
Uncanny X-Men (2013) #600

Nov 6, 2015

Uncanny X-Men #600 is a phenomenal send off because it embodies the average-ness of this series by being the most unwittingly anticlimactic issue of the year. This should have been a huge issue, and it's a huge dud.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Vision #1

Nov 6, 2015

The Vision is absolutely one of the best titles to come from the 'All-New, All-Different Marvel' initiative. Yes, there are many titles yet to come, and if any of them can reach the same emotional tension and aesthetic balance as this series, it would be like lightning striking twice.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Vision #2

Dec 4, 2015

This contextual relationship between King's words and Walta's visuals is what makes The Vision such a gorgeous, emotional, provocative, insightful, and necessary comic book.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Web Warriors #1

Nov 14, 2015

Web Warriors #1 is fun because it's everything that makes Spider-Man great without the one thing that usually drags Spider-books down: Peter Parker.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Weirdworld #3

Sep 11, 2015

The best part is, the main Secret Wars storyline is absolutely unnecessary to understanding Weirdworld, so even those abstaining from the even can enjoy this instant classic.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Wolverine and the X-Men #19

Oct 31, 2012

I'm actually very much anticipating this coming year of Wolverine and The X-Men. The series only got eight issue under it's belt before being forced to connect to "AvX" events, so it will be fun and interesting to see how Aaron handles the series going forward.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Wonder Woman (2011) #5

Jan 21, 2012

Plus, Poseidon shows up at the end!

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Wonder Woman (2011) #6

Feb 19, 2012

While a plot twist like this might be hard to pull off, Azzarello's narrative is smooth, easy to understand and compelling. In Wonder Woman, it comes down to the minor details that really sell the story; Hermes explains how the concept of imagination is nothing more than beings attempting to understand that which they do not; Lennox's off-handed "God a'mighty" causing all three present gods to respond, "Yes?"

View Issue       View Full Review
9.6
Wonder Woman (2011) #7

Mar 25, 2012

The truth comes out that if Hephaestus didn't save them, the Amazons would have drowned them simply for being male. It's a harrowing moment for Diana as she has to come to terms with the fact that her people murder innocents on a regular basis. By the final panel, Diana is weeping into her hands. It's a solemn end and a dramatic set-up for next month's journey into Hell.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Wonder Woman (2011) #15

Dec 20, 2012

Wonder Woman #15 is a great issue because not only does it completely move the story forward, but it also provides some great character growth for Hera, Zola, and the newly introduced Milan. It's also a great issue for new readers, as you wouldn't need to know too much about what's happened before this to enjoy the events of the issue. DC has a gem with Wonder Woman, and they're Azzarello and Chiang go crazy with the series just to see how fantastical they can get, and the results are amazing.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
Wonder Woman (2011) #16

Jan 27, 2013

Wonder Woman #16 continues to pave the way for the return of Jack Kirby's New Gods and a whole new era for DC's New 52. Obviously, the connections with Darkseid and Apokolips are present because of Orion's use of the boom tube technology, but as it stands, Orion's mission is purely Earth-based. Although, throughout the issue's events, Zola's baby is referred to as the "New God", which calls into question just exactly how Brian Azzarello plans on reintroducing the residents of New Genesis and how they fit into the greater universe.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Wonder Woman (2011) #21

Jun 20, 2013

So I find myself wanting Diana to get back to Earth as quickly as possible to handle her brother. But also NEW GODS!!! Azzarello and Chiang are bringing back Jack Kirby's New Gods, which is phenomenal, and also means major changes for how deities are portrayed in the DC universe, and how the different pantheons correlate.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Wonder Woman (2011) #22

Jul 31, 2013

Wonder Woman #22 is another stellar issue in an already amazing series. Even though Zeus' First Born son is still the overarching threat, it was a treat to take a trip to New Genesis and open up a whole new world of characters and stories. Cliff Chiang's artwork is one of this series' strongest elements. Chiang (and Tony Akins, who does an excellent job keeping a similar style) makes Azzarello's words come alive with vivid facial expressions against more minimal body designs. His backgrounds are also stunning. This is a series I could see standing on it's own, outside the ‘New 52′, outside the DC comics mythology — just a series about a demigod who can't seem to make everything right for her friends.

View Issue       View Full Review
4.0
Worlds' Finest #4

Aug 5, 2012

Because Earth 2 has been so strong, I want to believe that World's Finest will get better. Though, it may take some time to recuperate from this big letdown.

View Issue       View Full Review
7.0
Worlds' Finest #20

Mar 3, 2014

Worlds' Finest #20 is one of the better issues of the series thanks to the focus on character development from Greg Pak and regular writer Paul Levitz. While Karen and Helena have been the main focus of the entire series, Levitz often used their desire to return home as a crutch in his storytelling. Here, though, having the girls interact with Batman and Superman has done wonders for both duos.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
X-Men (2013) #1

May 29, 2013

These days, I find myself enjoying stuff I often scoff at when reading solicitations. It's a bad habit I'm trying to drop, but it's also a testament to how early previews sometimes skew opinions before the book has a chance to really make it's own case. I made a choice to invest myself in #1's when I got back into comics with the 'New 52' and Avengers vs. X-Men. I did this so the comic could prove itself without my preconceived notions getting in the way. X-Men #1 makes my case.

View Issue       View Full Review
8.0
X-Men (2013) #3

Aug 3, 2013

X-Men #3 is a great conclusion to a great first arc.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
X-Men (2013) #4

Aug 22, 2013

X-Men #4 is a fantastic single issue that's already on my top ten for the year. The two plot lines are easily digestible without being overly simplistic or dull. Brian Wood is writing character-driven stories with 90s plot-driven stories and it's working surprisingly well each and every month. I'm glad Jubilee is back in the main fold of things in the X-Men universe because aside from the fact that she's a great character that has been sorely underused in recent years, it's the perfect time for a 90s-era X-Man to come back because her style from back then isn't too far off from what goes for fashionable today.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
X-Men Legacy (2012) #1

Nov 16, 2012

The best part of the issue is when David senses his father's death at the hands of Scott Summers Dark Phoenix (at the end of Avengers vs. X-Men, true believers!) and basically erupts with emotion. I don't want to spoil the fun, but suffice it to say, I've already called my LCS and put X-Men Legacy on my subscription list. There are a lot of cool new ideas coming out of 'Marvel NOW!', and X-Men Legacy is at the fringe of it all, looking in and taking metaphorical approaches to literal problems. It's fantastic.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
X-O Manowar #18

Oct 20, 2013

Unfortunately that focus and determination are concentrated almost exclusively into Aric's ancient morality and sense of duty. This drive served to Aric's advantage when he stood up against the Vine and brought their society to ruin, but his vigor and stubbornness are less appreciated on Earth where it's 2013 and modern society hasn't observed Visigoth territorial demarcations for over 2000 years.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Young Avengers (2013) #1

Jan 23, 2013

As they've stated in many an interview, Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie have not recreated the magic that made Alan Heinberg and Jim Cheung's Young Avengers so amazing. Instead, they've evolved the idea (in Gillen's own words) from "being sixteen to being eighteen." While that's only a two year difference, in the life of a person that age, that's all the difference in the world, and Young Avengers #1 captures this sentiment perfectly.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Young Avengers (2013) #5

May 23, 2013

These kids don't want to be a team. This simple fact is what makes this vision of the Young Avengers so appealing -- by the end of Young Avengers #5, the only reason they all decide to stay together is to physically prevent an otherworldly invasion. It's not because they all necessarily like each other. In fact, everyone hates Loki mostly, and Miss America doesn't trust anyone else. Just like normal teenagers, their relationships are complicated. And just like eighteen-year-olds in real life, they have to recognize when to grow and step up to the challenge. This is as good at time as any.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.5
Young Avengers (2013) #11

Oct 29, 2013

Fantastic "calm before the storm" feeling.Always amazing artwork from Jamie McKelvie.A comic book that doesn't condescend to the reader.Some background knowledge is needed to really understand the ins and outs of Gillen's Loki saga.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Young Avengers (2013) #13

Dec 9, 2013

Young Avengers #13 is a very good comic book. It combines the best of what makes the Young Avengers so entertaining with Gillen and McKelvie's penchant for minimalist teenage drama that makes the reader think more than just follow. That being said, it's not for everyone and if you've had trouble wrapping your head around the duos take on the Young Avengers in the past, this issue will seem like a quagmire of emotions, metaphorical revelations, and hurried conclusions.

View Issue       View Full Review
9.0
Young Avengers (2013) #14

Dec 23, 2013

Young Avengers #14 is a great issue that does a fantastic job starting the denouement of the entire series. As I've said in past reviews, Gillen and McKelvie's Young Avengers isn't for everyone, but if you pay enough attention, and reread a few times to make sure you understand, this is one of the most satisfying and enjoyable series of 2013.

View Issue       View Full Review
10
Young Avengers (2013) #15

Jan 16, 2014

Young Avengers #15 is a highlight for the series. Kieron Gillen and Jaime McKelvie created something special with this run, and these last two issues truly showed that it was a once in a lifetime event. There may be other volumes of Young Avengers in the future, but they'll obviously be different, and they won't have the same panache this creative team brought to the table.

View Issue       View Full Review

Reviews for
the Week of...

November

October

More